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Biochemical Engineering concerns the use of biological organisms or processes by manufacturing industries. Read more
Biochemical Engineering concerns the use of biological organisms or processes by manufacturing industries. It is a multidisciplinary subject, requiring the integration of engineering and bioscience knowledge to design and implement processes used to manufacture a wide range of products; from novel therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer, vaccines and hormones, to new environmentally-friendly biofuels. It is also essential in many other fields, such as the safe manufacture of food and drink and the removal of toxic compounds from the environment..

This course will provide you with the skills you need to start an exciting career in the bioprocess industries, or continue research in the area of bioprocessing or industrial biotechnology.

Industry involvement

As this is a highly industrially-led subject area, we have secured guest lectures from Cobra Biologics (contract manufacturing), Biocats Ltd (Enzyme manufacture) and the Centre for Process Innovation Ltd (biological process development) and are currently seeking additional industrial lectures.

Academics working at Birmingham have strong links with industry, through collaborative projects, so allow students to make contact with companies. Graduates from the MSc programme have gone on to careers in biochemical engineering world-wide, in large and small companies working in diverse areas.

There are also guest lectures from academics working at other institutions.

Practical experience

You will gain practical experience of working with industrially applicable systems, from fermentation at laboratory scale to 100 litre pilot scale, in the Biochemical Engineering laboratories. Theory learned in lectures will be applied in practical terms. In addition, theoretical aspects will be applied in design case studies in a number of modules, including the Design Project.

All MSc students complete a summer research project, working on a piece of individual, novel research within one of the research groups in the school. These projects provide an ideal experience of life as a researcher, from design of experimental work, practical generation of data, analysis and communication of findings. Many students find this experience very useful in choosing the next steps in their career.

Special Features

The lecture courses are supplemented with tutorials, seminars and experimental work. Industrial visits and talks by speakers from industrial and service organisations are also included in the course programme.

Pilot Plant

The Biochemical Engineering building houses a pilot plant with large-scale fermentation and downstream processing equipment. The newly-refurbished facility includes state-of-the-art computer-controlled bioreactors, downstream processing equipment and analytical instruments.

Course structure

The MSc is a 12-month full-time advanced course, comprising lectures, laboratory work, short experimental projects and a research project. You will take an introductory module, four core modules, and then choose 50 credits of optional themed modules. The course can also be taken on a part-time basis. The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) lasts for 8 months from the end of September until June.

For the first eight months you have lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. Core module topics include:

Fermentation and cell culture
Bioseparations
Process monitoring and control
Systems and synthetic biology approaches
Optional module include:

Biopharmaceutical development and manufacture
Food processing
Business skills for the process industries
The programme is strongly design-orientatedand you complete a full process plant design exercise. You also have practical experience of working in the newly-refurbished pilot plant of the Biochemical Engineering building.

From June to September you gain research training on your own project attached to one of the teams working in the bioprocessing research section.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Our MRes in Social Science Research Methods offers subject routes in Criminology, Education, Gerontology, Health Policy, Management, Social Work and Sociology. Read more

Overview

Our MRes in Social Science Research Methods offers subject routes in Criminology, Education, Gerontology, Health Policy, Management, Social Work and Sociology. The programme is designed to provide training in a range of research skills and methodologies essential to the systematic research practice demanded in many professional environments, or to pave the way to further postgraduate study. As such the programme is open to graduates looking to pursue an academic or research related career and those seeking to enhance their practical social research skills for professional purposes. Modules are taught by experts in their field and will introduce concepts and skills that will enable you to pursue an independent research project of your choice.

The MRes programme requires satisfactory completion of 180 credits, comprised of modules up to 120 credits, plus a 15,000 to 20,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits. Taught modules consist of face to face contact between staff and students, supported by online content, while the independent subject specific training modules and the dissertation are supported by regular individual supervision. There are a broad range of assessment methods to evaluate your analytical abilities and your critical engagement with relevant debates, approaches, theories, scholarship and evidence. These include portfolios, essays, research proposals, reviews, reports, exams, learning plans, pilot studies and the dissertation. Written assignments for taught modules vary in length from 1,500 word reports to 5,000 word personal development portfolios.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/mressocialscienceresearchmethods/

Course Aims

The general aims of the programme are as follows:
- To equip participants with a ‘toolkit’ for research design, consisting of a range of social science research methods and strategies
- To explore in detail the philosophical assumptions underlying contemporary research in the social sciences
- To develop the qualities needed to evaluate critically social science research
- To provide practice in a range of transferable skills, improve existing skills and enhance employability, whether in an academic context or beyond
- To apply more general methods and philosophies to the student’s own discipline and to gain an in-depth understanding of the current issues related to that discipline

Course Content

Those taking taught modules only, without producing a dissertation, may qualify for a postgraduate

award (30 credits), a post graduate certificate (60) credits or a postgraduate diploma (120 credits).

