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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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A Message from the Graduate Coordinator. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Windsor offers an excellent environment for the pursuit of a graduate education. Read more
A Message from the Graduate Coordinator

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Windsor offers an excellent environment for the pursuit of a graduate education. Our Department is enthusiastic, friendly, cooperative and rejuvenated. Of our 23 faculty, nine have been hired since 2000 to complement the established faculty. As summarised in this brochure, our Department has research groups active in all of the traditional areas of Chemistry and Biochemistry and we have also recently formed several new multi-disciplinary research programmes, including The Centre for Catalysis and Materials Research (CCMR) and The Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER). We invite you to join our exciting and growing department.

In addition to our people, the Department’s state-of-the-art equipment and completely renovated laboratories provide us with research facilities that are comparable to, or even exceed, those found in the Chemistry Departments of much larger universities. In addition to a complete array of spectrometers and other standard synthetic and characterisation equipment, we have many instruments that are not typically available in a single department. To give only a few notable examples: we have two CCD-equipped X-ray diffractometers; solid-state NMR facilities; an AFM imaging system; Raman and IR microscopes; a fluorescence imaging system; and much more! Furthermore, our geographic location puts us in close proximity to Wayne State University and other large American research universities such as the University of Michigan and Michigan State University. This situation allows the members of our Department convenient access to the other institutions’ facilities, conferences, and visiting speakers.

The greater Windsor region has a highly-diverse population of around 325,000 people. The city boasts dozens of excellent and unique restaurants, a thriving night-life, numerous festivals and events on the waterfront, and a variety of parks and outdoor recreation areas. Windsor has a remarkably low cost of living and has one of warmest climates in the country. In addition, our proximity to the Detroit metropolitan area (pop. ca. 5 million) and the United States provides us with numerous unique advantages over other cities in southern Ontario. For example, one can conveniently attend professional sporting events, major concerts, world-class art galleries, and numerous other attractions that are all located less than one hour drive from the University of Windsor. Furthermore, the Detroit International Airport has flights around the globe and provides us with an often less expensive alternative to flying via Toronto. Overall, Windsor has the benefits of a major metropolis combined with the advantages of a smaller city.

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The Arts and Entertainment Journalism program is a cross-disciplinary offering that gives you a solid grounding for this exciting field and includes a strong focus on reporting, criticism, social media, imaging and multi-platform design. Read more
The Arts and Entertainment Journalism program is a cross-disciplinary offering that gives you a solid grounding for this exciting field and includes a strong focus on reporting, criticism, social media, imaging and multi-platform design.

This two-semester Arts and Entertainment Journalism program is perfect for you if you have a passion for music, theatre, film, television, dance or culture. In your courses, you learn to write snappy, relevant and market-driven stories for multiple platforms as well as the social science aspect of pop culture in a Canadian and global context. You also learn to develop a critical voice and critical thinking essential to working in the industry.

To round out training, you gain an understanding of arts promotion and publicity, and complete a six-week industry field placement. Upon completion of the program, you will have a portfolio of writing samples produced in a variety of media including album, concert and theatre reviews, columns and profiles.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-There is a strong focus on developing entrepreneurial skills along with personal branding to help you stand out in the industry.
-You have the ability to work with faculty drawn from all sectors of the industry and to participate in client-focused projects.
-The Story Arts Centre campus, where the program is based, offers access to publishing, radio and television broadcasting facilities along with a fully functioning newsroom.
-Hands-on, real-world experience is available through award-winning community media, including the East York Observer newspaper and the Toronto Observer news website and a variety of student generated online platforms.

Career Outlook
-Arts and Entertainment reporter
-Freelance writer
-Online journalist
-Photographer
-Publicist
-Online marketing professional

Areas of Employment
-Large and small newspapers
-Magazines
-Online publications
-Radio and television newsrooms
-Public relations agencies
-TV and film production companies

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On this exciting and challenging music course, you will have the opportunity to follow one of four specialist pathways. Composition (C). Read more
On this exciting and challenging music course, you will have the opportunity to follow one of four specialist pathways:

• Composition (C)
• Performance (P)
• Critical Musicology (CM)
• Interactive Music and Advanced Studio Production (IMASP).

