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Masters Degrees (Physical Science)

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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc will take you between two and two and half years of full-time study or up to four years part time. In the first year of your MSc you'll take several courses related to your specialist subject area. Next, you'll carry out in-depth supervised research for 12–15 months and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc you'll need a Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area. You may also be able to qualify for entry if you have appropriate work or other experience.

Range of Master's programmes

Choose to complete this Master's programme or one of the specialist science Master's programmes. Most specialist programmes are 180 points and don't require a thesis.

If you have already done a BSc(Hons) you can apply to go directly into the 120-point MSc by thesis.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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This MSc is specifically aimed at those pursuing a professional career in neuroimaging, either in clinical practice or in neuroscience research. Read more

This MSc is specifically aimed at those pursuing a professional career in neuroimaging, either in clinical practice or in neuroscience research. This multidisciplinary programme provides training in both the basic scientific and technological principles of modern neuroimaging methods, and in their application to understand neurological function and neurological disorders. Study by distance learning is also available.

About this degree

Students will develop a foundational knowledge of neuroanatomy, understand the principles and main technical aspects of neuroimaging instrumentation and data acquisition, basic image processing and image analysis techniques, and gain a good working knowledge of modern methods for scientific and clinical investigation of the human nervous system using neuroimaging.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), a library project (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma is offered in full-time, part-time and distance learning mode, consisting of six core modules (90 credits) and a library project (30 credits).

Core modules

All of the Advanced Neuroimaging modules are considered core modules

  • Physical Science module 1: Introductory Science and Methods
  • Physical Science module 2: Imaging Modalities
  • Physical Science module 3: Advanced Imaging
  • Clinical module 1: Introduction to Neuroanatomy, Systems & Disease
  • Clinical module 2: Pathology & Diagnostic Imaging I
  • Clinical module 3: Pathology & Diagnostic Imaging II
  • Library project
  • Research Project

Please note: every face-to-face module has a distance learning equivalent with alternative learning activities.

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake a library project which is assessed by a 5,000-word project, and a laboratory research project which culminates in a 10,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught by lectures and workshops delivered by experts in various clinical and technical fields of neuroimaging. Assessment is through written examination, coursework, presentations, research project, dissertation and viva voce. Distance learning students may spend up to three months in London carrying out the research project and receiving relevant training and mentoring. Alternatively they may carry out an extended systematic review of the literature related to a chosen field within neuroimaging. In exceptional circumstances students may carry out the research project remotely if they are based at a hospital with established research links with Principal Investigators at the UCL Institute of Neurology.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Advanced Neuroimaging MSc

Careers

Graduates of the programme will have developed the necessary knowledge and skills essential for a future research career in the areas of neuroradiology, imaging neuroscience or neuroimaging technology.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Associate Image Analyst, IXICO
  • Neuroradiologist, Hospital Eugenio Espejo
  • Radiographer, East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, UCL
  • Doctor, Addenbrooke's Hospital (NHS) and studying Radiology, University of Cambridge

Employability

Students on this programme are immersed in a world-class clinical and scientific environment, taught by leading experts in the field. For clinicians, and professions allied to health care, the programme will equip them with a sound understanding of neuroimaging techniques. For medical physicists it will enable them to develop their theoretical understanding in an internationally renowned centre. A number of high-achieving students on the programme will be offered the opportunity to undertake a paid internship at a London-based company which runs neuroimaging clinical trials.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The focus of this degree is neuroimaging of neurological disease. Together with our associated hospital, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, the UCL Institute of Neurology promotes research that is of direct clinical relevance to improved patient care and treatment.

With its concentration of clinical and applied scientific activity the institute is a unique national resource for postgraduate training in neurology, its associated disciplines and the basic neurosciences. During their time at Queen Square students will have the opportunity to contribute to world-leading research and have access to cutting-edge neuroimaging facilities.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Neurology

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc by thesis will take you between 12 and 15 months to complete. You'll carry out in-depth supervised research and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc by thesis you'll need an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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This programme is for graduates with a strong grounding in forensic science who wish to advance their knowledge of the field. It prepares you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police or forensic practice, or research. Read more
This programme is for graduates with a strong grounding in forensic science who wish to advance their knowledge of the field.

It prepares you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police or forensic practice, or research. You develop command, control and management skills that will enable you to present expert evidential incident reports to the highest standard at court.

You also develop your knowledge and understanding of advanced laboratory analytical methods applied to forensic investigation. This enables you to select the most appropriate analytical techniques for forensic investigation and to use a wide range of advanced analytic apparatus to evidential standards.

