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Masters Degrees (Political Culture)

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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Sophisticated politics involves communication, strategy and manipulation of the political agenda. This programme engages you in the practical issues of political delivery. Read more
Sophisticated politics involves communication, strategy and manipulation of the political agenda.

This programme engages you in the practical issues of political delivery. The areas of political communication, political leadership, strategy, crisis management, political branding, and public relations are all the leading vocational aspects of a developed academic understanding of politics and international relations. It is an area of growing importance that distinguishes our graduates as policy-relevant, engaged thinkers in the political arena.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/59/political-strategy-and-communication

Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent bringing together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration and the political economy and legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School, our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly both to the academic as well as to the social experience at BSIS. The value-added of a location in Brussels is the opportunity to expose students of international issues to the working of major international organisations such as the EU and NATO and the many international and non-governmental organisations based in Brussels. Students have the added opportunity of undertaking an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

The MA in Political Strategy and Communication allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Political Strategy and Communication in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; Human Rights Law, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'Political Strategy and Communication with Human Rights Law'.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide you with a research-active teaching environment which provides a good grounding in the study of social science in general, in political strategy, and in the communication of political positions in particular

- offer you a critical perspective of the interplay between international relations and European politics as they relate to the process of creating a strategy for dealing with political issues, and communicating effectively the issues and positions on the basis of that strategy, in order to influence outcomes at the European and national levels

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of political strategy in particular

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of major theoretical approaches to policymaking and policy analysis, the historical development of the contemporary European policy landscape, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field, with particular emphasis on the manner in which policies, positions, perspectives, and attitudes are communicated

- ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for an advanced assessment of contemporary problems in European politics, society, and economy, and their solutions

- develop your general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills).

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its three core research groups: Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Comparative Politics; and Political and Social Thought. We also host four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Global Europe Centre (GEC), the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT), and the Centre for Federal Studies (CFS).

All members of staff can supervise theses leading to research degrees. We encourage potential research students to refer to our postgraduate research handbook (pdf) for detailed information (http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/postgraduates/research-programmes/pgrhandbook.pdf).

In 2011, the University successfully applied for ESRC recognition as a provider of doctoral training in political science and international studies (and other areas of the social sciences) as part of a consortium. As a result, we are now part of the South East ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, making us one of the key training outlets in our subject in the UK.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MA provides students with key analytical skills to study the ethical dimensions of public policy. The programme, drawing on three areas of excellence at UCL, is a unique mix of politics, law and philosophy, centred on the normative evaluation of public policy at both the domestic and international levels. Read more
This MA provides students with key analytical skills to study the ethical dimensions of public policy. The programme, drawing on three areas of excellence at UCL, is a unique mix of politics, law and philosophy, centred on the normative evaluation of public policy at both the domestic and international levels.

Degree information

The programme explores the moral quality of the decisions citizens and professionals take, and the justice of the legal and political structures within which they operate. Students develop the ability to analyse important modern political theories, and justify their position on issues concerning the relationship between politics, law and society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Meanings of Liberty: Applied Methods in Political Theory (30)
-Seminars in Political Theory, Colloquium in Legal Philosophy and Peer Assisted Learning Sessions (30)

Optional modules - students choose modules worth a total of 45 credits from the list below (the others remain available as options).
-Contemporary Political Philosophy I: Authority, Obligation & Democracy (15)
-Contemporary Political Philosophy II: Social Justice and Equality (15)
-Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
-Global Ethics (15)
-Jeremy Bentham and the Utilitarian Tradition I and II (30)
-Jeremy Bentham and the Utilitarian Tradition I (15)
-Jurisprudence and Legal Theory I & II (30)
-Jurispudence and Legal Theory I (15)
-The Ethics of Poverty (15)
-Public Ethics (15)
-Theoretical Foundations of Human Rights (15)
-The Ethics of Counterterrorism (15)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching for all modules takes the form of seminars where time is dedicated both to introducing knowledge and materials, and allowing students to test their understanding, knowledge and evaluative skills, through discussion, criticism and debate. Assessment is primarily through long essays, coursework and the dissertation.

Careers

This MA provides an excellent foundation for further research in political theory, or a wide variety of careers in this field.