If you are keen to broaden your musical knowledge, you can also combine your specialist pathway with other pathways.

Key benefits:

• Taught by professional practitioners at all stages of your study
• Compete for a variety of prizes including the Kirklees Composition Competition
• Gain a breadth of professional musical experience.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/music2

Suitable for

A musician and/or musicologist wishing to further develop their skills and expertise to an enhanced professional level. You will typically have a good honours degree in music or a related subject and/or evidence of industry/professional practice experience.

Programme details

Our postgraduate degrees in music stand apart from similar courses due to the breadth of musical genres that they will expose you to. From rock and pop, to classical, jazz, electronic and other world styles, each genre is given equal precedence, and you will have a great opportunity to learn from each tradition.

During your time with us, you will also have the opportunity to collaborate on projects with other students and you will learn from academics who are all practicing professional musicians at national and international levels.

Format

The course is delivered by way of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, supervision tutorials/instrumental lessons

Semester 1

• Composition, Performance and the Musical Text (Plenary)
• Composition Techniques (C)
• Individual Performance (P)
• Critical and Theoretical Positions (CM)
• Advanced Studio Composition and Production Techniques (IMASP)

Semester 2

• Applied Composition Techniques (C)
• Group Interaction in Performance (P)
• Subject Specific Evaluation (CM)
• Interactive and Emergent Music Programming Techniques (IMASP)
• Ethnomusicology Theories and Techniques (Option)
• Community Music Theories and Techniques (Option)

Semester 3

• Negotiated Final Project

Assessment

• Examination
• Coursework folio

Career potential

After completing the MA in Music people will find their professional skills to be considerably enhanced. We have found that this has enhanced career prospects in Music Education (Teachers/Lecturers), Arts Administration and as freelance Performers and Composers.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The interdisciplinary MA in Film and Literature at the University of York examines the lively and symbiotic traffic between written words and cinematic images (through adaptation, borrowing, versioning, negotiation, appropriation, transmediation, analogy, equivalence, resistance, pastiche, collision). Read more
The interdisciplinary MA in Film and Literature at the University of York examines the lively and symbiotic traffic between written words and cinematic images (through adaptation, borrowing, versioning, negotiation, appropriation, transmediation, analogy, equivalence, resistance, pastiche, collision).

It combines trenchant academic enquiry with passionately committed teaching, recent cinematic releases with early silent cinema, pop culture with high culture, theoretical questions with practical ones, blockbuster with poetry, mainstream with avant-garde, institutional studies with formal aesthetic analysis. And it allows students to determine the particular film/literature balance of the degree according to their own preferences.

Film and Literature both asks what is particular to the narrative codes and presentational conventions of cinema (as opposed to various literary forms) and also pits questions of medium-specificity against shared narrative, interpretive and socio-cultural histories. Through ranging cinematic, literary and theoretical illustration, it examines the ways in which the circulation of ideas between these two influential modes of expression can be more varied, more interesting and sometimes more surreptitious than conventional studies simply of ‘adaptation’ might imply.

Overall, it:
-Enables nuanced and sophisticated case-studies of mainstream literary adaptations for the screen (from classic novels, popular fiction, play texts, Shakespeare, real life news stories and more).
-Innovatively extends academic enquiry into other forms of influence, exchange and response between print and cinematic media (which includes the study of novels, poetry, journalism, reviews, plays, filmscripts, contracts, film censors’ reports and more).
-Roots all films in their broader cultural, historical, industrial, technological and aesthetic contexts.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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In 2015 we were awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. Read more
In 2015 we were awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. This represents one of the most coveted distinctions in UK Higher Education.

You will join a thriving community of postgraduate musicians receiving regular individual tuition from staff who are recognised nationally and internationally in their chosen specialisms, and by a team of part-time instrumental and vocal teachers from regional and national orchestras, many of whom are distinguished solo performers.

There are many opportunities to take part in directed ensembles, amongst which are the Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, Big Band, Symphonic Wind Orchestra, Brass Band, Choir, Chamber Choir, Opera Group, New Music Ensemble, Early Music Ensemble, Folk Group, Samba Band, South Asian Arts Ensemble, Blues Group, Improvisation Group, and A Cappella Choir, as well as various chamber music ensembles.

