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The MA in Music (Popular Music Research) engages with scholarly debates and public controversies around popular music, while examining and developing both traditional and innovative ways of researching popular music- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-music-popular-music-research/. Read more
The MA in Music (Popular Music Research) engages with scholarly debates and public controversies around popular music, while examining and developing both traditional and innovative ways of researching popular music- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-music-popular-music-research/

The Masters provides a grounding in the development of popular music research as a subfield of musicology, and encourages critical thinking about:

musical texts, artefacts and ecologies
audiences, reception and questions of interpretation
creativity, industries and production
repertoires broad in historical range and geographical scope
The course addresses contemporary issues of significance to academics, musicians, industries and organisations involved with popular music.

You'll develop research skills, critical thinking and rigorous methodological expertise with a range of applications both within the academy (at doctoral level) and outside (in music related industries, marketing, arts management, museums and archives, the sciences).

Although a knowledge of and passion for popular music is vital, it is not essential that your first degree is in music or popular music.

We welcome applicants from a wide range of disciplines: the course is designed to be of benefit not only to those wishing to continue their research at doctoral level, but also those wishing to reflect on their experiences as musicians, listeners, or media and arts industry professionals.

MA in Music student wins the 2015 Andrew Goodwin postgraduate essay prize:
Ben Assiter, a student on the MA in Music (Popular Music Research) was awarded the prize by the International Association for the Study of Popular Music for an essay written as part of his coursework. Read his award-winning essay here.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Keith Negus

Modules & Structure

Core module:
Critical Musicology and Popular Music- 30 credits

Option modules:
Popular Music: Listening, Analysis and Interpretation- 30 credits
Contemporary Ethnomusicology- 30 credits
Ethnographic Film and Music Research- 30 credits
Contemporary Music: Practices and Debates- 30 credits
Performance as Research- 30 credits
Philosophies of Music- 30 credits
Interpretation, Meaning and Performance- 30 credits
Working with Original Musical Documents- 30 credits

Dissertation:
MA in Music Dissertation- 60 credits

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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A unique opportunity to study in the city of Liverpool, home of The Beatles and with access to leading Popular Music academics and Beatles specialists, this MA is the only one of its kind in the UK and the world. Read more
A unique opportunity to study in the city of Liverpool, home of The Beatles and with access to leading Popular Music academics and Beatles specialists, this MA is the only one of its kind in the UK and the world.

This MA will examine the significance of the music of the Beatles in the construction of identities, audiences, ethnicities and industries, and localities; by doing so it will suggest ways to understand popular music as a social practice, focusing attention on issues such as the role of music in the construction of regional identities, concepts of authenticity, aesthetics, meaning, value, performance, and the use of popular music as a discursive evocation of place. Furthermore, in a consideration of popular music as a text, popular music semiotics will also be employed.

This MA will be of interest to those working in the fields of popular music studies, cultural studies, social anthropology, politics, gender studies, and musicology, among others. Such a course is an essential addition to the discipline of Popular Music Studies.

Curriculum

Currently four taught modules are offered on this programme.

Texts and Contexts: Understanding Popular Music

This will offer you an understanding of how Popular Music Studies has expanded and developed to deal with the changing nature of popular music over the past 50 years. This module will also provide students with contextually related research methods.

Topics in History: Liverpool

This module will introduce and discuss musical production and consumption within the post WWII era and will discuss the roles of locality, economics, space and place, and other issues specifically relating to Merseyside.

Musicology and the Beatles

In this module you will take a popular music semiotics approach and will textually analyse a variety of Beatles material.

Historical and Critical Approaches

You will be invited to study a more ethnographic approach to the Beatles, the various cultural discourses surrounding their music, and the local tourist industry established in Liverpool to capitalise on the group.

The Dissertation module will be introduced to students towards the end of the Topics in History module with a request for student abstracts, the allocation of supervisors, and the agreement of research areas.

Please Note:

1. The Postgraduate Certificate will be awarded on the successful completion of 60 credits. This will consist of two taught modules.

2. The Postgraduate Diploma will be awarded on the successful completion of 120 credits. This will mean the completion of all modules apart from the Dissertation.

