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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas. Read more

Introduction

MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas: interaction design, design prototyping, physical computing, user centered design, open source digital platforms, design research, foresight and insight, experience design, communication design, speculative and critical design, interactive design and digital arts.

Content

MA Interaction Design Communication provides an opportunity for experimental practice in an area of design that increasingly explores the intersection of the physical and digital domains. With a focus on synthesising thought through rigorous design prototyping (making), digital processes and user perspectives, the course is highly reflective of interdisciplinary practice within the contemporary design, media and communications industries.

The integrated approach of the course to critical thinking provides you with the opportunity to work with critical ideas in an applied design context – for example psycho-geographic practice as empirical research or engaging with other critical theories of space to generate user perspectives. This ensures that ideation processes take on both the macro as well as micro opportunities for innovation and speculation crucial to building a portfolio of highly engaged work.

As well as placing you in a position to work across the board spectrum of interaction, design and communication the course is just as interested in design questions as design answers. This means that the course also prepares you for progression to further design research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.

LCC has an outstanding team of practitioners and published researchers and enjoys a powerful programme of visiting speakers. The course also benefits from a cross-European collaboration with design industry professionals and higher education institutions and there is an opportunity to visit at least one other centre in Europe during the course.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Theories and Technologies of Interaction Design (40 credits)
1.2 Research Practice and Human Centered Design (20 credits)

Phase 2

2.1 Interaction Futures and Speculative Design (40 credits)
2.2 Physical Computing and Design Prototyping (20 credits)

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Final Major Research Project

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This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules & Structure

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme:

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing
Interactive Media Critical Theory- 15 or 30 credits
Physical Computing: Arduino and Related Technologies- 30 credits

In Year 2 you will study the following:

Studio Practice- 120 credits
Computational Arts Critical Studies- 60 credits

Assessment

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & Careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Who is this course for?. Recent graduates in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or Computer Science, who wish to develop their skills in the field of distributed computing systems. Read more
Who is this course for?
Recent graduates in Electrical or Electronic Engineering or Computer Science, who wish to develop their skills in the field of distributed computing systems.
Practicing engineers and computer professionals who wish to develop their knowledge in this area.
People with suitable mathematical, scientific or other engineering qualifications, usually with some relevant experience, who wish to enter this field.

Modules

Computer Networks, which aims to advance knowledge on computer networks. Topics to be covered in this module include OSI reference model, Physical and Data Link Layer Protocols, TCP/IP Networking, IPv6, Routing Protocols, Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Networks, Packet Delay and Queuing Analysis, IP Quality of Services (Integrated Service Model and Differentiated Service Model), Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS), IP Multicasting, Network Application Layer Protocols such as HTTP, DNS, SNMP.

Network Computing, which focuses on principles and techniques for network computing. Topics to be covered in this module include Object-Oriented Software Engineering, Object-Oriented Programming with Java, Network Computing Models such as Client/Server Model and Peer-to-Peer Model, Socket Programming, Remote Procedure Call (RPC), Java Remote Method Invocation (RMI), Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), Web Computing Technologies (Java Servlet, Java Server Pages), Message Exchanging with XML, Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), XML based Web Services (WSDL, SOAP, UDDI).

Network Security and Encryption, which introduces the fundamental theory that enables what is achievable through the use of Security Engineering to be determined, and presents the practical techniques and algorithms that are currently important for the efficient and secure use of distributed /Grid computing systems. Topics to be covered in this module include Introduction to Security Engineering, Classical Cryptography (Monoalphabetic and Polyalphabetic Ciphers, Transposition, Substitution, Linear Transformation), Computational Fundamentals of Cryptosystems (Computational Complexity and Intractability, Modular Arithmetic and Elementary Number Theory), Modern Symmetric Key Cryptography (Feistel Ciphers, DES, Triple-DES and AES),Public Key Cryptography (The Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange Algorithm, Public Key Infrastructures, X.509 Certificates, PK Systems such as RSA and Elliptic Curves), Multilevel Security (the Bell-LaPadula Security Policy Model, the Biba Model, the NRL Pump), Multilateral Security (Compartmentation and the Lattice Model, the Chinese Wall, the BMA Model), Protecting e-Commerce Systems.

