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Masters Degrees (Physics And Astronomy)

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Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects. Read more
Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects .

Would you rather specialise in pure physics or discover the interface between physics and astronomy, mathematics, chemistry or biology? The choice is yours. At Radboud University, you can choose from six specialisations and within each specialisation you’ll have plenty of room to customise your programme. We guarantee the highest quality for all specialisation programmes, resulting in number one rates by the Dutch ‘Keuzegids Masters’ for three years running.

In your internship(s), you can dive into theoretical physics or perform your own experiments: discover new material properties in Europe’s highest magnetic fields or with unique free electron lasers, study space objects with the telescopes on top of the Huygens Building or unravel brain activity with MRIs. It’s all possible on the Radboud campus. That’s why many international physicists come here to perform their experiments. Take Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, who revealed the amazing properties of graphene in our High Field Magnet Laboratory. In 2010, they received the Nobel Prize in Physics for those discoveries.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

Specialisations of Physics and Astronomy

- Particle and Astrophysics
In this Master’s specialisation you’ll unravel questions like: What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? And how will it evolve? One of the topics is the Higgs particle, which is partially a Nijmegen discovery.

- Physics of Molecules and Materials
This specialisation focuses on the structure and properties of materials. You’ll work at the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum and classical physics, which is of great importance for designing next-generation materials and devices.

- Neuroscience
In this specialisation you’ll use your physics background to understand the communication between neurons in the brain. This fundamental knowledge can be applied in all kinds of devices, including hearing aids or Google glasses.

- Science in Society
This specialisation will equip you with the tools and skills to become a professional intermediary between science and society. You’ll learn to analyse (governmental) science communication and connect scientific knowledge with divergent perspectives and interests of various stakeholders.

- Science, Management and Innovation
This specialisation will teach you what is happening in the world of business and public administration, how innovation is managed in company strategies, how government designs policy and how that interacts with societal challenges.

- Science and Education (in Dutch)
Do you want to become a secondary school teacher in the Netherlands? In this Dutch-taught specialisation you’ll get the necessary didactic background and extensive experience in the classroom.

Why study Physics and Astronomy at Radboud University?

- It’s the best Master’s programme of its kind in the Netherlands, according to the Keuzegids Masters.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your internship supervisor.
- We have a multidisciplinary approach: you not only can specialise in Physics, but also in astrophysics, biophysics, mathematical physics, chemical physics or materials science.
- You’ll spend one year on research, and thus get an extensive experience in scientific methods.
- Radboud University hosts multiple state-of-the-art research facilities, such as the High Field Magnet Laboratory , FELIX laser laboratory, Nanolab and neuroimaging facilities (MRI, MEG, EEG, TMS). We also participate in the LHC particle accelerator in Geneva, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina and various other large-scale research projects.
- On average, our graduates find a job within 2 months after graduating. A majority of these jobs are PhD positions at universities in the Netherlands and abroad.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

All specialisations of this Master’s programme are an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Think in an abstract way
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments

PhD positions

If you would like to have a career in science, it’s possible to apply for a PhD position at Radboud University. Of course, you can also apply at any other university anywhere in the world.

Positions in business or governmental organisations

To get an idea the various career opportunities, a sample of jobs performed by our alumni:
- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro
- Consultant at Accenture
- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem
- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research
- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

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Are you interested in theoretical and/or experimental research of elementary particles, stars and the universe? Do you want to attend lectures by Nobel… Read more

Something for you?

Are you interested in theoretical and/or experimental research of elementary particles, stars and the universe? Do you want to attend lectures by Nobel Prize laureates and other internationally renowned researchers during your education? Do you want to participate actively in the latest, innovative experiments at CERN or on Antarctica? Or do you aspire to have a career in academia, industry, banking, in the medical sector or education? In that case this Master programme is what you are looking for!

About the programme

This MSc programme combines the expertise in research of both the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Ghent University (UGent). This allows you to tailor your study programme according to your interests. The programme consists of several components: basic competences, electives, Master’s thesis and, specifically for the minor Research, mobility / internship. Mobility means taking courses at another university, usually in Belgium, while the internship can be either in Belgium or abroad.

Content

Elementary particles
The structure of this Master’s programme ensures a broad formation as a physicist and offers you the opportunity to partake in top-level research in our very own research groups. This programme focuses on the physics of elementary particles, where both experimental and theoretical research topics are discussed, as well as astro-particle physics.

