• University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"planning" AND "law"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Planning Law)

  • "planning" AND "law" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 571
Order by 
This is a course that adapts to your lifestyle - you will study via online learning, using learning materials provided by our University. Read more
This is a course that adapts to your lifestyle - you will study via online learning, using learning materials provided by our University. You will gain a sound understanding of the procedures and methods of town and country planning in the UK, and to some extent Ireland - developing an appreciation of who does what, why and how.

Our course is suitable if you are in a related profession and wish to improve your knowledge as part of your continuing professional development or, if you are a planner - including Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) members - wishing to update your knowledge on core aspects of planning practice, either for your professional development or other reasons such as returning to work.

The award is supported by the RTPI and develops qualified practitioners, who are able to meet the current skills gap in the sector. It also allows European Union planning professionals from outside the UK to qualify for membership to RTPI and to practice in the UK.

To successfully complete the course you are required to pass all six coursework assignments in a maximum of three years.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University's results for the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit, which it entered for the first time, were impressive with 37% of its research being rated world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/planninglaw_pgcert

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

As one of our graduates you can access a wide range of career options in the planning sector. This will normally include working with local and regional authorities and in the private sector aiding the property sector. Our course team have excellent contacts with industry and there are numerous opportunities for you to network and access prospective employers.

- Planning and Development Advisor
- Planning Consultant
- Real Estate Consultant

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

The award is supported by the Royal Town Planning Institute and develops qualified practitioners, who are able to meet the current skills gap in the sector. In particular the award provides an understanding of planning practice in the UK.

The course team features many academic staff who have previous experience in the sector and many who still maintain working links with local authorities and private sector consultancies. The research Centre for Urban Design and Environmental Management (CUDEM) provides an important source of relevant research materials for this postgraduate award and importantly many seminars, conferences and other networking events.

Modules

The Principles & Practice of Planning
An introduction to planning as an activity, and to the evolution of planning in the UK. It also provides an understanding of how the development management system works from the viewpoint of those involved in its operation.

Urban Design & Development
Investigate the development process and the main motivation for those who are participants in it. You will explore the importance of place and places in our everyday lives, review urban design principles and examine methodologies for analysing the qualities of existing built environments.

Spatial Planning & Regulation
Study the processes involved in the statutory spatial plan-making systems in the UK and Republic of Ireland. You will learn the administrative frameworks and respective legal systems, particularly with regard to planning and property at national, regional and local governmental level.

Professor Mohammad Dastbaz

Dean, Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology

"We aim to provide innovation in curriculum, engagement with current industry practices and standards, and to give our students the experience of working with staff whose research has national and international reputation."

Mohammad is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Arts, Environment and Technology,having joined our University in June 2011 from the University of East London. A well published researcher, with over 50 refereed conference and Journal publications, his research profile includes many funded research programmes including JISC and EU FP7 projects. Mohammad’s first degree was in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He then went on to complete a PhD in the 'Design, Development and Evaluation of Multimedia Based Learning Systems' at Kingston University. In 1989 he set up one of the UK's first multimedia PC companies, 'Systems 2000'.

Facilities

- Online Library
Global access to our University's extensive online library, plus free eBooks to support you in your study.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

- Virtual Learning Environment
A Virtual Learning Environment that's easy to use and available whenever and wherever you are.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Read less
The Master of Planning (MPlan) degree requires two years of full-time, or the equivalent in part-time, study and entails postgraduate coursework in planning and planning-related subjects, as well as a significant piece of supervised research. Read more
The Master of Planning (MPlan) degree requires two years of full-time, or the equivalent in part-time, study and entails postgraduate coursework in planning and planning-related subjects, as well as a significant piece of supervised research. There are two streams: one involving a thesis, and the other a research project. The normal admission requirement for both streams is a completed Bachelor's degree in any subject(s) relevant to planning.

A candidate's academic programme is decided at enrolment, and the research topic is determined at the end of the first year of studies. The thesis or the research project must be submitted by the end of the final year of the programme.

The MPlan is a professional qualification, and graduates are employed in local, regional and national government agencies, health boards, industry and planning consultancies in New Zealand and overseas. Some proceed to doctoral studies in preparation for employment in a university or as consultants on policy and planning.

