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Masters Degrees (Politics And Journalism)

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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms. Read more

This is an integrated multimedia journalism course that prepares you for a career in the global journalism industry by providing you with the core skills for print, broadcast, magazine and online platforms.

During the course you learn how to gather, organise, write and present information to a professional standard across a variety of platforms and to different audiences.

Key areas of study include • print • broadcast • digital/online journalism • writing and presentation skills • interviewing • TV and radio presentation skills • professional practice • global journalism • shorthand.

By selecting options to meet your own interests you are able to specialise in print journalism, magazine journalism, radio journalism and television journalism.

Throughout the course you gain an understanding of how your chosen area operates in Britain and internationally by examining different examples of journalistic practice. You are able to bring your own experience of journalism in your home country and gain insight into practices in Britain, Europe and the wider world. You study case-studies from regions of the world that interest you in order to compare different approaches to journalism.

Print and online journalism modules prepare you to develop the multiplatform skills to operate effectively as a news and feature journalist in any global newsroom. This means learning to develop a strong news sense, an ability to select and prioritise key facts and quotes, and writing skills for different platforms.

You also

  • learn how to produce accurate material for publication to a given length and deadline
  • develop an understanding of how news is consumed and how to meet the needs and expectations of a range of audiences
  • develop both multidisciplinary and team working skills that equip you to work with people from a range of backgrounds

Broadcast journalism modules develop your skills in radio and TV broadcasting, and in interviewing and presenting. You produce radio and TV packages in a dedicated TV and radio studio and two dedicated newsrooms.

Alongside practical skills, the course gives you the opportunity to study the ethical, legal and regulatory context in which journalism is practised. Theoretical content deepens your understanding and critical awareness of on-going debates about the economic and political role played by journalists and global news organisations in modern societies.

Read about opportunities and experiences available to our students on our Journalism blog.

Sheffield Hallam University acts as a centre for the NCTJ national examinations.

Course structure

Semester one core modules

  • writing for the media
  • radio journalism
  • magazine journalism

Semester one optional modules

  • sports journalism 1
  • media law and regulation 1
  • practical PR and professional experience

Semester two core modules

  • print and online reporting
  • TV journalism
  • international journalism and PR

Semester two optional modules

  • sports journalism
  • media law and regulation 2
  • public affairs
  • PR: politics and lobbying

Semester three core modules

  • international journalism project

Assessment

  • coursework
  • critical evaluation
  • dissertation or project
  • a combination of practical and theoretical work

Employability

Journalism is a global industry and this course prepares you for a career in your home country or elsewhere in • print journalism • magazine journalism • sports journalism • online journalism • broadcast journalism (TV and radio) • public relations.

Journalism is a broad term and you could pursue a very rewarding career in any of its many forms.

A career in journalism suits those who are flexible and enjoy team work as you may be dealing with breaking news and a tight deadline. In today’s newsrooms journalists require skills across a range of media-platforms and need to be able to communicate news and information to a range of audiences.

There are opportunities to work on regional newspapers, television and radio throughout the world, but some choose to pursue a career in a national media industry and may therefore be based in a capital city. Many journalists work on a freelance basis and the demand for experienced freelancers is increasing, making this an attractive option, especially for feature writing.

In the UK salaries vary considerably depending on whether the post is a regional or national one. A regional journalist just starting out on a career in the UK can expect to earn £12,000 – £15,000 as a trainee, whereas an experienced person working for a national newspaper can expect up to around £35,000 – £40,000. 



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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

Postgraduate programmes in journalism at Kent offer you the opportunity to research and learn in an environment that combines excellence in the practice of convergent, multimedia journalism with intellectual leadership in the history, ethics and future of the news industry.

Research programmes are best suited to students who have a clear and original idea of a topic that they would like to investigate in detail. The MA by Research entails producing a 40,000 word thesis; the MPhil programme demands a high level of research and analysis resulting in a dissertation of 50,000 words (MPhil).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/111/journalism

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

All first-year research students attend a Methodologies and Research Skills seminar. Through the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Centre provides training in methods of using sources and can assist in funding applications.

