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Masters Degrees (Political Communication)

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The MA Political Communication will deepen your understanding of political communication in national and international contexts and, where relevant, your skills in this field. Read more
The MA Political Communication will deepen your understanding of political communication in national and international contexts and, where relevant, your skills in this field.

You will:

• Explore the political content of the mass media
• Deepen academic and practical understanding of the actors and agencies involved in the production of political news and information
• Examine the impact of media coverage of politics on audiences
• Explore the interaction between media systems and political systems including government media policy, censorship, regulation and ownership
• Be equipped with the research and study skills necessary to carry out project-based professional and academic research
• Enhance academic skills and knowledge in preparation for further academic study
• Develop basic skills in political communications practice

The course explores the rapidly evolving role of communication in political life, both nationally and internationally, and examines how changes such as the increasing importance of new online and social media platforms, image-based politics, and the globalisation of media are shaping politics.

MA Political Communication looks at the influence of actors in the political communications process, including politicians, journalists and citizens by drawing on cutting edge research and case studies.

This course is suitable for those interested in an advanced academic study of political communication or a career in political communication, as well as those already working in political communication, political parties, government agencies and bodies, statutory and voluntary organisations and the mass media.

It is also suitable for people looking to undertake PhD research in political communication.

Distinctive features

Studying MA Political Communication will increase your ability to undertake rigorous analytical work, be capable of producing well researched essays, assignments and dissertations to deadline, and you will have refined and improved your practical political communications skills.

Structure

This is a year-long Master’s course combining core and optional modules.

Throughout the Autumn and Spring semesters, robust method training will be provided in order to enhance your research skills that will be assessed in your Masters dissertation.

As part of a core Autumn module, you be introduced to the practice of political communication by placing the profession into its societal and media contexts. The dual emphasis on practical matters and their underpinning theory and ethics have been designed to help you develop an appreciation of how political communication practitioners interact with the media and the wider community, and how they have become a significant factor in shaping world events.

Please visit the website to see which modules are taught on this course:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/political-communication-ma

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and seminars, which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career prospects

Graduates of this course are employed in a range of occupations, such as campaign and press officers, researchers for political parties and institutions, business management leaders, political consultants, international conference and seminar coordinators and PR officers.

Several graduates have also undertaken PhDs in Political Communication.

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This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication. Read more
This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication.

Why this programme

-If you want to work as a researcher, develop academic research skills or embark on a PhD in political communication and related subjects, this programme is designed for you.
-The programme draws on very strong staff expertise in political communication, as well as recognised strength on comparative politics and international relations.
-Through the Political Communication seminars you can benefit from a truly unique opportunity to meet with top practitioners in the profession to informally discuss the practical aspects of political communication as well as career options.
-The programme is an excellent preparation for doctoral work, and is eligible for the ESRC 1+3 scheme.
-Research methods courses are delivered through the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School. They are taught by staff with specialist expertise in quantitative and qualitative research methods.
-The programme covers the same topics as the MSc in Political Communication but has been tailored to provide appropriate training for those who are intending to pursue doctoral studies or research-intensive careers.

Programme structure

You will take 4 core and 2 optional courses. You will also write a dissertation on a political communication topic of your choice, under the guidance of personal supervision by a specialist member of staff.

You will attend lectures, seminars and tutorials and take part in project work and case studies.

Core courses
-Media and democracy
-Political institutions and communication
-Qualitative research methods
-Social science statistics 1

Optional courses
-Challenges in international politics
-China's international politics
-Comparative public opinion
-EU in international politics and development
-Human rights and global politics
-Humanitarian intervention
-Institutions and policies of the European Union
-Internet and civil society
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union
-Media, war and security
-Media, communications and journalism: Criticism and theory

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in research organisations such as think-tanks; public relations and communications in government agencies, political parties, charities and international organisations; politics and political consultancy; political journalism; media policy makers; and higher education, including doctoral studies.

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This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication. Read more
This ESRC-recognised research-training programme gives you a broad and rigorous grounding in the study and methodologies of political communication.

Why this programme

◾If you want to work as a researcher, develop academic research skills or embark on a PhD in political communication and related subjects, this programme is designed for you.
◾The programme draws on very strong staff expertise in political communication, as well as recognised strength on comparative politics and international relations.
◾Through the Political Communication seminars you can benefit from a truly unique opportunity to meet with top practitioners in the profession to informally discuss the practical aspects of political communication as well as career options.
◾The programme is an excellent preparation for doctoral work, and is eligible for the ESRC 1+3 scheme.
◾Research methods courses are are taught by staff with specialist expertise in quantitative and qualitative research methods.
◾The programme covers the same topics as the MSc in Political Communication but has been tailored to provide appropriate training for those who are intending to pursue doctoral studies or research-intensive careers.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course. You will also write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a specialist member of staff.