You will study the following core modules:

• Research Skills and Researcher Development
• Principles of Social Science Research
• Quantitative Research and Data Analysis
• Qualitative Research Methods
• Subject-Specific Training I
• Dissertation

The following is a list of indicative elective modules:

• Subject-Specific Training II
• Advanced Quantitative Data Analysis
• Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
• Ethnographic Research

The University offers this social science MRes in the following disciplines:
- Criminology
- Education
- Geography
- Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations
- Management
- Sociology
- Social Policy
- Social Work

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed through a broad range of methods of assessment, including: portfolio, essay, research proposal, review, report, exam, learning plan, pilot study and dissertation. These enable assessment of the student’s analytical abilities, and of the student’s evaluation of particular debates, material and evidence. The research proposal, the review, the pilot study and the dissertation facilitate assessment of the student’s ability to select, apply and evaluate appropriate research methodologies in their chosen field of studies. The written assignments vary in length from 1,500 word reports through to 5,000 word personal development portfolios. Students must pass all the taught modules before they may proceed to the dissertation, which involves writing a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post-graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Mediation is developing at great speed in many countries. For example, it is part of the civil justice system of England and Wales through the Civil Procedure Rules and the provisions in the rules which encourage the use of mediation. Read more

Course description

Mediation is developing at great speed in many countries. For example, it is part of the civil justice system of England and Wales through the Civil Procedure Rules and the provisions in the rules which encourage the use of mediation. Additional government initiatives in England and Wales have been introduced such as automatic referral to mediators for small claims court matters.

In Europe, the EU Directive on Cross-Border Mediation has led to the implementation of mediation legislation throughout the EU. Beyond Europe, other developments continue: for example, Japan has introduced mediation in its financial services sector; Hong Kong is promoting mediation through new legislation protecting confidentiality of the process; the International Bar Association has drafted investor-state mediation rules; Nigeria continues to develop its multi-door courthouses through which mediation is a primary process.

The Postgraduate Distance Learning Diploma in International Dispute Resolution - Mediation has a strong focus on mediation and conciliation. The course will introduce you to the process of mediation and its role in the resolution of disputes. The diploma not only provides an understanding of the theoretical, practical and ethical problems relating to international mediation, but can also provide a stepping stone for professionals to become involved in international alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

The diploma is aimed not only at lawyers, but also at other professionals who may be involved in mediation - be it as a disputant, representative or perhaps as a mediator: a legal qualification will not be a prerequisite for admission, although you will be expected to appreciate that the course will involve an understanding of law and legal implications. References and materials will be legally orientated, but this will enable the non-lawyer to be better equipped to deal with the issues raised in international business mediation.

This programme will:
◦Give you a thorough grounding on all major issues arising in day-to-day international mediation practice.
◦Promote academic research of the highest standard on selected topics of interest.
◦Allow flexibility to enable you to plan and balance your study and work commitments.

Why is the course relevant?

Mediation is developing at great speed in many countries. For example, it is part of the civil justice system of England and Wales through the Civil Procedure Rules and the provisions in the rules which encourage the use of mediation. Additional government initiatives in England and Wales have been introduced such as:

A pilot scheme for the automatic referral to mediation in the UK County Court Money Claims Centre for claims of less than £5,000.
Automatic referral to mediators for small claims court matters (claims up to £5,000).
A Court of Appeal scheme whereby appeals of personal injury and contract claims of up to £200,000 will be automatically recommended for mediation.
The Department for Business, Innovations and Skills has instituted a pilot scheme for two regional mediation networks for small and medium sized enterprises.
In Europe, the EU Directive on Cross-Border Mediation (2008/52/EC) has led to the implementation of mediation legislation throughout the EU. Beyond Europe, other developments continue: for example, Japan has introduced mediation in its financial services sector; Hong Kong is promoting mediation through new legislation protecting confidentiality of the process; the International Bar Association has drafted investor-state mediation rules; Nigeria continues to develop its multi-door courthouses through which mediation is a primary process.

