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Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this. Read more
Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this.

The ICT for Development (ICT4D) specialism is a strand within the established and highly successful MSc Practising Sustainable Development. It is offered jointly by the Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) Group and the UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway, University of London.

This ICT4D Masters strand takes a global perspective on sustainable development and the role of ICTs; placed at the interface of research and practice, it is designed for those who want to launch or further their careers as development practitioners or scholars. It combines cutting-edge teaching on ICT4D with rigorous training in the broader field of sustainable development, to provide a well-rounded perspective on current and future development challenges. This degree extends knowledge, develops key skills and optimises career prospects.

The course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Master’s degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscpgdippsdict4d.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This is an intellectually exciting and inspiring course, drawing on both physical and social sciences, which attracts a diverse, international group of students.

- Our teaching staff are leading international experts and have wide experience in different developing regions and economies in transition, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, East Asia and South-East Asia.

- You will benefit from small group learning and an intense but friendly atmosphere, and will receive individual mentoring and career advice from our staff (both from your personal tutor and a dissertation supervisor).

- You will receive an internationally renowned University of London degree, giving you a solid foundation for a career in the field of development and/or environment.

- The course will provide you with training in the skills needed to research and assess ICT for development. These include research design, project development, geographic information systems, remote sensing, participatory methods, project analysis and evaluation.

Department research and industry highlights

The UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway is an interdisciplinary centre involving staff in Geography, Management, Computer Science and Earth Sciences. One of the world leaders in its field, with 17 affiliated staff and 18 PhD students, it is a vibrant research community embedded in both the College and the international ICT4D Collective of ICT4D practitioners. It has excellent links with NGOs, businesses and international organisations. Friendly and diverse, it is an exciting place to study and network with other ICT4D experts.

The Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) group consists of over 20 research-active staff, 35 PhD students and 50 Master’s students on four MSc programmes. We are committed to conducting collaborative research which seeks to understand and contribute to addressing problems of social inequality, environmental destruction and injustice. The breadth of its members’ research places it in an ideal position to contribute to theoretical and policy debates on key challenges facing Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean today.

Course content and structure

The course is divided into three compulsory elements; theory, policy and practice; research training; and a dissertation. Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Sustainability, Development and Governance
This course will equip students with a detailed understanding of the development of sustainable development as a discourse. Students will explore key sustainability issues such as climate change, globalisation, and human responses with an emphasis on the emergence of environmental governance as a means to pursue sustainability.

Technology and Development
This course provides you with an introduction to the role of technology in development, focusing particularly on mobile phone and computer technologies. The course combines an understanding of key theoretical debates and how technologies have been applied in diverse sectors such as health and education. The course also includes training in the use of GIS (geographical information systems) within a development context.

ICT4D
This course gives you the opportunity to develop deeper understandings of cutting-edge applications of ICT4D research and practice. Topics covered include environmental change and Green ICT, open development and subversive forms of technology use, and logics of inclusion and exclusion in ICT programmes. You will also examine project planning, monitoring and evaluation in the field of ICT4D.

Participatory Research
This course combines detailed understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of participatory research and methods with practical experience of using different participatory research techniques. These include participatory diagramming, participatory video and participatory environmental monitoring.

Research Training
You will be provided with training in a range of methods to enable you to plan, carry out and complete a piece of research. There are three modules in this element:
- Social Research Methods Training - provides a range of social science methods for field research and analysis.
- Quantitative Methods for Graduates - provides basic statistical concepts and procedures used in empirical research.
- Development and Environment Research Training - provides guidance for planning, developing and undertaking research in a development and environment context.

Dissertation (MSc only)
The dissertation is of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, on a topic of your choice which has been approved by the supervisor. It requires both secondary and primary research, and the demonstration of originality in integrating theoretical and practical research methods in tackling a particular problem. You will be encouraged to carry out your dissertation in collaboration with an organisation in the field of development and environment.