This programme helps you to develop an integrated and critical understanding of forensic science to prepare you to undertake a PhD in any associated discipline.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/5/forensic-science

About The School of Physical Sciences

The School offers postgraduate students the opportunity to participate in groundbreaking science in the realms of physics, chemistry, forensics and astronomy. With strong international reputations, our staff provide plausible ideas, well-designed projects, research training and enthusiasm within a stimulating environment. Recent investment in modern laboratory equipment and computational facilities accelerates the research.

The School maintains a focus on progress to ensure each student is able to compete with their peers in their chosen field. We carefully nurture the skills, abilities and motivation of our students which are vital elements in our research activity. We offer higher degree programmes in chemistry and physics (including specialisations in forensics, astronomy and space science) by research. We also offer taught programmes in Forensic Science, studied over one year full-time, and a two-year European-style Master’s in Physics.

Our principal research covers a wide variety of topics within physics, astronomy and chemistry, ranging from specifically theoretical work on surfaces and interfaces, through mainstream experimental condensed matter physics, astrobiology, space science and astrophysics, to applied areas such as biomedical imaging, forensic imaging and space vehicle protection. We scored highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with 25% of our research ranked as “world-leading” and our Functional Materials Research Group ranked 2nd nationally in the Metallurgy and Materials discipline.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

PS601 - Fires and Explosions (15 credits)
PS637 - DNA Analysis & Interpretation (15 credits)
PS700 - Physical Science Research Planning (15 credits)
PS702 - Contemporary and Advanced Issues in Forensic Science (15 credits)
PS704 - Major Incident Management (15 credits)
PS713 - Substances of Abuse (15 credits)
PS720 - Advanced Forensic Project Laboratory (30 credits)
PS780 - MSC Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by examination and coursework.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- develop your integrated and critically aware understanding of forensic science and to prepare you to undertake a PhD in any associated disciplines

- prepare you for a professional role in forensic science within the criminal or civil judicial system, police, or forensic practice or research

- develop your command, control, and management skills in relation to major incidents, and to prepare and present expert evidential incident reports at court to the highest standard

- develop a clear recognition of the constraints and opportunities of the environment in which professional forensic science is carried out

- develop a variety of Masters’ level intellectual and transferable skills

- equip you with the learning skills to keep abreast of developments in the continually evolving field of forensic science and forensic investigation

- enable you to realise your academic potential.

Careers

All programmes in the School of Physical Sciences equip you with the tools you need to conduct research, solve problems, communicate effectively and transfer skills to the workplace, which means our graduates are always in high demand. Our links with industry not only provide you with the opportunity to gain work experience during your degree, but also equip you with the general and specialist skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the workplace.

Typical employment destinations for graduates from the physics programmes include power companies, aerospace, defence, optoelectronics and medical industries. Typical employment destinations for graduates from our forensic science and chemistry programmes include government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, laboratories, research or academia.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Join us for our. Master Open Day. to find out more about our courses. This Masters will prepare you in the physical sciences and mathematics for a research career in climate, atmospheric or environmental sciences. Read more

Join us for our Master Open Day to find out more about our courses.

This Masters will prepare you in the physical sciences and mathematics for a research career in climate, atmospheric or environmental sciences. It ideally bridges the gap between undergraduate studies in physical/natural sciences and engineering, and study for a PhD.

Alternatively, if you decide to leave academia, the highly transferable skills gained from this course could lead to a research role in industry or government.

Gain a broad overview of physical problems in climate and atmospheric science, together with a sound physical understanding of natural processes. Alongside this, develop highly transferable skills to conduct research in these subjects with a strong emphasis on quantitative data analysis and physical and numerical modelling.

A career in scientific research is always interesting – sometimes exciting – but might not suit everyone. This course provides an excellent opportunity to get a taste of postgraduate research study and decide whether it is really the career for you.

Course highlights:

Interact with academics who are at the forefront of major global issues. Leeds is a leading centre of excellence across both the physical science of the climate and atmosphere science, and the resultant socio-economic impacts and processes:

National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS), one of six research centres funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), providing its core atmospheric research.

Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science (ICAS) is the UK’s most diverse academic institute for atmospheric research.

Priestley International Centre for Climate Change (PICC) a world-leading centre for policy-relevant, solution-driven climate research.

Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) is a research centre that studies processes in the Earth's polar latitudes that may affect the Earth's albedo, polar atmosphere and ocean circulation, and global sea level.

Develop your research skills – you will be regarded as a researcher in the School and expected to work closely with ICAS staff as well as presenting at the annual ICAS Science Conference along with academics and doctoral researchers.

Continue on to a PhD, or move into a research role in industry or government. Highly numerate graduates with training in independent research are widely sought after in many sectors.