You will also have many opportunities to experience and perform music, including weekly student concerts, and recitals and masterclasses. Recent guests include Emma Kirkby (voice), Martin Roscoe (piano), Wissam Boustany (flute), Jah Wobble (pop ensembles), Lore Lixenberg (voice), John Scott Whiteley (organ), Snake Davis (saxophone), The Clerks, Ensemble 360.

You will be based in the Creative Arts Building with its purpose-built facilities with access to the well-resourced Music Library, and be able to experience recent developments in new music at first hand at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival based at the University.

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This course will suit highly motivated individuals who want to develop fashion marketing and business skills to either work within the fashion industry, explore new ideas to set up their own business or extend family enterprises. Read more

OVERVIEW

This course will suit highly motivated individuals who want to develop fashion marketing and business skills to either work within the fashion industry, explore new ideas to set up their own business or extend family enterprises. Previous experience in allied industries such as advertising will be of a particular advantage.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Our location offers a fantastic opportunity to explore the world of fashion, from up-and-coming designers and their pop-up shops, to global trend laboratories, leading high street names and luxury fashion brands. On campus, you can take advantage of our fashion studio equipped with the latest design software.

MODULES

• Marketing in a Global Age
• Trend Prediction and Fashion Forecasting
• International Fashion Marketing
• Fashion and Brand Management
• Buying and Merchandising in a Changing Global Industry
• Buyer Behaviour
• Retail and Service Marketing
• Business and Management Research Methods
• Fashion Marketing and Communication in a Global Context
• London Fashion Live Project

Project options
• Internship
• Consulting Project
• Entrepreneurship Project
• Simulation
• Dissertation

ACCREDITATION

Upon successful completion of the programme and selected modules you will be awarded the CMI Level 7 Certificate in Strategic Management and Leadership*.

*Subject to registering as a CMI member

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Coventry University London is delighted to have recently launched a number of scholarships to UK and International students. You can find out more about our Scholarships by viewing our website.

START DATES

MSc International Fashion Marketing has start dates in October 2017.

FUTURE PROSPECTS

“I really appreciated the range of work experience options which were available and I would highly recommend an internship module. It helped me bring together everything I had learned and combine it with real-world practices. I am currently pursuing a career in the media and entertainment industry and cannot wait to see what the future holds.” - Samantha Johnson, Germany

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Nid oes llawer o eiriau sydd mor atgofus a chyfareddol â ‘Cheltaidd’, yn dwyn i gof cywreinrwydd gemwaith yr Oes Efydd, adeiladwaith enfawr Côr y Cewri a Newgrange, chwedlau Arthur a Cú Chulainn a chrefft Farddol brenhinoedd a thywysogion y canol oesoedd. Read more
Nid oes llawer o eiriau sydd mor atgofus a chyfareddol â ‘Cheltaidd’, yn dwyn i gof cywreinrwydd gemwaith yr Oes Efydd, adeiladwaith enfawr Côr y Cewri a Newgrange, chwedlau Arthur a Cú Chulainn a chrefft Farddol brenhinoedd a thywysogion y canol oesoedd. Ond mae ‘Celtaidd’ hefyd yn gysylltiedig â’r Dadeni, yr Ymoleuo a’r Byd Newydd; Rhamantiaeth, Chwyldro a brwydr ieithoedd, llenyddiaeth a hunaniaethau cenedlaethol cyfan i oroesi yn y cyfnod Modern.

Mae’r cwrs course newydd hwn ym Mhrifysgol Bangor yn rhoi’r cyfle a’r gallu i fyfyrwyr fedru didoli’r ffeithiau a’r ffuglen, ac i ateb yn fanwl y cwestiwn:

‘Pwy oedd – a phwy yw – y Celtiaid?’

