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The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) offers postgraduate research supervision on a smaller scale than the PhD, towards which it can provide a pathway. Read more
The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) offers postgraduate research supervision on a smaller scale than the PhD, towards which it can provide a pathway.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of a Masters Degree (Research) will have:

Knowledge:

*A body of knowledge that includes the understanding of recent developments in one or more disciplines
*Advanced knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to the field of work or learning.

Skills

*Cognitive skills to demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on theory and its application
*Cognitive, technical and creative skills to investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories and to apply established theories to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Cognitive, technical and creative skills to generate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts at an abstract level
*Cognitive and technical skills to design, use and evaluate research and research methods
*Communication and technical skills to present a coherent and sustained argument and to disseminate research results to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse, theorise and disseminate research that makes a contribution to knowledge.

Graduates of a Masters Degree (Research) will demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills:
*With creativity and initiative to new situations and/or for further learning
*With high level personal autonomy and accountability
*To plan and execute a substantial piece of research.

Award title

MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY (MPhil)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.
JCU scholarship applicants require Band 3a

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/212/physics

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The University has good facilities for modern research in physical sciences. Among the major instrumentation and techniques available on the campus are NMR spectrometers (including solutions at 600 MHz), several infrared and uvvisible spectrometers, a Raman spectrometer, two powder X-ray diffractometers, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption in flame and graphite furnace mode, gel-permeation chromatography, gaschromatography, analytical and preparative highperformance liquid chromatography (including GC-MS and HPLC-MS), mass spectrometry (electrospray and MALDI), scanning electron microscopy and EDX, various microscopes (including hot-stage), differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis, dionex analysis of anions and automated CHN analysis. For planetary science impact studies, there is a two-stage light gas gun.

- Interdisciplinary approach

Much of the School’s work is interdisciplinary and we have successful collaborative projects with members of the Schools of Biosciences, Computing and Engineering and Digital Arts at Kent, as well as an extensive network of international collaborations.

- National and international links

The School is a leading partner in the South East Physics Network (SEPnet), a consortium of seven universities in the south-east, acting together to promote physics in the region through national and international channels. The School benefits through the £12.5 million of funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), creating new facilities and resources to enable us to expand our research portfolio.

The School’s research is well supported by contracts and grants and we have numerous collaborations with groups in universities around the world. We have particularly strong links with universities in Germany, France, Italy and the USA. UK links include King’s College, London and St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London. Our industrial partners include British Aerospace, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Ophthalmic Technology Inc, Canada. The universe is explored through collaborations with NASA, ESO and ESA scientists.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Nature; Science; Astrophysical Journal; Journal of Polymer Science; Journal of Materials Chemistry; and Applied Optics.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA by Research (Physical Education and Physical Activity) is a brand new and exciting opportunity for you to undertake a supervised programme of independent study and practice in a structured and supportive environment within the field of Physical Education, and or Physical Activity. Read more
The MA by Research (Physical Education and Physical Activity) is a brand new and exciting opportunity for you to undertake a supervised programme of independent study and practice in a structured and supportive environment within the field of Physical Education, and or Physical Activity. The Masters by Research sits within the Directorate of Physical Education, within the School of Childhood and Education Sciences, which forms part of the Faculty of Education.

To support your independent study, there are research methods sessions run by the Graduate School throughout the year, and you will also be invited to research theme group meetings and events that are held within the Faculty of Education. There are eight research theme groups that will also support and guide you through your studies. These include: Holistic Early Learning and Development; Curriculum, Creativity and Innovation; Professional Organisational and Leadership Development; Pedagogy and Identity; Ecopedagogy; Autobiography and Narrative; Inclusion, Equalities and Social Justice and Post Secular Values and the Sacred. It is possible to complete the MA by Research either part-time (two years) or full-time (one year).

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/physical-education-and-physical-activity-by-research.aspx

Course detail

The title of the MA by Research (Physical Education and Physical Activity), is intentionally very broad to allow you to specialise in an area in which you are particularly interested.

The project may develop from recent undergraduate work or from an aspect of your current employment which you wish to unpick, extend or challenge, for example in the areas of Physical Education, Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Physical Activity, or Primary Physical Education or Coaching.

You will be supported through regular tutorials from your specialist supervisor, as well as by a second supervisor, who will bring knowledge and expertise in research methodologies.

The supervisor's role would be to help you select the appropriate research method, to support you in devising and producing the project and to aid you in setting this this within the critical framework of Physical Education, and or Physical Activity.