Experimental physicist
As an aspiring experimental physicist you can focus on the experimental study of high-energy interactions and cosmic radiation, and you can work with the most innovative detectors in the biggest particle accelerators.

Theoretical physicist
As a future theorist you will be confronted with gauge theories, strings and branes, gravitation and cosmology. This theoretical part has links with theoretical research in astrophysics, since that discipline studies the evolution of massive double stars, the evolution of star birth galaxies and the chemical evolution of galaxies.

Astronomer
As an aspiring astronomer you can choose to do observational research on topics such as astroseismology and the development of photometric techniques.

Quantum physics
Finally, you can also decide to specialise in the most fundamental aspects of quantum physics and its recent applications in the field of quantum information.

Curriculum

The curriculum consists of four components:

1. Mandatory courses
2. Electives
3. Internship
4. Master thesis
This structure ensures that you will have a solid formation as a physicist, while offering you the possibility to participate in high-level research in our research groups.

Room for interaction and discussion

Physics students at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel attend lectures, exercises, lab sessions and excursions in small groups. There is room for interaction and discussion, and a low threshold for students to actively participate. This programme pays special attention to critical analysis.

The different research groups at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel are in close contact with leading universities and research institutes around the world, which allows you to do part of your studies and/or the research for your Master’s thesis abroad. Our research groups work for example at the particle accelerator at CERN.

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The Masters in Astrophysics gives you an understanding of the principles and methods of modern astrophysics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Astrophysics gives you an understanding of the principles and methods of modern astrophysics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾The School has a major role in the award winning NASA RHESSI X-ray mission studying solar flares and in several other forthcoming international space missions such as ESA’s Solar Orbiter.
◾The School plays a world-leading role in the design and operation of the worldwide network of laser interferometers leading the search for gravitational waves.
◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾You will gain the theoretical, observational and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced astrophysics problems, providing you with an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

[Modes of delivery of the MSc in Astrophysics include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional courses and project work to a variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of astrophysics.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾General relativity and gravitation (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
◾Gravitational wave detection
◾Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2017–18)
◾Pulsars and supernovae (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
◾Research skills
◾Statistical astronomy (alternate years, starting 2017–18)
◾The Sun's Atmosphere
◾Extended project

Optional courses include

◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Applied optics
◾Circumstellar matter (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
◾Cosmology (alternate years, starting 2018–19)
◾Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
◾Exploring planetary systems (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
◾Galaxies (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
◾Instruments for optical and radio astronomy (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
◾Statistical mechanics
◾Stellar astrophysics (alternate years, starting 2017–18)

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Industry links and employability

-◾The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
◾You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
◾Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.

For further information please visit:

Scottish Universities Physics Alliance
Project Juno of the Institute of Physics
The award of Juno Champion status

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The environmental impact from the use of fossil fuels and the uncertainties in their sources of supply has led to many alternative energy sources being proposed and investigated. Read more
The environmental impact from the use of fossil fuels and the uncertainties in their sources of supply has led to many alternative energy sources being proposed and investigated. However, of the non-fossil fuel sources, only nuclear fission power is at present sufficiently developed to provide an economically viable alternative to fossil fuels.

The aim of this programme – which began in 1956 – is to provide the necessary background, both in breadth and in depth, for anyone wishing to enter the nuclear industry. The areas of study and degree of specialisation involved have changed considerably to reflect the increasing sophistication of the field, and yet the overall breadth of the course has been maintained, because we feel that only in this way can new entrants to the field obtain a perspective which will be of continuous help in future careers.

Studentships are sponsored by the nuclear industry in the UK, and these provide excellent and effective entry routes into careers in this stimulating field for physicists, mathematicians, metallurgists or engineers.

A taught element from September to May is followed by a 14-week project, usually undertaken within the industry.