The School's £23m building gives you access to world-class research, teaching and laboratory facilities, and dedicated computer facilities – many of which will be available to you throughout your studies.

You will be regarded as a researcher within the School and be expected to work closely with ICAS staff as well as presenting at the annual ICAS away day along with academic staff and doctoral researchers.

Programme team

Be taught by staff from across the School, primarily from ICAS. Your programme manager is Dr Ryan Neely (ICAS) who also teaches as well as regularly supervises your research project and provides tutorial support.




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A country's physical land resources are a fundamental pillar of support for human life and welfare. Read more
A country's physical land resources are a fundamental pillar of support for human life and welfare. Worldwide, population pressures and severe degradation, pollution and desertification problems are threatening this - for several countries relatively scarce - natural resource, and cause competition between agricultural or industrial purposes, urban planning and nature conservation. To guarantee a proper use and management of this for a nation basic commodity, well trained specialists with a thorough knowledge of the properties and characteristics of this natural resource, and a solid insight in factors and measures that may alter its actual state and value are warranted and call for a high standard scientific and practical education.

The main subject in Soil Science aims at training researchers, academics, government staff and expert consultants in the inventory and detailed characterization of land capacity, and of soils in particular. Graduates should be able to understand the development and evolution of soils under natural conditions or following human interference using field, map, laboratory and remote sensing data. They should have the scientific knowledge to use and manage soil and water in a sustainable way, and to optimize land use under different natural and environmental conditions.

Structure

The Master of Science degree programme in Physical Land Resources is a two year, full time course. The first year provides a fundamental basis in physical land resources, with a main subject in either Soil Science or Land Resources Engineering. The second year offers specialised courses in one of the two main subjects. The students have to prepare a master dissertation in the second year. Successful completion of the programme leads to the award of an Master of Science degree in Physical Land Resources. The course curriculum of the first year, and of the main subject in soil science of the second year is organised at the Ghent University, whereas all courses of the main subject in Land Resources Engineering of the second year are lectured at "Vrije Universiteit Brussel".

The academic year starts the last week of September. However students are advised to arrive in Ghent in the first week of September to follow the preparatory summer course.

Teaching methods
A wide variety of teaching methods are used in the PLR programme. All course units, except for “Internship” and “Master Dissertation” include lectures. Lectures are fundamental to provide students with the necessary basic knowledge in order to acquire the requested competences. Besides lectures the following teaching methods are very frequently used: practical classes, PC-room classes and coached exercises. Teaching methods like guided self-study, group work and microteaching are occasionally used. Field work and excursions are naturally an important component of the Physical Land Resources programme, especially in the first year.

Learning Outcomes

The Master of Science in Physical Land Resources is organized at both UGent and VUB and aims to contribute to an increased knowledge in Physical Land Resources both in terms of quantity (more experts with a broad knowledge) and of quality (knowledge and its use at an advanced scientific level). The incoming students have diverse backgrounds in geology-related sciences, civil engineering or agronomy and the large majority of students originate from developing countries.
-Possesses a broad knowledge at an advanced level in basic disciplines (soil physics, soil chemistry, soil mineralogy, meteorology and climatology) that provide a polyvalent scientific understandinga. needed to evaluate land potential for agricultural and environmental applications, understand the evolution of soils under natural and human-impacted conditions, and contribute to sustainable land use planning and integrated management of land and water (Soil Science); or in non-agricultural applications of land, such as geotechnical aspects, the role of soil and groundwater in water resources management and water supplies, and of land management in relation to other environmental and land use aspects (Land Resources Engineering).
-Possesses the basics to conduct field work (soil survey, soil profile description, soil sampling), interpret analytical data, classify the soil, and manage and interpret existing cartographic and remote sensing data using modern equipment, informatics and computer technology.
-Characterize soil physico-chemically and mineralogically with advanced techniques to understand soil processes, translate this to soil quality and assess the influences by and on natural and anthropogenic factors.
-Recognize interaction with other relevant science domains and identify the need to integrate them within the context of more advanced ideas and practical applications and problem solving.
-Demonstrate critical consideration of and reflection on known and new theories, models or interpretation within the specialty.
-Plan and execute target orientated experiments or simulations independently and critically evaluate the collected data.
-Develop and execute original scientific research and/or apply innovative ideas within research units.
-Formulate hypotheses, use or design experiments to test these hypotheses, report on the results, both written and orally, and communicate findings to experts and the general public.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The objective of this course is to introduce students to an inter-disciplinary approach to research, which utilises technologies and skills from a wide spectrum of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines to address fundamental questions originating in biology and medicine. Read more

Course Objective

The objective of this course is to introduce students to an inter-disciplinary approach to research, which utilises technologies and skills from a wide spectrum of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines to address fundamental questions originating in biology and medicine. During the course students will carry out a number of practicals. They will be introduced to selected advanced experimental techniques used in biomedical science and industry. The techniques include:
DNA-microarray and RT-PCR, Immunostaining and Confocal Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and Nano Hardness Tester, Mass Spectrometry, various chromatography methods and Infra-red spectroscopy.