Yn ystod un flwyddyn academaidd bydd modiwlau yn cael eu dysgu gan arbenigwyr yn Ysgolion Cymraeg; Hanes, Hanes Cymru ac Archaeoleg; a Cherddoriaeth, yn canolbwyntio ar lenyddiaeth, archaeoleg, crefydd, mytholeg, hynafiaeth, hanes celf a cherddoriaeth, er mwyn archwilio diwylliant a hunaniaeth y bobl Geltaidd o’r bryngaerau cynhanes i seneddau datganoledig ac annibynnol heddiw.

Bydd myfyrwyr hefyd yn cael arweiniad wrth wneud eu hymchwil eu hunain ar gyfer traethawd hir gradd Meistr ar bwnc o’u dewis.

Mae’r holl gyfarwyddyd ar gael yn Gymraeg a Saesneg, ac mae cefnogaeth gynhwysfawr ESOL ar gael lle bo angen.

Dyma rai o’r prif bynciau sy’n cael eu trafod yn y cwrs course:

A yw’r ‘Celtiaid’ yn bodoli mewn gwirionedd, ac os felly, pwy a beth ydynt? Sut allwn ni drafod cwestiynau o’r fath, gyda pha fethodoleg a gyda pha dystiolaeth?
Sut mae’r gair ei hun (‘Celt’, ‘Keltoi’, ac yn y blaen) wedi cael ei ddefnyddio ar hyd y canrifoedd, o haneswyr Clasurol i gerddorion pop modern?
Beth yw cryfderau a gwendidau ‘Celtomania’ a ‘Celtosgeptigiaeth’? Sut mae’r cysyniad o’r ‘Celtiaid’ wedi ei ddarganfod a’i wrthod mewn gwahanol feysydd fel Llenyddiaeth, Archaeoleg, Ieithyddiaeth, Cerddoriaeth, Crefydd?
Sut y cyfrannodd ysgolheigion cyfandirol y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg at greu’r ‘Celtiaid’?
Sut y gwnaeth y bobl sy’n siarad ieithoedd Celtaidd ennill eu hunaniaeth eu hunain a sut maent yn dal i wneud hynny? Beth mae’r testunau canoloesol (Cyfreithiau, Chwedlau, Barddoniaeth Llys, Bywydau’r Seintiau) a chanfyddiadau archeolegol yn dweud wrthym, a beth sydd gan hanes diweddar i’w ddweud?
Beth yw’r prif ffynonellau tystiolaeth am hanes a hunaniaeth y bobl ‘Geltaidd’ (hynny yw, y rhai sy’n siarad ieithoedd Celtaidd yn y cyfnod modern)? Sut ydym ni’n defnyddio’r ffynonellau hyn? A all Arthur a Cú Chulainn ddweud rhywbeth buddiol wrthym?
Sut mae hunaniaethau ethnig a chenedlaethol y ‘Celtiaid’ modern wedi eu portreadu a’u trafod mewn perthynas â’r cysyniad hwn o’r ‘Celtaidd’?
Beth oedd perthnasedd gwleidyddol ac ideolegol y ‘Celtiaid’ a beth ydyw erbyn hyn?
Gyda materion fel hyn dan sylw, mae’r cwrs course wedi ei lunio i ddatblygu sgiliau’r myfyrwyr trwy gynllun astudiaeth uwch arbenigol. Un amcan pwysig yw rhoi hyfforddiant dadansoddol perthnasol i’r myfyrwyr, fel eu bod yn gyfarwydd â’r datblygiadau damcaniaethol ac ymarferol diweddaraf mewn perthynas ag Astudiaethau Celtaidd. Ar ôl cwblhau’r cwrs, bydd gan fyfyrwyr sail gadarn ym mhrif ddulliau a ffynonellau’r ddisgyblaeth, a byddant hefyd wedi datblygu sgiliau y gellir eu trosglwyddo’n eang ac a fydd yn berthnasol i amrywiaeth fawr o yrfaoedd.