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This MMus builds on our international reputation in the popular music field, as seen in the success of our BMus graduates- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mmus-popular-music/. Read more
This MMus builds on our international reputation in the popular music field, as seen in the success of our BMus graduates- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mmus-popular-music/

The programme offers you the opportunity to reflect critically upon your own creative practice – whether that consists of performance, songwriting, arranging, production, or collaboration – and to integrate theoretical perspectives from contemporary popular music studies.

You’ll also be able to extend your own practice through options in sonic and studio art, advanced music technology, exploration in audiovisual media, and ethnomusicology.

The MMus in Popular Music is intended for music creators who integrate these elements in the compositional, recording and performance work.

You’ll acquire graduate-level training in creative practice and subject-specific skills that could set you up for a career as a composer-performer or studio practitioner/producer, as well as other employment within the popular music sector.

This programme is distinguished by:

Quality

We have an international reputation and proven leadership in the field, evidenced in the success of our BMus Popular Music alumni

Innovation

The unique combination of theory and practice allows for forward-thinking, innovative practice-as-research through popular music

Industry links

You can benefit from our proximity to central London, our links with music industry professionals, and our record label, NX Records, run in collaboration with Matthew Herbert and Accidental Records.
Contact the department
If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Music

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
Critical Musicology and Popular Music- 30 credits
Popular Music Composition- 30 credits
Popular Music Project- 60 credits

Department

Music at Goldsmiths is ranked 12th in the UK for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings)

From opera to electronica, and from Errollyn Wallen to James Blake, music studies at Goldsmiths are unique and different. Firmly rooted in the 21st century, our programmes entwine academic with practice-based study, and historical with contemporary repertories.

Performance opportunities

We’re committed to high quality, ambitious and innovative performance, and we have a wide range of ensembles that you can join, including:

Goldsmiths Sinfonia
Chamber Choir
Contemporary Music Ensemble
Lunchtime and evening recitals
Music Collective
Studio Laptop Ensemble
Goldsmiths Vocal Ensemble
Plus student-led ensembles: Chamber Orchestra, New Music Ensemble, Big Band and Film Orchestra
These culminate in our end-of-year degree show and public music festival PureGold, which in recent years has launched at London’s Southbank Centre.

Facilities

We have excellent rehearsal and performance facilities including:

Goldsmiths Music Studios
Electronic Music Studio
Sonics Interactive Multimedia Laboratory
Council Chamber (with its Steinway Model D)
Two suites of practice rooms

Skills & Careers

Employability and cultural entrepreneurship is in our DNA

Graduates may progress to be composer-performers, studio practitioners/producers and music industry employees within the popular music sector. Older students who have returned to advance their knowledge and practice base will be better positioned in the job market.

We are also able to offer a series of employability/placement/internship style opportunities to include:

the Music Professional Practice scheme - a departmental scheme supporting final year undergraduate and MMus/MA students with employability concerns
Music Management Course - specifically assesses students on cultural entrepreneurship and their own real world music projects
NX records - the departmental record label in association with Matthew Herbert and Accidental Records
PureGold festival - the annual departmental festival launched at the Southbank centre
Simon Says - showcase events in collaboration with Goldsmiths Students' Union
Goldsmiths Vocal Ensemble - recent performances at Glastonbury, the Southbank Centre and Shepherds Bush Empire

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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* Subject to validation, 2017 entry. The only postgraduate award of its kind in the UK, the MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is a part time, evening programme. Read more
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry

The only postgraduate award of its kind in the UK, the MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is a part time, evening programme. This degree course is based at Liverpool Hope’s Creative campus which is near Liverpool City Centre and will draw on the expertise of resident staff at the University’s Dance, Drama and Performance Studies Department as well as guest lecturers and practitioners.

Liverpool Hope University’s MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is aimed at postgraduate students with an interest in Contemporary British or Irish Popular Theatre. Students who have enjoyed the work of Lee Hall (Billy Elliott, The Pitmen Painters) or Dermot Bolger (Dublin Quarter) or Amanda Whittington (Be my Baby, Ladies Day) as well as the works of more established popular writers such as Willy Russell, Jim Cartwright and John Godber will find the course a unique opportunity for detailed study of underrepresented material.