Benefits of the Course

The programme offers the Biological Sciences graduate a means of achieving the mathematical, computational, and instrumentation skills necessary to work in biomedical science. Likewise the Physical Science/Engineering graduate will gain experience in aspects of cell biology, tissue engineering, and animal studies. The course work will draw mainly from courses already on offer to undergraduates in the Science faculty, but will also include new modules developed specifically for this course. Expertise from other research institutes and from industry will be used,where appropriate.

The course covers following areas:
Material Science and Biomaterials
Applied Biomedical Sciences
Cell & Molecular Biology: Advanced Technologies
Fundamental Concepts in Pharmacology
Human Body Structure
Protein Technology
Tissue Engineering
Bioinformatics
Radiation & Medical Physics
Molecular Medicine
Regulatory Compliance in Healthcare Manufacturing
Advanced Tissue Engineering
Introduction to Business
Scientific Writing

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the MSc in Biomedical Science with undergraduate degrees in engineering and science have gone on to work within the medical device and pharmaceutical industry, hospitals and academia.

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Why this course?. This taught MSc course gives you a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art research in nanoscience. It provides you with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary for this emerging area. Read more

Why this course?

This taught MSc course gives you a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art research in nanoscience. It provides you with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary for this emerging area.

The course is mainly designed to equip you for a research-based career in industry but it can also serve as a way of progressing towards a PhD.

Who’s the course suitable for?

This course will be of interest to physical science graduates looking to work in the field of nanoscience. It’s also suitable for those with an industrial background as a further training opportunity and a way of gaining insights into topics at the forefront of academic research.

The course

This course explores the frontiers of science on the nanoscale. It provides a strong grounding in basic nanoscience before progressing to advanced topics.

Taught classes have been developed from the many years of nanoscience research at the University in areas such as:

  • nanoscale imaging
  • nanoparticle fabrication and functionalisation
  • chemical physics
  • computational modelling of the nanoworld

You’ll study

Two semesters of formal teaching are followed by a three-month intensive project.

Research project

Following the taught classes, you’ll undertake a research intensive project in a relevant nanoscience topic.

The projects take place primarily in research labs located in the University’s physical science departments. There are some opportunities for relevant industrial placements.

Facilities

This course is run by the Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:

  • photophysics lab with world-leading instrumentation for fluorescence lifetime, spectra, microscopy, imaging and sensing
  • a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
  • the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
  • access to top-of-the-range facilities for high-performance computing
  • industry standard cleanroom in the Institute of Photonics

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in exams, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral exam.

Careers

What kind of jobs do Strathclyde Physics graduates get?

To answer this question we contacted some of our Physics graduates from all courses to find out what jobs they have. They are working across the world in a number of different roles including:

  • Medical Physicist
  • Senior Engineer
  • Professor
  • Systems Engineer
  • Treasury Analyst
  • Patent Attorney
  • Software Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Spacecraft Project Manager
  • Defence Scientist
  • Procurement Manager
  • Oscar winner


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Ocean acidification, energy resources, coastal erosion and flooding are just some of the issues that make ocean science such an important component when addressing the world’s most pressing environmental, energy and construction challenges. Read more
Ocean acidification, energy resources, coastal erosion and flooding are just some of the issues that make ocean science such an important component when addressing the world’s most pressing environmental, energy and construction challenges. This course allows you to tailor your study towards employment in a specific sector including oceanographic and environmental research and consultancy, marine renewable energy, marine conservation management, offshore exploration and hydrographic surveying.

You will equip yourself for a career in hydrographic surveying by choosing the hydrography pathway in the final year - study the exploration and sustainable management of marine resources, construction and environmental support. You’ll conduct a research or consultancy-type project closely linked to one of our marine science research groups or industrial partners, providing an experience of working with established marine scientists and contributing to current work in a wider context.