Fframwaith y Cwrs
Mae’r course yn gwrs un flwyddyn (llawn amser) a gellir hefyd ei wneud yn rhan amser (gan amlaf hyd at dair blynedd). Ceir dwy ran i’r rhaglen gradd:

Rhan 1:

Mae hon yn elfen gwbl hyfforddedig, ac mae’n cyfrannu 120 credyd. Mae gan bob modiwl hyfforddedig bwysiad credyd o 40 credyd. Dysgir rhan 1 yn ystod dau semester y flwyddyn academaidd. Mae’r dysgu yn ystod semester 1 gan amlaf rhwng diwedd mis Medi a mis Rhagfyr. Mae’r dysgu yn ystod semester 2 gan amlaf rhwng diwedd mis Ionawr a dechrau mis Mai.

Bydd y modiwlau yn Rhan 1 yn cael eu hasesu trwy gyfrwng traethodau.

Rhan 2:

Mae rhan 2 yn cynnwys traethawd hir dan oruchwyliaeth o oddeutu 20,000 gair, ar bwnc o’ch dewis, a benderfynir ar ôl trafod gyda chynghorwr traethawd hir. Cwblheir yn ystod misoedd yr haf, rhwng diwedd mis Mai a mis Medi, a dylai myfyrwyr llawn amser gyflwyno eu traethodau hir erbyn mis Medi yn y flwyddyn galendr ar ôl cofrestru.

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Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. Read more
Our MA in International Film Business aims to train the next generation of innovative executives for the international film industry. We will teach you about film finance and sales, distribution and marketing, creative management and development, digital strategy and festival curation and programming.

You will learn about the impact technology is having on the industry and gain insider access to a range of events including the Berlin Film Festival and European Film Market.

The London Film School is a world leading postgraduate filmmaking school and you will have the opportunity to access their extensive expertise, attend master-classes and industry events organised by the school as well as the opportunity to benefit from working with an industry mentor as part of the dissertation.

As you might expect from a ground breaking programme of study, assessment will be more than just essays. Instead you will give presentations, pitch ideas, and take on negotiation exercises. During your first term at the University of Exeter you will design, promote, and deliver a pop-up cinema event in the Bill Douglas Cinema Museum.

If you’re serious about pursuing a career in the film business this MA will give you the chance to develop the key business skills and networks you will need, and benefit from mentoring by leading UK and European industry professionals.

Learning and teaching

As an MA International Film Business student you will have access to the world-renowned expertise of the London Film School and the academic excellence and research resources of the University of Exeter.

Your first term will be taught by leading film and business academics at Exeter where you will undertake a global survey of international film production, distribution and exhibition strategies and trends, and study business strategy, accounting and finance, intellectual property and entertainment economics. You will have the opportunity to examine innovative business models and the rapidly changing digital landscape of independent film.

At the London Film School you will take part in talks, master classes and question and answer sessions with film makers, as a graduate of the MA you will have access to the knowledge and contacts few programmes can offer their alumni. You’ll study the entertainment value chain through seminars delivered by London Film School staff and industry professionals, and a further series of intensive full-day seminars exploring film business innovation.

While there is no requirement to make a film as part of the MA, you can take the initiative in the second and third term to work independently, outside of the programme, with other LFS students who are studying on the MA screenwriting or filmmaking.

Field trip

In your second term you will take part in our field trip to the Berlin International Film Festival, including access to the European Film Market, which is a business to business event not open to the public.

The Berlinale takes place in February and is one of the world's oldest and most important international film festivals. About 400 films from all around the world are screened each year at the festival, most of which are international or European premieres.

As well as the excitement of premieres and the films in competition, the Berlinale is an important place for film industry executives to do business. The Berlinale hosts both the European Film Market and the International co-production market, where around 400 companies are represented. The festival also organises a variety of workshops, panel discussions and film programmes.

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Study film and screen cultures while immersing yourself in the creative culture of London at film festivals, studios, galleries and pop-up cinemas. Read more

Summary

Study film and screen cultures while immersing yourself in the creative culture of London at film festivals, studios, galleries and pop-up cinemas. Our MA combines the study of mainstream and experimental film, contemporary television and the video-essay form, and includes the option to produce either a written or audio-visual dissertation.

This cutting-edge MA offers the opportunity for advanced studies in television and new media. Taught by leading figures in the field, the course allows you to engage with the most up-to-date research and to explore new approaches to audio-visual scholarship.