Programme Requirements

Option A
Seven prescribed papers in planning studies with a value of 130 Points:
PLAN 411 Planning Theory
PLAN 412 Spatial Planning and Development
PLAN 435 Planning Case Study I
PLAN 438 Planning Practice
PLAN 535 Planning Case Study II
LAWS 515 Resource Management Law
One of:
LAWS 521 International Environmental Law
LAWS 540 Environmental Law
LAWS 577 Advanced Resource Management Law
One planning-related paper worth 20 Points, as approved by the Director of the Planning Programme
Thesis: PLAN 5 (90 Points)

Option B
Seven prescribed papers in planning studies with a value of 130 Points:
PLAN 411 Planning Theory
PLAN 412 Spatial Planning and Development
PLAN 435 Planning Case Study I
PLAN 438 Planning Practice
PLAN 535 Planning Case Study II
LAWS 515 Resource Management Law
One of:
LAWS 521 International Environmental Law
LAWS 540 Environmental Law
LAWS 577 Advanced Resource Management Law
Planning-related papers worth 60 Points, as approved by the Director of the Planning Programme
PLAN 590 Planning Project (50 Points)

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of either:
Seven prescribed papers in planning studies (PLAN 411, PLAN 412, PLAN 435, PLAN 438, PLAN 535, LAWS 515, and one of LAWS 521, LAWS 540, LAWS 577) with a value of 130 points, one planning-related paper worth 20 points, as approved by the Director of the Planning Programme, and a thesis (PLAN 5) with a value of 90 points.
OR
Seven prescribed papers in planning studies (as in (a)(i) above) with a value of 130 points, planning-related papers worth at least 60 points, as approved by the Director of the Planning Programme, and a planning research project (PLAN 590) with a value of 50 points.

-With the approval of the Director of the Planning Programme, one or more papers from relevant subject areas may be substituted for a prescribed paper in planning studies worth up to 20 points.
-A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in either the planning project or the thesis, secure the approval of the Director of the Planning Programme for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate shall submit the planning project by 1 October of the year in which the coursework is completed.
-A candidate shall submit the thesis by 1 November of the year following that in which the coursework is completed.
-A candidate may not present a planning project or a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.

Read less
With the growing importance of world trade, lawyers are expected to look beyond national jurisdictions and understand issues of public international law and international commercial law. Read more
With the growing importance of world trade, lawyers are expected to look beyond national jurisdictions and understand issues of public international law and international commercial law. Legal employers now place a high premium on graduates with international commercial law skills. This programme focuses on the law and legal framework governing the international community, as well as various legal issues surrounding international trade and global markets.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/law/intllaw

Law

With the growing importance of world trade, lawyers are expected to look beyond national jurisdictions and understand issues of public international law and international commercial law. Legal employers now place a high premium on graduates with international commercial law skills and our LLM focuses on the law and legal framework governing the international community, as well as various legal issues surrounding international trade and global markets.

What you'll study

We regularly update our programmes to reflect the ever-changing nature of the discipline, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change. The list provided here is for illustrative purposes only. Please note that some 'core' courses are only open to certain students - for further details on any restrictions that apply or, for any other query on the programme's structure, please contact the School of Law (insert hyperlink to ).

Structure for the full-time programme starting in September 2016:

Core courses

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses:

- Research methods in law (15 credits)

- Common law foundations OR pro bono placement (15 credits) (NOTE: Certain applicants will only be permitted to study common law foundations - please see note 1 below for details)

- Corporate law OR public international law (30 credits) (NOTE: Certain applicants may not have a choice of option OR may not be able to study either option - please see note 2 below for details)

- Dissertation (60 credits)

Important notes on core courses

1. Where a student has the choice of common law foundations or the pro bono placement, overseas students who do not have any experience of a common law jurisdiction only be permitted to take common law foundations. Also, any former University of Greenwich student who has already taken the pro bono placement as an option in the 3rd year of one of the University's LLB programmes, will not be permitted to take this course on the LLM programme.

2. Any former University of Greenwich student who has already taken corporate law or public international law as part of one of the University's LLB programmes, will not be permitted to take the same course(s) again as part of the LLM programme.

Anyone with any query about Note 1 or 2 above should contact the School of Law at .

Option courses

Students are required to choose two 30-credit options from the following:

- International labour law (30 credits)
- Intellectual property law (30 credits)
- International human rights law (30 credits)
- Competition law (30 credits)
- International criminal law (30 credits)
- Public shipping law (30 credits)
- Banking and finance law (30 credits)
- International trade law (30 credits)
- Environment, regulation and responsibility (30 credits)
- Oil and gas law (30 credits)
- Business, human rights and the environment (30 credits)
- Commercial landlord and tenant law (30 credits)
- Law of maritime security (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

You will be assessed through coursework, class presentations and a dissertation.