We welcome research applications across the range of expertise in the Centre and from all over the world.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, journalism technology, democracy

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

The resources for journalism research at Kent are led by the Drill Hall Library at Medway. The journalism collection includes a comprehensive range of texts on the history, principles and practice of journalism. Specialist resources include a complete microfiche archive of popular newspapers of the Second World War. Students have access to online full-text journals plus extensive online newspaper resources. The Centre subscribes to all relevant UK journals. Research students have access to the SCONUL access scheme to visit and borrow from other UK libraries. The Drill Hall Library contains more than 250 study spaces, 370 computers and more than 150,000 items.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); The Media, Politics and Public Life, Slow Living, Informing Voters? Politics, Media and the New Zealand Election 2008, Politics and the Media (Geoffrey Craig); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills

Careers

A postgraduate research degree in Journalism provides you with qualifications for a teaching career in Journalism or a related discipline. It can also provide you with expertise that can assist in a journalism career in a particular area of reportage. Other career options include public policy research, media promotions and public affairs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Are you a student of politics eager to enter the world of journalism? Do you have a journalism background but want to add powerful critical analysis to… Read more

Are you a student of politics eager to enter the world of journalism? Do you have a journalism background but want to add powerful critical analysis to your reports on international affairs? Are you interested in entering the complex crossroads of politics, international studies, and the media? If so, the Double Master in Journalism, Politics & International Studies is the degree programme for you.

Born from the Alliance between the University of Warwick and Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, this unique double degree offers advanced multidisciplinary training in the fields of Politics and International Studies and Journalism in two world-leading departments in these fields.

Programme content

Unlike the other Double Degrees on offer, this programme partners Politics and International Studies not with another politics department, but with the School of Media, Film and Journalism (MFJ) at Monash in order to bridge the disciplinary difference between both subject areas. On this programme, you will follow the taught portion of a single MA in PAIS, the taught portion of the Master of Journalsim in MFJ, and combine your cross-disciplinary training in a final joint dissertation project of 15,000-18,000 words.

By following one of the MA programmes in PAIS, you will gain a solid critical foundation in politics and international studies, developing your analytical framework for studying international political phenomena. By following the Master of Journalism in MFJ, you will receive advanced training in the theory and practice of modern international journalism. 

This dual foundation is more than the sum of its parts, however. In addition to synthesising what you learn in each discipline, you will have valuable international experience and increase your ability to adapt to new cultures and systems by studying both in the UK and Australia. You will also collaborate directly with your counterparts at both institutions through combined virtual workshops and conferences. Additionally, you will not be restricted to a traditional dissertation format: you will have the opportunity to create a piece of journalism in combination with a shorter 'written up' research section if you choose.

This blend of international, cross-disciplinary, theoretical, and practical training will prepare you well for a career in political or international journalism or further research in this fertile area where politics and the media meet.

Read more about the structure of this two-year programme.



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Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again. Read more
Study International Politics and Human Rights at City, and discover why you will never read international news in the same way again.

Who is it for?

The International Politics and Human Rights programme is for students who want to explore international politics and human rights more widely and then drill down to specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to create your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t. These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Do human rights offer universal protections, or do they provide ideological cover for neo-imperialist powers?
-Can human rights provide protection to individuals in a way that supersedes the nation-state, or do they serve the interests of powerful states?
-Should human rights be concerned with the minimalist needs of security and subsistence, or should they aspire to grander visions of global justice?

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We unpick the ideas that structure the way we understand the world, so we can identify how those understandings shape global events. We then focus on how the way we view things may, in itself, be ethically problematic.

International Politics and Human Rights is an evolving subject so you explore unique specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

Placements

You have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams.Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The first core module Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics l is taught in the first term and Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics, is taught in the second term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

You take two 30-credit core modules, one in each term, totalling 60 credits. You will then take elective modules totalling 60 credits, which include 15 and 30 credit options, and complete your 60 credit dissertation in the third term as a student on the full-time programme (with submission in September of that year). You must also attend the dissertation workshops that are offered by the department, as it is a compulsory and important part of the MA programme.

Core modules
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics IPM117 (30 credits)
-International Politics dissertation IPM111 (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding Security in the 21st Century (15 credits)
-International Organisations in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-Development and International Politics (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)
-Global Capitalism: Past, Present and Future (30 credits)
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
-Global Governance (15 credits)
-International Politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-making (30 credits)
-US Foreign Policy (15 credits)
-Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
-Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
-Global Political Economy: Contemporary Approaches (30 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Department of Sociology:
-Developments in Communication Policy (30 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication (30 credits)
-Criminal Minds (15 credits)
-Crime News (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice (30 credits)
-Human Rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International Criminal Law: Crimes & Institutions (30 credits)
-Law and War (30 credits)
-Minorities and Indigenous People in International Law (30 credits)
-International Law & The Use of Force (30 credits)

*MA International Politics and Human Rights students have access to additional LLM options with The City Law School.