Liverpool Hope University is privileged to have John Godber as a visiting Professor of Contemporary theatre, Professor Godber is best known for his innovative work in theatre – Bouncers, Teechers, Up n Under to name but three from the fifty-three plays produced to date. He has also written and directed a significant number of plays for television. Students on the MA will have an opportunity to meet Professor Godber as part of their programme.

The MA Contemporary Popular Theatre will focus on contemporary British and Irish popular theatre, analysing popular theatre productions and examining their historic context. It will investigate issues of excellence, access, regionalism, metropolitanism and the gendered nature of the popular. Distinctive features of the course will include the use of a wide range of research strategies to assist information retrieval in an under-represented area; a Special Topic module allowing some practical exploration and the impact of ‘Capital of Culture’ status on popular theatre production. Theatre visits will also be built into the programme.

The Award Director for the MA is one of very few academics researching and publishing in the field of popular theatre. Research is one of the strengths of the programme and students will be working alongside scholars who will be disseminating new material in this field.

The programme will begin with the year-long taught module, Contemporary Contexts which will look at aspects of cultural theory and aesthetics. This will run in parallel with the supervised Special Topic module and both will be assessed at the end of the first year. The Special Topic module will involve a small amount of practical work. The Dissertation module will be launched in the first year with the allocation of supervisors and the agreement of research areas and will be assessed at the end of the second year. The Regionalism module will consider aspects of Localism and will be taught and assessed in the second year.

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This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. Read more
This course will enable you to study popular music from a practical perspective with an emphasis on music production and songwriting. For your final major project you will focus on composition and production within the popular music genre, producing an extended professional-quality album of your popular music compositions/covers.

Key features
-The wide selection of option modules allows you to tailor the course to your interests.
-Several members of staff are engaged practically with the professional production of popular music. You will also have the chance to attend masterclasses and workshops run by national and international producers, performers and composers - such as Youth, Gavin Greenaway, Rick Astley and Steve Martland.
-We have five, state-of-the-art recording studios, including one with a large live room used for professional recordings. We also have two computer laboratories containing iMacs with full music software for sequencing and processing.
-Lunchtime concerts, involving students or visiting artists, take place throughout the year.

What will you study?

You will focus on the production of current popular music, creating and recording tracks using the University's high-quality recording facilities.

You will also explore the composition of popular music, recording techniques and the marketing of popular music. In addition, you will widen your musical knowledge and experience by choosing one option module from an extensive range, including those covering sound design, ensemble performance and composing for film and TV.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, compositions, productions, and major recording project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Advanced Production of Popular Music
-Composing and Marketing Popular Music
-Major Project
-Researching Music

Optional modules
-Constructing Music Education in the UK
-Critical Reflection on Musical Performance
-International Music Education: Psychology, Culture and Philosophy
-Special Study: Arranging and Scoring
-Techniques and Technology for Composing for Film and Television
-Current Debates in Music Education
-Jazz Studies
-Live Performance Technologies
-Performance Studies
-The Psychology of Music
-The Studio Musician

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This course examines the changing dynamics of contemporary international relations in the context of the politics of the forces shaping and being shaped by popular culture. Read more

Course Overview

This course examines the changing dynamics of contemporary international relations in the context of the politics of the forces shaping and being shaped by popular culture. It focuses on key theories, policies, and events in world politics, in relation to both traditional and new media.

As a student on this course you learn to think critically about: how world politics is reflected or reproduced in popular culture; how the politics of popular culture shapes the dynamics of world politics; approaches and methods in social science and in cultural studies research.

You develop the skills to: identify, analyse, evaluate and interpret the principal source materials for world politics and popular culture; plan, carry out and communicate original research.

This specialist knowledge and skills equip you for careers in government agencies, business, the media and other areas where an advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary world politics and popular culture is needed.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/world-politics-popular-culture-ma/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/world-politics-popular-culture-ma/#howtoapply

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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. All our MA programmes are designed to provide knowledge and skills in practice-based research, as well as giving you experience of current research practices in various areas of critical and analytical thinking. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

All our MA programmes are designed to provide knowledge and skills in practice-based research, as well as giving you experience of current research practices in various areas of critical and analytical thinking. The MA in Popular Music (Research, Production or Performance) offers a high level of flexibility enabling you to choose a pathway that best suits your key interests.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/355/popular-music-research-production-performance

Course detail

The MA Popular Music at the University of Kent gives you the opportunity to develop an area of specialism alongside rigorous training in key professional and academic skills. In studying for the MA you will choose one of three pathways:

- Research (Popular Musicology, Popular Music Studies or Ethnomusicology)
- Production
- Performance

Each pathway allows you to undertake two large-scale projects (Specialist Project and Dissertation) in areas of your choosing. Regular one-to-one tutorials and work in small seminar groups will help you to gain new levels of confidence and expertise in both theoretical and practical work.