Professional Exams Exemptions

The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) have approved the following exemptions:
◦CCDD002 – exempt from CIArb Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution/Associate Level
◦CCDM113 – exempt from CIArb Introduction to Alternative Dispute Resolution

Programme structure

You can study the Postgraduate Distance Learning Diploma in International Dispute Resolution - Mediation, part-time for a period of 18 months, starting in January each year.

The year is divided into two seven-month terms, with a selection of optional modules and dissertation being offered during the second term.
◦Taught modules (22.5 or 45 credits). Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module assessment will vary and consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).
◦Dissertation (15,000-words) (45 credits) – on a topic of your own choice

Modules

Core modules:
◦CCDD002 Alternative Dispute Resolution (45 credits)
◦CCDM042 Negotiation and Mediation Workshop (Residential) [PDF 134kb] (30 credits)

Students must take a further 45 credits from the elective module list below: (a minimum of 3 student is required for a module to run)

◦CCDD001 International and Comparative Commercial Arbitration (45 credits)
◦CCDD003 International Construction – Contracts and Arbitration (45 credits)
◦CCDD005 International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement (45 credits)
◦CCDD006 International Commercial Litigation (45 credits)
◦CCDD008 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦CCDM112 Multi-party Negotiations and Mediation (22.5 credits)
◦CCDM113 Labour Disputes (22.5 credits)
◦CCDD007 15,000 Dissertation (45 credits)

Application date

January 2015 start - deadline for applications is 15 December 2014
As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London and are unable to deliver supporting documents in person. Electronic copies of supporting documents are acceptable for the online application. To comply with official admissions procedures, if you are made an offer, applicants must submit original certified or notarised copies of the supporting documents by post or courier and make a payment of part or full fees to be received no later than 12 January 2015. We have set the deadline to ensure that your documentation arrives in time for us to process it. This also allows time for you to receive the required course materials ready for the start of the programme.

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The Diploma in International Dispute Resolution not only provides an understanding of the theoretical, practical and ethical problems relating to International Dispute Resolution, but also provides a stepping stone for professionals becoming more involved in international alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. Read more
The Diploma in International Dispute Resolution not only provides an understanding of the theoretical, practical and ethical problems relating to International Dispute Resolution, but also provides a stepping stone for professionals becoming more involved in international alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes.

All taught modules are taught as part of the LLM degree. On this Diploma there are core modules which you must take in order to qualify.

There are two distinct Diploma routes, Arbitration or Mediation, to choose from, each with their own specialised focus.

Continuous assessment will provide regular feedback and enhance the student-tutor relationship. Students will also be able to address questions and concerns directly to the course convenor and the course director. Participants are entitled to use specialist electronic databases, such as Westlaw, Lexis Nexis and Kluwer Arbitration.

Why is the course relevant?

Mediation is developing at great speed in many countries. For example, it is part of the civil justice system of England and Wales through the Civil Procedure Rules and the provisions in the rules which encourage the use of mediation. Additional government initiatives in England and Wales have been introduced such as:

A pilot scheme for the automatic referral to mediation in the UK County Court Money Claims Centre for claims of less than £5,000.
Automatic referral to mediators for small claims court matters (claims up to £5,000).
A Court of Appeal scheme whereby appeals of personal injury and contract claims of up to £100,000 will be automatically recommended for mediation.
The Department for Business, Innovations and Skills has instituted a pilot scheme for two regional mediation networks for small and medium sized enterprises.
In Europe, the EU Directive on Cross-Border Mediation (2008/52/EC) has led to the implementation of mediation legislation throughout the EU. Beyond Europe, other developments continue: for example, Japan has introduced mediation in its financial services sector; Hong Kong is promoting mediation through new legislation protecting confidentiality of the process; the International Bar Association has drafted investor-state mediation rules; Nigeria continues to develop its multi-door courthouses through which mediation is a primary process.

core Modules

Modules:
You will be required to take the two core modules:
◦CCDD001 International and Comparative Commercial Arbitration (45 credits)
◦CCDM035 International Arbitration Award Writing (30 credits)