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2016 70% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-UNESCO
-Amnesty International
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-US Embassy
-International Crisis Groupp
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-European External Action Service

From human rights organisations to NGOs and government agencies, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

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The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Read more

About the course

The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Not only do we need to understand the ongoing changes in the nature of war and conflict, but we are also today faced with important transformations in global power relations, international flows of goods, people and diseases and, indeed, shifts in the nature of political communities on the globe. Whatever your background, whether in international politics or another discipline, this flagship MA programme provides you with the necessary tools to tackle these shifting landscapes.

The scheme will introduce you, first, to the core notions that help shape the analysis of and the practices of international politics but also encourages you to think creatively about the kinds of concepts we need today to capture complex political realities. Taught by a team of world-leading research staff, the core module will challenge you to reflect on the way you think about international politics and the issues facing individuals, societies, states and humanity as a whole. Beyond the core module students pursue their own interests by choosing specialist modules. The options, ranging from the study of war, conflict, strategy and security to the study of global order, international theory and ethics, are designed to stimulate you in pursuing your own path to an advanced study of international relations.

At the heart of the scheme is a desire to expose students to envisioning new, different, better ways forward in our efforts to cope with the challenging political, military, social, economic and environmental contexts we live in today.

MA students taking this course will be integrated into the unique world-leading research culture, including contributing to research groups, participating in a range of events, seminars and round-tables, and attending the weekly departmental research seminar. Whether you are interested in understanding the conceptual underpinnings of international politics or tackling practical policy implications by taking this flagship Masters degree you will be part of a department at the forefront of understanding and tackling the challenges of ‘how we might live’ in the 21st century.

Why study International Politics at Aberystwyth?

Founded in 1919 after the end of World War I, the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth is the world’s first university department of International Politics. The Department is renowned for its pioneering research and is recognised as number one in the UK for the study of international politics. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014), the Department of International Politics was placed best in Wales with 76% of publications submitted rated as world leading and internationally excellent. This research excellence is mirrored in our teaching, as evidenced in the recent 2016 National Student Satisfaction survey. The 2016 NSS placed us in the top ten in the UK and best in Wales among Politics and International Relations departments, with 95% overall Student satisfaction, well above the average for the subject nationally. Our staff’s commitment to excellence in both teaching and research, provides you with an outstanding and dynamic learning environment. Finally our Department’s vibrant and cosmopolitan learning environment welcomes students from all over the world, and provides a lively venue for contemporary and international political debate.

This degree will suit you:

• If you want to study international relations at advanced level
• If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of past and contemporary international politics
• If you wish to nurture a career in areas such as international diplomacy, journalism or the NGO-sector or if you wish to work internationally
• If you desire formal recognition of skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course structure

The MA in International Politics pursued through the Specialist Pathway is the traditional Masters degree which offers the opportunity to for students to pursue specialised, advanced, subject-specific study in the discipline of international politics. Students following this pathway take the degree scheme core module (compulsory), two modules from a basket of options, and three further modules chosen from the baskets or any Masters options taught by the Department (including a maximum of one module offered by another department). More information on modules available from other departments is available at: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/modules/. Finally students complete a 13-15,000 word dissertation.

Core modules:

Dissertation
International Politics
Principles Of Research Design
Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis (1120)
Quantitative Data Collection And Analysis
Research In Politics And International Studies

Optional modules:

Cyber Security
Politics, Media, Performance: Transdisciplinary Critical Frameworks
Power And Postwar Reconstruction: A Critical Approach
The State Through The Ages
Thoughts Of War: Strategic Theory & Thinkers (s)
Understanding Wales In An Age Of Global Transformation
Critical Security Studies: Contemporary Theories
Intelligence, Security And International Politics Since 1945
International Communications In Asia-pacific: Power, Peoples And Propaganda
Islam And Modernity
Political Responsibility In A Globalized World
Postcolonial Politics