Format and assessment

Option modules support the development of your specialism. Studies in areas such as audio engineering, music programming, critical musicology, popular music, group performance and advanced acoustics, delivered through our team of world-leading researchers and practitioners, will provide an important grounding in relevant fields of inquiry and creative practice.

Assessment is by a range of coursework, including individual projects, skills-based tasks, seminar presentations and written work.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the area of music and audio arts is a valuable and flexible qualification, which can lead to career opportunities within the creative industries, music recording and production, audio software development, sound for film, composition and academic careers.

These possibilities are augmented by work in video games, the Internet, live sound for theatres and festivals, audio installations for museums, sonic arts and computer music. Postgraduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Research Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture. Read more
This is the only degree which offers students the opportunity to specialise as a translation expert in audiovisual translation and in the translation of popular culture.

Who is it for?

This course is for you if you:
-Are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
-Love languages, other cultures and their differences
-Are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
-Know about translation and want to specialise
-Have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
-Have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
-Are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
-Want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:
-Provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques.
-Uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over.
-Specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games.
-Introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres.
-Focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions.
-Provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The course:
-Aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation.
-Develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics.
-Works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity.
-Has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists. We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work. The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).

Core modules
-Principles and practice of translation theory (15 credits)
-Translating children’s literature (15 credits)
-Subtitling (15 credits)
-Translating crime fiction (15 credits)
-Translating science fiction and fantasy (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose three:
-Principles of screenwriting and the translation of screenplays (15 credits)
-Creating and managing intellectual property (15 credits).
-Dubbing and voice over (15 credits)
-Translation project management (15 credits)
-Translating multimodal texts (comics, graphic novels, manga, video games) (15 credits)
-International publishing case studies (20 credits)

Dissertation - 60 credits
-Dissertation option A (discursive/research)
-Dissertation option B (extended translation with critical introduction and analysis)

Career prospects

The degree is designed to produce graduates who are fit for the market, either working in translation agencies / companies or as a freelancer, addressing the need for properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Career options come in a wide range of jobs in the translation industry, ranging from self-employed translator, staff translator or localisation expert to editor, researcher or project manager.

Recent graduate destinations include: video game testing and localisation at Testronic Laboratories; video game translation at Sega; Dubbing, subtitling and voice over at VSI London; translation at the World Health Organisation; project management at Maverick Advertising and Design and at Deluxe Media Europe; freelance translator creative and literary texts.

The degree also lays the foundation to continue to a research degree / doctoral study in any area of translation studies. Currently, graduates from the course are pursuing doctoral study at City, specialising in crime fiction translation.

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On the MA in Film Studies. Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Read more
On the MA in Film Studies: Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Through this course, you will build a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining academic and professional writing projects. We cover the history and theory of popular cinema in the US (classical and contemporary Hollywood), Europe and East Asia (especially Japanese cinema). Through modules on story development and research methods you will sharpen your writing skills in preparation for your dissertation project.

You will develop skills central to a career in either academia or the media industries. You will be taught by a diverse team of film specialists with different national and cultural backgrounds, as well as by industry professional guest speakers.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access. All Film Studies staff are active researchers publishing widely on subjects such as: Italian films and their audiences, puzzle films, film theory, film policy, film tourism, visual anthropology, and crime films.

You will have the opportunity to go on the annual field trip to the Cannes Film Festival. We have an advisory panel of film industry experts including leading directors, journalists, and producers and technical specialists who contribute to the programme and our annual series of Film Studies events, including an annual Careers Day. Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s premier cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, the Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Contemporary Music, and locally held Film Festivals.