Community Volunteer Project
You will undertake an independent volunteer project which will give you practical experience in gaining sustainability related work experience in a non-for profit organisation. The project will enhance your employability whilst and provide an opportunity to gain practical experience of third sector organisational objectives, cultures and practices.

Elective course units:
Sustainability, Development and Society
You will develop a detailed understanding of key social / environmental relationships incorporating contemporary issues in the geographies of sustainability. These will include 'risk society', sustainable cities, and the impacts of corporate sector activities on the environment. You will also understand the challenges to sustainable development at household and community levels, with a focus on community-based approaches to sustainable development.

Business Ethics and Enterprise
The aim of the course is to equip students with the moral frameworks and critical abilities necessary to understand the role of business in society from an ethical perspective. The course will cover different types of business including large publicly traded multinationals, small and medium sized enterprises, social enterprises and family firms. Students will be expected to understand the different issues in these organizational types and to articulate moral arguments from a range of different perspectives.

International Sustainability Management
This course provides participants with an understanding of how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) informs sustainability management issues in large, transnational organisations. It will focus on issues such as consumption and sustainability as dichotomised between the apparently incompatible tensions of economic and environmental interests.

Other courses Geopolitics and Security / PIR / Management / Computer Science

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an understanding at an advanced level of the relationships between, and complexities of, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development and ICT4D

- an understanding at an advanced level of how the key issues in sustainable development theory and ICT4D influence policy and impact on practice

- the ability to critically analyse complex or contradictory areas of knowledge in aspects of sustainable development.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Past students of the MSc Practising Sustainable Development are now employed by international development and/or environment agencies, national government in their countries, national programmes and implementing agencies, higher education institutions, consultancies, private sector businesses, social enterprises and NGOs; as environmental and development policy-makers, managers, workers, activists, teachers and researchers. Many of our alumni are also currently undertaking doctoral programmes in the UK and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. Read more
Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. 75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded the quality rating of 3* out of 4* for 'environment' - quality that is defined as conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability (Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014).

The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor John Taylor: an internationally renowned expert in social development and poverty reduction. Professor Taylor has undertaken research for the UK's Department of International Development, the World Bank, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNICEF, national and international NGOs.

See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/research/research-interests/sites/international-development-emergencies-refugee-studies-group

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:
- Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
- Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
- Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
- Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
- Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
- Environmental policies and sustainable development;
- Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The MSc develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-studies-msc

Modules

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Human development in a globalised world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
The Module Analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Forced migration and resettlement
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Human rights in the developing world

- Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Teaching and learning

- Study hours
Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognized among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/msc-development-and-urbanisation

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

- Economies in transition
The module analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Human development in a globalising world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Urban challenges
The module addresses a wide range of topical and interlinked issues relevant to the evolution, tensions, economies, societies, cultures and demographies of developing-country cities; and the evolving frameworks for aid, governance, planning and management of their economic, social and physical space. It will draw on expertise of colleagues in practice and advocacy to explicate the links between theory and practice; and on seminars and special events to deepen understanding of the links between urban, and broader development contexts.

- Urban project
In this module students will develop a project in a developing-country city. In Part One of the project, students work in groups to develop a project background portfolio. In Part Two individual students propose a development plan for part of the project site which will focus on livelihoods, public space, housing, infrastructure, or Community development. Projects will be presented in class, but also uploaded on a website.

- Research methods
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies in the Development field, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

- Dissertation and voluntary work placement
Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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Interest in development, environment and issues of sustainable development has never been so intense. UN climate change summits , Millennium Development Goals and the World Social Forum have brought environmental and development issues and problems long on local and national agendas, onto the international scene. Read more
Interest in development, environment and issues of sustainable development has never been so intense. UN climate change summits , Millennium Development Goals and the World Social Forum have brought environmental and development issues and problems long on local and national agendas, onto the international scene.