About the School of Physics and Astronomy

We are one of the largest physics departments in the country with a high profile for research both in the UK and internationally, covering a wide range of topics offering exciting challenges at the leading edge of physics and astronomy. Our student satisfaction rating of 96% in 2016 demonstrates the quality of our teaching.
The School of Physics and Astronomy’s performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF), the system for assessing the quality of research in the UK higher education institutions, has highlighted that 90% of research outputs in the School were rated as world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our research portfolio is wide-ranging, and covers three principal themes: Particle and Nuclear Physics; Quantum Matter and Nanoscale Science; and Astronomy and Experimental Gravity. We have over 120 academic and research staff together with 120 graduate students with around 50 technical and clerical support staff. Our annual research income is over £8 million and more than 250 research publications are produced each year.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This degree course will provide students with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding in nuclear sciences (nuclear physics and radiochemistry), geosciences (including geochemistry, geophysics and hydrogeology) and materials science, to prepare graduates for a career in nuclear decommissioning, waste management and remediation. Read more
This degree course will provide students with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding in nuclear sciences (nuclear physics and radiochemistry), geosciences (including geochemistry, geophysics and hydrogeology) and materials science, to prepare graduates for a career in nuclear decommissioning, waste management and remediation.

The University of Birmingham has a long and established track record of research and education in the nuclear sector, including reactor technology, metallurgy and materials, decommissioning and waste management, dating back to the earliest days of the nuclear industry. The University runs one of the longest-standing Masters level courses in the nuclear sector (over 50 years), in the Physics and Technology of Nuclear Reactors (PTNR). The University has extensive links to the nuclear industry and regulators both within the UK and internationally, including National Nuclear Labs, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Idaho National Labs, NAGRA, British Energy, AMEC, Serco, HSE (NII), Atkins, Babcock Marine, Westinghouse, UKAEA, EDF, E.ON and RWE NPower.

About the School of Physics and Astronomy

We are one of the largest physics departments in the country with a high profile for research both in the UK and internationally, covering a wide range of topics offering exciting challenges at the leading edge of physics and astronomy. Our student satisfaction rating of 96% in 2016 demonstrates the quality of our teaching.
The School of Physics and Astronomy’s performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF), the system for assessing the quality of research in the UK higher education institutions, has highlighted that 90% of research outputs in the School were rated as world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our research portfolio is wide-ranging, and covers three principal themes: Particle and Nuclear Physics; Quantum Matter and Nanoscale Science; and Astronomy and Experimental Gravity. We have over 120 academic and research staff together with 120 graduate students with around 50 technical and clerical support staff. Our annual research income is over £8 million and more than 250 research publications are produced each year.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or… Read more
Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or astronomy? Develop valuable new knowledge and skills? Prepare for a research career, or embark on a completely new path? Whatever your motivation, a postgraduate degree from the School of Physics and Astronomy can help you achieve your ambitions.

The MSc Physics is available in three different pathways: Particle Physic, Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics. The School of Physics and Astronomy also offers an MSc in Astrophysics and a PGCert in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Programme outcomes

The aim of the programme is to deepen your understanding of contemporary theoretical physics, covering advanced concepts and techniques, leaving you well prepared for further doctoral level study and research. The programme will also enable you to develop skills transferable to a wide range of other careers.

This programme will:

Teach you the fundamental laws and physical principles, along with their applications, in your chosen area of physics.
Introduce you to research methodology, and how to manage your own research, making use of journal articles and other primary sources.
Allow you to communicate complex scientific ideas, concisely, accurately and informatively.
Instruct you how to use mathematical analysis to model physical behaviour and interpret the mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena.

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The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics has been designed to deliver thorough training and practical experience in compound semiconductor theory, fabrication and applications, and integration with silicon technology. Read more
The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics has been designed to deliver thorough training and practical experience in compound semiconductor theory, fabrication and applications, and integration with silicon technology.

The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Compound Semiconductors (ICS).  The ICS is an exciting new development at the cutting edge of compound semiconductor technology. The Institute has been established in partnership with IQE plc, to capitalise on the existing expertise at Cardiff University and to move academic research to a point where it can be introduced reliably and quickly into the production environment. It is unique facility in the UK, and aims to create a global hub for compound semiconductor technology research, development and innovation.

Our flexible curriculum contains a robust set of required modules and a number of cutting-edge elective modules, which include the latest results, innovations and techniques) and are designed to incorporate the most effective teaching and learning techniques.

As part of the programme you will undertake a 3-month summer project which will be based either in the School of Physics and Astronomy, within the ICS, or in placement with one of our industrial partners.  We have strong, long-established industrial links with companies such as IQE and are therefore in a unique position to be able to offer a portfolio of theoretical, practical, fabrication and applications-centred projects in both academic and industrial placement environments.  No other Russell Group university can boast such opportunities in this field.