First destinations of recent graduates include:
-UK Parliament: Researcher for MP
-Nacro: Resettlement Plus Helpline Information Officer
-Medway Council: Political Assistant
-English Speaking Union: Publicity Officer
-London Sustainable Business Forum: Research
-Vault Europe: Business Journalist
-Centre Forum: Research Intern
-Stephen Rimmer and Co Solicitors: Trainee Solicitor
-Legal & Constituency Ltd: Underwriter
-City University: Graduate Diploma in Law

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Journalist, BBC
-Political Analyst, DeHavilland
-Policy Adviser, HM Treasury
-Politician, The Labour Party
-DPhil Politics, University of Oxford

Employability
Students of the Legal and Political Theory MA acquire advanced analytical transferable skills and exposure to cutting-edge legal and philosophical work - problem-solving, logical skills - combined with deep understanding of challenges of the contemporary world. As a result our students have an excellent record of employability in leading professions - law, consultancy, politics, journalism and academic careers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of legal and political theory.

Weekly interactive seminars offer students an unrivalled opportunity to meet and engage with some of the leading figures in the field.

The Legal and Political Theory MA benefits from the interdisciplinary research culture of the School of Public Policy, as well as from the participation of UCL Philosophy and UCL Laws.

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Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication. Read more

Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication.

Core modules will introduce you to political communication in established and emerging democracies worldwide, exploring the ethics and power dynamics at play. You’ll ask questions around media freedom, the responsibilities of journalists, ‘spin doctors’, the impact of emerging technologies and whether elections really are decided on TV.

You’ll also tailor the programme to suit your personal and career interests, choosing from optional modules on topics such as digital media, PR and the role of the media in democratisation. Supported by our Media Industries Research Centre, leading researchers and experienced practitioners, you’ll be well equipped for a career in this challenging field.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study two core modules that cover the foundations of the programme, exploring the role of communications in contemporary politics.

You’ll look at different models of contemporary democracy and compare the relations between political actors, the media and citizens. From there you’ll move onto recent innovations sparked by cultural, technological and political change. With this in mind, you’ll then design a political campaign that incorporates some of these developments.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments also take different forms so you can develop diverse skills. These are likely to include essays and exams as well as group presentations, projects and reports, as well as campaign analyses and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme isn’t a practical training course, but it does give you an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of political communication – a sector which is constantly growing.

Our graduates have entered a wide range of related careers in political journalism, government communications, communications analysis and advisory roles for political parties. Others have gone on to work for international organisations and pressure groups.

You’ll also be prepared to continue with further research at PhD level and pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/. Read more
This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/

These come from current work in politics, political science and media studies, and also from political sociology, cultural theory and journalism. The curriculum covers political communication, from the national and international down to the local and personal, from governments and parties to NGOs and local activist groups. It engages with cultural, alternative and digital, interactive communication as well as traditional mass media.

This dynamic programme, first and foremost, offers critical engagement. It asks difficult questions about politics, economic policy, society and the media. Taking this course will not just give you an understanding of the the forms and impacts of political communications. It will also help you contextualise that knowledge in relation to the structures, institutions and actors that are at the heart of politics and media.

This course is broadly conceptual in focus, but also offers several practical, applied options as well as skills-based components. All students take a research skills course and are supervised through a dissertation with a research component. There are options, such as Campaign Skills, Social Media Campaigning, Digital News Writing and Media Law, which are entirely practice-based and taught by professionals in the field. There are also several speaker series running each year with guests from the worlds of politics, journalism, business and campaigning coming to talk.

Studying in London

Goldsmiths’ London location means that students remain in close proximity to a range of national and international political institutions, political parties, interest groups and media centres.

The MA also attracts a stimulating combination of recent graduates and experienced professionals, as well as a mix of UK and international students from across Continental Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Aeron Davis.

The programme’s core curriculum will address a range of contemporary issues, debates and theory in political communication, including work on:

-comparative media systems
-theories of communication and democratisation
-global media, international governance and transnational communication
-economic, financial and industrial policy
-digital media and online politics
-media sociology and news production
-political parties, party ideologies and party-member dynamics
-public relations, political marketing and spin
-government communication systems and media management
-media audiences, effects and agenda-setting
-public opinion and public sphere debates
-interest groups, social movements and alternative media
-advocacy, civil society and public affairs
-new technologies and the information society
-citizenship and public engagement
-the policy process and government decision-making
-politics and culture
-social theories of power, culture and communications

Theory is usually applied to a number of case study areas on, for example: conflict and war; elections; social and environmental debates; foreign affairs; the economy, finance and business; crime and disorder. Theory and discussion is always related to current events and debates.