All sustainable development issues are a complex and dynamic web of natural, social, political and economic processes, and it is this unique interdisciplinary approach which drives the MSc in Practising Sustainable Development. This popular course has evolved and expanded in scope and appeal, and has attracted students from about 30 countries and a diverse range of backgrounds who work or are interested in development issues and the environment.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Master’s degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscpgdippractisingsustainabledevelopment.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Our teaching staff have wide experience in different developing regions and economies in transition, including Latin America, the Caribbean, South, East and South-East Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Staff have also worked with indigenous and marginalised communities in North America.

- You will benefit from a diverse range of teaching and learning strategies including tutor-led discussions and seminars, oral presentations, role-playing, problem-solving and group work.

- You will be well prepared for a career in the development and environment field as the course is very highly regarded.

- The course can be used as part of an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) research training pathway for PhD study. This indicates that the content and approach of our academic research training is of a very high standard.

- You will be provided with training in skills needed to research and assess sustainable development, such as research design, project development, environmental monitoring, geographic information systems (GIS), participatory

Department research and industry highlights

The Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) group consists of over 20 research-active staff, 35 PhD students and 50 Master’s students on four MSc programmes. We are committed to conducting collaborative research which seeks to understand and contribute to addressing problems of social inequality, environmental destruction and injustice. The breadth of its members’ research places it in an ideal position to contribute to theoretical and policy debates on key challenges facing Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean today.

Course content and structure

The course is divided into three compulsory elements. Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Sustainability, Development and Governance
This course will equip students with a detailed understanding of the development of sustainable development as a discourse. Students will explore key sustainability issues such as climate change, globalisation, and human responses with an emphasis on the emergence of environmental governance as a means to pursue sustainability.

Technology and Development
This course provides you with an introduction to the role of technology in development, focusing particularly on mobile phone and computer technologies. The course combines an understanding of key theoretical debates and how technologies have been applied in diverse sectors such as health and education. The course also includes training in the use of GIS (geographical information systems) within a development context.

Sustainability, Development and Society
You will develop a detailed understanding of key social / environmental relationships incorporating contemporary issues in the geographies of sustainability. These will include \'risk society\', sustainable cities, and the impacts of corporate sector activities on the environment. You will also understand the challenges to sustainable development at household and community levels, with a focus on community-based approaches to sustainable development.

Participatory research
This course combines detailed understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of participatory research and methods with practical experience of using different participatory research techniques. These include participatory diagramming, participatory video and participatory environmental monitoring.

Research Training
You will be provided with training in a range of methods to enable you to plan, carry out and complete a piece of research. There are three modules in this element:
- Social Research Methods Training - provides a range of social science methods for field research and analysis.
- Quantitative Methods for Graduates - provides basic statistical concepts and procedures used in empirical research.
- Development and Environment Research Training - provides guidance for planning, developing and undertaking research in a development and environment context.

Dissertation (MSc only)
The dissertation is of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, on a topic of your choice which has been approved by the supervisor. It requires both secondary and primary research, and the demonstration of originality in integrating theoretical and practical research methods in tackling a particular problem. You will be encouraged to carry out your dissertation in collaboration with an organisation in the field of development and environment.

Community Volunteer Project
You will undertake an independent volunteer project which will give you practical experience in gaining sustainability related work experience in a non-for profit organisation. The project will enhance your employability whilst and provide an opportunity to gain practical experience of third sector organisational objectives, cultures and practices.

Elective course units:
ICT4D
This course gives you the opportunity to develop deeper understandings of cutting-edge applications of ICT4D research and practice. Topics covered include environmental change and Green ICT, open development and subversive forms of technology use, and logics of inclusion and exclusion in ICT programmes. You will also examine project planning, monitoring and evaluation in the field of ICT4D.

Business Ethics and Enterprise
The aim of the course is to equip students with the moral frameworks and critical abilities necessary to understand the role of business in society from an ethical perspective. The course will cover different types of business including large publicly traded multinationals, small and medium sized enterprises, social enterpises and family firms. Students will be expected to understand the different issues in these organizational types and to articulate moral arguments from a range of different perspectives.