Upon graduation, you will have the training, skillsets and hands-on experience you need to succeed in the dynamic and highly competitive field of compound semiconductors.

Distinctive features

• Cardiff University’s unique position at the forefront of compound semiconductor technology will provide you with the opportunity to develop experience and build contacts with a range of leading companies and organisations.

• Our specialist elective modules are delivered by expert scientists, who deliver their courses based on their research expertise and current research portfolio.

• We offer a range of specialist modules that give you the opportunity to tailor the programme to suit your interests and ambitions.
Whether you’re fascinated by superconductivity and magnetism or want to specialise in photonics we have modules to suit you. We also have modules designed to develop commercial skills and more technical options such as advanced LabVIEW programming.

• Central to the design of this programme is the opportunity to ownership of real theoretical or practical projects. You will have acquired a full year’s worth of practical research experience by the time you complete your MSc, greatly enhancing your CV and prospects for employment or further study.

• You will be trained in the practical use of the LabVIEW programming environment. Recognised by industry this will serve as a solid foundation for preparing for the National Instruments (NI) Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) examination.

• We currently offer the opportunity to take the CLAD examination for free as an extra-curricular activity, supported by our certified academic staff. CLAD status is industrially recognised and indicates a broad working knowledge of the LabVIEW environment.

• We encourage a “research group” atmosphere within which you’ll be given the opportunity to work together, across disciplines, to enhance each other’s learning and be a vital part of our thriving, international scientific community.

Structure

The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics is a two-stage programme delivered over three terms.

• Autumn term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake two required modules (30 credits total) covering core skills and three elective modules of 10 credits value each covering specialist skills.

• Spring term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake three required modules (40 credits total) covering core skills and two elective modules of 10 credits each covering specialist skills.

You must successfully complete the 120 credits of the taught component of the course before you will be permitted to progress to the research project component.

• Summer term (60 credits, research project)
The summer term consists of a single 60 credit research project module of 3 months’ duration.  You will be required to produce a research dissertation and present your research to the School in order to complete this module.

Core modules:

Advanced Experimental Techniques in Physics
Study and Research Skills in Physics
Compound Semiconductor Fabrication
Concepts and Theory of Compound Semiconductor Photonics
Compound Semiconductor Application Specific Photonic Integrated Circuits
Compound Semiconductor Physics Research Project

Assessment

Multiple assessment methods are used in order to enhance learning and accurately reflect your performance on the course.  In the required modules, a mixture of problem-based learning, short practical projects, written assignments, coding exercises, written and oral examinations and group work will be used.

In some of the required modules there are weekly assignments.  The feedback provided for these allows you to make incremental improvements to the development of your core skillset, giving you ample opportunity to implement the suggestions made by our expert staff.

The methods used on the elective modules vary depending on the most appropriate assessment method for each module, but typically include written and/or practical assignments together with a written and/or oral examination.

All assessments make use of feedback, which can be divided into formative and summative feedback.

Career Prospects

An MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics degree will open up opportunities in the following areas:

• Technical, research, development and engineering positions in industrial compound semiconductors, silicon semiconductors and semiconductor photonics;

• Theoretical, experimental and instrumentational doctoral research;

• Numerate, technical, research, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields;

• Physics, mathematics and general science education.

Placements

There will be a number of industrial placements each year for the summer research project module, which will either be hosted at the ICS or at the industrial partner’s facilities.  The number and nature of these projects will vary from year to year and will be assigned based on merit demonstrated during the autumn and spring terms.

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Leiden Observatory offers a challenging two-year master’s programme in Astronomy, leading to the MSc degree in Astronomy. Students can expect research at the cutting edge of modern astronomy as an integral part of the programme. Read more
Leiden Observatory offers a challenging two-year master’s programme in Astronomy, leading to the MSc degree in Astronomy. Students can expect research at the cutting edge of modern astronomy as an integral part of the programme. Both education and research focus on two major themes:

- the formation and evolution of galaxies, from high-redshifts to the nearby universe, and
- the birth and death of stars, including the lifecycle of dust and gas.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/astronomy/nl/introduction

Course detail

The overall goal is to integrate students in research as soon as possible. Right from the start of the programme, master’s students get involved in front-line research, have access to all facilities, and get their own workspace at the institute. During the programme, students learn to analyse and evaluate scientific information independently and critically, and to conduct academically sound research.