Assessment

The programme is assessed through the submission of a piece of academic writing between 25,000 and 30,000 words in length. There are no examinations, including oral examinations. You will meet regularly with first supervisor, virtually or physically and will present your work in progress to the full Supervisory Panel half way through your registration period. Following advice from the Panel you will complete your final dissertation submission.

What can I do next?

The programme leads to the award of an MA by Research, which is a significant qualification in its own right, but you could also continue ultimately on to PhD or EdD programmes. The research writing skills you will gain and your expert knowledge you will develop in your research area, will enhance your employability and can provide invaluable grounding for continuing and extending your careers in Physical Education and Physical Activity settings.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. Read more
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. The department is based in the Tayside Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology (TORT) Centre. The current staff includes a professor, two clinical senior lecturers, two non-clinical senior lecturers, one clinical and one non-clinical lecturer, one research assistant and four clinical fellows, who are supported by various staff members.

With a tradition of teaching and research in the field of mechanisms of disease, treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system and biomedical and rehabilitation engineering. The founder, Professor Ian Smillie, gained a worldwide reputation in knee surgery and the role of the meniscus. His successor, Professor George Murdoch, founded and developed the Dundee Limb Fitting Centre and the Tayside Rehabilitation Engineering Services, which have acquired an international reputation for the treatment of the amputee and assessment of gait analysis. His successor, Professor David Rowley, sustained the department’s international reputation and innovation in the area of joints replacement complemented by a worldwide service in Clinical Audit Outcomes

Overview

The MSc in Orthopaedic Science programme will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It is the only programme amongst the few comparable MSc programmes in the UK with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical application of technology within orthopaedics. Additionally, it equips trainees with the knowledge of fundamental science required for the FRCS exit exam.

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide students with a Masters level postgraduate education in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It also aims to provide experience in the design and execution of a substantive research project in the field of orthopaedic, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology and its underlying science.
By the end of the programme, students should have a systematic understanding and knowledge of the physical sciences and technology relevant to orthopaedics, a critical awareness of current research questions in the field and the appropriate practical and analytical skills in order to be able to:

- Understand and interpret complex scientific concepts.
- Critically evaluate current research.
- Understand and utilise relevant technology, and have the ability to evaluate and critique methodologies.
- Develop and test scientific hypotheses, including the design of laboratory research projects aimed at addressing specific hypothesis-driven questions.
- Undertake the practical and technical aspects of a laboratory-based project.
- Communicate complex scientific concepts to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both verbally and in writing.
- Demonstrate an understanding of whether specific research outcomes make a significant, novel contribution to the field.

Programme Content

The programme will be taught part-time by distance learning over a period of normally 3 to 5 years, or one year full time in house. It is comprised of five compulsory 30-credit taught modules and one 60 credit research project module.

Module 1 - Mechanics
Module 2 - Biomechanics
Module 3 - Rehabilitation Technology
Module 4 - Orthopaedic Technology
Module 5 - Statistics

Methods of Teaching and Assessment

Modules 1-5:
Teaching in modules 1-5 will be delivered through distance learning module components, each comprised of a module component guide and several component units. Tutor support will be available via email, web conferencing, written correspondence and telephone.

Assessment of modules 1-5 will be by examination with the option of sitting exams upon completion of each individual module or upon completion of all five modules. Assessment is weighted (80%) by exam and (20%) by coursework.

Successful completion of the PGDip modules 1-5 is required to progress to the research project component. Successful completion of course work will normally be required prior to sitting the examination papers. Each of the two components of assessment for the PGCert and PGDip (course work and examination) must have a minimum grade of D3 to pass and progress to the full MSc programme.

Module 6 - Research Project:
During the research project, learning will be partly experiential, partly directed and partly self-directed. The research project will be assessed through the presentation of a thesis, and the final mark will be moderated through an oral exam (60 credits).

why study at Dundee?

In 2013 the MCh (Orth) Dundee, course was granted full accreditation by the Royal College of Surgeons of
England. This accreditation is extremely important and comes as the department is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of the course. This is the only face-to-face course accredited by the College outside of England.

“It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall
personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write
a thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in
field of Orthopaedic surgery” International Student Barometer, 2009

Career Prospects

The programme will prepare graduates for a research-focused clinical career in the NHS or academia, and is particularly well positioned to prepare graduates for entry into a clinical academic career path.

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
* The taught elements are conducted by self-directed learning modules as with distance learning but the project will be undertaken in-house. The candidate will be attached to a consultant firm as an observer.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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The School offers a two-year Master’s degree in Physics in partnership with the South East Physics Network (SEPnet) which comprises the universities of Kent, Portsmouth, Queen Mary London, Royal Holloway London, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex. Read more
The School offers a two-year Master’s degree in Physics in partnership with the South East Physics Network (SEPnet) which comprises the universities of Kent, Portsmouth, Queen Mary London, Royal Holloway London, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex.