You will be part of a stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in diverse areas from videogaming to modernism.

This course in detail

Compulsory modules - Students studying for the MA in Film Studies are required to complete the following two compulsory modules:
-Narration in Classical Hollywood Cinema
-Research Methods in Film

Optional modules - MA students can then choose any two of the options below:
-Popular European Cinema
-Professional Film Cultures
-Story Development
-Popular Cinema in East Asia
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is centred around film screenings, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of Story Development, intensive writing workshops.

Assessment activities include writing academic essays and a dissertation. Other assessments include professional writing activities - book reviews, feature articles, and screenplays.

Careers and professional development

Having a master's qualification helps you to stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the MA straight after graduating or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in the creative and media industries or to improve your current position. However, an MA in Film Studies can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including teaching, lecturing, publishing, arts administration, journalism, museum work, fundraising and higher education management.

The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA also open up wider opportunities in business and law. Many MA students continue onto further research and careers in academia, and our course provides the necessary research training required for doctoral work.

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The MA in Popular Culture is a distinct, interdisciplinary MA programme that covers film, literature and cultural history. Read more
The MA in Popular Culture is a distinct, interdisciplinary MA programme that covers film, literature and cultural history. It will appeal if you are interested in popular culture in its critical and historical contexts and provides excellent preparation should you wish to pursue a research-based higher degree, such as a PhD, in the future.

Delivered by an enthusiastic team of cross-disciplinary specialists in popular culture research, the programme will provide you with the opportunity to undertake a comparative study of literature, history and film, working across subject boundaries. You will also develop the practical skills necessary to undertake work across subject boundaries and receive training in transferable research skills and methodologies.

What will I study?

The programme consists of two compulsory modules (20 credits each), four optional modules (20 credits each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credits).

If you are interested in literature, the available options cover contemporary texts, including the genre fiction, journalism and print culture, and gender studies. Film-related modules focus on genre, identity and representation.

How will I study?

You will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and guided independent learning. Taught sessions take place between 6pm-9pm on weekday evenings. If you are studying full-time you will attend two evenings per week and if you are studying part-time you will attend one evening per week.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a combination of assignments which, depending on the modules you choose, may include essays, critical reviews, critical diaries, presentations, online discussions and research-based projects, as well as a 15,000-word dissertation.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by a team of specialist tutors who are active researchers and committed teachers with interests in popular culture, literature, film, genre studies, modern history, gender studies, and history.

What are my career prospects?

Graduates in the humanities with a higher degree find employment in a wide variety of careers such as teaching, arts organisation and management, the heritage industry, publishing, advertising, journalism, libraries and learning centres or management/administration.

Alternatively, upon successful completion of the programme, you may wish to apply to progress onto a research degree such as an MPhil or PhD.

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This programme offers a variety of practice-based opportunities, which may be combined with a range of academic modules as appropriate- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/music/. Read more
This programme offers a variety of practice-based opportunities, which may be combined with a range of academic modules as appropriate- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/music/

Awards available are:

–MMus (Composition)
–MMus (Creative Practice)
–MMus (Performance)
–MMus (Popular Music)
–MMus (Sonic Arts)

Programme aims:

The MMus programme accords with Goldsmiths’ declared aims to work beyond the boundaries of preconceptions, provide freedom to experiment, encourage individuality and nurture talent. It is designed with careful consideration of the opportunities, challenges and intellectual demands presented by careers in music and the creative industries in general, such as professional performance, composition, film/TV composition, sound design, teaching, broadcasting and arts administration. The MMus is closely linked with the department’s research strategy, and the wide-ranging research and practice-based activities of academic staff.

The programme addresses the evolving challenges presented in creating music, sound art and technology, and/or concert performances. You develop systematic, critical and technical approaches to practice and research, exploring, as appropriate, contemporary or historical understandings of creative practice and musical performance. You investigate and appraise the contextual and technical basis of artistic and musical aims, helping you formulate an independent and original approach to your own work as a composer and/or performer. The programme explores the complex interrelationships between music and other disciplines, between theory and creative expression, and between composition, musical realisation and reception. It references a diverse range of music, focussing as appropriate upon contemporary and historical Western art music, popular music, the music of other cultures, and computer music.