Distributed Systems Architecture, which presents a comprehensive evaluation of the design philosophies, fundamental constructs, performance issues and operational principles of distributed systems architectures, covering applications, algorithms and software architecture, engineering issues and implementation technology. Topics to be covered in this module include System Architecture (Bus Systems, High Performance I/O, Memory Hierarchies, Memory Coherence and File Coherence), Distributed Database, Processor Architecture, File Services, Inter-Process Communication, Naming Services, Resource Allocation and Scheduling, Distributed System Case Studies.

Grid Middleware Technologies, which introduces the principle, concepts and practice of Grid middleware technologies, and provides a practical knowledge on developing Grid applications. Topics to be covered in this module include Parallel Computing Paradigms, Parallel Programming with MPI/PVM, Cluster Computing Principles (Condor, Sun Grid Engine), Grid Computing Middleware Components (Job Submission, Resource Management and Job Scheduling, Information Service, Grid Portal, Grid Security Infrastructure), Grid Standards (OGSA/WSRF), Grid Middleware Case Study with Globus.

Grid System Analysis and Design, which aims to analyse representative production Grid systems and gain knowledge on how to design and optimise large-scale Grid systems. Topics to be covered in this module include System Analysis Methodologies with UML, Model Construction (Process Modelling, Static Class Modelling, Dynamic Modelling, Interface Modelling), Management of Large-Scale Grid System (Portal, Concurrent Version System (CVS)/Wiki), Grid System Analysis Case Study (GridPP, LCG/EGEE), Grid System Design (Performance Consideration, Open Standards, Design Patterns, Usability Analysis), Grid System Programming Models, Testing (Unit Testing, Integration Testing, Regression Testing), Debugging, Risk Analysis, System Maintenance.

Project Management, which introduces a range of formal methods and skills necessary to equip the student to function effectively at the higher levels of project management. Covers the need for the development of project management skills in achieving practical business objectives.

Workshop involves practical work, which is an important component of the course and gives students experience with relevant techniques and tools. Assignments are of practical nature and involve laboratory work with relevant equipment, hardware and software systems, conducted in a hands-on workshop environment. Typical assignments are:
TCP/IP Network Layered Protocol Analysis
Object-Oriented Programming, Java Socket Programming
Network Security and Encryption
Java RMI Programming for Distributed Systems
Grid Programming with Globus Toolkit 4 (GT4)
Grid System Analysis/Simulation

Dissertation, which is a stimulating and challenging part of the MSc programme. It provides the opportunity to apply the knowledge learnt in the taught part of the programme and to specialise in one aspect, developing students’ deep understanding and expertise in Distributed Systems related area of their choice. Students may carry out their projects wholly within the University, but industrial based projects are encouraged.

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This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years with a focus on Physical Education, and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Read more
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years with a focus on Physical Education, and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You'll gain 60 Masters level credits and be awarded with a Post-Graduate Certificate of Education.

The programme will give you an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice, equality and diversity to prepare you for a career in London schools. As a part of the programme you will experience different schools and also have an opportunity to work in an Alternative Education Setting. At Masters level you'll develop leadership skills and expertise in the subject and pedagogy of Physical Education.

LSBU has a particular focus on social justice and equality that is well matched to the needs of schools in urban and multicultural areas. At LSBU we encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues.

Bursaries

The Government provides the following bursaries to be off-set against tuition fees, via the Training Agency. Tuition fees need to be paid by all students direct to LSBU. Students can use any bursary they receive from the Training Agency for this purpose.

If you have a 1st Class or 2.1 Degree or a PhD you will be eligible for a bursary of £3,000

You do not need to apply for bursaries. Once you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer of a place on a Teacher Training course (and supplied proof of your degree grade) the University will liaise with the Department for Education to put your bursary in place.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/primary-with-physical-education-pgce

Modules

H Level Modules:
- Core curriculum
This module covers all aspects of the English, mathematics, science and computing national curriculum at Key Stage 1 and 2.

- Professional studies
This module covers theories of learning, planning, teaching and assessment, classroom management and employment.

- Physical education, pedagogy and practice
In this module you will develop understanding of functional skills, physical literacy, movement and fitness.