The programme involves both a taught and research component.

Key benefits

This is a unique opportunity to join the only programme of its kind in the UK and to tailor it to your individual needs. Here are just some of the benefits:

• You can choose to study at any one of the seven universities within the SEPnet consortium. This offers great flexibility and variety - you can even change location for your second year.
• Through events and state-of-the-art video conferencing, you’ll benefit from the combined facilities, specialist knowledge and brilliant minds at all of the universities.
• Our European Masters is designed similarly to Erasmus and Socrates programmes.
• Recognised by European employers and equivalent to 120 ECTS credits, you’ll be qualified to pursue a career in physics or take on a PhD anywhere in the world.
• Our graduates are highly sought after by global employers which opens up a whole world of possibilities.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/16/physics-euromasters

Course detail

Spend a year studying at your choice of seven world-class universities in the South of England that are at the forefront of pioneering research from nanoscales to cosmology, from experiments to theory. Then spend a year in research working with some of the finest minds in physics on groundbreaking research projects such as ATLAS and LOFAR that push the boundaries of science.

In the first year, you will follow a taught Master’s course, which includes specialised research, and in the second year you will undertake an advanced research project with the option to change locations to a SEPnet partner university or research institution. This may include Cern, Switzerland, the UK’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS, Diamond or NPL. The School of Physical Sciences at Kent offers EuroMasters research strands in Atomic and Condensed Matter and Astrophysics.

Purpose

Study the European way: the MSc in Physics (EuroMasters) is fully compatible with the European Credit Transfer Accumulation System across the European Union and other collaborating European countries, and qualifies students to pursue a PhD or a career in physics upon completion. It is also open to UK entrants.

Applications

Although the delivery of this programme is consistent, the criteria, application process and scholarship opportunities will depend on the university you want to study it at in your first year. They are:

• Queen Mary - University of London
• Royal Holloway - University of London
• University of Kent
• University of Portsmouth
• University of Southampton
• University of Surrey
• University of Sussex

So, to discover more about our programme, scholarship and research projects, click the 'visit website' link below.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This programme is for graduates with a strong grounding in forensic science who wish to advance their knowledge of the field. It prepares you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police or forensic practice, or research. Read more
This programme is for graduates with a strong grounding in forensic science who wish to advance their knowledge of the field.

It prepares you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police or forensic practice, or research. You develop command, control and management skills that will enable you to present expert evidential incident reports to the highest standard at court.

You also develop your knowledge and understanding of advanced laboratory analytical methods applied to forensic investigation. This enables you to select the most appropriate analytical techniques for forensic investigation and to use a wide range of advanced analytic apparatus to evidential standards.

This programme helps you to develop an integrated and critical understanding of forensic science to prepare you to undertake a PhD in any associated discipline.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/5/forensic-science

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

PS601 - Fires and Explosions (15 credits)
PS637 - DNA Analysis & Interpretation (15 credits)
PS700 - Physical Science Research Planning (15 credits)
PS702 - Contemporary and Advanced Issues in Forensic Science (15 credits)
PS704 - Major Incident Management (15 credits)
PS713 - Substances of Abuse (15 credits)
PS720 - Advanced Forensic Project Laboratory (30 credits)
PS780 - MSC Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by examination and coursework.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- develop your integrated and critically aware understanding of forensic science and to prepare you to undertake a PhD in any associated disciplines

- prepare you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police, or forensic practice or research

- develop your command, control, and management skills in relation to major incidents, and to prepare and present expert evidential incident reports at court to the highest standard

- develop a clear recognition of the constraints and opportunities of the environment in which professional forensic science is carried out

- develop a variety of Masters’ level intellectual and transferable skills

- equip you with the learning skills to keep abreast of developments in the continually evolving field of forensic science and forensic investigation

- enable you to realise your academic potential.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows. Read more
Research degrees may be undertaken in the three main areas of research interest in the Laboratory. The growing number of academic staff are supported in their research by the technical staff and post-doctoral research fellows.

We make every attempt to allocate you to a supervisor directly in your field of interest, consistent with available funding and staff loading. When you apply, please give specific indications of your research interest – including, where appropriate, the member(s) of staff you wish to work with – and whether you are applying for a studentship or propose to be self-funded.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/18/chemistry

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Research areas

- Applied Optics Group (AOG):

Optical sensors
This activity largely covers research into the fundamental properties of guided wave interferometers, and their application in fields ranging from monitoring bridge structures to diagnostic procedures in medicine.