Core courses
◾Media and democracy
◾Political institutions and communication
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design.

Optional courses
◾China's international politics
◾Chinese politics and society
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Critical perspectives on human rights
◾Environmental problems in China
◾European Union in international politics and development
◾Generalised linear models
◾Global security: Theories and concepts
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention
◾International organisations
◾International relations and development
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾International security and strategic thought
◾Introduction to social theory for researchers
◾Internet and civil society
◾Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe
◾Media, security and war
◾Researching audiences and the media.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in research organisations such as think-tanks; public relations and communications in government agencies, political parties, charities and international organisations; politics and political consultancy; political journalism; media policy makers; and higher education, including doctoral studies.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication. Read more

Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication.

Core modules will introduce you to political communication in established and emerging democracies worldwide, exploring the ethics and power dynamics at play. You’ll ask questions around media freedom, the responsibilities of journalists, ‘spin doctors’, the impact of emerging technologies and whether elections really are decided on TV.

You’ll also tailor the programme to suit your personal and career interests, choosing from optional modules on topics such as digital media, PR and the role of the media in democratisation. Supported by our Media Industries Research Centre, leading researchers and experienced practitioners, you’ll be well equipped for a career in this challenging field.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study two core modules that cover the foundations of the programme, exploring the role of communications in contemporary politics.

You’ll look at different models of contemporary democracy and compare the relations between political actors, the media and citizens. From there you’ll move onto recent innovations sparked by cultural, technological and political change. With this in mind, you’ll then design a political campaign that incorporates some of these developments.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments also take different forms so you can develop diverse skills. These are likely to include essays and exams as well as group presentations, projects and reports, as well as campaign analyses and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme isn’t a practical training course, but it does give you an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of political communication – a sector which is constantly growing.

Our graduates have entered a wide range of related careers in political journalism, government communications, communications analysis and advisory roles for political parties. Others have gone on to work for international organisations and pressure groups.

You’ll also be prepared to continue with further research at PhD level and pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This course offers a mix of academic and practical study that will give you theoretical insight and hands-on experience of political communication. Read more

About the course

This course offers a mix of academic and practical study that will give you theoretical insight and hands-on experience of political communication. You’ll explore a range of issues related to the media and its relationship with political and public institutions within regional, national and international contexts. You’ll gain hands-on experience of the communication of politics and an insight into the workings of political journalism. This course is great grounding for a career in public relations, political organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

Your career

A masters from Sheffield is the mark of someone who thinks differently. Graduates from our applied courses are creative, disciplined journalists.

They’re working in radio and television, newspapers and magazines, print and online, across the UK and internationally.

The BBC, Guardian, Daily Mail, Channel 4, Sky and Wall Street Journal all employ Sheffield journalists.

About us

Our teaching staff are professionals who have worked at the highest level in newspaper, magazine, radio, television and online journalism. This is a great place to learn practical skills. Three quarters of our research is rated world-leading or internationally excellent. The discussion of ideas about journalism, its past, present and future, is part of all our courses.

We have strong links with the industry. We send our masters students on a three-day field trip to London, visiting national news organisations for briefings on current developments with senior editors and meeting politicians and political journalists.

Guests from the media industries, regulators, campaigning groups and research institutes give lectures in the department. Broadcast editors run radio and television newsdays, and print and online production editors bring their expertise to newspaper, web and magazine exercises.

Work experience

If you’re taking one of our applied courses, we encourage you to go on a work placement of one to three weeks during vacation time. Employers regularly notify us as opportunities come up and we have a dedicated work placement administrator to help you find a placement that’s right for you. Our students often find a work placement leads to a job after graduation.

Professional accreditation

All our applied postgraduate courses are accredited by the main professional bodies representing the media industries: the National Council for the Training of Journalists, the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and the Professional Publishers Association. Our International Political Communication and Global Journalism programmes are not accredited and have limited practical content.

Real-world learning environment

The University has invested £3 million in a superb new home for the department in 2014, with four large newsrooms designed to simulate a real working environment. The print newsroom is equipped with 30 PCs, all of which have access to the latest print production software such as Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. You’ll also have access to a Press Association newsfeed, telephones, daily newspapers and Sky TV.

The broadcast newsroom is equipped with industry-standard software for radio production. We have a state-of-the-art radio studio and digital audio recorders. Students on the applied MA courses learn how to create packages, put together live news bulletins, shoot professional news pieces on HD TV cameras, and use Apple Final Cut X to cut rushes together. They acquire the skills needed to prepare text, audio and video content for publication online. These degrees also show how to use audio recorders, video and stills cameras to gather content. In the web newsroom, students use audio, video and image editing software to create their own sites.