Contact time

In Semester One you will normally have eight hours per week of specific Research Training Modules and one two-hour seminar per week for the degree scheme core module. In Semester Two you will normally have one two-hour seminar per week for each of the three modules you take (one Research Training specific and two subject specific modules). You will also have contact with academic staff through participation in research groups, attendance in departmental research seminars and masters workshops and through staff office hours (two one hour sessions per week). There will also be additional sessions working towards developing your master’s dissertation. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment will be through a combination of examinations, project work, short reports, essays and dissertation. It may, depending on the modules chosen, include seminar presentations, review essays and literature searches.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained international politics specialist with a strength in depth of knowledge on vital subjects such as conflict, power, peace, justice and injustice, security, the global distribution of wealth and resources and trust in world politics. You will also graduate with a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. On the research training pathway you also develop advanced skills in quantitative and qualitative research skills and data analysis. In addition, the prestige of masters from our department of International Relations wills open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Study skills

Alongside the wealth of world-class critical expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. The research training pathway provides you with a specific set of study skills focused on interrogating and analysing a range of different types of data from multiple sources. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Masters degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The International relations Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. You will also have advanced skills in data analysis that can be applied in a wide variety of work environments from business to the public sector and non-governmental organisations.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Journalism at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Journalism at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Journalism offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approach to contemporary journalism studies under the impact of globalisation and digitalisation, drawing upon expertise in Media and Communication Studies.

Key Features of MA in International Journalism

The MA in International Journalism provides an international and cross-cultural approach to journalism in the 21st century and aims to develop the knowledge and understanding of the role of journalism in society. The International Journalism course combines the teaching of practical skills and techniques of journalistic production with the exploration of practice from a range of theoretical and analytical perspectives. Graduates have careers in journalism, media, communication and PR, broadcasting, publishing, marketing and sales.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The International Journalism course structure is split across the year allowing three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component allows students to either write a 20,000 word dissertation or a journalism/media project of their own (with 10,000 word report) which draws upon issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Journalism typically include:

• Global Media

• Conceptual Issues in the Theory and Practice of Social Sciences

• Development and Communications

• Risk Reporting

• The Digital Edge

• The Business and Politics of Digital Media

• Digital Skills and Defence

• Online Journalism

• War Reporting

• Promotional and Professional Writing

Who should Apply?

Students interested in journalism and media studies, from a media studies, literature, history, sociology, politics and international relations, social science, or other related background. Professionals interested in journalism and global media both in terms of their professional practice, but also related to fields in policy research and public administration.

Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to global media and international journalism.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Journalism graduates. Media organizations, non-profit organizations, government and the public sector and private companies value the fact that our graduates have developed a range of critical abilities and skills in problem solving. Our International Journalism graduates enter careers in journalism (Guardian Online), broadcasting (BBC Wales), advertising, publicity, arts and cultural bodies or are employed as NGOs. Others go on to study a PhD and have a career in academia.



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Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs. The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. Read more
Study International Politics to get behind the headlines as you discover structures and ideas that shape global affairs.

Who is it for?

The International Politics MA programme is for students who want to explore international politics more widely and then drill down to follow their unique interests and specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to pursue your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t.

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We probe the ideas that structure the way we think about the world and examine the institutions that determine events. We then focus on how you can use this new understanding to judge global affairs for yourself.

International Politics is an expansive and ever-changing subject so you learn about the broad contours of the field while developing specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving students a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-Is the USA a benevolent global leader or a neo-imperial power?
-How does the shift in power from the West to the Rest reshape international politics in the 21st century?
-Can states act effectively in a world increasingly shaped by international institutions and global economic actors?

Placements

You may have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:
-Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission.
-Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
-Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.
You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams. Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The core module 'Theories of International Politics' is taught in the first term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

Core modules
-Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
-International Politics Research Workshop
-International Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules - choose 60 credits
Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:
-Understanding security in the 21st century (15 credits)
-International organisations in global politics (15 credits)
-Development and international politics (15 credits)
-Religion in global politics (15 credits)
-Global capitalism: past, present and future (30 credits)
-Global political economy (30 credits)
-Political economy of global finance (15 credits)
-The politics of forced displacement and resettlement (15 credits)
-Global governance (15 credits)
-International politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global financial governance (15 credits)
-Strategy, diplomacy and decision-making (30 credits)
-US foreign policy (15 credits)
-Foreign policy analysis (15 credits)
-Economic diplomacy (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by the Sociology Department:
-Developments in communication policy (30 credits)
-Transnational media and communication (30 credits)
-Criminal minds (15 credits)
-Crime news (15 credits)