Biomedical imaging/Optical coherence tomography (OCT)
OCT is a relatively new technique which can provide very high-resolution images of tissue, and which has a major application in imaging the human eye. We are investigating different time domain and spectral domain OCT configurations.

The Group is developing systems in collaboration with a variety of different national and international institutions to extend the OCT capabilities from systems dedicated to eye imaging to systems for endoscopy, imaging skin and tooth caries. Distinctively, the OCT systems developed at Kent can provide both transverse and longitudinal images from the tissue, along with a confocal image, useful in associating the easy to interpret en-face view with the more traditional OCT cross section views.

The Group also conducts research on coherence gated wavefront sensors and multiple path interferometry, that extend the hardware technology of OCT to imaging with reduced aberrations and to sensing applications of optical time domain reflectometry.

- Forensic Imaging Group (FIG):

The research of the forensic imaging team is primarily applied, focusing on mathematical and computational techniques and employing a wide variety of image processing and analysis methods for applications in modern forensic science. The Group has attracted approximately £850,000 of research funding in the last five years, from several academic, industrial and commercial organisations in the UK and the US. The Group also collaborates closely with the Forensic Psychology Group of the Open University.

Current active research projects include:

- the development of high-quality, fast facial composite systems based on evolutionary algorithms and statistical models of human facial appearance

- interactive, evolutionary search methods and evolutionary design

- statistically rigorous ageing of photo-quality images of the human face (for tracing and identifying missing persons)

- real and pseudo 3D models for modelling and analysis of the human face

- generating ‘mathematically fair’ virtual line-ups for suspect identification.

- Functional Materials Group (FMG):
The research in FMG is concerned with synthesis and characterisation of functional materials, as exemplified by materials with useful optical, catalytic, or electronic properties, and with an
emerging theme in biomaterials. The Group also uses computer modelling studies to augment
experimental work. The research covers the following main areas:

- Amorphous and nanostructured solids
- Soft functional material
- Theory and modelling of materials

- Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science (CAPS):
The group’s research focuses on observational and modelling programmes in star formation, planetary science and early solar system bodies, galactic astronomy and astrobiology. We gain data from the largest telescopes in the world and in space, such as ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the New Technology Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. We also use our in-house facilities which include a two-stage light gas gun for impact studies.

Staff are involved in a wide range of international collaborative research projects. Areas of particular interest include: star formation, extragalactic astronomy, solar system science and instrumentation development.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Molecular Life Sciences programme focuses on the molecular aspects of the fields of nutrition, health, nature and the living environment and works in close coordination with colleagues from different disciplines. Read more

MSc Molecular Life Sciences

The Molecular Life Sciences programme focuses on the molecular aspects of the fields of nutrition, health, nature and the living environment and works in close coordination with colleagues from different disciplines.

Programme summary

The Molecular Life Sciences programme focuses on molecules and their properties. It seeks to discover relationships between the physical and chemical properties of molecules, particularly the role of complex molecules in living systems. It is an interdisciplinary programme that combines chemistry, physics and biology. The aim of the programme is to enable students to conduct independent research at the interface of chemistry, biology and physics, or in an applied field such as medicine, the environment, food sciences or (bio) nanotechnology. The programme is tailormade and thesis-oriented, with the thesis being the culmination of the study.

Specialisations

Biological Chemistry
By combining the principles of chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology, genetics and bioinformatics, this specialisation enables students to contribute new insights to the life sciences. Increasingly complex areas are studied, such as the molecular regulation of growth and cell differentiation, gene control during development and disease, and the transfer of genetic traits. Another important field is enzymology where enzyme mechanisms are studied with the aim of understanding and modifying their properties to make new compounds or biological membranes.

Physical Chemistry
This specialisation uses the most advanced technologies to focus on the chemical and physical properties of molecules and their behaviour in chemical and biochemical processes. The processes in nature are used as models for studying and synthesising new compounds with interesting chemical or physical properties for applications such as LCDs, biosensors or food science. Students can major in the fields of biophysics, organic chemistry or physical chemistry and colloid science.

Biomedical Research
This specialisation equips graduates with key skills in the natural sciences and enables them to use these skills as part of an integrated approach. Many recent breakthroughs in biomedical research have taken place at the interface between chemistry, biology and physics, so it is logical that many of our graduates enter careers in biomedical research. The explicit aim of this specialisation is to prepare students for careers at a medical research institute, academic hospital or a company in the pharmaceutical industry. As a result, students also complete their internships at such locations.