International Sustainability Management
This course provides participants with an understanding of how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) informs sustainability management issues in large, transnational organisations. It will focus on issues such as consumption and sustainability as dichotomised between the apparently incompatible tensions of economic and environmental interests.

Other courses Geopolitics and Security / PIR / Management / Computer science

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an understanding at an advanced level of the relationships between, and complexities of, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development

- an understanding at an advanced level of how the key issues in sustainable development theory influence policy and impact on practice

- the ability to critically analyse complex or contradictory areas of knowledge in aspects of sustainable development.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Past students of the course are now employed by international development and environment agencies, national policy making and implementing agencies, higher education institutions, private sector natural resource companies and NGOs; as environmental and development workers, activists, teachers and researchers. Many of our alumni are also currently undertaking doctoral programmes in the UK and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Security and Development at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.
- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Critical Security
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Civil Society and International Development
• Approaches to International Relations
• War, Identity and Society
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• War in Space
• State of Africa
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security
• Development Studies
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The full-time Development and Human Rights course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in (part one) and then a dissertation over the summer (part two).

Development and Human Rights students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of their choosing.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Over the last three decades, political economy has been one of the fastest growing approaches in the social sciences. If you are interested in how institutions shape the behaviour of political actors and how political decisions influence markets and vice versa, then you will profit from our course. Read more
Over the last three decades, political economy has been one of the fastest growing approaches in the social sciences. If you are interested in how institutions shape the behaviour of political actors and how political decisions influence markets and vice versa, then you will profit from our course.

Our MRes Political Economy is a two-year course, designed to give you additional training in research design and research methods compared to an MSc or MA. You study modules on political economics and research methods across your two years, while developing a 35,000-word dissertation.

At Essex, we are primarily interested in the study of political institutions and how they might determine economic variables. Our MSc Political Economy covers all aspects of modern political economy, including:
-Micro and macroeconomics
-The quality of governance
-Monetary policy choices
-Mathematical Methods
-Environmental policies
-Market failure

Run jointly between our Department of Economics and our Department of Government, our MRes Political Economy offers excellent preparation for PhD study, combining substantive political economy modules with additional training in research design and research methods. You learn how to develop theories, conduct research, and explore the empirical implications of theoretical models using the most appropriate empirical methods.

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our Department of Economics is top 5 in the UK for research, with over 90% of our research rated as ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’.

Our expert staff

Study and work alongside some of the most prominent economists and political scientists of our time.

Our researchers are at the forefront of their field and have even received MBEs; they are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Many of our economic researchers also provide consultancy services to businesses in London and other major financial centres, helping us to develop research for today's society as well as informing our teaching for the future.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political and quantitative analysis
-ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, economics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

An MRes puts you in a particularly strong position to succeed in a research degree. We offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Other recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Year 1
-Political Economy
-Advanced Research Methods
-Essex Summer School Module 30 Credits
-Essex Summer School Module 30 Credits
-Mathematical Methods
-Microeconomics
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science

Year 2
-MRES Dissertation
-Applied Research Design
-Macroeconomics
-Research Design
-Applications of Data Analysis (optional)
-Banking
-Behavioural Economics I: Individual Decision Making
-Behavioural Economics II: Games and Markets
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Computational Agent-Based Macro-Economics, Financial Markets and Policy Design
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Econometric Methods (optional)
-Economic Development Theory (optional)
-Economics of Financial Markets (optional)
-Economics of Incentives, Contracts and the Firm (optional)
-Economics of the European Union (optional)
-Economics of Transition (optional)
-Environmental Economics (optional)
-Estimation and Inference in Econometrics (optional)
-Game Theory and Applications (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-International Finance (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-International Trade (optional)
-Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour (optional)
-Mathematical Methods (optional)
-Microeconometrics
-Microeconomics (optional)
-Monetary Economics
-Panel Data Methods (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Theory of Industrial Organisation (optional)
-Time Series Econometrics (optional)
-Topics in Financial Economics (optional)

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The Master of International Development engages students with the contemporary challenges of addressing poverty and inequality globally through an emphasis on empirical evidence, real-world case studies, and debates. Read more
The Master of International Development engages students with the contemporary challenges of addressing poverty and inequality globally through an emphasis on empirical evidence, real-world case studies, and debates.