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:
-International human rights in law and practice (30 credits)
-Human rights in the EU (30 credits)
-International criminal law: crimes & institutions (30 credits)
-Law and war (30 credits)
-Minorities and indigenous people in international law (30 credits)
-International law & the use of force (30 credits)

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2014-15, 87.5% of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:
-Amnesty International
-European External Action Service
-International Crisis Group
-Ministry of Economy and Finance
-The Open Rights Group
-The Grass Roots Group
-The United Nations
-UNESCO
-US Embassy

From government agencies to NGOs and human rights organisations, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.

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The Master of Science in Communication Studies. Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. Read more

About the programme

The Master of Science in Communication Studies: Journalism and Media in Europe takes a critical and interdisciplinary look at the role of journalism and media in European societies. The Master looks at journalism and media from an economic, political-ideological and policy perspective. It pays attention to the impact of recent economic, political and technological developments on journalism and media. The Master zooms in on media and journalism in a European context, looking comparatively at journalism across Europe and at journalism in the context of European integration. It makes optimal use of Brussels with its range of European and international institutions and the many media, journalism and communication professionals working in and around those institutions.

This master offers...

- A high-level and integrated programme and interdisciplinary approach to journalism and media in Europe
- Teaching in small groups, using interactive methods, stimulating individual participation
- The possibility of writing your thesis in English, Dutch, French or German (the last three on approval)
- Close collaboration with researchers from the research centers Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunication (SMIT), Studies on Media and Culture (Cemeso), and Democracy, Signification, Resistance (Desire), and the Brussels Platform for Journalism (BPJ)
- Teaching in Brussels, the capital of Europe and home to an emerging European communication space. The Master will acquaint you with European institutions and media players. The Master includes a yearly lecture series with representatives of European media industry, journalism and institutions, organizes site visits, and offers the possibility of an internship.

Structure

https://my.vub.ac.be/sites/default/files/faculteit/ES/Documenten/msc_in_communication_studies_jnm.pdf

This daytime programme consists of two semesters and can be completed in one academic year.
Alternatively, it can be completed in one and half or two years. It comprises compulsory courses including a master's thesis (48 ECTS), and two optional courses or an internship (12 ECTS).

Compulsory Courses (48 ECTS)

Advanced Methods for Journalism Research
Advanced Theoretical Debates: Journalism, Politics and Ideology
Brussels talking: Lecture Series on Europe, Media and Society
Current Case Studies in Journalism
The Political Economy of Journalism in the EU
Master's Thesis in Communication Studies

Optional Courses (12 ECTS)

Traineeship in Communication Studies
Journalism Practice in Europe
Media, Public Spheres and Public Opinions in Europe
Policy Advocacy and Media in the EU
Challenges and Mutations of Journalism (course at the Université Libre de Bruxelles - in English)

Admission requirements

Direct access is granted for students with a Belgian Bachelor’s degree in Communication Studies.

All other applicants' files will be evaluated by the Admission Board on an individual basis. Applicants with a bachelor diploma in a field other than Communication Studies may still be accepted provided they take a few additional courses in the form of a short preparatory programme (consisting of maximum 24 ECTS credits). This preparatory programme can be followed while starting the Master.

Please note: An academic BA or MA degree is required to apply.

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https://www.facebook.com/pages/Master-of-Communication-Studies-Journalism-and-Media-in-Europe/1543453242599680

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The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts. Read more
The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of how media work across a variety of social, cultural, economic and political contexts.

We focus on the academic study of journalism, but also offer opportunities for the development of professional skills through optional modules in the second semester and through research.

The course provides insights into how journalism is changing in a globalised context, exploring key debates and issues in journalism studies today. It also provides training in the use of a range of research skills in journalism studies, to support academic scholarship in the field of journalism studies.

You will learn to assess how media are linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, global responses to war and conflict, and environmental challenges, amongst others.

You will explore the roles of new information and communication technologies, their opportunities and challenges, their democratic potential and their regulation

We will consider issues of citizenship, race, gender, ethnicity and class that are shaping contemporary forms of news media content.

This programme offers knowledge and expertise for a career in the journalism, media and communication industries or as a foundation for PhD research.