Physical Biology
Students in this specialisation learn to view biomolecules from a physical point of view. They use techniques in biophysics, physical chemistry, microspectroscopy and magnetic resonance (MRI) to contribute to areas such as cell-cell communication, transformation of light into chemical energy, and protein interactions. Students can major in fields such as biochemistry, biophysics, microbiology, molecular biology, plant physiology, physical chemistry and colloid science.

Your future career

By combining the power of chemistry, physics and biology, graduates are able to make a significant contribution to fundamental and/or applied research in fields such as (bio) nanotechnology, biotechnology, environmental research, biomedical research, nutrition and the food sciences. Our graduates enter careers at universities, research institutes and industrial laboratories. The first job for many of our graduates is a four year PhD project at a university or research institute. This is not only an excellent preparation for a research career, but it also prepares you for management positions. Others become science journalists, teachers or consultants in government or industry.

Project Flu Vaccination for bacteria.
Together with his colleagues of the Laboratory of Microbiology, professor John van der Oost unravelled part of the working of the immune systems of bacteria that had been infected by a virus. Theoretically, this knowledge allows for other bacteria to be protected against specific viruses and, thus, may be considered to be a flu vaccination for bacteria. Understanding this process in simple organisms on a molecular level, is the first step in revealing the mechanism of viral infection in the human body. This can be the starting point for a whole new line of medicines.

Related programmes:
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Food Technology
MSc Bioinformatics
MSc Nutrition and Health
MSc Plant Biotechnology
MSc Biology

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Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success. Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. Read more
Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success
Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. As new discoveries are made, so are new industries — and new opportunities. Whether you’re currently a chemistry professional or seeking to enter the field, Penn’s rigorous Master of Chemical Sciences (MCS) builds on your level of expertise to prepare you to take advantage of the myriad career possibilities available in the chemical sciences. With a faculty of leading academic researchers and experienced industry consultants, we provide the academic and professional opportunities you need to achieve your unique goals.

The Penn Master of Chemical Sciences connects you with the resources of an Ivy League institution and provides you with theoretical and technical expertise in biological chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry and materials. In our various seminar series, you will also regularly hear from chemistry professionals who work in a variety of research and applied settings, allowing you to consider new paths and how best to take advantage of the program itself to prepare for your ideal career.

Preparation for professional success
If you’ve recently graduated from college and have a strong background in chemistry, the Master of Chemical Sciences offers you a exceptional preparation to enter a chemistry profession. In our program, you will gain the skills and confidence to become a competitive candidate for potential employers as you discover and pursue your individual interests within the field of chemistry. Our faculty members bring a wealth of research expertise and industry knowledge to help you define your career direction.

For working professionals in the chemical or pharmaceutical industries, the Master of Chemical Sciences accelerates your career by expanding and refreshing your expertise and enhancing your research experiences. We provide full- and part-time options so you can pursue your education without interrupting your career. You can complete the 10-course program in one and a half to four years, depending on course load.

The culminating element of our curriculum, the capstone project, both tests and defines your program mastery. During the capstone exercise, you will propose and defend a complex project of your choice, that allows you to stake out a new professional niche and demonstrate your abilities to current or prospective employers.

Graduates will pursue fulfilling careers in a variety of cutting-edge jobs across government, education and corporate sectors. As part of the Penn Alumni network, you’ll join a group of professionals that spans the globe and expands your professional horizons.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Chemical Sciences degree is designed to give you a well-rounded, mechanistic foundation in a blend of chemistry topics. To that end, the curriculum is structured with a combination of core concentration courses and electives, which allow you to focus on topics best suited to your interests and goals.

As a new student in the Master of Chemical Sciences program, you will meet with your academic advisor to review your previous experiences and your future goals. Based on this discussion, you will create an individualized academic schedule.

The Master of Chemical Sciences requires the minimum completion of 10 course units (c.u.)* as follows:

Pro-Seminar (1 c.u.)
Core concentration courses (4-6 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Elective courses in Chemistry, such as computational chemistry, environmental chemistry, medicinal chemistry, catalysis and energy (2-4 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Optional Independent Studies (1 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
Pro-Seminar course (CHEM 599: 1 c.u.)
The Pro-Seminar will review fundamental concepts regarding research design, the scientific method and professional scientific communication. The course will also familiarize students with techniques for searching scientific databases and with the basis of ethical conduct in science.

Concentration courses
The concentration courses allow you to develop specific expertise and also signify your mastery of a field to potential employers.

The number of elective courses you take will depend upon the requirements for your area of concentration, and upon the curriculum that you plan with your academic advisor. These concentration courses allow you to acquire the skills and the critical perspective necessary to master a chemical sciences subdiscipline, and will help prepare you to pursue the final capstone project (below).