Career opportunities

Graduates may take up careers with international institutions or nongovernmental organisations, or pursue university teaching and further research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

Read less
In recent years corporate governance has experienced a considerable growth in popularity and recognition. Good corporate governance is a crucial part of corporate performance and accountability particularly during periods of economic downturn. Read more

Why take this course?

In recent years corporate governance has experienced a considerable growth in popularity and recognition. Good corporate governance is a crucial part of corporate performance and accountability particularly during periods of economic downturn.

The LLM is designed for law and non-law graduates, practising lawyers and business professionals who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of corporate governance, risk and compliance and gain the GradICSA qualification from ICSA, the international membership and qualifying body for chartered secretaries and other governance professionals, and a world-leading authority on governance, risk and compliance. Those with the relevant work experience can apply for chartered secretary status and use the post nominal ACIS. The University of Portsmouth is an ICSA University Partner.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Choose to take this course in full-time or part-time mode – whichever suits you best
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection
Benefit from an accelerated route to a senior position in business once this course is completed

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is designed to give you a thorough grounding in corporate governance, vital legal regulation governing commerce and finance. It is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Secretaries and Administrations, and also ICSA which will be of particular interest if you want a professional qualification and career as a chartered secretary.

Qualifying as a chartered secretary is the route to a rewarding career that offers variety, challenge, influence and opportunity. You will be qualified to undertake a variety of senior roles in a number of sectors, both private and public. Moreover your qualification will have international recognition and provide opportunities for working overseas.

The Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) Level 6 Diploma in Law and Practice is offered as an option for law graduates on our LLM programmes, giving you the opportunity to obtain its Graduate Fast Track Diploma together with your postgraduate law degree. After graduating this will enable you to apply for work as a legal executive or paralegal and following three years of qualifying employment, you can apply to be admitted as a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Legal Executives.

Module Details

The full-time mode of this course lasts for one year:

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake the following compulsory units:

Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Corporate Secretarial Practice and Strategy
Financial Reporting, Analysis and Decision-making
Dissertation

Optional units include:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Employment Law (this unit is compulsory if you have not studied Employment Law at undergraduate level)
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning

Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Corporate Secretarial Practice and Strategy
Financial Reporting, Analysis and Decision-making
Legal Approach to Business
Dissertation or Corporate Secretarial Case Study

Please note that those who undertake the non-law route will not be able to choose an optional unit.

The part-time mode of this course lasts three years:

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake the following compulsory unit:

Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice

Optional units include:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Employment Law (this unit is compulsory if you have not studied Employment Law at undergraduate level)
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Two

You will undertake the following compulsory units:

Corporate Secretarial Practice and Strategy
Financial Reporting, Analysis and Decision-making

Year Three

In the final year, you will complete and submit your dissertation.

Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake the following compulsory units:

Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Legal Approach to Business

Year Two

You will undertake the following compulsory units:

Corporate Secretarial Practice and Strategy
Financial Reporting, Analysis and Decision-making

Year Three

In the final year, students will complete and submit their dissertation.

Programme Assessment

You will be expected to attend eight hours of class time per week if you are on the full-time course whereas for the part-time course you attend approximately four hours per week. You will be encouraged to undertake independent study with time also devoted to group problem solving, discussion and debate.

The majority of the units will be assessed via exams, however much of your time will also be spend researching and writing your dissertation which concentrates on a topic of your choice.

Student Destinations

Chartered Secretaries are a primary source of advice on the conduct of business, from advice on legal issues through to the development of strategy and corporate planning. They are, in effect, an organisation's 'corporate conscience' and are highly valued by employers in all sectors. The profession is highly versatile with a variety of well-remunerated roles.

Once you graduate from this course and upon joining ICSA, which will require you to pay a fee, you will be entitled to use 'LLM' and 'GradICSA' after your name. You’ll be qualified as a Chartered Secretary and fully equipped to apply for a variety of roles in both the private and the public sectors. As well as providing a diverse and interesting career, the financial rewards for Chartered Secretaries is high. You can expect to be in demand across all sectors. Moreover your qualification will have international recognition and provide opportunities for working overseas.