Students must take a further 45 credits from the elective module list below (a minimum of three students are required for a module to run):

◦CCDD002 Alternative Dispute Resolution (45 credits)
◦CCDD003 International Construction - Contracts and Arbitration (45 credits)
◦CCDD008 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦CCDD005 International Trade and Investment Dispute Settlement (45 credits)
◦CCDD006 International Commercial Litigation (45 credits)
◦CCDM112 Multi-party Negotiations and Mediation (22.5 credits)
◦CCDM113 Labour Disputes (22.5 credits)
◦CCDD007 Dissertation (45 credits)

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UCC has a history of nearly a century of teaching and research in the food sciences and is amongst Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions with world-class academics working in all aspects of the food area. Read more
UCC has a history of nearly a century of teaching and research in the food sciences and is amongst Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions with world-class academics working in all aspects of the food area. Our first-rate facilities include extensive and well-equipped laboratories and a large pilot plant with excellent dairy, meat and bakery facilities in addition to a modern pilot-scale brewery.

Course Details

The MSc (Food Science) is a full-time taught postgraduate programme running for 12 months from the date of first registration.

Format

Modules will be chosen with the approval of the Programme Board depending on the student's background.

Part 1 - Taught modules

Students take 60 credits as follows:

- Core Modules -

Students take 15 credits:

PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies (5 credits)
FS6101 Library Project in Food Science (10 credits)

- Elective Modules -

Student take 45 credits from the following:

FE6101 Food Business: Markets and Policy (5 credits)
FS6105 Material Science for Food Systems (5 credits)
FS6106 Advanced Topics in Dairy Biochemistry (5 credits)
FS6107 Advances in the Science of Muscle Foods (5 credits)
FS6108 Advances in Food Formulation Science and Technology (5 credits)
FS6103 Novel Processing Technologies and Ingredients (5 credits)
FS6120 Cheese and Fermented Dairy Products (5 credits)
FS6121 Meat Science and Technology (5 credits)
MB6114 Hygienic Production of Food (5 credits)
NT6102 Human Nutrition and Health (5 credits)
NT6108 Sensory Analysis in Nutrition Research (5 credits)

Depending on background of the student, the Programme Board may decide to replace some of the above modules to a maximum of 15 credits from:

FS3602 Chemistry of Food Proteins (5 credits)
FS3605 Macromolecules and Rheology (5 credits)
FS4603 Advanced Analytical Methods (5 credits)
FS4606 Cereals and Related Beverages (5 credits)
FS4014 Food Product Development and Innovation (5 credits)
MB4611 Microbial Food Safety (5 credits)

Students who pass Part 1 and achieve a minimum aggregate of 55% are eligible to progress to Part 2. Students who pass Part 1 but who fail to meet the minimum progression standards, or who choose to exit the programme, will be conferred with the Postgraduate Diploma in Food Science.

Part 2

FS6102 Dissertation in Food Science (30 credits)

Assessment

The taught modules of this course are assessed by examination in Winter, Spring and Summer. The research aspect is assessed on the quality of a substantial written dissertation.

Careers

On completing this course, you will be able to:

- conduct original research in food science
- demonstrate an understanding of scientific literature
- apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills in food science
- explain the techniques used in food research, in both principle and practice
- communicate effectively with the food industry and with society at large
- show a comprehensive understanding of current food consumer and food industry trends

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The Doctor of Education degree is aimed at experienced educational professionals and sets out to place you at the leading edge of your professional field in terms of knowledge, awareness and understanding. Read more

Overview

The Doctor of Education degree is aimed at experienced educational professionals and sets out to place you at the leading edge of your professional field in terms of knowledge, awareness and understanding.

The professional doctorate is for those who are eager to make substantial and original contributions to the development of educational knowledge in a broad range of settings.

The degree meets the need for the highest levels of professional development and training of both educators and those concerned with educational policy and administration. The prime focus is on the interplay between the multi-dimensional practices of education and scholarship.

The degree is designed to engage current practitioners with knowledge, awareness and understanding of the philosophical, organisational, political, social, managerial, interpersonal, and technical dimensions of schools and other educational institutions.

Exploration of the nexus between theory and practice begins with a series of taught units that will develop you capability to perceive critical issues facing educators and policymakers today through the lens of contemporary and historical research and philosophy. This broad foundation will enable you to hone your specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research that will make an original contribution to your field.