Key features

-Gain a sound knowledge base across all areas of ocean science with options to develop specialist skills in marine conservation, oceanography or hydrography.
-Specialise in subjects that most interest you including coastal dynamics, seafloor mapping, physical oceanography, meteorology, remote sensing, offshore exploration, biological oceanography, marine pollution and conservation.
-Equip yourself for a career in hydrographic surveying by choosing the hydrography pathway in the final year (with potential high-level professional FIG/IHO/ICA accreditation) - study the exploration and sustainable management of marine resources, construction and environmental support.
-Conduct a research or consultancy-type project closely linked to one of our marine science research groups or industrial partners, providing an experience of working with established marine scientists and contributing to current work in a wider context.
-Develop your range of practical skills with our own fully-equipped fleet of boats, a new £4.65 million Marine Station used as a base for fieldwork afloat, industry standard oceanographic and surveying equipment and a type-approved ship simulator.
-Option to take the industry-recognised professional diving qualification (HSE Professional SCUBA) alongside your degree, and an optional scientific diving module to provide training and qualification for diving-based research projects and employment (limited places and additional costs apply).
-Experience an overseas field course that's aimed at integrating ocean science knowledge and understanding across the different sub-disciplines.

Course details

Year 1
Your first year, shared across the Marine Science Undergraduate Scheme, introduces the full range of topics within the degree and develops your underpinning scientific knowledge and practical skills. You’ll develop your understanding of the Earth’s oceans and the key physical, chemical, biological processes that occur in these systems. You’ll build practical skills and enhance your ability to analyse, present and interpret scientific data through field-based activities.

Core modules
-OS101 Introduction to Ocean Science
-OS103 Biology and Hydrography of the Ocean
-OS105 Mapping the Marine Environment
-OS102 Physical and Chemical Processes of the Ocean
-OS104 Measuring the Marine Environment

Optional modules
-GEES1002PP Climate Change and Energy
-GEES1003PP Sustainable Futures
-GOV1000PP One Planet? Society and Sustainability
-ENGL405PP Making Waves: Representing the Sea, Then and Now
-GEES1001PP Natural Hazards
-OS106PP Our Ocean Planet
-OS107PP Space Exploration

Year 2
In your second year, the emphasis will be on understanding core aspects of ocean science, including topics in ocean exploration, oceanography and marine conservation, and enhancing your practical and research skills. You’ll participate in a field work module based at our Marine Station, learning how to use industry standard instrumentation and software for measuring a variety of parameters in the coastal zone and you’ll develop a proposal for your final year project. There's also opportunity to apply scientific diving skills gained alongside the degree for suitably qualified individuals.

Core modules
-OS201 Global Ocean Processes
-OS202 Monitoring the Marine Environment
-OS206 Researching the Marine Environment

Optional modules
-OS208 Meteorology
-OS209 Marine Remote Sensing
-OS207 Scientific Diving
-OS203 Seafloor Mapping
-OS204 Waves, Tides and Coastal Dynamics
-OS205 Managing Human Impacts in the Marine Environment

Year 3
You’ll focus on topics with special relevance to your future plans including options across the specialisms offered through the related BSc Marine Science courses. A residential field course allows you to develop a group-based in-situ investigative study. A large part of the year is spent completing a research project, carrying out an in-depth investigation under the guidance of a member of academic staff.

Optional modules
-BPIE338 Ocean Science Placement

Year 4
Pathway options in the final year provide both an opportunity for you to pursue your choice of topic in greater depth and an opportunity to increase the breadth of your study through modules from the applied contemporary offerings of our Marine Science MSc programmes: Applied Marine Science, Marine Renewable Energy and Hydrography. You’ll conduct a research or consultancy-type project closely linked to one of our internationally-leading marine science research groups or industrial partners, providing an experience of working with established marine scientists.

Optional modules
-MAR517 Coastal Erosion and Protection
-MATH523 Modelling Coastal Processes
-MAR520 Hydrography
-MAR522 Survey Project Management
-MAR515 Management of Coastal Environments
-MAR518 Remote Sensing and GIS
-MAR521 Acoustic and Oceanographic Surveying
-MAR507 Economics of the Marine Environment
-MAR523 Digital Mapping
-MAR516 Contemporary Issues in Marine Science
-MAR519 Modelling Marine Processes

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management. Read more

Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management.

It is also a key tool in medical research and it is becoming increasingly possible to relate imaging studies to genetic traits in individuals and populations. Novel imaging biomarkers of disease can enable more rapid and precise diagnosis and inform decision making in drug discovery programmes.

As medical imaging involves knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, physics, mathematics and computation, our course is suitable if you want to expand your disciplinary horizons and pursue a career in an image-related field in clinical medicine, medical research, or technological research or development.

You will cover the basic science and technology behind the principal imaging modalities currently used in medicine and medical research, as well as advanced imaging methods, clinical and research applications, imaging biomarkers and computational methods.

You will learn how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. You will also receive training in computational and quantitative methods of image analysis or in the interpretation of clinical images from different imaging modalities.

This course comprises both a taught component and a research project, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical or scientific research, or technical development.