Read less
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

Marine Spatial Planning is a new field arising from new legislation geared to sustainable use of the marine environment. New planning procedures are being introduced and new skills are required to engage with the process. It is aimed at environmental planners and consultants working with local authorities, regulatory bodies, government, land owners and NGOs.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places, Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning students?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning. is a practice based approach to learning processes processes of plan-making and the management of development.

Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:

Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces students to various planning theories and their relevance to practice.

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. Students select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis
Semester 3:

A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.

SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

Read less
In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority. Read more

Why this course?

In a world facing unique economic, environmental and social challenges of a scale not seen before, promoting sustainable development has become a pressing priority.

The course will give you a solid grounding in the structures, rules and principles of aspects of public international law that impact on sustainable development.

This programme is designed specifically for graduates who want to work in the international development sector in management, planning or policy-related areas.

The course has a flexible structure. You’ll have the opportunity to pursue your own interests and tailor your degree to your chosen career path. You can select elective classes from other Masters Programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the University.

It is not necessary that you hold a law degree before embarking on this course of study however law content in your previous course may be useful.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationallawsustainabledevelopment/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Master’s degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Research Methods (compulsory for LLM)
- The World Trading System: Law & Policy
- International Environmental Law

Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- Business & Human Rights
- Comparative Company Law & Regulation
- Competition Law & Policy in the EU
- Legal Process & the Law of Contract & Other Obligations (for non-lawyers)
- UK & EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Global Water Policy
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Fundamentals of Environmental Forensics
- Energy Resources and Policy

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

A limited number of students will be given the opportunity to choose elective classes from the optional modules offered in the LLM in Climate Change Law and Policy. This allows those students to combines sustainable development law and policy with climate change. The programme is delivered off campus on an intensive three-day basis in January. For further information, please contact the Law School.

- Field dissertation
A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.
Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You will have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

The Law School is home to Scotland’s first Law Clinic. It provides a ‘real life’ learning experience for students and an invaluable service to members of the public who do not qualify for legal aid, and cannot otherwise afford legal advice.

Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance

You're encouraged to engage with the activities of the centre. These include guest lectures and international conferences. The Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law and Governance is a centre of excellence in environmental law and governance and boasts a vibrant research community.

You'll also have the opportunity to participate in the organisation of the annual postgraduate Colloquium on Environmental Law and Governance. This has a session devoted to the presentations of highly qualified LLM students.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English must be provided. The minimum standards [at the date of writing] are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0). Tests are valid for two years.

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two 4,000-word essays or one final examination together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a module. To pass each module, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of sustainable development, and its relationship with other rights and norms.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Economic Law have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Coordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Urban Conservation is designed to equip graduates for professional management roles concerned with the critical interplay of transport and spatial planning.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning is a practice based approach to learning processes, processes of plan-making and the management of development.

Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces you to various planning theories and their relevance to practice.

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. You'll select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

Read less
- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code. M2Q3. - LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4. The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. Read more

LLM (Master of Laws) Law and Economics

- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code: M2Q3
- LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4

The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. It is a specialist programme which aims to provide rigorous training in theoretical and applied economic analysis as a means of analysing law and the legal framework. It is designed for students with a strong academic background in Law or Economics.

Aims of Programme

Graduates of the programme will possess a solid grounding in Legal theory and modern Economics that will enable them to conduct, assess, and supervise both theoretical and applied research in the field. Students who perform well on the programme are encouraged to apply for a joint doctoral study in the School of Economics and Finance and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies. For those seeking to develop or start their careers outside of academia, the new LLM programme will include a number of practical and knowledge transfer components that will allow a better transition to work outside the higher education sector. Students will, for example, have the opportunity to engage in an academic year-long Investment Club. During this time, students will be gaining hands on experience in trading and portfolio analysis alongside their studies.

Who is the course aimed at?

Such interdisciplinary skills make this LLM ideal for those already in, or planning a career in law or economics in academia, the public sector, international institutions, financial or legal industry or management consulting.

Structure of Programme

The LLM in Law and Economics is available to study full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

The programme of study provides a flexible mix of classroom based teaching (assessed by formal examinations and/or coursework) through:
◦An introductory pre-sessional in mathematics and statistics
◦Two compulsory taught modules which lay a foundation to Law and Economics theories
◦A 15,000 word dissertation
◦Choice of optional law and/or economic modules

Modules

Modules

For the LLM in Law and Economics you take a total of 180 credits. The two compulsory modules and the dissertation have a value of 90 credits. The remaining 90 credits are going to be selected from the range of law or economics modules.