Programme features

- a high-level academic study of a range of educational and professional issues
- four tutored units and a supervised research component
- will enable you to make a contribution to knowledge through unit assignments, and through your research enquiry
- focus on the interplay and relationship between professional practice and scholarship.

Programme structure

You will complete four taught units (two are optional) before moving onto the Research Enquiry.
Core units

- Educational Research: philosophy and practice
- Educational Policy: theory and practice

Optional units

- Curriculum philosophy and practice
- Educational management, leadership and administration
- International education: philosophy and practice
- Language, culture and education
- Philosophy of education
- Pilot research enquiry *
- Reading paper *

* If your background and experience is appropriate, one of your units can be a reading paper or a pilot research enquiry.

Learning and teaching

Each unit is led by a specialist tutor and comprises:

- Tutored time - 40 hours involving you in lectures, group work and individual or paired tasks.
- Independent study - 80 hours in which you will research issues raised in tutored time and plan, research and write the Unit Assignment.

Studying by means of directed learning is currently possible for some units. In the Research Enquiry phase, a supervisor and co-supervisor will be responsible for giving you advice and support, and monitoring your progress.

Intensive teaching weeks

On-campus units are offered at specific times of the year according to a programme published in advance.

The Summer School normally runs for three weeks from the beginning of July, one or two units are also usually offered in January (applications for both must be made via Summer School process).

One core and one optional unit are typically offered via distance learning in either the spring or autumn term.

Methods of assessment

Units will normally be assessed through one assignment of 8,000 words.

Your Research Enquiry will be assessed through a viva voce examination at the University by a member of staff (not your supervisor) and by an external examiner especially appointed to your thesis. The Research Enquiry must provide evidence of originality of mind and critical judgement about your chosen aspect of education, and must contain material which is worthy of publication.

Entry requirements

Academic requirements

- First or 2:1 Honours degree (or equivalent) in an appropriate subject, from a recognised university.
- Advanced qualification (MEd, MA or MPhil) in education or a related field. Alternatively, the completion of two Masters level education-focused units at the University of Bath will be considered.

Professional requirements

- Appropriate professional experience in the practice of education or a related field.

English Language requirements
(Certificates must be dated to within two years of the start of the programme of study.)

- IELTS 7.0 (with not less than 6.5 in each of the four components)
- TOEFL 600 (paper-based test) or 250 (computer-based test) with a score of not less than 4 in TWE or 100 (internet-based test) with not less than 24 in each of the components.

References

- Two references are required. At least one of these should be an academic reference.

Financial information

Please see the programme page for full programme fees.

Funding

http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/funding

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Most drama writers move between media so that's what we do; join us to learn about writing for theatre, film and television. Read more
Most drama writers move between media so that's what we do; join us to learn about writing for theatre, film and television.

Who is it for?

This programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. It is also suitable for writers who while continuing with their own practice, will work in development roles in the film, TV, theatre and related industries such as literary agencies.

The programme has been designed, with input from a range of playwrights and screenwriters, to provide the optimum environment for students to complete a full length play or feature film script to a high standard.

Objectives

Creatively stimulating, challenging and above all practical, this innovative two-year programme provides a supportive and thought-provoking environment for playwrights and screenwriters to explore their ideas, develop their craft and finish a full-length work to a high standard.

You will develop as a writer and sharpen your understanding of what's working and what isn't. No single style or genre is prescribed; the ethos of the programme is excellence and diversity. You will get to understand writing choices in the work of leading playwrights and screenwriters. You will work with actors and directors from London's new writing theatres, and receive guest talks from agents, producers and artistic directors.

By the end of the course, you will have taken a full-length play, screenplay or television pilot through a number of drafts, working as professional writers do. This play or screenplay will be your calling card. You will receive a performed reading of an extract of your work and a professional script report.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught and run by professional working writers. Teaching is based around a mix of practical workshops, seminars and lectures. All this is supported by one-to-one tutorials and by independent study: notably reading and preparing presentations on set texts and performing set writing exercises. As the course progresses, the emphasis shifts to independent study and is supported by workshops and one-to-one tutorials.

You will be mentored by a professional working playwright or screenwriter for the whole of Year Two.

Central to this Creative Writing MA course is the requirement to finish a full-length play or screenplay. The course culminates in a showcase of your work to an audience of industry professionals and other interested parties.