- School experience
School experience begins in week four of the course. During your Reading Mentor placement you'll be placed in a local school three times a week, gaining experience in the teaching of reading. You'll have opportunities to work with a designated child to develop an in-depth understanding of how teaching relates to pupil learning and progress. Your first block school experience is an eight week paired block practice. During this practice you will shadow a PE co-ordinator and have opportunities to teach PE across the primary school age range. You will also be encouraged to work with teachers running after school PE activities. School experience 2 is a nine week block, and by the end of this placement you will be expected to teach the whole class for up to three days a week.

- Alternative education setting
In term two you will take your Alternative Education Setting placement in an outdoor centre or similar that will allow you to develop expertise in a specific area of the primary school curriculum, for example adventurous activity.

- Foundation subjects (optional)
This module covers the national curriculum foundation subjects including: history, geography, art and design, music, and design technology.

M Level Modules:
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
This module will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context. You'll undertake a small piece of classroom research.

- Understanding and leading PE in the primary school
You will build knowledge and skills to teach and lead PE. You will learn to audit staff needs and how to plan, review and adjust the curriculum. Physiology sessions will help you to develop a greater sense of learners’ physical development.

Employability

Completion and employment rates for our PGCE are both above the sector norms and we have been identified as a good provider of initial teacher training (OFSTED 2014). Although we pride ourselves in providing teachers for London schools, successful students enter the teaching profession in a variety of schools/nurseries within the UK.

All students entering the course have the possibility of gaining up to 60 credits at Masters level, which can be used by students to count towards the award of full Masters qualifications (such as the LSBU MA in Education) gained via further study after graduation.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

Academics from other institutions and related industries are invited as guest speakers to form part of the Equality Inclusion and Citizenship module. The Alternative Educational Settings (AES) placement provides an opportunity for you to experience teaching and learning in a completely different environment, and is one of the unique aspects of our programme. PE subject matter experts from partnership schools and outside organisations, including sports coaching bodies, will promote professional links relating to PE.

Placements

Placement schools are chosen to provide different experiences including size, organisation and location. You will begin your teaching experience in a local school to LSBU where you will support children in learning to read. School Experience 1 will be a PE placement, focusing on teaching PE and shadowing a school PE co-ordinator. School Experience 2 will also have a PE focus, while giving you the opportunity to teach the core and foundation subjects of the primary curriculum subjects in order to fulfill the requirements for gaining Qualified Teacher Status.

In addition you'll undertake an Alternative Education Setting (AES) placement in an outdoor and adventure facility, or other non-school Physical Education setting. A key element of the programme is to prepare you to work in multi-cultural, urban settings. In terms of school experience placements, you'll normally be required to do at least one practice in an inner or outer London state school.

Teaching and learning

We provide a thorough training course incorporating all areas of the primary curriculum with a focus on Physical Education.

The university based sessions are taught through lectures, workshops, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials. The aim throughout is to encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues, aims and objectives. We aim to provide a learning community that actively challenges inequality and injustice.

In particular, the module on Equality, Inclusion and Citizenship will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context.

You will be encouraged to make links between the theoretical and practical elements of the course. We use an interactive model of teaching and learning and you will be encouraged to think critically about subjects to inform your understanding of effective methods of teaching and learning and how best to apply these in classroom situations.

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The MSc Computing will help you to develop your computing skills in the theory and practice of designing and developing computer systems. Read more
The MSc Computing will help you to develop your computing skills in the theory and practice of designing and developing computer systems. On this course you will build on your existing skills and develop new skills in order to prepare yourself for employment in the computing industry. This requires an understanding of programming, systems design and evaluation, project management, creative problem-solving and a range of technical skills. You will also have the opportunity to work on a substantial project of your own choice.

You’ll investigate the current trends and research activities in the computing community, and plan, undertake and evaluate a substantial computing project in which you will put into practice and develop your self-management, communication, critical evaluation and technical skills.





There is a mix of compulsory and optional modules. Compulsory modules include Critical Evaluation (20 credits), OO Software Development (20 credits), User-Centred System Design & Evaluation (20 credits), IT Project Management (20 credits), Master’s Project (60 credits). These core modules give you a solid basis in core computing skills and current research. The optional modules build on these and allow deeper understanding in specific topics such as web development, security and design.

To enhance your work experience you will have an opportunity to undertake an industrial placement as part your MSc. This will extend your study time by six to twelve months depending on the length of the placement. Alternatively there are opportunities to choose an industry-based project.