Studentships

There are a limited number of external bursaries for UK students on the Print, Magazine and Broadcast courses, from the AHRC, Scott Trust and Journalism Diversity Fund. Please see our web pages for details.

Core modules

Political Communication: journalism and democracy; Global Issues in Political Communication; Communicating with the Media; Writing for the Media; Research Methods; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

A range including Global Journalism; Media and Public Communication in Japan; Media, State and Society in China; Censorship and the Media; Ethics and Regulation; The Media in Europe and its Neighbouring States; News and Civil Society; Journalism Politics and Public Debate; Journalism in Britain.

Teaching and assessment

We teach through lectures, seminars, workshops and research exercises. You’re assessed by essays, examinations and a dissertation.

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Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. Read more
Communication lies at the heart of politics and is essential to understanding it in contemporary media saturated countries. This course focuses on political communication in a global context, looking at the development of message production, transmission, and reception across nations as well as key theories, themes and controversies.

In a multi-country perspective, it examines the strategies used by political advocates to build and maintain support, especially during election campaigns, and analyses the relationships between key political actors, media actors and citizens, as well as exploring the wider issues of influence and representation. The course draws on the enduring strength of the School’s research specialism in political communication and media studies.

Core study areas include global communications, marketing politics, politics of representation, textual analysis research techniques, production and reception analysis, and a dissertation.

Optional study areas include media and modernity, communication and citizenship, sex industries, global communications, media, nations and nationalisms, digital cultures, digital economies, cultural memory and the heritage industries.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Global Communications
- Marketing Politics
- Politics of Representation
- Textual Analysis Research Techniques
- Production and Reception Analysis
- Dissertation

Optional Modules:
A selection of the following options will be available:
- Media and Modernity
- Communication and Citizenship
- Sex Industries
- Global Communications
- Popular Music and Modern Times
- Media, Nations and Nationalisms
- Digital Cultures
- Digital Economies
- Cultural Memory and the Heritage Industries

Assessment

Coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

Careers and further study

The degree is designed to enhance specialist knowledge and methodological expertise of relevance to professionals working in communications, to students interested in global political communication and to those wishing to progress to a research degree in these fields.

Why choose social sciences at Loughborough?

The Department of Social Sciences has long been recognised as an international centre of academic excellence and for its cutting-edge interdisciplinary work.

This recognition of excellence has been a major factor in enabling the Department to recruit a lively community of postgraduate students that currently numbers around 100.

In the Department of Social Sciences we offer a rich variety of taught postgraduate masters. The courses are delivered by an internationally renowned interdisciplinary team, through the use of contemporary case studies and research-informed applied teaching and learning.

The courses provide training in digital culture, media, communications, sociological and anthropological, theory, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods

- Research
All of our academic staff are active researchers, working within and across the following disciplinary boundaries – Communication and Media Studies, Criminology, Social Policy, Social Psychology, and Sociology.

Loughborough is home to the most world-leading, original and internationally excellent research in communication, media studies, sociology, and social psychology. Our research has excellent impact, with staff working with a wide range of public and third sector bodies (e.g., BBC Trust, the Metropolitan Police, the Electoral Commission, the College of Mediators, UK Drug Policy Commission, Department of Health). Our social policy and criminology research also has world-leading impact, particularly in services for children and minimum income standards.

- Career prospects
Our programmes prepare our graduates for the real world of the television industry, marketing, academia, publishing, plus many more industries. They go on to work for companies and organisations such as China Development Research Foundation, Elsevier Ltd, Image Line Communication, Institute of Psychiatry, Metropolitan Police Service, Oxfam and X-Pert Med GmbH.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/social-sciences/global-political-communication/

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This course is designed to provide an advanced understanding of the issues and debates surrounding political communication in the twenty first century. Read more
This course is designed to provide an advanced understanding of the issues and debates surrounding political communication in the twenty first century. The units are conceptually led, combining discussions of theory with an exploration of current and best practice in society. All units will offer an international perspective and provide insights into the latest developments in political communication research and practice and the impact of recent technological innovations.

Our academic team have wide ranging expertise, grounded in years of research within fields such as political psychology, voter behaviour, international relations and political campaigning. The team have cultivated links with research institutions and universities across the globe, from Massachusetts and Prague to Bogota and Auckland. The team also enjoys extensive connections with a range of political organisations, including the UK House of Lords, the European Parliament, the Thai Chamber of Commerce, and local, national and international pressure groups, charities and communication consultancies.