Specialisations

Students can choose one out of six specialisations, each containing a different study path:

- Astronomy Research
Broadest possible training in astronomical research.

- Astronomy and Cosmology
Research training with a particular focus on modern observational and theoretical cosmology.

- Astronomy and Instrumentation
Research training with a particular focus on astronomical instrumentation and instrument development.

- Astronomy and Education
Teacher training for obtaining the qualification required for teaching in Dutch secondary schools.

- Astronomy and Science-Based Business
Research education combined with training in management, business and entrepreneurship.

- Astronomy and Science Communication and Society
Research education combined with training in science communication and public outreach.

Careers

Graduates holding an MSc or PhD degree in Astronomy from Leiden University find work in many different capacities, including:

- High technology
- Aerospace industry
- IT/Telecommunications
- Computer software
- Finance banking
- Consultancy
- Insurance industry
- Science communication
- Education

Some graduates continue in science and get research positions at universities, observatories or research institutes. Others pursue a career as science communicator, science policy maker, or a physics teacher.

Reasons to choose Astronomy in Leiden:

1) Leiden Observatory is a vibrant university astronomy department with a distinguished history. It has both a strong international reputation, and is widely known to turn out masters and doctoral students of the highest quality.
2) The favorable student-staff ratio guarantees a high degree of interaction with and personal attention from the senior staff.
3) The Leiden programme is particularly known for its emphasis on the interface between observation and theory: interpretation, modeling and simulation.
4) Leiden astronomers have access to the foremost observing facilities and the largest high performance computer facilities in the world.
5) The Observatory provides an international atmosphere. It has close ties with other astronomy institutes in Europe and the U.S. Many students, postdocs and staff come from abroad, and there are regular visits by guests from all over the world.
6) The institute provides a very welcoming, informal atmosphere, in which social activities flourish.

How to apply: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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This programme will offer home astronomers, who may have graduated in subjects other than physics, the opportunity to gain a formal postgraduate qualification in Astronomy and Astrophysics, and is designed to give students a robust and up-to-date background in these areas. Read more
This programme will offer home astronomers, who may have graduated in subjects other than physics, the opportunity to gain a formal postgraduate qualification in Astronomy and Astrophysics, and is designed to give students a robust and up-to-date background in these areas. Over the course of two years, we will explore the solar system, stellar physics, infra-red, radio and high energy astronomy, as well as discussing the foundations of cosmology.

By its very nature, astronomy is a mathematical subject - students will therefore need a background in this area, although fully-supported maths master classes will be a permanent feature on the programme for those who need to refresh their skills in this area.

The programme starts in late September/early October each academic year, as well as a second start date in January each year – places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions.

This is a part-time, postgraduate-level programme delivered wholly online in a fully-supported learning environment. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate after successful completion of the first year if their circumstances change.

Overview

Through this programme, students will:
-Gain a comprehensive knowledge of the development of astronomy, astronomy in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the solar system and stellar physics.
-Learn that physics is a quantitative subject and appreciate the use and power of mathematics for modelling the physical world and solving problems.
-Develop skills in research and planning and their ability to assess critically the link between theoretical results and experimental observation.
-Develop the ability to solve advanced problems in physics using appropriate mathematical tools.
-Be able to identify the relevant physical principles, to translate problems into mathematical statements and apply their knowledge to obtain order-of-magnitude or more precise solutions as appropriate.
-Develop the ability to plan and execute under supervision an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions.
-Be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data.
-Possess a more complete working knowledge of a variety of experimental, mathematical and computational techniques applicable to current research within physics.

Structure

This part-time two-year programme will comprise six 20-credit modules:
Year One
-Introduction to Astronomy
-Stellar Physics
-The Solar System

Year Two
-Infrared and Radio Astronomy
-High Energy Astronomy
-The Foundations of Cosmology

Students will be required to complete all these modules in the first instance, though additional modules may be added in the future to accommodate future programme growth and offer a broader learning experience.

It is anticpated that assessments will comprise a balance of short and long critical essays, conference style posters and maths-based open book problems.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Two stages: Certificate and Diploma. Each stage typically takes 12 months
-Comprises six distinct modules
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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The School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester is one of the largest and most active schools of physics in the UK. We have a long tradition of excellence in both teaching and research, and have interests in most areas of contemporary research. Read more
The School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester is one of the largest and most active schools of physics in the UK. We have a long tradition of excellence in both teaching and research, and have interests in most areas of contemporary research.