You may study on one of two pathways: Jurisprudence, if you have a legal background or an undergraduate degree in law; or Economics, if you have an economic/finance background or have an undergraduate degree in economics or finance.

If you want to review concepts such as statistical distributions and matrix algebra, you also have the option to attend pre-sessional modules during induction week (week zero) and week one of the first term within the School of Economics and Finance. You will be also presented with basic statistics and statistical software during the first term.

You are required to balance your taught modules equally across the two teaching semesters – a full explanation of this process will be available during induction and before module selection.

Jurisprudence Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Lawyers) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation – 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules

Economics Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Economists) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation - 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules.

Visit the LLM in Law and Economics module page to see the full list of modules available on this course. Please note that not all options will be available every year.

Read less
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. Read more
Spatial Planning determines the design of places, the relationships between land uses, and identifies infrastructure requirements. The planning process makes provision for the needs of households and the requirements of the economy, and planning aims to mitigate the adverse impacts of development upon our natural environment.

The planning system is currently undergoing change to be better able to address the challenges of competitiveness and sustainability. There is a pressing requirement in both the public and private sectors for planners with appropriate understanding and skills to plan for development and protect the environment.

The University is a long-established provider of planning education. MSc Spatial Planning will be attractive to individuals with a real interest in tackling the challenges of important urban planning issues; MSc Spatial Planning with Sustainable Urban Design is designed to equip graduates with the professional skills for resolving environmental, economic, social, cultural and spatial dimensions in designing for sustainable development.

Why choose spatial planning?

Spatial Planning is concerned with creating sustainable places. Planners achieve this in a number of ways:

Planners work with building firms and housing organisations to help make available sites addressing the housing needs of local areas. They meet with local communities to learn about their concerns and to discuss ways of tackling issues such as the protection of homes from flood risk. They provide guidance on how to promote quality in the design of places and buildings.

Planning makes possible investment in sustainable economic development. Through preparing medium and long-term plans, planners ensure that land is available for development within and around our cities and towns. Planners often lead on regeneration projects and work in partnership with engineers to bring forward the infrastructures necessary to relieve transport congestion and to provide for long-term energy solutions.

Climate change is making achieving sustainability increasingly important. Planners, work with the environmental agencies and with conservation interests to ensure that the potential environmental impacts arising from development proposals are first established and then they use planning powers to promote a sustainable balance between social and economic development and the protection of the environment.

Who becomes a planning student?

Spatial Planning is a multi-disciplinary activity and attracts a wide mix of graduates. Often these are geography graduates, but increasingly graduates with social science, law, architecture and surveying degrees, as well as graduates from the environmental sciences find that Spatial Planning makes use of their knowledge and training.

Aims of the Programme

The Spatial Planning programmes are designed to provide the knowledge, skills and understanding required for graduates wishing to enter into professional careers in urban planning and development.

Programme Content

Semester 1:
Spatial Analysis has two key components. The first component analyses built and natural environments particularly from a conservation perspective. The second part of the module focuses on socio-economic analysis of data at a city scale and the relevance of this to planning.

Statutory Planning. is a practice based approach to learning processes processes of plan-making and the management of development.Property Development Processes deals with complexities and challenges in the property development sector and the role of different stakeholders involved.

Semester 2:
Concepts of spatial planning introduces students to the role of planning and planning systems. The other part of this module introduces students to various planning theories and their relevance to practice..

Sustainability in Contemporary Cities examines various challenges facing the growth of cities globally and the implications of these to planning of cities and the countryside.

The third second semester module is optional depending on the selected specialism. Students select one specialist module from the following:

Environmental Assessment
Marine Spatial Planning
Sustainable Urban Design
Urban Conservation
Applied Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Data Analysis

Semester 3:
A 60 credit dissertation in line with the selected specialism

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods cover a mix of formats including 'live' project-work and a research project. There are no written examinations. The educational aims are to develop subject understanding and to equip students with research and practice skills. Assignments call for visioning, problem-solving, forward-planning and critical reflection. Assignments are informed by students making effective use of available literature, conducting investigations and accessing sources of data. Attention is paid to building the effective communication and partnering skills vital for practicing professional planners.

Sources of Funding

Information about the School of the Environment scholarships can be found on the School of the Environment scholarships webpage. Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage.
SAAS tuition fee loans are available for this course for students who meet the eligibility criteria. Visit our SAAS tuition fee loan webpage for more information and links.