This programme is not designed as a vocational degree and does not provide training in Journalism. You should not consider this degree as a professional qualification towards becoming a journalist.

Distinctive features

• The course is designed for those with no previous experience in journalism and for mid-career journalism practitioners wanting a period of reflection to deepen their understanding of journalism practice.

• It aims to promote an awareness of the place and importance of journalism in the contemporary world, and in local and global contexts.

• It attracts students from all over the world, providing a rich and diverse environment for academic study and critique.

Structure

The taught component of the course amounts to 120 credits and is taught across two semesters (Autumn and Spring) from the end of September to the beginning of June and combines core and elective modules.

You will submit a dissertation at the end of August. The dissertation carries 60 credits.

Core modules:

Introduction to Journalism Studies
Mediatised Conflict: The Politics of Conflict Reporting
Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through lecture and seminars series which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career Prospects

Graduates of MA Journalism, Media and Communications are employed in a range of occupations in journalism, media and communication institutions both in the UK and globally, taking on a variety of leading roles.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares students for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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If you're interested in learning about how journalism is practised across the world and what threats and challenges it faces, and if you want to get some hands-on practical experience then the MA Global Journalism is for you. Read more
If you're interested in learning about how journalism is practised across the world and what threats and challenges it faces, and if you want to get some hands-on practical experience then the MA Global Journalism is for you.

The MA Global Journalism combines theoretical and practical concerns with regard to the principles of a free press and its relationship to political and civil institutions. It examines, compares and contrasts the diverse forms of regulation and restrictions – both legitimate and illegitimate – surrounding the practice of journalism around the world.

You'll engage in debates about the key issues facing news journalism in a comparative global context. The course will also give you hands-on practical experience in writing for various media platforms and communicating news in the contemporary global environment.

Teaching on Global Journalism extends beyond the classroom. You'll have the opportunity to visit BBC studios and attend conferences that give insights into the daily practice of news journalism across the world. We also host our own Global Journalism Film Festival and collaborate with the European Parliament in Brussels.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

We have strong links with the industry. We send our masters students on a three-day field trip to London, visiting national news organisations for briefings on current developments with senior editors and meeting politicians and political journalists.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Work experience

If you’re taking one of our applied courses, we encourage you to go on a work placement of one to three weeks during vacation time. Employers regularly notify us as opportunities come up and we have a dedicated work placement administrator to help you find a placement that’s right for you. Our students often find a work placement leads to a job after graduation.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association. Our International Political Communication and Global Journalism programmes are not accredited and have limited practical content.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

There are a limited number of external bursaries for UK students on the Print, Magazine and Broadcast courses, from the AHRC, Scott Trust and Journalism Diversity Fund. Please see our web pages for details.

Core modules

The Principle of Publicity I, The Principle of Publicity II, Writing for the Media, Research Methods, Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

Journalism in Britain, Media, Politics and Publics, Global Communication: History, Theory and Practice, Reporting the European Union, Propaganda, Media and Conflict, Online Journalism Studies, Media Freedom: European, UK and US Perspectives, Media, State and Society in China, Researching Social Media, Digital Advocacy

Teaching and assessment

We teach through lectures, seminars, workshops and research exercises. You’re assessed by essays, examinations and a dissertation.

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This course offers a thorough grounding in journalism studies and introduces debates in the field. It covers a range of topics including the impact of digital technologies on journalism practice and the relationship between journalism and politics. Read more

This course offers a thorough grounding in journalism studies and introduces debates in the field. It covers a range of topics including the impact of digital technologies on journalism practice and the relationship between journalism and politics. You will also be introduced to the practice of research, undertaking an independent research project. You will also have the opportunity to choose optional modules from across the School.

The course is designed to cater for international students who wish to study journalism at MA level, perhaps for the first time, and graduates who have a background in journalism.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film. 

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room. 

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Core modules will lay the foundations for your understanding of the theory and ongoing research in the world of global journalism, and how journalism shapes – and is shaped by – global political, social, economic and cultural issues. Then you’ll explore how this affects journalistic practice, considering issues like regulation and ethics as you build skills in news research and writing.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Journalism Theory and Research 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Journalism MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We also use different forms of assessment including essays, exams, news stories and reports. Optional modules may also use methods such as case studies and source analysis, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a wide range of knowledge, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis and communication that will serve you well in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a range of careers. These have included national and international journalism, as well as public relations roles for government, international and not-for-profit organisations.