The School has a strong presence in a number of Manchester-based centres for multidisciplinary research: The National Graphene Institute, the Photon Science Institute; the Manchester Centre for Non-Linear Dynamics; the Dalton Nuclear Institute; and the Mesoscience and Nanotechnology Centre. In addition, the Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire is a part of the School.

Strong research activity exists in a broad range of physics topics funded by the Research Councils including EPSRC, STFC, BBSRC, the EU and industry. All the research groups offer well-equipped laboratories and computing facilities and are involved in a wide range of collaborative projects with industry and other academic departments in the UK and overseas. For more information please visit our research page.

Programme description

The School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester is one of the largest and most active schools of physics in the UK. We have a long tradition of excellence in both teaching and research, and have interests in most areas of contemporary research.

The School has a strong presence in a number of Manchester-based centres for multidisciplinary research: The National Graphene Institute, the Photon Science Institute; the Manchester Centre for Non-Linear Dynamics; the Dalton Nuclear Institute; and the Mesoscience and Nanotechnology Centre. In addition, the Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire is a part of the School.

Strong research activity exists in a broad range of physics topics funded by the Research Councils including EPSRC, STFC, BBSRC, the EU and industry. All the research groups offer well-equipped laboratories and computing facilities and are involved in a wide range of collaborative projects with industry and other academic departments in the UK and overseas.

Career opportunities

A research degree in physics is highly regarded by employers as evidence of a thorough training in numerate problem-solving and opens a wide range of possible career choices. In addition to continuing physics research in industry, an MSc provides the entry level training to undertake a PhD in physics.

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The Masters in Physics. Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Advanced Materials provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to global interdisciplinary challenges in the area of advanced materials and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Physics: Advanced Materials include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of advanced materials.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Research skills
◾Solid state physics
◾Extended project.

Optional courses include
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Detectors and imaging
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Semiconductor physics
◾Statistical mechanics.

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Physics. Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Energy & the Environment provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with emphasis on their application to global challenges in sustainable energy, climate change and the environment, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
◾You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Energy and the Environment include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the areas of energy and the environment.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Energy and environment
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Research skills
◾Extended project

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Detectors and imaging
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Statistical mechanics

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Physics. Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Global Security provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on their application to interdisciplinary challenges in the area of global security, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
◾The School of Physics & Astronomy hosts the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre, which houses state-of-the-art instrumentation for studying materials at the nanoscale or below.
◾You will gain the theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of this global challenge, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Global Security include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of global security.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Research skills
◾Extended project.

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Applied optics
◾Detectors and imaging
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Quantum information
◾Statistical mechanics.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
◾You will gain the theoretical and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Theoretical Physics include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of theoretical physics.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Quantum information
◾Quantum theory
◾Research skills
◾Extended project

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Advanced mathematical methods
◾Applied optics
◾Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
◾General relativity and gravitation (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
◾Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
◾Relativistic quantum fields
◾Statistical mechanics
◾The sun's atmosphere

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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The Masters in Physics. Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾You will gain theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of Nuclear Technology, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Nuclear Technology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
◾Environmental radioactivity
◾Imaging and detectors
◾Nuclear power reactors
◾Research skills
◾Extended project

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Advanced nuclear physics
◾Computational physics laboratory
◾Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
◾Energy and environment
◾Medical imaging
◾Nuclear and particle physics
◾Relativistic quantum fields
◾Statistical mechanics

The programme in Physics: Nuclear technology lasts 1 year and contains a minimum of 180 credits. You will undertake a minimum of 120 credits in Semesters 1 and 2 and be assessed on these courses either via continuous assessment, or unseen examination in the May/June examination diet, or a combination thereof. The remaining 60 credits will take the form of an extended MSc project, carried out on a specific aspect of theoretical, computational or experimental physics which has current or potential application in the areas of nuclear technology, nuclear energy, radiation detection or environmental monitoring. You will conduct this project while embedded within a particular research group – under the direct supervision of a member of academic staff.

Your curriculum will be flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, particular research interests and specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme. Generally, however, courses taken in Semester 1 will focus on building core theoretical and experimental/computational skills relevant to the global challenge theme, while courses taken in Semester 2 will build key research skills (in preparation for the extended project).

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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