You may choose from the following six chemical sciences concentrations:

Biological Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry
Materials
Independent Studies
The optional Independent Studies course will be offered each fall and spring semester, giving you an opportunity to participate in one of the research projects being conducted in one of our chemistry laboratories. During the study, you will also learn analytical skills relevant to your capstone research project and career goals. You can participate in the Independent Studies course during your first year in the program as a one-course unit elective course option. (CHEM 910: 1 c.u. maximum)

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Chemical Sciences program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will develop a project drawing from your learning in and outside of the classroom to demonstrate mastery of an area in the chemical sciences.

The subject of this project is related to your professional concentration and may be selected to complement or further develop a work-related interest. It's an opportunity to showcase your specialization and your unique perspective within the field.

Your capstone component may be a Penn laboratory research project, an off-campus laboratory research project or a literature-based review project. All components will require a completed scientific report. It is expected that the capstone project will take an average of six months to complete. Most students are expected to start at the end of the first academic year in the summer and conclude at the end of fall semester of the second year. Depending on the capstone option selected, students may begin to work on the capstone as early as the spring semester of their first year in the program.

All capstone project proposals must be pre-approved by your concentration advisor, Master of Chemical Sciences Program Director and if applicable, your off-campus project supervisor. If necessary, nondisclosure agreements will be signed by students securing projects with private companies. Additionally, students from private industry may be able to complete a defined capstone project at their current place of employment. All capstone projects culminate in a final written report, to be graded by the student's concentration advisor who is a member of the standing faculty or staff instructor in the Chemistry Department.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences. Read more
Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences.

The course is aimed at introducing students to quantitative aspects of biological and medical sciences. It is intended for mathematicians, computer scientists and others wishing to learn about the subject in preparation for a PhD course or a career in industry. It is also suitable for students with a first degree in biosciences as long as they have strong quantitative skills (which should be documented in the application).

This 11-month course consists of core modules in bioinformatics, scientific programming with R, genomics, systems biology and network biology. Before the start of the first term, students are required to attend an introductory course in molecular biology. Courses are delivered in association with several University departments from the Schools of Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences, groups within the School of Clinical Medicine, the European Bioinformatics Institute and the Sanger Institute. The course concludes with a three-month internship in a university or industrial laboratory.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maammpcbi

Course detail

After completing the MPhil in Computational Biology, students will be expected to have:

- acquired a sound knowledge of a range of tools and methods in computational biology;
- developed the capacity for independent study and problem solving at a higher level;
- undertaken an internship project within a laboratory or group environment, and produced a project report;
- given at least one presentation on their project.

Format

The course combines taught lectures (October-April), followed by a summer internship project (May-August). There are typically 3-4 taught modules per term, and each module consists of 16 hours of lectures. Each module is assessed by coursework, and there is one general examination in May.

Placements

Students undertake a mandatory internship (May to August) in either a university or industrial laboratory. The Department will compile a list of possible opportunities which students can discuss directly with the host laboratory. Alternatively students may organise their own internship, subject to the approval of the Course Director.

Assessment

A 18,000 word (maximum) report must be written to summarise the student's internship. An oral presentation on this report must also be given.

Each module is assessed typically by two written assignments. These assignments involve significant computational elements.

A compulsory two-hour general examination is sat in May.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to apply for a PhD at Cambridge must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for continuation by the relevant deadline.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences. Read more
Introduced in 2004, this course was developed by the Cambridge Computational Biology Institute, an interdisciplinary centre bringing together the unique strengths of Cambridge in medicine, biology, mathematics and the physical sciences.

The course is aimed at introducing students to quantitative aspects of biological and medical sciences. It is intended for mathematicians, computer scientists and others wishing to learn about the subject in preparation for a PhD course or a career in industry. It is also suitable for students with a first degree in biosciences as long as they have strong quantitative skills (which should be documented in the application).

This 11-month course consists of core modules in bioinformatics, scientific programming with R, genomics, systems biology and network biology. Before the start of the first term, students are required to attend an introductory course in molecular biology. Courses are delivered in association with several University departments from the Schools of Biological Sciences and Physical Sciences, groups within the School of Clinical Medicine, the European Bioinformatics Institute and the Sanger Institute. The course concludes with a three-month internship in a university or industrial laboratory.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maammpcbi

Learning Outcomes

After completing the MPhil in Computational Biology, students will be expected to have:

- acquired a sound knowledge of a range of tools and methods in computational biology;
- developed the capacity for independent study and problem solving at a higher level;
- undertaken an internship project within a laboratory or group environment, and produced a project report;
- given at least one presentation on their project.