We expect our students to seek employment within a computing environment. This course will provide a framework within which you can take advantage of the opportunities of developing and improving technology to meet business and user needs.

There are opportunities to continue with your studies to MPhil or PhD.

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Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Read more
Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Numerical methods can only play an even more important role in the future as we face even bigger challenges. Therefore, skilled scientific programmers are in high demand in industry and academia and will drive forward much of the future economy.

Degree information

This programme aims to produce highly computationally skilled scientists and engineers capable of applying numerical methods and critical evaluation of their results to their field of science or engineering. It brings together best practice in computing with cutting-edge science and provides a computing edge over traditional science, engineering and mathematics programmes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), is also offered.

Core modules
-Computational and Simulation Methods
-Numerical Methods
-Numerical Optimisation
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python
-Techniques of High-Performance

Optional modules - options include a wide selection of modules across UCL Engineering and UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and hands-on programming and includes a variety of short programming projects, delivered as part of the taught component. Students are encouraged to participate in scientific seminars, for example, weekly seminars at the UCL Centre for Inverse Problems. Assessment is through examinations, assignments, small projects and the dissertation, including a computer programme.

Careers

We expect our graduates to take up exciting science and engineering roles in industry and academia with excellent prospects for professional development and steep career advancement opportunities. This degree enable students to work on cutting-edge real-life problems, overcome the challenges they pose and so contribute to advancing knowledge and technology in our society.

Employability
Students develop a comprehensive set of skills which are in high demand both in industry and academia: professional software development skills including state-of-the-art scripting and compiled languages; knowledge of techniques used in high-performance computing; understanding and an ability to apply a wide range of numerical methods and numerical optimisation; a deeper knowledge of their chosen science subject; oral and written presentational skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a global reputation for excellence in research and is committed to delivering impact and innovations that enhance the lives of people in the UK, across Europe and around the world. UCL is consistently placed in the global top 20 across a wide range of university rankings (currently fifth in QS World University Rankings 2014/15). Furthermore, the Thomson Scientific Citation Index shows that UCL is the 2nd most highly cited European university and 13th in the world.

Our wide-ranging expertise provides opportunities for groundbreaking interdisciplinary investigation. World-leading experts in the field and students benefit from a programme of distinguished visitors and guest speakers in many scientific seminars. In this way a network of collaborators, mentors and peers is created, which students can access in their future career.

This degree has been designed to balance a professional software development and high performance computing skills with a comprehensive selection of numerical mathematics and scientific subjects, culminating in a scientific computing dissertation project. The dual aspect of a science and computing degree enable students to tackle real-life problems in a structured and rigorous way and produce professional software for their efficient solution.

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The MSc Computing will help you to develop your computing skills in the theory and practice of designing and developing computer systems. Read more
The MSc Computing will help you to develop your computing skills in the theory and practice of designing and developing computer systems. On this course you will build on your existing skills and develop new skills in order to prepare yourself for employment in the computing industry. This requires an understanding of programming, systems design and evaluation, project management, creative problem-solving and a range of technical skills. You will also have the opportunity to work on a substantial project of your own choice.

You’ll investigate the current trends and research activities in the computing community, and plan, undertake and evaluate a substantial computing project in which you will put into practice and develop your self-management, communication, critical evaluation and technical skills.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

UCLan provides an 'electronic learning' environment to facilitate flexible learning. This environment combines traditional face-to-face lecture/tutorial and practical sessions with additional, resource-rich, online materials allowing you to continue independent learning through a variety of approaches.

Assessment methods will include individual and group assignments, presentation, seminars and examinations.

FURTHER INFORMATION

To enhance your work experience you will have an opportunity to undertake an industrial placement as part your MSc. This will extend your study time by six to twelve months depending on the length of the placement. Alternatively there are opportunities to choose an industry-based project.

We expect our students to seek employment within a computing environment. This course will provide a framework within which you can take advantage of the opportunities of developing and improving technology to meet business and user needs.

There are opportunities to continue with your studies to MPhil or PhD.

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Study for your doctorate or MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of. Read more
Study for your doctorate or MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of: art; design and media production; communication studies; computing; engineering.

The Institute consists of two research centres:
-Art and Design Research Centre.
-Communication and Computing Research Centre.