The biggest names in the worlds of film, television and theatre visit the course and visiting lecturers include:
-Dr Terry Bailey (TV Writer, director and producer. He has worked internationally and with the BBC. His play, Grave Men, Near Death, was staged last year.)
-Penny Gold (writer, dramaturg, director and producer. She has worked in theatre, television, film and radio).
-Jim Hill (writer and director of popular television drama and is perhaps best known as the co-creator of the successful series Boon).
-David Lane (professional playwright and dramaturg, and has been a Literary Associate to established London and regional new writing companies such as Soho Theatre & Writers' Centre and Theatre and Beyond in Brighton).

Assessment includes participation in lectures, seminars and workshops; of work on presentations; set exercises and own script proposal.

Modules

You will take three modules (Writing Workshop, Dramatic Writing and Storytelling) and be taught for six hours a week*. There will be tutorials alongside this in all 3 terms. You will create a 10 minute film as well as a 10 minute play.

In the second year you choose to write either a full length play, or screenplay, or a pilot for an original television series (along with the series "bible" and synopses for several episodes). In addition to this you will participate in workshops.

Year 1
-Writing Workshop
-Dramatic Writing
-Storytelling

Year 2
-Own Play or Script
-The Production Business

Career prospects

Many of our graduates go on to have their work performed professionally and have won many awards and nominations. Some examples from 2016 include:
-Aisha Zia, who received a grant from Brookleaze and her play ‘Besieged’ is on at the Arcola Theatre.
-Dianna Hunt, Her play ‘One Woman's Slide: A Blues’ has been programmed in the Talawa Arts Festival.
-Cheryl White, whose films include Before Babel (2013) which won Best Short at the Kent and Rye Film Festival International film festival 2015; Winner of Best Film and Most Innovative Film at WOW Festival 2014.
-Louisa Hayford, who did a ten week paid internship at the Coronation Street story department as part of the ITV Coronation Street Original Voices scheme.

Some of our first year students have also had their work picked up professionally.

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The Higher Diploma in Food Science and Technology will provide you with an excellent education in various aspects of food science, food technology and food microbiology. Read more
The Higher Diploma in Food Science and Technology will provide you with an excellent education in various aspects of food science, food technology and food microbiology.

Subjects that you will cover during the course include:

- food proteins
- food fats
- food macromolecules
- sensory science
- food packaging
- food processing and preservation
- food microbiology

UCC has a 100-year history of teaching and research in the food sciences and is currently one of Europe’s largest multidisciplinary education and research institutions. You will be taught by world-class academics who work in all aspects of food science.

Our first-rate facilities include extensive and well-equipped laboratories and a large pilot plant with excellent dairy, meat and bakery facilities, in addition to a unique pilot-scale brewery.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cko06/

Course Details

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

- apply the principles of food chemistry and technology and food microbiology to food systems
- demonstrate an ability to perform selected techniques in food analysis
- develop the capacity to undertake lifelong learning
- communicate effectively with the food industry and with society at large.

Format

The course is one year full time, or two years part time.

Students take taught modules to the value of 60 credits as follows:
FS3002 Chemistry of Food Proteins (5 credits)
FS3003 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats (5 credits)
FS3004 Sensory Analysis, Flavour and Colour (5 credits)
FS3005 Macromolecules and Rheology (5 credits)
FS3006 Food Processing and Preservation (10 credits)
FS3007 Dairy Product Technology (5 credits)
FS3008 Fundamentals of Food Packaging (5 credits)
FS3012 Library Project (10 credits)
MB3003 Food and Industrial Microbiology I (5 credits)
MB3014 Food and Industrial Microbiology II (5 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is principally by end-of-semester written examinations. There are also some elements of continuous assessment.

Careers

On successful completion of this course, you will have a solid foundation in food science. You will also understand the principles and practical application of the processing and preservation technologies used in the food industry. You can use your knowledge as a basis for further study or for employment in food-related industries.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. Read more

Overview

The Professional Doctorate in Criminology and Criminal Justice (or DCrim) is a 4-8 year part-time course. In the first two years you would be required to attend taught modules. There are 5 modules in total, each of which is taught in 1-2 day blocks. Around this formal teaching, there are regular opportunities for face to face and e-mail support. In years 3 - 4 (and beyond where necessary) you would work under the guidance and support of a nominated supervisor to produce a 60,000 word thesis.