Format

The course combines taught lectures (October-April), followed by a summer internship project (May-August). There are typically 3-4 taught modules per term, and each module consists of 16 hours of lectures. Each module is assessed by coursework, and there is one general examination in May.

The Course Director is available throughout the year for individual meetings, and briefly meets termly with each student to check on progress. Each lecturer is also encouraged to arrange an office hour whereby students can talk about their progress.

Lectures: Typically 16 hours per module, with students taking 8 modules.

Journal Clubs: A weekly seminar is held during the first two terms on topics across Computational Biology. These seminars help students to select an appropriate project.

Placements

Students undertake a mandatory internship (May to August) in either a university or industrial laboratory. The Department will compile a list of possible opportunities which students can discuss directly with the host laboratory. Alternatively students may organise their own internship, subject to the approval of the Course Director.

Assessment

A 18,000 word (maximum) report must be written to summarise the student's internship. An oral presentation on this report must also be given.

Students give a 25 minute presentation on their project as part of the formal assessment. Some assessed coursework may also require students to present their work.

Each module is assessed typically by two written assignments. These assignments involve significant computational elements.

A compulsory two-hour general examination is sat in May.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to apply for a PhD at Cambridge must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for continuation by the relevant deadline.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Through a mix of lectures, laboratories, clinical demonstrations and hospital visits, our MSc in Medical Imaging will develop you as a professional, enhancing your ability to take on new challenges with confidence. Read more
Through a mix of lectures, laboratories, clinical demonstrations and hospital visits, our MSc in Medical Imaging will develop you as a professional, enhancing your ability to take on new challenges with confidence. This programme is run together with the Department of Physics.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Medical imaging is a rapidly-growing discipline within the healthcare sector, involving clinicians, physicists, computer scientists and those in IT industries.

This programme delivers the expertise you'll need to forge a career in medical imaging, including radiation physics, image processing, biology, computer vision, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Image Processing and Vision
-Professional Skills for Clinical Science and Engineering
-Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-AI and AI Programming
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Diagnostic Apps of Ionising Radiation
-Non-Ionising Radiation Imaging
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPORT

To support your learning, we hold regular MSc group meetings where any aspect of the programme, technical or non-technical, can be discussed in an informal atmosphere. This allows you to raise any problems that you would like to have addressed and encourages peer-based learning and general group discussion.

We provide computing support with any specialised software required during the programme, for example, Matlab.

The Department’s student common room is also covered by the university’s open-access wireless network, which makes it a very popular location for individual and group work using laptops and mobile devices. There is also a Faculty quiet room for individual study.

We pride ourselves on the many opportunities that we provide to visit collaborating hospitals. These enable you to see first-hand demonstrations of medical imaging facilities and to benefit from lectures by professional practitioners.

To support material presented during the programme, you will also undertake a selection of ultrasound and radiation detection experiments, hosted by our sister MSc programme in Medical Physics.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Information retrieval. Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental content
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Surrey’s satellite and space technology programmes are renowned internationally, and our graduates are held in equally high regard. Read more
Surrey’s satellite and space technology programmes are renowned internationally, and our graduates are held in equally high regard.

The Masters in Satellite Communications Engineering is a leader in Europe in equipping students with the necessary background to enter the satellite industry or to continue on to a research degree.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our Masters programme in Satellite Communications Engineering is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary skills required for careers in the satellite and space industries.

We have an exceptional concentration of academic staff experienced in the satellite area, in addition to well-established contacts with all the major satellite manufacturers, operators and service providers.

Industry participates in the MSc programme in both lecturing and projects, and facilitates excellent engagement for our students. Graduation from this programme will therefore make you very attractive to the relevant space-related industries that employ over 6,500 people in the UK alone.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Space Dynamics & Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Principles of Telecommunications & Packet Networks
-Satellite Communications Fundamentals
-RF Systems & Circuit Design
-Data & Internet Networking
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation & Control
-Launch Vehicles & Propulsion
-Network & Service Management & Control
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Standard Project

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPORT

Through consistent investment, we have built up an impressive infrastructure to support our students and researchers. The University of Surrey hosts Surrey Space Centre – a unique facility comprising academics and engineers from our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

Our mission control centre was designed and developed by students to support international CubeSat operations as part of the GENSO network, and it also supports the development of the University’s own educational satellites.

Our teaching laboratories provide ‘hands-on’ experience of satellite design and construction through the use of EyasSAT nano-satellite kits. They also house meteorological satellite receiving stations for the live reception of satellite weather images.