Programme Structure and Requirements:
Each Master’s degree is awarded after the accumulation of 180 CAT (Credit and Transfer) points. You must take four modules (30 CATs each) and the portfolio or recital option (60 CATs) designated for your pathway. Each pathway comprises: 1. Core modules. 2. Options. 3. Portfolio or Recital. The specialism of your portfolio/recital should be closely allied to the specific programme outcomes of your pathway and its core modules, and agreed with the relevant pathway coordinator. The options provide you with a choice of modules most relevant to your chosen pathway. You will receive advice from the department at interview and/or enrolment about your choices. Please note that choices may be affected by the department timetable.

Further information:
Detailed information about the structure and content of each pathway can be found on the Goldsmiths website.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This is a modular course leading to the award of MA in Popular Music. The course taught at our Kingsway Campus in Chester, and will be of interest to those concerned with the exploration of all aspects of performance, songwriting and composition or popular music studies. Read more
This is a modular course leading to the award of MA in Popular Music. The course taught at our Kingsway Campus in Chester, and will be of interest to those concerned with the exploration of all aspects of performance, songwriting and composition or popular music studies.

Our course is designed to develop your creative skills and theoretical understanding to an advanced level, and has pathways in: performance; songwriting and composition; and music studies.

Initially, you will follow a core curriculum that seeks to contextualise your own practice and start an engagement with the general field of study.

Our course offers you the opportunity to shape your learning through a series of modules that will enable you to integrate scholarly work with your own practice as a musician, composer or musicologist. Our modules consider current theoretical and practical debates in the subject area, and will guide you through the kind of research methodologies required at Master's level. You will be given the opportunity to negotiate the most effective means of approaching your subject, with a view to producing an intensive study of your specialism.

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This innovative course introduces you to advanced level study of the various aspects of popular culture; principally that produced and consumed in Britain since the late nineteenth century. Read more
This innovative course introduces you to advanced level study of the various aspects of popular culture; principally that produced and consumed in Britain since the late nineteenth century

The programme consists of a broad range of modules from a number of academic disciplines, including History, English, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Religious Studies, and Film Studies

All modules are taught by experts in their respective fields, and informed by research at the forefront of the various disciplines. For your own independent research into popular culture, we can also offer supervision in a wide range of areas and approaches
You will experience a variety of teaching methods with a high level of input from students on the course. Assessment is largely by coursework, essays and presentations

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The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres. Read more
The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres.

Our postgraduate music performance courses offer substantial one-to-one instrumental tuition, with recitalists of international renown. They comprise fascinating and engaging modules that support and extend your practical musicianship and academic skills.

London College of Music's (LCM) regular Composition Workshops and Masterclasses offer great opportunities to learn new skills and network with students from other postgraduate courses. You can also benefit from being part of the vibrant LCM community with regular performance opportunities at LCM Sessions gigs, hosted by Popular Music students, and are encouraged to join in with musical activities throughout the LCM. The college runs several large ensembles including Pop and Gospel Choir, LCM Sinfonia, LCM Big Band, LCM Choir, and LCM Glee Choir, which students are able to participate in.

Course detail

This course provides specialist training for drummers, vocalists, guitarists, bassists and keyboard players that reflects the needs of today’s music industry.

The course is taught by postgraduate tutors from the London College of Music, all of whom are active professional musicians of the highest standard.

It combines technical and stylistic performance tuition through one-to-one lessons, as well as group sessions with other students from across the postgraduate community, to ensure an enhanced learning experience and the opportunity to network with like-minded artists.

The course runs throughout each calendar year.

Modules

• Performance Portfolio
• Ensemble and Music Direction Skills
• Critical Perspectives
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project.
Plus one option from:
• Studio Recording Project
• L Music Pedagogy.
Plus one option from:
• Performing in the Studio
• Live Event Management.

Format

You will have the opportunity to develop your technical and creative performance skills through a programme of one-to-one tuition supported by group-based lectures, seminars and workshops.

There is also an exciting masterclass programme which provides students with the opportunity to engage with leading practitioners from across all areas of the music industry - performance, production and songwriting.

Career and study progression

Graduates will likely pursue a career as a professional performing musician.

The degree might lead to further academic study, including DMus or MPhil/ PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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