Aims

We aim to provide you with:

  • with a systematic understanding of the scientific basis of the major medical imaging modalities;
  • a broad understanding of the principal clinical applications of medical imaging and its role in diagnosis, monitoring and therapy;
  • an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of medical imaging for deriving quantitative anatomical and physiological data;
  • knowledge of how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery;
  • the experience to plan, implement and complete a research project;
  • generic transferrable skills required in a multidisciplinary scientific or clinical research environment;
  • the knowledge and skills required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical research, scientific research or technical development.

Special features

Excellent facilities

Benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Learn from experts

Manchester has an imaging and image computing research group with a strong international reputation. Our research groups and facilities are staffed by scientists conducting research in novel imaging and image analysis methods, and clinicians who apply these methods in clinical practice.

Flexible learning

Learn when it suits you thanks to options for either full-time or part-time study.

Multidisciplinary learning

Study alongside physicists, engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemists, biologists and clinicians working in hospitals and research-dedicated imaging facilities.

Teaching and learning

As this course aims to produce graduates equipped to pursue either clinically or technically-focused careers in imaging, it is important to provide an adequate knowledge base. For this reason, much of the teaching takes the form of lectures.

However, in most course units, this is supplemented by group discussions and practical exercises. Other than the introductory units, most course units provide you with an understanding of research methods by requiring submission of a critical review of appropriate research literature or clinical material, either as a report or presentation.

Where appropriate, practical imaging exercises are provided, requiring you to cooperate in acquiring images and analysing results.

All units require a considerable component of independent research and study.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will occur in a variety of forms.

Summative assessment takes the form of written assignments, examinations, oral presentations and online quizzes. Written assignments and presentations, as well as contributing to summative assessment, have a formative role in providing feedback, particularly in the early stages of course units.

Online quizzes provide a useful method of regular testing, ensuring that you engage actively with the taught material. As accumulation of a knowledge base is a key aim of the course, examinations (both open-book and closed-book) form an important element of summative assessment.

In addition, formal assessment of your research and written communication skills is achieved via the dissertation. This is a 10,000 to 15,000-word report, written and organised to appropriate scientific standards, describing the design, execution and results of the research project.

Course unit details

The MSc requires students to pass 180 credits composed of eight course units of 15 credits each and a 60-credit research project.

We provide course units in Human Biology and Introductory Mathematics and Physics to bring students up to the required level in these topics.

Semester 1: Compulsory units

  • Scientific Skills
  • Mathematical Foundations of Imaging
  • Radioisotope Imaging (PET/SPET)
  • Non-radioisotope Imaging (MRI, CT, US)

Semester 2: Compulsory units

  • Advanced MR Imaging
  • Advanced PET Imaging
  • Quantitative Imaging into Practice (Imaging Biomarkers for Healthcare and Research)

Semester 2: Elective units (select one)

  • Imaging in Clinical Diagnosis
  • Medical Image Analysis and Mathematical Computing

Semester 3:

  • Research project

Facilities

You will benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Each student will have an identified personal tutor who can provide advice and assistance throughout the course. During the research project, you will be in regular contact with your research supervisor.You will also be able to access a range of other library and e-learning facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Graduates will be in an excellent position to pursue careers in image-related fields in healthcare and research. This MSc will also form a sound basis for students who wish to proceed to PhD research in any aspect of medical imaging.

Intercalating medical students may use this qualification as a platform to pursue a clinical career in radiology.

Physical science/engineering graduates may see this as a route to imaging research or development in an academic or commercial environment.



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This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. Read more

This MSc effectively transfers to students the knowledge and expertise gained by UCL space scientists over more than four decades and is taught by world-recognised researchers in the field. The programme aims to provide a broad understanding of all aspects of space science together with specialised training in research methods, directly applicable to a career in academia, the public and private sectors.

About this degree

The Space Science pathway is focussed on scientific research applications of space technology; it aims to equip participants with a sound knowledge of the physical principles essential to sustain careers in space research and related fields. Students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of:

  • a range of space science fields
  • spacecraft, space science instrumentation, the space environment, space operations and space project management

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a group project (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Space Data Systems and Processing
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering
  • Group Project

Optional modules

  • Planetary Atmospheres
  • Solar Physics
  • High Energy Astrophysics
  • Space Plasma and Magnetospheric Physics
  • Principles and Practice of Remote Sensing
  • Global Monitoring and Security

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, which normally involves attachment to a research group, and culminates in a report of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, team-based coursework exercises, presentations and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination, coursework, and the individual and group projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Space Science and Engineering: Space Science MSc

Funding

STFC and NERC studentships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme aims to prepare students for further research degrees and/or careers in space research or the space industry.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL’s Space & Climate Physics Department, located at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, is a world-leading research organisation and is the largest university space science group in the UK.