Elsewhere, our fully equipped RF lab has network analyser, signal and satellite link simulators. The Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment, and roof-mounted antennas to communicating live with satellites.

A security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation. We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including Matlab, and you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house.

Satellite Communications Engineering students can also make use of SatNEX, a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications supported by ESA; a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe. This is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by partners.

Our own spin-out company, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, is situated close by on the Surrey Research Park and provides ready access to satellite production and industrial facilities. In addition, we have a strategic relationship with EADS Airbus Europe-wide and several other major communications companies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). The programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin satellite communications engineering.
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within satellite communications engineering.
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s. Read more
Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s.

Since then, our sustained programme of building complete satellites, performing mission planning, working with international launch agencies and providing in-orbit operations has kept us at the forefront of the space revolution –utilising new advances in technology to decrease the cost of space exploration.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our Masters in Space Engineering programme is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary knowledge and skills required for a career working with space technology and its applications.

Surrey students have access to all aspects of the design and delivery of spacecraft and payloads, and as a result are very attractive to employers in space-related industries.

As we develop and execute complete space missions, from initial concept to hardware design, manufacturing and testing, to in orbit operations (controlled by our ground station at the Surrey Space Centre), you will have the chance to be involved in, and gain experience of, real space missions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Space Avionics
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin space engineering.
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within space engineering.
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff. Read more
The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff.

Taught material is presented in the Michaelmas Term, usually in the form of seminars. The material is organized in two strands, suitable for students interested in the humanities and social sciences or in the natural sciences. It is examined through the submission of three essays, which can take the form of research papers. In the Lent and Easter terms students carry out research towards their dissertations. Dissertation topics are agreed with supervisors and are closely integrated with the ongoing research activities of the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). Students are expected to participate in internal and external research seminars, and a research forum.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmps

Course detail

The outcomes of the course are achieved both through focused study of specialised aspects of research on the Arctic and Antarctic, either in terms of Arts and Humanities or the Sciences, and through the development of research skills and methods. The following outcomes of student learning are sought:

Knowledge of ideas: Students gain familiarity with an appropriate range of intellectual and methodological traditions relevant to the study of the Arctic and Antarctic. For the humanities and social science strand, students draw on material from Geography, Anthropology, Political Science and other social sciences, and understand the significance of different epistemological positions that provide the context for research. For the physical sciences strand, students will become familiar with theories and empirical work from, amongst other areas, the fields of glaciology, oceanography and atmospheric science. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the field-based, remote sensing and modelling techniques used in polar science research. The teaching is provided via lectures and seminars, research supervision via bi-weekly meetings between students and their supervisor and sessions concerning research skills. Students also attend the research seminars held in their research groups. This allows exchange of ideas and debate with more experienced academic researchers and their peers;

Critical skills: Students become skilled and critical readers of Arctic and/or Antarctic publications and data sets. This is achieved through structured reading associated with each module, as well as via supervision on the essays and dissertation;

Substantive knowledge of ideas: Students gain in-depth knowledge of substantive areas of Arctic and/or Antarctic research. This knowledge is gained in the modules on The Emerging Arctic, Northern Peoples, Polar Remote Sensing, Glacier and Ice Sheet Dynamics: Present and Past. Students gain an in-depth knowledge either of underlying patterns of development, conservation and cultural transformation in the Arctic and/or Antarctic regions, or of the physical processes at work in these regions, how these have changed in the past and are changing currently, and the methods and techniques for investigating them;

Research design skills: Students develop their capacity to frame research questions, to derive appropriate research designs, and develop awareness of different epistemological approaches. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course;

Practical research skills: Students gain a competence and confidence in using a range of qualitative and/or quantitative methods for gathering, analysing and interpreting data. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course and the dissertation;

Presentation skills: Students gain skills in the presentation of research-based evidence and argument. Students are expected to take an active role in the research seminars of the research groups to which they belong and to contribute actively to seminar discussions. They are also expected to present their dissertation aims, methods, preliminary results, and plans for future work at a student forum held part way through their dissertation research period;

Management and other transferable skills: Students gain skills in managing a research project, and its execution (including, where appropriate, elements of data management, understanding ethics and codes of good practice in cross-cultural research, understanding uncertainty, disseminating research). Several of these elements are taught in the ‘Research Training’ sections of course, and then are extended and applied via the dissertation research, which has individual supervision from an experienced researcher.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation that, at the discretion of the examiners, can include an oral examination on the thesis and the essays and on the general field of knowledge.
- Three essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words each.

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

AHRC for Arts and History topics approved by the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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