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Come Study how communication shapes world politics within a high quality graduate program that focuses on elected leadership in the age of global communication. Read more
Come Study how communication shapes world politics within a high quality graduate program that focuses on elected leadership in the age of global communication. The program provides students with advanced knowledge, understanding and tools of analysis in a world characterized by growing fusion between politics and communication. Graduates are equipped to evaluate and respond to the challenges that arise from the interconnectedness between politics and communication and are prepared for careers as leading scholars, campaign managers, political analysts, diplomats, journalists or professionals in related fields.
The Political Science & Political Communication MA program extends far beyond the traditional classroom, field trips to various governmental, parliamentary and media institutions and discussion forums comprise an integral part of the program's curriculum.Students are encouraged to supplement their academic work with internships at organizations ranging from Israel's preeminent political and research institutes to communications teams to diplomatic missions.

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. Read more
Global Politics and Communication is an interdisciplinary and innovative Master’s degree programme that addresses the key challenges of globalisation from the perspective of media and communication studies, organisation research and global political economy. The programme emphasises developing your critical thinking, a necessary skill in many careers.

The specific objectives of the programme include:
-Providing you with advanced knowledge of global political economy, relationships between the media and the development of democracy, and linkages between governance, organisations and communication.
-Empowering you to assess how politics and the media are linked to the forces of globalisation.
-Equipping you with conceptual understanding and the theoretical and methodological skills needed to carry out original and relevant research on key societal issues.
-Preparing you to engage in public discussions and develop critical reasoning and argumentation skills that are equally important in academia, public organisations and the private sector.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

How do global transformations affect democratic politics? What is the role of the media in the transformation of contemporary democracies? Why do economic activities result in global and national financial crises and inequality instead of in stability and democratisation? How does governance affect organisations and communication, and how do governance and organisations structure communication and political and economic activity?

The Global Politics and Communication programme offers a cutting-edge combination of political science, communication studies and global political economy. You will apply ideas, concepts and methodologies to key societal and political issues such as the changing character of democracy, the role of organisations and governance in the globalising world, and the regulation of global finance and trade.

During the first year, you will study general theoretical and methodological courses and take part in thematic courses offered by the programme’s study orientations. You will also begin to work on your Master’s thesis. In the second year, you will deepen your knowledge on your selected study orientation or orientations by participating in thematic specialisation courses. You will also attend the Master’s seminar and write your Master’s thesis.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s degree programme on Global Politics and Communication has three study orientations:
-Governance, Organisations and Communication
-Media and Democracy
-Global Political Economy

The interplay between Governance, Organisations and Communication gives this study line its name. Governance and organisational and communication practices are increasingly global but are modified locally. The foci of this study line include the global governance of knowledge, organisational communication, the changing institutions of knowledge and communication, the digitalisation of politics and communication, and changes in media policies.

Media and Democracy exposes you to the key debates about the relationship between the media and democratic processes at a time when the future of democracy remains uncertain because of authoritarian tendencies in politics and the commercialisation of the public sphere. It focuses on such questions as how the media represent and frame conflicts and war; how new forms of political participation are challenging the traditional conduct of politics; how human rights such as freedom of expression rely on media practices; and how new digital media reconfigure public communities and extend the possibilities for civic engagement.

Global Political Economy covers multidisciplinary studies drawing on economics, sociology, and political science. It explains how social practices and institutions constitute relational, complex and open systems of production, exchange and distribution. Taking into account the widely-shared aim of sustainable global development, political economy is crucial for understanding the principal current problems such as global warming; potential financial crises; disparities in income, wealth and power; or war and peace.

You will specialise in one of these three orientations. However, you can also combine them by including courses from other orientations in your elective studies.

Programme Structure

The Master's Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication is a full-time, two-year programme. The programme fulfils the requirements of a 120 credits (ECTS, European Transfer Credit System) Master's degree in social sciences in the Faculty of Social Sciences. The programme consists of advanced studies in politics and communication, as well as other elective and compulsory studies.

Master’s Degree Programme on Global Politics and Communication: 120 credits (ECTS)

Advanced studies: 80 – 95 credits
-Theoretical studies 10-15 credits
-Methodology studies 10-15 credits
-Specialisation Studies 20-25 credits
-Master’s Seminar (10 credits) and Master’s Thesis (30 credits) 40 credits

Elective studies and other studies, including voluntary internship: 25 – 40 credits

Career Prospects

Graduates of the Discipline of Politics and Communication Studies at the University of Helsinki have gone on to work in a range of jobs as experts and consultants in Finland and internationally, in the public and the private sectors as well as in non-governmental organisations. They are mainly employed in the fields of politics, administration, the media and communication. Some graduates also continue on with academic research to pursue an academic career in universities in Finland and around the world.

Internationalization

The Global Politics and Communication programme is an international programme with students from around the world. In addition to the degree students, we receive many visiting and exchange students and scholars from Europe and further afield. In addition to providing you with a unique international learning environment, we also encourage you to participate in Erasmus and Nordplus exchange programmes for a short-term study period in Scandinavian and European universities. You will have the opportunity of doing a voluntary internship abroad with support from Erasmus.

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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