It offers a unique environment at the forefront of space science research, where scientists and research students work alongside top engineers building and testing instruments for space, as well as studying the data from these and other spaceborne and ground-based instruments.

The close contact that the laboratory enjoys with space agencies such as ESA and NASA and with industrial research teams encourages the development of transferable skills which enhance job prospects in academic circles and beyond.



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Our Social Science Research (Sport and Exercise Science) programme provides students with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that shape the social sciences. Read more

Our Social Science Research (Sport and Exercise Science) programme provides students with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that shape the social sciences.

Our research is multidisciplinary, drawing on the full spectrum of natural and social sciences, and is focused on issues of contemporary concern at international, national and local levels. We engage in strong partnerships with leading schools, institutes and universities across the world in the research fields of sport, exercise, education, health and well-being. The broad scope of this research has led to developments in the treatment of eating disorders; improved understanding of the effects of sedentary lifestyles and the benefits of physical activity; academic support to enhance sport coaching; advice to international sport organisations and governments on policies and procedures; guidance and support for elite athletes (both able-bodied and disabled) to achieve their full potential; and the use of exercise in treating health conditions.

Recent research projects have included: the sociology of policing and police-community relations in the 2012 Olympics; levels of BAME representation in football leadership and coaching, and Sport For A Better World? - a social scientific investigation of the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) sector.

We are ranked 1st in the UK for the overall quality of our research, and 1st in the UK for research outputs, impact and research environment (based on GPA x Volume).

The programme is in full compliance with the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for an MSc in Social Science Research. On completion of the course, a student will have met the training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC.

The School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences is a great place to study, boasting access to first-class facilities, the wide-ranging expertise of our teaching staff, and a lively community of around 1500 students and 140 academic, research and support staff. Students within the School have access to the very best facilities - including bespoke training and testing equipment, the latest physiological, molecular and environmental technologies, two climatic chambers, and laboratory space within the recently refurbished Clyde Williams building.

At Loughborough you will be part of a university with a unique sporting heritage that attracts athletes, industry leaders and policy makers from around the world. Based on campus is SportPark – home to many of the UK’s sports organisations and governing bodies – and the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine – East Midlands (NCSEM), an Olympic legacy project delivering education, research and clinical services in sport, exercise and physical activity. It aims to apply world-class expertise to policies and practice that will benefit the health and wellbeing of the nation.

What makes this programme different?

  • Ranked 1st in the UK for quality of research
  • Accredited by the ESRC
  • Be part of an Olympic legacy project

Who should study this programme?

  • Individuals wishing to pursue a career in academia
  • Sport and exercise practitioners, who wish to both develop and strengthen their applied research skills
  • Those wishing to conduct research in non-academic public and private sector roles

What you'll study

Our Social Science Research MSc programmes are designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well equipped to progress onto being high level researchers in their chosen field of study.

Modules

This programme covers a wide range of topics; please visit the website to see a full up to date list of modules.

The modules are taught by leading researchers selected for their expertise in the taught research methods and topics.

The course consists of compulsory and optional modules, delivered across four different academic schools within the University, which means you benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to your studies. The academic schools involved are:

  • School of Business and Economics
  • School of Social, Political and Geographical Sciences
  • School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
  • School of Science


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Sport and Physical Activity is fun, good for us and can change lives. It is a huge global industry that is set to grow further as governments increasingly recognise the role of sport in supporting health and wellbeing and creating vibrant communities. Read more
Sport and Physical Activity is fun, good for us and can change lives. It is a huge global industry that is set to grow further as governments increasingly recognise the role of sport in supporting health and wellbeing and creating vibrant communities.

To deliver this, the sector needs an innovative and dynamic workforce. This course will support you as a current or future leader to develop skills in the management and development of Sport and Physical Activity.

You will have the opportunity to review and analyse examples of best practice, develop sustainable sport participation programmes and research a Sport and Physical Activity topic area of your choice.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-management-of-sport-and-physical-activity

Course detail

• Gain an advanced understanding of the management and leadership of sport and physical activities and interventions aimed at making a positive impact upon individuals and communities locally and worldwide
• Study using range of learning activities, including lectures, seminars, online learning, action learning and tutorials, and from a team who have a wide range of expertise and experience in specific subject areas such as leisure, sport
• Explore ways to develop new, creative and innovative ideas to motivate people to participate in sport and physical activities while gaining the necessary personal competencies, applied practical skill-sets and subject expertise to become a theoretically informed and reflective practitioner
• Develop the ability to implement a wide range of programmes and interventions, as well as being able to manage people and organisations to achieve sport and physical activity outcomes both nationally and internationally.
• Benefit from our links with industry and the Government as you gain considerable experience of working with employers to investigate and analyse real industry problems and develop potential solutions for them (including a semester long research project).