Structure

The MA in Political Communications is built up of modules that must count up to 180 credits. The programme comprises:

Two core modules taught in the Department of Media and Communications (60 credits in total)
A research skills module
60 credits' worth of modules chosen from the Department of Politics or Department of Media and Communications. These can be a combination of 30 and 15 credit modules
Up to 30 of the 60 credits of options may be chosen from the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

On completing the programme you'll come out with a mixture of:

-field expertise
-new analytical skills
-an understanding of research methods
-practical, applied knowledge

Careers

The programme caters to both recent graduates and those with experience who are looking for career change or advancement. Recent graduates have found (re)employment in:

-political journalism,
-olitical parties
-government institutions
-interest groups
-international bodies

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more
This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture.

Graduates of this programme will have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

Key Benefits

- Develop an understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.

- Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.

- Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.

- Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-culture-and-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The central focus of the programme is the interrelatedness of technology and culture in contemporary society. The principle educational aims are to develop and enhance participants’ awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

- The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
- The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically as these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
- The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
- How digital technologies are shaping society more generally, e.g. social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
- The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
- The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

- Course purpose -

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

- Course format and assessment -

The programme consists of a compulsory core module (40 credits), optional modules (which consider aspects of the core module in greater detail) to the value of 80 credits, and a supervised research project (dissertation worth 60 credits). The taught core and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination. One of the optional modules offered is an internship (20 credits) in an organisation relevant to digital culture.

Career Prospects:

Advanced research degree; cultural heritage institutions - libraries, archives, museums, galleries - either as early stage training or as professional development; commercial organisations interested in the social and organisational impact of technology.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This programme offers a combined competency in economics and politics, enriched with the study of law. Read more
This programme offers a combined competency in economics and politics, enriched with the study of law. Additionally, it allows for a specialisation in a subfield such as development, environmental policy, migration, conflict and security, political strategy and European public policy, and so equips you with cutting-edge qualifications.

The exposure you are given to policy practice at the international institutions based in Brussels - together with high-quality education - prepares you for a challenging and fulfilling career in international and domestic public policy, diplomacy, non-governmental organisations, as well as in the private sector.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/58/international-political-economy

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussels School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent. We bring together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration, the political economy and the legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School: our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly to the academic and social experience at BSIS. Being located in Brussels allows us to expose students to the working of major international organisations, such as the EU and NATO, and to the many international and non-governmental organisations based here. Students also have the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of these organisations.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The MA in International Political Economy allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS (http://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/index.html). Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Political Economy in the context of International Relations; Conflict and Security; International Law and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an MA degree in, for example, 'International Political Economy with International Law'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a research-active teaching environment which gives you a good grounding in the study of study of social science in general and international political economy (IPE) in particular

- offer a critical perspective of the interplay between structures and actors in the global economy, political systems and processes, individuals and the institutions of civil society

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of methodologies for the study of social science in general, and in the application of those understandings to the study of international political economy in particular

- ensure that you acquire a solid understanding of major theoretical approaches to international political economy, the historical development of the contemporary global economy, and the application of theoretical and historical knowledge to the analysis and understanding of contemporary issues and cases in the field

- ensure that you acquire the necessary skills for advanced assessment of contemporary problems in IPE and their solutions

- develop you general research skills and personal skills (transferable skills).

Research areas

Our research interests span a broad spectrum of the discipline, with particular strengths in the fields of conflict analysis and resolution, political theory and European politics. The strength of the School’s research culture is reflected in the numerous books and articles published and in the existence of its three core research groups: Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Comparative Politics; and Political and Social Thought. We also host four University-recognised research centres: the Conflict Analysis Research Centre (CARC), the Global Europe Centre (GEC), the Centre for Critical Thought (CCT), and the Centre for Federal Studies (CFS).

All members of staff can supervise theses leading to research degrees. We encourage potential research students to refer to our postgraduate research handbook (pdf) for detailed information.