You will develop the knowledge and skills to approach practical and policy challenges in a wide range of contexts by drawing on expertise from development geographers, political scientists, resource economists and development practitioners.
The Politics and Development specialisation
Politics and Development (co-ordinated by the School of Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts) uses social theory to analyse and interpret the geo-political dimensions of development. This specialisation provides students with an understanding of the key conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding development. It considers the changing role of states, markets, firms, institutions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the process of negotiating and implementing development policy. This specialisation also introduces students to a range of approaches and frameworks employed by policymakers and practitioners in designing, implementing, and evaluating development policy.
You will explore, for example, debates regarding the role of gender in development; the origin and impact of 'good governance' agendas; the politics of aid programming and foreign policy; the historical and contemporary relationship between security and development, particularly in Africa; and the development dimensions of natural resource governance.

Key features

Specialisations are unique and provide students with both focus and flexibility.
Students will be equipped with analytical and practical skills to engage critically in development policy, research and practice.
Interdisciplinary focus enables a richer learning experience and an appreciation of different disciplinary perspectives - valued by employers.

Career opportunities

The Master of International Development enables you to build a diverse and rewarding career path in local and international development, from field based roles to research and policy within education and government.

Prospective employers include aid and development agencies, government departments, non-government organisations, and international institutions such as the United Nations.

Each of the specialisations are also pathways to Higher Degree by Research and an academic career in international development.

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MSc Political Economy of Emerging Markets programme offers a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on the political economy of emerging markets, especially national development strategies and the underlying politics and institutions. Read more
The MSc Political Economy of Emerging Markets programme offers a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on the political economy of emerging markets, especially national development strategies and the underlying politics and institutions. Subjects covered include development theory, political economy, geography, and management Students may also focus on particular countries and regions.

Key benefits

- The programme offers a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on the political economy of “emerging markets” with particular emphasis on national development strategies, policies, and institutions.

- As an interdisciplinary programme, this MSc enables students to study the political economy of emerging markets from a variety of perspectives.

- Students may take a wide range of optional taught modules drawing on King’s college-wide expertise with particular emphasis on King’s Global Institutes.

- We accept students from a wide range of academic backgrounds and mid-career professionals.

- The unrivalled location in the heart of London brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities and wide-ranging access to library and archival resources.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/political-economy-of-emerging-markets-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme provides high-quality post-graduate teaching and research training in the analysis of emerging economies. It offers a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on rising economic powers with a particular focus on national development strategies, economic and political institutions, and the political processes that influence economic reforms. Based at King’s International Development Institute, it draws on social scientific expertise located across other departments in the Schools of Social Sciences & Public Policy and Arts & Humanities as well as King’s Global Institutes.

The programme critically assesses economic development theory to ask whether these countries offer a new model or models of development. Our main thrust is examining the strategies that emerging economies have adopted to promote development. This includes asking how sustainable or enduring these new strategies are, how emerging markets solve difficult problems of promoting growth over the longer term, including development and diffusion of technology, managing trade and financial flows, balancing the role of the state and the market, and dealing with problems of institutional underdevelopment and weak systems of law and accountability.

- Course purpose -

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the large development sector in the UK, other OECD countries and in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

- Course format and assessment -

The programme consists of 180 credits: a 60-credit dissertation; 60 credits of taught core modules; and up to 60 credits of optional modules from a list taught by affiliated faculties and from complementary programmes. The majority of International Development Institute modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay; other optional modules may differ. The dissertation module is assessed by a 10-12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and other OECD countries and also in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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