The DCrim builds on the established and very successful UG and PGT provision in Criminology and Criminal Justice in the School to provide a specialist route for professionals and managers working in the field of criminal justice, or in related fields, who wish to embark on doctoral study located within their own professional discipline and practice. Indeed, this programme focuses on practitioners and professionals in criminal justice (e.g. policing, courts, probation, prison work, alternative sanctions, community sanctions, service providers in the sphere of drugs and addiction, and so on) or related fields of work and practice (e.g. local authority and third sector service providers in the sphere of crime prevention, security, community building and offender rehabilitation; private providers in the above or related spheres; non-governmental action in a variety of spheres such as environmental action, human rights policy and activism, and so on). This list is not exhaustive. Practitioners and professionals working in fields and organisations as diverse as (e.g.) Amnesty International and (e.g.) the Police all share a common sphere of work which is structured around problems and issues of deviance from legal norms.

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/sspp/postgraduatetaught/criminology/professionaldocorate/

Course Aims

- Promote an understanding of research evidence and methodologies relevant to professional practitioners.

- Develop a critical awareness of the policy context in which professional practice takes place.

- Enable participants to undertake a research study of relevance to their professional activities.

Course Content

Module 1 (30 credits) Introduction to theories and methods as a reflective practioner-researcher (EDU-40106)
Assignment: Self-Reflection and Personal Development Plan

Module 2 (30 credits) Critical perspectives in criminology and criminal justice
Assignment: Theoretical perspectives essay

Module 3 (30 credits) Research methods and evaluation (EDU-40103)
Assignment: A general research methods critique

Module 4 (30 credits) The pilot study (EDU-40105)
Assignment: a commentary and report on a pilot study that will inform the final research proposal for the thesis

Module 5 (60 credits) Preparing and presenting a thesis proposal (EDU-40107)
This is a summative assignment comprising a written research proposal and an oral presentation

Years 3 and 4+: A Research Thesis
This will be up to 60,000 words and will draw from the previous five assignments. It should form a contribution to the knowledge of the subject area and show evidence of originality, either by the discovery of new evidence, or by the exercise of independent critical power. The thesis is examined by the conventional method of the viva voce.

Tutors will guide the participants through their formative assignments and a supervisor will be allocated for the Thesis Proposal and Thesis

Teaching & Assessment

The programme is assessed by four formative assignments, one summative assignment and a Research Thesis.

Additional Costs

Additional costs for textbooks, inter-library loans, photocopying, printing, and potential overdue library fines.

No other additional costs for this postgraduate programme are anticipated.

Award Pathway Option

Upon successful completion of the taught part of the DCrim programme and a 15-20,000 word mini-thesis, students may be awarded an MRes (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The new Master in City & Technology (MaCT) is a program oriented in training Change Makers that City Government Administrations, the Industry and Communities… Read more
The new Master in City & Technology (MaCT) is a program oriented in training Change Makers that City Government Administrations, the Industry and Communities need in order to develop projects for the transformation of the cities.From urban planning to urban management and citizen-based services, the Master in City & Technology foresees new city economy and new city management models through the creation of efficient, responsive, decentralized, productive and hyper connected systems to be implemented in order to build the city of the future.The program will be developed with the collaboration of companies and industry, and will form new professionals interested in leading this new field of city economy that is emerging worldwide. The program aims to develop new categories of projects, technologies and solutions that can be extended systematically to the cities of the world, thus helping them to become more efficient and more human.
Every Master Candidate will attend and develop technological seminars, city studies, cultural analysis, and pilot projects in order to have a global comprehension of the development of Smart City Projects based in real real-life environments

You can find more information on our blog: http://www.iaacblog.com/programs/courses/maa-01/

Course Structure

The Master in City & Technology is an innovative educational format that offers interdisciplinary skills and understanding through the researching on new categories of projects, technologies and solutions related with information and communication technologies in urban environments. IAAC gives students the opportunity to  create individual Studio agendas and develop Pilot Thesis Projects based on Citizen Innovation, Cities New Business Models, Urban Apps, Smart City Infrastructures, new Citizen-based Services, Open Data Development and more. In this way, IAAC puts together an experimental and learning environment for the training of professionals with both theoretical and practical responses to the increasing complexity of contemporary urban environments. Students have the opportunity to be part of a highly international group, including faculty members, researchers and lecturers, in which they are encouraged to develop collective decision-making processes and materialise their project ideas. The aim of the IAAC is to form graduates who, after the completion of the programme, will be able to develop their acquired skills in a diversity of professional environments, related with the transformation and management of cities and technologies of information.