In 2011, the University successfully applied for ESRC recognition as a provider of doctoral training in political science and international studies (and other areas of the social sciences) as part of a consortium. As a result, we are now part of the South East ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, making us one of the key training outlets in our subject in the UK.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This Master's degree in politics explores pressing contemporary issues using political theory and sociology. Our focus is on the nature and workings of political power and authority and we will consider the relationships between states and societies and the place of politics and power in everyday life. Read more
This Master's degree in politics explores pressing contemporary issues using political theory and sociology. Our focus is on the nature and workings of political power and authority and we will consider the relationships between states and societies and the place of politics and power in everyday life. As well as reading key classical texts of political theory and sociological analysis, we also analyse real-world contemporary problems and address fundamental questions of political power and social order. Topics studied include sovereignty, territory and state building, property and law, the legitimacy of political authority, democracy, violence and pluralism. As well as choosing option modules from the Department of Politics, you can select options from the Department of Psychosocial Studies and the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, thus offering you access to historical and psychosocial approaches to theory, politics and the social sciences.

The core modules will give you the theoretical framework and confidence to explore and deepen your knowledge in the subjects you are most interested in. You will examine political power, how it originates and operates at an individual, social and political level, its relationship to sovereignty and the state, and how it intersects with issues such as justice and human rights, civil identity, democracy and economics. You will be equipped with the conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study politics at postgraduate level.

You can then choose 2 option modules from a wide variety of topics including international security, nationalism and religion, war and conflict, 'race', racism and postcolonial studies, psychoanalysis, and gender and sexuality. You can take options from the Department of Politics or from the Department of Psychosocial Studies and the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology. You will also learn research techniques that will enable you to specialise and undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation or a research portfolio on the subject that interests you most.

Our Department of Politics is a lively and distinguished centre of interdisciplinary research, with a strong reputation for the quality of our teaching. Some of the world’s most famous libraries are on our doorstep in Bloomsbury, central London, and you can walk down to Whitehall, where Parliament and the UK’s most influential and important think-tanks and centres of political research and analysis are located.

Our departmental building was once a key location for members of the Bloomsbury Group, so you could be studying in rooms that have hosted distinguished visitors, including T. S. Eliot, George Bernard Shaw and Maynard Keynes.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

This Master's degree will enable you to develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of the main ideas and current trends and directions in social and political theory.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our location in central London puts us at the heart of the UK’s political life and at the centre of academic London. You can walk down to Parliament and Whitehall, while Bloomsbury contains some of the world’s most famous libraries and centres of research.
You can take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including Senate House Library, which is right next door to Birkbeck, the British Library, which is 5 minutes’ walk away, and the British Library of Political and Economic Science at the London School of Economics, which is walkable from Birkbeck.
Our Department of Politics was ranked 12th in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) results and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.
The department organises a lively programme of seminars and conferences and is home to affiliated research centres, such as the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life, which run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, publishing and delivering stimulating teaching in a wide range of political topics including civil society and the state, public policy, development, gender, international security and terrorism, and social and political theory, among others.
Birkbeck Library has a large politics collection, including the major specialist journals, and provides you with access to an extensive range of online materials.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Politics at Birkbeck was ranked 17th in the UK.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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The MA Modern History at Aberystwyth offers you the opportunity to study modern British, continental European, American and/or world history from the early 19th century to the present with a team of leading specialists in their fields. Read more

About the course

The MA Modern History at Aberystwyth offers you the opportunity to study modern British, continental European, American and/or world history from the early 19th century to the present with a team of leading specialists in their fields. The course embraces a range of perspectives including political, diplomatic, social, cultural and media history, and also provides you with intensive training in research skills and methods for modern history, including the opportunity to develop or enhance your knowledge of a European language.

Why study MA Modern History at Aberystwyth University?

Study just five minutes away from one of five UK copyright libraries, the National Library of Wales

History has been taught in Aberystwyth since 1872, making our department the oldest in Wales and one of the foremost in Britain

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work

Benefit from small group teaching

Opportunity to undertake a work placement as part of this course with an institution that engages on a daily basis with history

Engage with a variety of paradigms, perspectives, methodologies, sources and interdisciplinary approaches to history

Develop your own research interests in the field of modern history (18th 19th, 20th centuries including the contemporary period) aided by the longstanding expertise of the Department of History and Welsh History

A wide variety of option modules are available as part of this course and staff expertise within the Department is varied and expansive

Course structure and content

When studied full-time, the first two semesters consist of six 20 credit modules. Students will take a core module that addresses the concept of political culture in the modern era and a research training module - Research Methods and Professional Skills in History.