We provide an environment in which each discipline can develop its own approach to research. At the same time we bring people together on questions that cut across traditional subject boundaries.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-research-degrees--cultural-communication-and-computing-research-institute

Research activity at C3RI

C3RI is Sheffield Hallam University’s largest community of researchers, with over 100 academics, researchers and technical staff. Our work covers basic, strategic and applied research as well as covering research into teaching and learning. Much of it is through partnerships with businesses and professional collaborators.

Research is supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Board, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the European Union, commercial clients, charitable bodies and government.

We support a PhD research programme with over 40 students. The C3RI also maintains many knowledge transfer partnerships that support close collaboration between academics, researchers and industrial partners.

Design Futures

C3RI also houses Design Futures – a Yorkshire Forward Centre of Industrial Collaboration for Product and Packaging innovation.
Design Futures has had specialist design teams working exclusively on commercial consultancy services for several years. These teams have developed award winning, innovative solutions for many clients, some of which have been patented.

Course structure

Note: this MPhil can be developed into a PhD. See website for more information: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-research-degrees--cultural-communication-and-computing-research-institute
PhD by confirmation – 3-4 years full time, or 5-7 years part-time.
MPhil – 2 years full time, or 3 years part time.
Start dates – September, January or May.

Master of Philosophy (MPhil)
-Candidates are required to critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic, to demonstrate an understanding of research methods appropriate to their chosen field and to present and defend a thesis by oral examination.

Supervision
Each student is allocated a director of studies and a supervisor. Regular meetings between the student and supervisors are scheduled, with targets set for written and oral presentation of research progress.

Research training
All students are required to complete research training modules unless already studied as part of a masters degree. This has fee implications for part-time students, but is included in the full-time fee. Training is followed by theoretical and textual research, analysis and writing, working closely with the supervisors. Students are expected to present seminar papers on their work and to submit written papers for comment. Students will also be expected to attend relevant seminars from the research seminar series.

Assessment: thesis followed by oral examination.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level. The final thesis must be presented in English.

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Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. Read more
Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. The consequences will be profound because parallel computational activities will need to be handled as the norm, rather than the exception; programmers of the future will need skills that are currently possessed by very few, due to the inherent complexities of parallel systems.

This pathway is centred round a core theme, Parallel Computing in the Multi-core Era , that introduces students to the aforementioned complexities, and provides techniques and tools that can alleviate the ensuing problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they might apply their newly learned skills.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Multi-Core Computing pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers in the software industry since they will acquire the necessary skills to design and develop software that makes the most out of state-of-the-art multi-core architectures. This includes the games industry, the financial sector, and all other areas in which high performance computing is key.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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This course in Industrial Physical Biochemistry provides graduates with an advanced knowledge and understanding of physical biochemistry, with particular relevance to industry. Read more
This course in Industrial Physical Biochemistry provides graduates with an advanced knowledge and understanding of physical biochemistry, with particular relevance to industry. Focusing upon technical knowledge and practical skills, the course is ideal for those wishing to pursue careers in research or develop a leading career in the field of physical biochemistry.

Specialist facilities in the School relevant to Industrial Physical Biochemistry include analytical ultracentrifugation, light scattering, protein and carbohydrate biochemistry, and access to Surface Plasmon Resonance, Atomic Force Microscopy, Fluorescence, X-ray crystallography and NMR facilities.

Computing facilities within the School are excellent. Advice on mathematical analysis, statistical design and computer programming is provided.

You will undertake a taught module (Fundamentals of Biomolecular Science) during the autumn semester with lectures, tutorials and a practical. The research module takes place from the start of the course (late September) until the end of August the following year. This is an opportunity to complete a major piece of independent research under the supervision of a member of academic staff. The project can be undertaken wholly or partially in an industrial company’s laboratory in any field of physical biochemistry. There are also two generic training modules.

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Designed and run in partnership with the oil and gas sector, specifically to produce industry-aware graduates with advanced Computing Science expertise. Read more
Designed and run in partnership with the oil and gas sector, specifically to produce industry-aware graduates with advanced Computing Science expertise.

The MSc Oil & Gas Computing programme has been developed in collaboration with world leading oil and gas companies and service providers in the industry. The programme is truly unique and is specifically for Computing Science graduates looking to gain the required knowledge to help solve a major “skills gap” within the oil and gas sector.