Request More Information

If you have any questions about the program, or would like to request more information please get in touch here: https://iaac.net/iaac/contact/

Skype

Would you like to talk to our admissions specialist on Skype? Skype ID iaac.admissions.

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The MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to build knowledge on the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft. Read more
The MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to build knowledge on the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft. This course provides a taught engineering programme with a focus on the technical, business and management aspects of aircraft design in the civil and military aerospace sectors.
One unique feature of the course is that we have four external examiners; two from industry who assess the group design project and two from academia who assess the individual research project. Students can take advantage of our impressive facilities at Cranfield, which include large aircraft flight simulator, a flying experience with our Bulldog aircraft, and the National Flying Laboratory Centre (NFLC) Jetstream aircraft in which on-board monitors give you first-hand experience of the theory from a pilot’s perspective.

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Our English Masters by Research is a one year independent study programme, which is especially attractive to students who already know they want to study for a PhD and have a clear sense of their research interests. Read more
Our English Masters by Research is a one year independent study programme, which is especially attractive to students who already know they want to study for a PhD and have a clear sense of their research interests.

The MA is an opportunity to ‘pilot’ this research and undertake essential preparatory research methodology training (as required by the Arts and Humanities Research Council). Students may choose to pursue an MA by Research in any area of Literary Studies providing a suitable supervisor is available.

Tuition is through one-to-one supervision plus attendance on the Department’s Research Methodologies programme.

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This MSc teaches an international community of students about the latest advances in clean power developments and enables graduates to design and develop benign renewable energy solutions that can be implemented in countries around the world. Read more
This MSc teaches an international community of students about the latest advances in clean power developments and enables graduates to design and develop benign renewable energy solutions that can be implemented in countries around the world.

It is aimed at engineers and natural scientists pursuing or wishing to pursue a career in the renewable energy sector, particularly those in technical positions e.g. systems designers, technical consultants and R&D engineers and scientists.

Core study areas include solar power, wind power, water power, biomass, sustainability and energy systems, integration of renewables and a research project.

Optional study areas include advanced solar thermal, advanced photovoltaics, advanced wind, energy storage, energy system investment and risk management.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/renewable-energy-systems-tech/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Solar Power
- Wind Power 1
- Water Power
- Biomass
- Sustainability and Energy Systems
- Integration of Renewables
- Research Project

Optional Modules (choose three):
- Advanced Solar Thermal
- Advanced Photovoltaics
- Wind Power 2
- Energy Storage
- Energy System Investment and Risk Management

How will you learn

You can select options to develop a chosen specialism in greater depth, including through your individual project which is often carried out with renewable energy companies or alongside the research portfolio of our international experts.

This is a very practical course backed up by strong theoretical understanding of the principles and facts behind renewable energy production.

Assessment is via a mixture of written and practical coursework and examinations. The individual research project is also assessed by viva. Because of its multidisciplinary nature, assessment may be done in collaboration with academic colleagues from Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Materials.

Facilities

We have current industrial equipment and laboratories for PV cell production, PV module production, qualification testing, PV quality control, energy storage research facilities, vacuum glazing, wind flow measurement, and instrumentation for energy consumption and monitoring.

You will benefit from experience with industrial tools and software for system design (e.g. PV Syst, WASP, ReSoft Windfarm, DNV GL Windfarmer), materials research hardware (e.g. pilot lines for commercial solar cell production) and quality control laboratories.

This enables you to acquire the practical skills that industry uses today and builds the foundations for developing your knowledge base throughout their career.

Careers and further study

There is a world-wide shortage of skilled engineers in this field and so the combination of hands on experience with global industry standard tools and techniques and the strong theoretical knowledge which graduates of this course acquire, makes them highly attractive to employers.

Students may carry out their projects as part of a short-term placement in a company and graduates of this course are often fast-tracked in their applications. Consequently we have an extensive network of alumni, many in top jobs.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/renewable-energy-systems-tech/

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