The programme includes first-hand engagement with cultural institutions across the city. Building on our links with festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, this MA is not only about studying film theory but also about immersing yourself in the wealth of screen-related events and institutions the capital has to offer. In recent years, our students have been on trips to the London Film Festival, the British Film Institute, the Scalarama Cult Film Festival, the British Artists' Film & Video Study Collection, and the Tate Modern.

As a student you will also become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC) which means you will be able to engage with new and emerging research by attending a range of guest talks, conferences, media masterclasses and research seminars led by industry professionals. In recent years students have attended an exclusive preview of comedian and producer Omid Djalili’s film We Are Many, and gained advice on how to be a success in the filmmaking industry from BBC producer and director Jonathan Taylor, and the producer of Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Gareth Wiley.

Our alumni go on to have successful careers in film and media. Here is what a few are doing after studying Film at Roehampton.
•Dominic Buchanan (Producer, including Gimme the Loot and Lilting)
•Lyle Lindgren (Director, including a commercial shoot for Breaking Bad)
•Shane O'Sullivan (owns distribution company, E2 Films)
•Christina Mankellow (film editor at Market Me)
•Simon Brand (channel co-ordinator at ABS Broadcast)

Content

You’ll develop your independent critical thinking by engaging in the programme’s four main areas:

•Screen Cultures of London
In a series of visits to festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, you will gain first hand engagement with cultural institutions across London.

•Cult and Quality Television
You will interrogate the dynamic role of television within the shifting media landscape, focusing on contemporary US television drama.

•Essay Films and Video Essays
You will combine history, theory and practice, be introduced to the Essay Film form and be equipped with the necessary skills to make your own video essays.

•Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web
You will undertake an in-depth examination of contemporary cinema through a global lens, taking in a variety of international films from big budget spectacles through to online films and mash-ups.

You will also choose between an academic dissertation and an audio-visual dissertation. The academic dissertation gives you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you. The audio-visual dissertation will provide the opportunity to undertake an innovative combination of theory and practice through the production of an extended audio-visual essay alongside a written critical reflection.

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The Secondary PGCE ‘Musicians in Education’ is a collaboration between Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance and the University of Greenwich. Read more
The Secondary PGCE ‘Musicians in Education’ is a collaboration between Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance and the University of Greenwich. It combines our expertise as one of the country’s leading conservatoires with a long tradition of teacher education at the University of Greenwich. The aim of the programme is simple: to prepare flexible and creative musicians who are confident working across a range of educational contexts. In addition to working in and qualifying for the formal school context, you will develop the skills to lead young people in making music in other settings too.

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/pgce-musicians-in-education

Programme Content

Training is provided through collaboration between Trinity Laban (16 days) and the University of Greenwich (44 days), and is underpinned by significant placement learning opportunities within the schools sector (120 days, of which 10 are placements in alternative contexts with Trinity Laban's partners). These elements will enable you to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required to teach in secondary schools, and you will be formally assessed against the national statutory requirements for Qualified Teacher Status.

In addition to practical teaching experience gained in two main schools, the partnership between Trinity Laban and the University enables you to gain training and teaching experience outside of classroom settings, for example in instrumental/vocal teaching for a Music Hub, school Musical Futures or community rock/pop projects, or leading orchestral outreach projects. As part of a collaborative team you will also design, coordinate and lead a two-day immersive creative composition project in a school.

In support of this work, you will be able to undertake instrumental/vocal lessons with Trinity Laban's outstanding teachers and will also be mentored by subject specialist teachers from whom you will receive daily feedback and guidance.

Progression Routes

By gaining Qualified Teacher Status you become a qualified teacher for both the maintained and independent sectors. The majority of our graduates become secondary music teachers. However, there are other opportunities, such as working for local authority music services in instrumental teaching or curriculum support. Some students use the skills they have developed to pursue a career as freelance workshop musicians.