The key benefits of the MSc to graduates are:

- Gaining knowledge and understanding of the language and concepts of the oil and gas industry
- Teaching and expertise from both academic staff and industry professionals
- Gaining full spectrum knowledge of the data and knowledge management needs of the sector from exploration through to market
- Based in Aberdeen, the European oil and gas capital and a global centre of oil & gas expertise
- Opportunities to engage in industry case studies and practical projects

The programme is structured across three semesters, each building on the achievements of the previous one. Students who reach the end of a semester of study have the option of graduating with the qualification reached (PgCert or PgDip) or continuing into the next semester of study to enhance their qualification to the next level (PgDip or MSc).

The main content of the programme is constructed around the following topics:

Big data in oil and gas
Security for data, software and data centres
Sensor networks
Autonomous intelligent systems
Computer modelling and simulation
Cloud computing and Web services
Mobile computing
Data visualisation
Data mining
Legal aspects of oil and gas software and data
Human-computer interaction and computer-mediated human-human interaction

Following successful completion of the required modules, students undertake a summer project which will be industry-led with the best candidates being hosted at a major Oil and Gas Company.

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Computing and communications technologies are having a truly disruptive effect on societies and business worldwide. Mobile payments, wireless communications and the ‘Internet of Things’ are transforming the way we approach key challenges in development, security, healthcare and the environment. Read more
Computing and communications technologies are having a truly disruptive effect on societies and business worldwide. Mobile payments, wireless communications and the ‘Internet of Things’ are transforming the way we approach key challenges in development, security, healthcare and the environment.

Taught jointly by the School of Computing and the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, this course will give you a grasp of all layers needed for mobile communication and computation, from the physical network layer through to the applications that run on mobile devices.

You’ll gain a full understanding of the web and cloud computing infrastructure, as core modules give you a foundation in key topics like systems programming and data communications. A range of optional modules will then allow you to focus on topics that suit your interests and career plans, from cloud computing to embedded systems design and high speed web architecture.

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Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. It trains students in advanced computational techniques and in the application of these techniques to at least one scientific area, such as Applied Mathematics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Physics, or Physical Oceanography. Students can expect to gain knowledge and experience in: (1) state-of-the-art numerical methods, (2) high performance computer architectures, (3) use of software development tools for parallel and vector computers, (4) graphics, visualization, and multimedia tools, and (5) acquisition, processing, and analysis of large experimental data sets.

The Scientific Computing program is interdisciplinary, enriched by the expertise of faculty members in a range of academic units. Researchers in external organizations contribute by co-supervising students, providing placements for co-op students, providing computing resources, and teaching some courses. The program has close links with ACEnet, the Atlantic Canada Excellence network of high performance computers on which much of our computational work is carried out.

The program is offered in both thesis and non-thesis (project) versions, with a cooperative education (co-op) option also available. Both full-time and part-time studies are possible. A distinguishing characteristic of this program is the emphasis on interdisciplinary studies. Graduating students will have mastered a broader range of science and engineering areas than graduates from the more traditional, discipline-based programs.

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Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Memorial University’s MSc program in Scientific Computing was one of the first in North America, and remains the only such program in Atlantic Canada. It trains students in advanced computational techniques and in the application of these techniques to at least one scientific area, such as Applied Mathematics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Physics, or Physical Oceanography. Students can expect to gain knowledge and experience in: (1) state-of-the-art numerical methods, (2) high performance computer architectures, (3) use of software development tools for parallel and vector computers, (4) graphics, visualization, and multimedia tools, and (5) acquisition, processing, and analysis of large experimental data sets.

The Scientific Computing program is interdisciplinary, enriched by the expertise of faculty members in a range of academic units. Researchers in external organizations contribute by co-supervising students, providing placements for co-op students, providing computing resources, and teaching some courses. The program has close links with ACEnet, the Atlantic Canada Excellence network of high performance computers on which much of our computational work is carried out.

The program is offered in both thesis and non-thesis (project) versions, with a cooperative education (co-op) option also available. Both full-time and part-time studies are possible. A distinguishing characteristic of this program is the emphasis on interdisciplinary studies. Graduating students will have mastered a broader range of science and engineering areas than graduates from the more traditional, discipline-based programs.

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