You’ll also be well prepared to continue with research in this rapidly evolving field at PhD level and in an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics.

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

• study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
• consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
• be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
receive close tutorial support.
• be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics:

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights:

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

PLUS

Research Methods
Dissertation

PLUS Two from:

Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
Global Environmental Politics
Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
Legacies of Warfare
Global Ethics
A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.

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Do you have a passion for journalism? Are you looking to further your career and increase your knowledge of multimedia communications and content? With… Read more

Do you have a passion for journalism? Are you looking to further your career and increase your knowledge of multimedia communications and content? With an emphasis on brand journalism, content creation and campaign management across paid, owned, earned and shared platforms, Southampton Solent’s MA Journalism and Multimedia Communications will leave you well-placed to bring these skills to the workplace.

Moving forward from traditional news media journalism, this course focuses on the strategic development of brand and corporate journalism content. Students on this course will learn how to commission and manage work from PR, marketing and advertising specialists, to ultimately integrate brand journalism and run corporate newsrooms.

Journalism is about crafting and managing communication, altering perceptions and changing people’s lives. The power of a journalist comes through their ability to hold people to account – this is a central foundation to the course, which places students alongside the creative pathways of advertising and public relations to forge an innovative and far reaching working relationship. The course focuses on journalism as an originator of content and a driver of perception as they meet the boundaries of communications.

The Professional Practice unit gives students work-placement and freelance opportunities, enhancing their professional skillset. Students will also be able to pitch for paid work at Solent Creatives, who specialise in connecting students with businesses who need creative support. These projects can help students to strengthen their portfolio of professional work.

The course concludes with a major project or dissertation. This is another opportunity for students to specialise their knowledge, conducting in-depth research into an area that complements their unique career ambitions.

What does this course lead to?

Journalism courses here at Southampton Solent University prepare students for a variety of careers both within the traditional journalism newsroom, but also within the wider world of corporate communications. 

Who is this course for?

Graduates who have studied a journalism degree or communications-related discipline and who wish to further explore new and emerging communications channels will be well-suited to this master’s programme.

Facilities

We have a fully-equipped IT centre with both PC and Mac computers. These feature industry-standard image manipulation, video, and audio editing software. Access to camera equipment and professional recording devices for podcast and video creation is highly likely, and access to photographic equipment is always available.

Southampton Solent is proud to offer students a range of high-end media facilities. Students also have the opportunity to access an extensive media loans service, where they can borrow high-end video production and photography equipment.

Your future

Previous graduates from Solent's journalism degrees have gone on to work for BBC; Closer Magazine; Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Communications Manager; Haymarket Media Group; Basingstoke Gazette; Sun Woman; The Argus newspaper, Brighton; TalkSport; Palm 105.5, Torquay; BBC Sunday Politics South; Athletics Weekly magazine; Mid Somerset News and Media; Taylor Newspapers; Bonhams, London; Mail Online; The News, Portsmouth; Bristol Rugby Club, Bristol.

Industry links

The University’s in-house publisher, Solent Press, has existing business relationships with Haymarket and Archant

Solent Creatives, the University’s own student-run agency, enables students to pitch for paid work and get involved on live client briefs and projects with local, regional and national businesses.

Students studying courses in the School of Business, Law and Communication can also benefit from an exciting and varied industry speaker programme. Recent speakers on our journalism courses have included Andrew Harrison, Editor of Esquire Weekly; Don John, founder of Black History Month; Lloyd Bradley, former commissioning editor at GQ and Men’s Health; Kate Hutchinson, journalist with Time Out, NME and The Guardian; David Davies, former MD of Bauer Publishing; Laura Miller, freelance writer for Grazia, Elle and Red; Tim Southwell, co-founder of Loaded Magazine and founder of award-winning magazine, GolfPunk; Mike Goldsmith, head of digital publishing at Future Publishing; and Kat Romero, Solent University journalism graduate and senior showbiz editor at Closer.

Placements

The Professional Practice unit requires students to undertake a work placement or complete a freelance project. Students are encouraged to source their own client (through Solent Creatives) or to find a work placement that is appropriate to their career ambitions. The minimum requirement for a placement is two weeks, however placements and projects can vary in length, depending on client needs.



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