PERFORMANCE AND PRACTICE FACILITIES

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion

THE FACULTY OF MUSIC

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

How to apply

Applications for the PGCE 'Musicians in Education' should be made to the University of Greenwich via the Graduate Teacher Training Registry (GTTR) website: https://www.ucas.com/ucas/teacher-training

All enquiries regarding the course should be directed to The University of Greenwich: http://www2.gre.ac.uk/
Tel. 0800 005 006

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The Middlesex PGCE Secondary Music course is one year full-time. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. Read more
The Middlesex PGCE Secondary Music course is one year full-time. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. You receive personal attention through regular tutor visits to school placements and individual tutorials. Schools are carefully selected to suit individuals and expose them to imaginative and thought provoking teaching and learning strategies.

The course aims to prepare you for the teaching profession. It will:

Enable you to develop knowledge and understanding of pupils and their learning
Develop your expertise in highly specialised professional skills in a context where you'll need to exercise initiative and take personal responsibility for decision making in complex and unpredictable situations
Equip you with the pedagogic knowledge, understanding and skills to teach effectively across the 11-16 age range
Develop your knowledge and understanding of the Secondary Music curriculum
Enable you to understand, critically evaluate and respond to the needs of children in multicultural, multilingual and multifaith settings and schools in an international, urban environment.


Five workshop/seminar programmes seek to develop and broaden your previous experience:

Practice and Content in Music Education
Music Technology in the Music Curriculum
Stylistic Diversity in the Music Curriculum
Process and Progression in Music Education
Music and the Whole Curriculum
The focus is on developing effective practice in the classroom within the context of the National Curriculum. Content includes the role of the electronic keyboard and computers and MIDI in music education. Your subject knowledge is broadened to include jazz and pop and world music. You will study the place of curriculum music in relation to other arts and the broader society and instrumental teaching.

We have a full range of specialist music and teaching facilities on-site and the course includes specialist mentors from our partner schools.

Two thirds (120 days) of the PGCE Secondary Music course will be on placement. We have excellent relationships with schools in north London, Essex and Hertfordshire and many of our graduates go on to work in their first teaching job at the schools where they had a placement.

In 2012, the secondary teacher training programmes at Middlesex were rated Good with Outstanding Features (by Ofsted), an excellent result for a large and diverse provider of teacher training.

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The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres. Read more
The Popular Music Performance course is designed to address the practical, academic and professional needs of contemporary musicians, and welcomes students from all genres.

Our postgraduate music performance courses offer substantial one-to-one instrumental tuition, with recitalists of international renown. They comprise fascinating and engaging modules that support and extend your practical musicianship and academic skills.

London College of Music's (LCM) regular Composition Workshops and Masterclasses offer great opportunities to learn new skills and network with students from other postgraduate courses. You can also benefit from being part of the vibrant LCM community with regular performance opportunities at LCM Sessions gigs, hosted by Popular Music students, and are encouraged to join in with musical activities throughout the LCM. The college runs several large ensembles including Pop and Gospel Choir, LCM Sinfonia, LCM Big Band, LCM Choir, and LCM Glee Choir, which students are able to participate in.

Course detail

This course provides specialist training for drummers, vocalists, guitarists, bassists and keyboard players that reflects the needs of today’s music industry.

The course is taught by postgraduate tutors from the London College of Music, all of whom are active professional musicians of the highest standard.

It combines technical and stylistic performance tuition through one-to-one lessons, as well as group sessions with other students from across the postgraduate community, to ensure an enhanced learning experience and the opportunity to network with like-minded artists.

The course runs throughout each calendar year.

Modules

• Performance Portfolio
• Ensemble and Music Direction Skills
• Critical Perspectives
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project.
Plus one option from:
• Studio Recording Project
• L Music Pedagogy.
Plus one option from:
• Performing in the Studio
• Live Event Management.

Format

You will have the opportunity to develop your technical and creative performance skills through a programme of one-to-one tuition supported by group-based lectures, seminars and workshops.

There is also an exciting masterclass programme which provides students with the opportunity to engage with leading practitioners from across all areas of the music industry - performance, production and songwriting.

Career and study progression

Graduates will likely pursue a career as a professional performing musician.

The degree might lead to further academic study, including DMus or MPhil/ PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. Read more
Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. But ‘Celtic’ is also about the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the New World; Romanticism, Revolution and the struggles for survival in modernity of languages, literatures and entire national identities.