Students will then take a further four optional modules. Option modules are varied and allow students to direct their study into a diverse range of topics. Students will also be able to undertake additional research training modules tailored to their own particular research interests (such as the use of public opinion data or private correspondence, visual and sound media, newspapers and broadcast sources, and oral history). Students on this course will also have the opportunity to study a modern European language at either beginners or advanced level.

In the final semester, students complete their MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

Core modules:

Dissertation *
Political Culture in Modern Britain, Europe and the Usa
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History

Optional modules:

Class and Community in Wales 1850 - 1939
Concepts and Sources in Heritage Studies
Heritage Organisations and the Presentation of the Past
Information and Society
Landownership and Society in Wales
Media History: An Introduction
Political Power and the Media in Britain
Politics and Culture of the Cold War in Southeast Asia
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (1120)
Science, Place and Victorian Culture
Sources for Postgraduate Research in the Modern Humanities and Social Sciences
The American Public, Washington and the World
The European Powers in the Age of World Wars
The Georgian Spa and Seaside Resort
The Making of Modern Wales
Understanding the Cold War
Working with History

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 10 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment for this course is largely essay based, with some optional modules also incorporating report writing and oral assessment.

The Research Methods and Professional Skills in History module will be assessed via an oral assessment of MA conference presentation, an assessed outline of an MA conference presentation, a critical assessment of a departmental research seminar, and a dissertation research proposal.

Successful submission of the MA dissertation in the final semester leads to the award of an MA.

Skills

This course will empower you to:

• Increase your critical faculties
• Develop study and research skills
• Develop strong writing and analytical skills as well as the capacity to work independently
• Develop your abilities in structuring and communicating complex ideas clearly, accurately, and authoritatively
• Interrogate historical practices at an advanced level
• Develop practical skills and hands-on experience in researching Modern History

Careers

Graduates from the Department of History and Welsh History at Aberystwyth University have expansive and varied careers.

Examples of pathways our previous graduates have taken include:

• Archivists
• Publishers
• Local and national politics
• Tourism
• Heritage administration
• Public administration
• Real Estate Development
• Law
• Civil Service
• Journalism
• Broadcast media
• Armed Forces
• Education
• Management
• Accountancy
• Entrepreneurs
• Academia/further study

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You will undertake advanced studies in political sociological analysis and this programme is ideal preparation for a research degree. Read more

You will undertake advanced studies in political sociological analysis and this programme is ideal preparation for a research degree. It assumes an undergraduate training in sociology and/or political science, or a cognate discipline, or relevant professional experience such as journalism.

Course detail

The programme is distinctive in its focus upon social and political movements, protest, and the less conventional and institutionalised forms of political action and participation, environmental politics and globalisation, but students with interests in other areas of more conventional and institutionalised politics are well catered for.

You will gain an understanding of the interaction and interdependence among social and political institutions, processes and action, especially collective action. The programme begins with a focus upon protest and social movements, and in the second term you may choose to focus upon either or both of environmental politics and / or processes of global social change and questions of political order. There is a wide range of optional modules from which to choose, and at the end of the programme, you should have a much enhanced understanding of processes of social and political change and the theoretical and methodological approaches to their interpretation and study.

Purpose

Depending upon your choice of option modules, the programme will also give you:

  • An understanding of the theoretical problems of political sociological inquiry and their relationship to research practices
  • Knowledge of the methodological procedures used to investigate a wide range of practical and substantive issues
  • Skills in practical research-related tasks
  • Awareness of the range of secondary data available and the ability to evaluate its utility for your research
  • The opportunity to develop transferable employment-related skills through group work, presentations and the use of information technologies
  • An enhanced capacity to undertake independent research.

The programme is also designed to enhance your professional development. We place considerable emphasis on the socialisation of graduate students into a research community. This is reflected in our pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning. There is less didactic teaching and more emphasis on structured seminars with greater participation from students. Class sizes are generally much smaller than at undergraduate level and you will be taught by established members of the academic staff, many of whom are internationally recognized leaders in their particular fields of inquiry. This facilitates close working relationships between staff and students. You will also be encouraged to participate in the staff/graduate seminar which allows MA and research students the opportunity to become more fully involved in a professional research culture, and to meet visiting speakers from many universities in Britain and beyond.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Social and political movements
  • Environmental politics 
  • Social and political change / globalisation
  • Research design and data collection
  • Using secondary and qualitative data

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/134/political-sociology#structure

Career options

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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