Modules

• Sport and Physical Activity Leadership
• Managing Sport and Physical Activity
• Applied Leadership and Management of Sport and Physical Activity
• The Structure of Sport and Physical Activity
• Research Methods for Sport and Physical Activity
• Comparative Sports Policy
• Sport and Physical Activity Research Project

Assessment

You will undertake a variety of assessments, including:

• Written Reports and Essays
• Verbal Presentations
• Online Reflective Journals
• Case Studies
• Phase Tests
• Applied assessments relating to managing the design, planning, delivery of a sport and physical activity intervention.

Assessment activities will be based on tasks that provide the opportunity to demonstrate both vocational skills and subject knowledge.

As you progress through the units, the assessment criteria will emphasise the expectation that you demonstrate theory driven understanding of sport and physical activity management issues and practices. This is reflective of the higher levels of cognition required to study at master's level.

Careers

Your employability is supported in the following ways:

1. Professional Accreditation – The course was written to meet the professional standards Job Band B (Middle Management and Aspiring) as identified by CIMSPA, the Chartered Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity. The University will support you in becoming a Student Member of CIMSPA and provide information regarding CIMSPA events and conferences which will support your employment opportunities.

2. Current and Future Industry Knowledge – The units, the resources and the teaching and learning will support the development of current industry knowledge and evaluate future industry direction.

3. Applied Industry Experience – The course provides the opportunity to test and apply industry experience.. There are also additional opportunities to gain applied industry experience by students involving themselves with the University of Bedfordshire Student Led Sports Company.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Why this course?. This is a Masters level course which looks at global physical activity for health. Background. Lack of physical activity is fuelling an increasing burden of morbidity and premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCD) like. Read more

Why this course?

This is a Masters level course which looks at global physical activity for health.

Background

Lack of physical activity is fuelling an increasing burden of morbidity and premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCD) like:

  • diabetes
  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • some cancers

The World Health Organisation has adopted targets to prevent and control these diseases. International action is likely and there's expected to be an increasing demand for academic expertise in this area.

What you'll learn

We'll provide you with a comprehensive introduction to physical activity, and its role in the prevention and control of NCD's. 

This course is suitable if you have a relevant background and training in areas like:

  • medicine
  • physiology
  • exercise science
  • nutrition

It's also a good option if you have a particular interest in the subject but don't have undergraduate training.

By the end of the course you'll have a high level of understanding and skill within the following areas:

  • measurement and analysis of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. This is within a variety of contexts and for a range of purposes, including research, clinical practicepublic health surveillance
  • patterns of, and variations in, levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in various population groups (national, clinical, specialist) world-wide
  • developing and influencing recommendations for physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels in various populations (national, clinical, specialist populations)
  • the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and health/disease within various populations (national, clinical, specialist populations)
  • sources of physical activity and sedentary behaviour (physiological, psychological, social and cultural)
  • developing, implementing and evaluating clinical and/or public health interventions to change physical activity and sedentary behaviour
  • identifying, appraising and synthesising research evidence
  • planning, conducting, analysing and reporting/disseminating research

Possible specialisations

You can specialise in:

  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • child & adolescent health
  • health policy

These are not compulsory and we're open to discussing other options.

PhD

This course is a good route into a three year PhD in Physical Activity and NCDs.

The Physical Activity for Health Group

The Physical Activity for Health Group is a team of:

  • academics
  • teaching staff
  • post-doctoral students
  • research students 

Expertise

The group's expertise lies in physical activity for health, with a global perspective on the subject. 

Research

Research looks at the development and testing of things that encourage people to take part in more physical activity. 

Location

You'll find the group within the School of Psychological Sciences and Health.

Learning & teaching

You'll attend six classes throughout the year and undertake one research project module. It's designed to offer an intensive immersion in the subject of physical activity for health if you've not studied it before.

You'll attend lectures along with tutorials, workshops, and seminars.

Assessment

You'll be assessed in a variety of methods including written assignments, reading, group work and online participation.

Careers

Research

This course is primarily designed for honours graduates who are interested in beginning a career in research with the opportunity to apply for PhD study upon completion of the course.

Career development

If you're coming from an existing post in health/NCD units, this course will offer an immersive conversion course in physical activity for health, for career development. 

Career change

If you're not currently working in this area, this course will offer a specialist qualification that will be useful when applying for jobs in health/NCD units at home and overseas.



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