Read less
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

Read less
The Urban and Regional Planning program at the University of Sydney is your pathway to the professional world of planning. The Planning Institute of Australia accredits this course, ensuring professional relevance and excellent employment opportunities. Read more
The Urban and Regional Planning program at the University of Sydney is your pathway to the professional world of planning. The Planning Institute of Australia accredits this course, ensuring professional relevance and excellent employment opportunities.

Planners are strategic professionals that reconcile the complex demands of law, budgets and aesthetics to produce plans for vibrant, functional and desirable public spaces and cities. The planning program at the University of Sydney is recognised for its focus on the significant challenges of scale in planning. Our expertise in both Urban and in Regional planning means that when you study with us, you will be adept at working across the spectrum of planning works, whether for a population of 500 or for 5 million.

You will benefit from the expertise of our staff and our close ties with industry. Our academics are all active contributors to the profession, forging close links with state, national and international planning organisations. In 2012, the planning program celebrated its close ties with the Office of Urbanisation in Papua New Guinea through a Memorandum of Understanding. We regularly host prestigious international planning conferences, including the only UPE conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific. All of this combines to give you unparalleled access to the best teachers and a solid network of industry contacts as you complete your degree. This is consistently demonstrated in our high student-satisfaction and graduate employment surveys.

We give you flexible options to expand the scope of your degree by undertaking one of our exclusive enrichment options. Offered in Heritage Conservation or Urban Design, you can improve your employment prospects by taking these specialisations. No other program planning program in Australia gives you the flexibility to pursue these enrichment options

Planning is an important function in many professions. You may find yourself working as a consult alongside politicians or private companies. There is also a demand for planners by local councils and state planning authorities. Planners are allied professionals to engineers, architects and environmental consultants. They provide advice, support and their expertise in planning to ensure that proposed projects are appropriately scoped and investigated on all relevant scales. There is also an important role for planners in the development of policy, particularly in international development, where the Faculty holds expertise.

Planning is a vibrant, challenging and rewarding career. It is much more than the simple, technical evaluation of different design options. Instead, planning is infused with consideration for human welfare and social progress. The social and ecological impacts of a project are always at the forefront of a planner’s mind. Our planning program gives you the tools and approaches that will enable you to work in planning-based roles both in Australia and internationally, and can give you this experience during your degree through our extensive exchange network.

International Connections:

The Urban and Regional Planning program has strong international connections and is recognised for its expertise in the formulation of national planning strategies. Dr. Paul Jones has recently signed a memorandum of understanding with the National Urbanisation Office in Papua New Guinea and has been instrumental in the launch of the first
national urbanisation strategy.

Students of the Urban and Regional Planning program benefit from this expertise and global connectedness. There are many exchange opportunities with institutions around the world, further expanding your understanding of urban planning in different national contexts. This all combines to give you perspectives on planning that go well beyond the classroom.

Graduates of the Master of Urban and Regional Planning are eligible, subject to professional experience requirements, for corporate membership of the Planning Institute of Australia (PIA).

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

Read less
At the centre of towns and cities regeneration, it is the duty of planners to take into account the views of business and local communities. Read more
At the centre of towns and cities regeneration, it is the duty of planners to take into account the views of business and local communities. It is a broad area of work that can require many different skills and others the option of specialisation – be it protecting the historical environment or urban design.

PgDip/MA Town Planning programmes are accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute. The courses enhance student's employability in planning, property development and research roles in the public and private sectors. This is through focusing not only on the planning system but on broader themes that influence the economic, environmental and social contexts in which we live.

The course enables you to study an area of spatial planning in some depth as many of modules are within a specialist area (urban design, urban regeneration or environmental planning).

Residential

It includes a compulsory one week residential European field study visit, recent destinations have been Venice and Germany. For all new entrants field study visit fees are included in the tuition fees.

Town Planning PgDip

You can also choose to study the PgDip for six modules; Full-time (10 months) or part-time (15 months).

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/town-planning-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Planning history and theory
This module examines the history of planning and the evolution of the theories and ideas that have underpinned the various attempts to intervene in the natural and built environment through the institution of state-led planning systems. It stresses the concept of theory as understanding, the interlinked nature of history and theory and the importance for the development of planning practice.