This new course from Bangor University gives students the opportunity and ability to sift fact and fiction, and to answer in detail the question:

‘Who were – and who are – the Celts?’

Over a single academic year, modules will be taught by experts in the Schools of Welsh, History, and Music, focusing on literature, archaeology, religion, mythology, antiquarianism, art history and music, to explore the culture and identity of the Celtic peoples from the hillforts of prehistory to the devolved and independent parliaments of today.

Students on the course will also be guided as they perform their own research towards a Master’s thesis on a topic of their choice.

All instruction is available through English or Welsh, and comprehensive ESOL support is available where necessary.

Major issues covered on the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ include:

Do ‘The Celts’ actually exist, and if so, who and what are they? How can we discuss such questions, with what methodology and with what evidence?
How has the word itself (‘Celt’, ‘Keltoi’, etc.) been used through the centuries, from Classical historians to modern pop musicians?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of ‘Celtomania’ and ‘Celtoscepticism’? How has the concept of the ‘Celt’ has been discovered and discarded in various fields such as Literature, Archaeology, Linguistics, Music, Religion?
How did nineteenth-century Continental scholars contribute to the creation of the ‘Celt’?
How do and how did the Celtic-speaking peoples negotiate their own identities? What do the medieval texts (Laws, Legends, Court Poetry, Saints’ Lives) and archaeological findings tell us, and what does recent history have to say?
What are the main sources of evidence for the histories and identities of the ‘Celtic’ peoples (i.e. those speaking Celtic languages in the modern period)? How do we use these sources? Can Arthur and Cú Chulainn tell us anything useful?
How have the ethnic and national identities of the modern ‘Celts’ been represented and negotiated with reference to this concept of the ‘Celtic’?
What has been – and what is – the political and ideological relevance of the ‘Celt’?
With issues such as these in mind, the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ is designed to develop participants’ skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to Celtic Studies. On completing this course, students will have a solid grounding in the main methods and sources of the discipline, and will also have developed widely-transferrable skills which will be of clear relevance to a broad range of careers.

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Transactional analysis is often associated with its pop psychology image of the hippy era – but since the ‘sixties it has continued to develop as a profession and is now practised worldwide and in many contexts. Read more
Transactional analysis is often associated with its pop psychology image of the hippy era – but since the ‘sixties it has continued to develop as a profession and is now practised worldwide and in many contexts. This programme concentrates on developmental applications, relating to individual, group and organisational contexts rather than the original focus on psychotherapy. It is suitable, therefore, for professionals such as consultants, educators, coaches, counsellors, managers – anyone with responsibility for the development of others (rather than ‘cure’).

The training is rigorous, with 4-5 years being a typical time frame to obtain international accreditation, so sits well alongside postgraduate qualifications. It is also work-based, with the requirement to demonstrate competent application of TA in the development of others, so we use a series of portfolio submissions based on your professional interventions, with no need for artificial projects to be set up.

Our modules relate to professional areas of practice, so for the first level thsese are Professional Intervention, Core Themes of TA, Individual Development, Interactions & Relationships, Group Processes and Organisations & Institutions. After that, the focus shifts to the context, to practitioner skills such as facilitating, learning, etc, process skills and research awareness. The final MSc level requires implementation of a research-based case study typical of your professional practice.

Our programmes are recognized for accreditation by the international TA associations. They can also be linked to accreditation by the European Mentoring & Coaching Council (EMCC) at Practitioner or Masters Practitioner level; and to the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and the Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM).

More details of the various TA qualifications, and how this programme fits, can be seen at http://www.pifcic.org

Faculty

Our faculty comprises internationally-accredited experts within the TA community, who have wide experience of applying TA professionally in many different contexts. Refer to our prospectus via the link above for further details.

Flexible Study to suit your Lifestyle

The programme is offered via webinars that allow interaction with tutors and with other participants, supplemented with occasional workshops arranged in various countries to suit demand. We have some national groups where students come together to attend the webinars. There are also options to attend regular workshops with our faculty in the UK, Netherlands, New Zealand and Romania, and in other countries through our non-faculty international TA colleagues.

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