- Sustainable places (with EU field study visit)
This module examines sustainability issues and challenges and the initiatives and responses from spatial planning and related agencies, institutions and organisations in the context of a European field study visit. The module will provide you with a detailed knowledge and understanding of the different forces at work within a region or city context. You'll develop your understanding of sustainability issues and the impact of climate change; recognise the processes of change and identify issues and mechanisms that allow an area to develop to fulfil its potential as well as respond to environmental and related challenges.

- Planning in London
You'll examine the planning context of London as a World City, as a centre for financial industries and as a home to millions of people. You'll find it particularly useful as an introduction to town planning in the UK and for understanding how a major city functions.

- Planning practice project
You'll have the opportunity to develop an individual project based on your chosen specialist area of study. The project must link together both theoretical and practice debates within the area of specialism (where required) and must be practice focused. You'll be able to relate the subject content contained in the specialist area of study to practical problems that may be encountered in a work situation. You'll be encouraged to explore the links between planning education and practice through a particular practice relevant project. In addition, the module will prepare you for your Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

- Elective
Students are required to take an elective module, on offer from the Masters Level modules within the Department. This may be an additional specialism module if desired.

Plus one specialist option from:
- Urban design project (urban design specialism)
This project based module provides you with the opportunity to extend and develop your urban design skills in a practical context in relation to the planning process and the urban context for design. You'll also review theories and approaches to urban design in the context of real projects and places in use as well as your own work. Whenever possible the module will be linked to 'live' projects and areas and cases of current interest.

- Urban regeneration strategies and projects (urban regeneration specialism)
The module focuses on contemporary regeneration practice, which in recent years has taken place within an increasingly competitive context including declining public finance. This will be explored in the context of a specific 'major' project and the regeneration strategy that provides a framework for development in the wider area.

- Environment and resource management, or, Transport, society and planning (environment specialism)
You'll focus on a number of key themes in the context of environmental management and planning, and explore them in the context of current policy, law and practice. You'll also be introduced to environmental assessment, sustainability appraisal and environmental management techniques and processes.

Plus the Dissertation (MA only)
Part-time taught one day per week, with one or two modules being taught in each semester.

Award
X6 modules = PgDip
X6 modules + dissertation = Masters

Employability

- Town Planner as a career
Currently there is a national shortage of qualified town and environmental planners in the UK so the demand for our postgraduate courses is particularly high.

The natural career path for graduates is to work as a town planner – this can be for a local authority, as private consultants or for planning government agencies.

- Role and responsibilities
General activities for town planners range from developing creative and original planning solutions to satisfy all parties, to writing often complex reports which make recommendations or explain detailed regulations, to conducting research and analysis to help determine strategic developments.

Most jobs will be largely office-based, but visits to meet clients and attend external meetings are not uncommon. There are opportunities available throughout the country, as every local authority employs planners.

- Career progression
Graduates from the programme will emerge with a range of knowledge and skills of value to potential employers and to career progression opportunities. Employment prospects are excellent with demand exceeding supply. Successful planning students are likely to find jobs with local authorities, private consultants in property and planning government agencies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year one class contact time for full-time students is typically 9 hours per week supplemented by study visits, tutorials and independent study.

Brief assessment outline:
Modules are assessed by a range of coursework, design and practice-based projects, presentations and a dissertation. There are no exams on this programme.

Read less
The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals. Read more

Why this course?

The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals.

At both policy and practical level, there's tension surrounding the function and role of international institutions such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

These debates are not confined to the realm of academia. The highest 'court' of WTO has opined that decisions must take into account "[h]uman societies as they actually exist, in other words... in the real world where people live and work and die." (WTO Appellate Body Report, EC-Hormones, paragraph 187)

This LLM in International Economic Law offers you the opportunity to explore how international economic law deals with real world challenges. You’ll gain an understanding of the fundamental rules and principles supporting international economic law.

You can tailor your degree to suit your intended career path by choosing elective modules from outside of our Law School.

The course is for those wanting to develop careers with international law firms and other organisations with an international focus. It’s also useful if you want to work in the international development sector in management, planning, or policy related areas.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationaleconomiclaw/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Masters degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Legal Research
- World Trading Systems: Law & Policy

In addition to the core classes, you'll have the opportunity to pursue elective classes from other Masters programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the university.

- Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- International Environmental Law
- E-Commerce
- Comparative Company Law and Regulation
- Competition Law and Policy in the EU
- Legal Process and the Law of Contract and Other Obligations (For non-lawyers)
- UK and EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Digital Copyright Law and Policy-Making
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Telecommunications Law

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

Field dissertation

A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.

This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.

Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources, which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Additional Entry requirements

If your first language is not English, you must provide documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English. The minimum standards are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0).

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two x 4,000-word essays or one final exam together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a class. To pass each class, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of international economic law.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Law and Sustainable Development have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Co-ordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
Programme overview. This distinctive LLM programme examines how we should approach the greatest challenges and opportunities for law and policy as mechanisms to address health and wellbeing. Read more
Programme overview
This distinctive LLM programme examines how we should approach the greatest challenges and opportunities for law and policy as mechanisms to address health and wellbeing. It looks at questions including reproductive justice, social and mental health and wellbeing, health inequalities, and the diverse roles of social and political institutions in shaping health, law and society.

It therefore goes beyond traditional courses on healthcare law to look at the relationships between law, governance and health across society and governmental sectors. Students will enjoy the opportunity to study wide-ranging questions concerning the impacts of law, regulation, policy and practice on health and wellbeing.

The attraction and utility of this LLM lies in both its subject coverage and the range of transferable skills it promotes. It would be of benefit in many different practical settings and careers. It is suitable for students working or planning a career in policy, healthcare management, health regulation (including at local authority level), healthcare and social care providers, legal practice, public health, advocacy, NGOs, special interest groups or legal/policy research.

You will be taught by leading academics who combine internationally recognised research profiles with wide experience with organisations responsible for policy development, professional regulation and social advocacy. The programme includes core teaching in health law and governance, along with specialist units.

The University of Bristol Law School has a large and vibrant international student community and LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

Programme structure

Students will take four units (120 credit points overall, 30 credit points each) and a compulsory dissertation (60 credit points). The units are made up of two compulsory core Health Law units, an optional specialist Health Law unit and an open choice of LLM unit.

Core units:
- Law, Governance, and Health
- Health Inequalities, Law and Society

Specialist Health Law units, one of which must be taken as part of the LLM*:

- Public and Global Health Law
- Law and Governance for Mental and Social Well-Being
- Health Law and the Body

The final option may be taken from the specialist Health Law units, or from any other LLM programme. These might include*:

- Law Gender and Sexuality
- Corporate Governance in the United Kingdom and United States
- Migration Law and Policy - International, European, and Human Rights Dimensions
- International Law and Human Rights
- Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
- Public Law

Careers

This programme develops specialist knowledge and understanding and transferable skills. Its content and approach to teaching and assessment supports diverse career paths in healthcare practice and management, health policy and regulation, healthcare provision, legal practice, public health practice, social advocacy (for example, in pressure groups or NGOs) and legal/policy research.

The LLM can be a starting point for careers in these fields, while also providing an appropriate programme of study for people already working in those areas.

This programme would be of interest to recent graduates in law, policy, politics and cognate fields, and of interest to anyone aiming to pursue a career in research.

Read less
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

The Commercial Law programme offers you an opportunity to engage in intensive study of specialist commercial and industrial topics. You may wish to concentrate on European commercial issues, international trade or aspects of domestic commerce. It provides a solid foundation for anyone wishing to enter the legal professions, aspiring to a career in business and finance or planning to become an in-house lawyer.

Programme structure

Part one - You will choose four units to study, which will be assessed by examinations and/or essays. The selection of units can vary, but has included:
-Banking Law
-Carriage of Goods
-Company Law
-Competition Law of the EU
-Corporate Governance in the UK and US
-EU Trade Law
-European Contract Law
-Global Perspectives on Corporate Governance
-Individual Employment Rights
-Information Technology Law
-Insolvency Law
-Intellectual Property
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Corporate Finance
-International Law of Trade and Aid
-Law of E-Commerce
-Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
-Maritime Security
-Public Contract Law
-Regulation of Financial Markets and Institutions
-The Law and Policy of Mergers and Acquisitions
-World Trade Law

Please view our programme catalogue (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/RouteStructure.jsa?byCohort=N&ayrCode=17%2F18&programmeCode=9LAWD007T) for further information on the course structure and units available.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation topic within the field of commercial law for approval by the Law School. After passing part one of the programme, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

There is a broad range of possibilities for those who successfully complete their Commercial Law LLM. It provides a solid foundation for any students wishing to enter the legal professions - in particular, to work in a commercial law firm or to embark on a career at the Commercial Bar. Alternatively, graduates might choose to work as in-house lawyers or with a variety of regulatory organisations.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X