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Masters Degrees (Philosophy Of Physics)

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who wish to specialise in philosophy of physics at a higher level, and for individuals with a background in physics or mathematics who wish to make a transition to philosophy and foundations of physics. The course consists of five taught units in philosophy, two taught master's units in physics, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components in philosophy and physics, as well as a dissertation.

Core units
- Philosophical Writing and Research Methods (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
- A mandatory, two-hour weekly seminar developing ideas, bibliographical and writing skills necessary for philosophical research. The unit is assessed by seminar contributions and presentations.
- Scientific Methodology and Epistemology (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit concerns core topics in scientific epistemology and metaphysics. The unit is examined on the basis of an essay of 5,000-6,000 words. As with all assessed essays, you may meet with a supervisor to discuss your work and to receive feedback on a draft essay.
- Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit covers philosophical issues related to basic physical theories, focusing on conceptual issues in the foundations of quantum theory and special relativity. We will cover topics such as the relativity of simultaneity; geometry and the causal structure of relativity physics; the conceptual structure of quantum mechanics, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument; the measurement problem and Schrödinger’s cat paradox of; locality and action-at-a-distance.
- Advanced Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit will examine a selection of conceptual issues in the foundations of physical theory with particular focus on the physics of the mid-to-late 20th century. We cover topics such as: the arrow of time in thermal physics; the interpretation of quantum field theory; emergence and universality in condensed matter physics; fine tuning problems and inflationary cosmology; spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism; and time in quantum gravity.
- Foundations of Modern Physics (Physics, 10-credit unit)
Emphasis is placed on students developing an appreciation of the foundations of different areas of physics, and the unit assessment involves students writing an essay whose detailed subject is partly decided by the student. The lectures are divided into Classical, Spacetime and Quantum Physics.
- Relativistic Field Theory (Physics, 10-credit unit)
This course will give an account of the modern approach to special relativity and Lagrangian field theory, and their role in the covariant description of the classical electromagnetic field, and the relativistic quantum Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. Formative assessment is through problem sheets discussed in problems classes. Summative assessment is through a 2 hour written examination

Optional units (all Philosophy 20-credit units)
- History of Science
- Logic
- Philosophy and History of Mathematics
- Philosophy and History of Medicine
- Philosophy of Biology
- Philosophy of Psychology
- An individual, supervised research project

Please be aware that optional units may vary from year to year.

Careers

The MA in Philosophy of Physics is an ideal platform for further studies in Philosophy or Foundations of Physics. This course will also provide students with Maths and Physics backgrounds with an opportunity to develop verbal, written and argumentative skills that are highly valued by employers.

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Are you looking for a highly challenging two-year Research Master's programme in Philosophy? Come to Radboud University!. Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Read more

Overview

Are you looking for a highly challenging two-year Research Master's programme in Philosophy? Come to Radboud University!

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy

What makes this programme special?

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- An offering of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, History of Philosophy, and Philosophy of Religion.
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

Specialisations of the Master's in Philosophy

The Faculty of Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies at Radboud University offers the entire range of philosophical disciplines. However, students enrolling in the Research Master's programme are expected to choose one of the following specialisations:

- Metaphysics and Epistemology
In Metaphysics and Epistemology you focus on the development of the hermeneutic tradition – key figures being Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.

- Philosophical Anthropology
In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et. al.). Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).

- Philosophical Ethics
In Philosophical Ethics you investigate the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). This section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

- Social and Political Philosophy
In Social and Political Philosophy you study ‘the political’ as an essential but conflict-ridden aspect of the human condition, and politics as a way of coping with this. Spinoza, Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Zizek and Foucault are central figures in this specialisation.

- Philosophy of Language and Logic
Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are being interpreted.

- Philosophy of Mind
In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.

- History of Philosophy
In History of Philosophy you explore the development of natural philosophy and metaphysics from the late Middle Ages to early modern and modern times, investigating, in particular the evolution of the sciences of psychology and physics from philosophy.

- Philosophy of Religion
In Philosophy of Religion you focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, and also exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into one of three groups:
1. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating.
2. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools.
3. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education.

Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

The reputation of Radboud University – and of the Philosophy Faculty in particular – will serve you well whichever career path you choose.

NVAO: quality Research Master Philosophy above average

At the end of April the Accreditation Organisation of the Netherlands and Flanders NVAO has renewed the accreditation of the Research Master Philosophy. The NVAO evaluates the Research Master Philosophy as 'good'. The verdict shows that the NVAO finds the Master's programme systematically above average quality.

Faculty scholarships for excellent international students

The Faculty offers scholarships for excellent students from abroad wishing to start the Research Master’s programme in Philosophy every year. Each scholarship amounts to €10,000 for the first year of the Research Master’s programme, and in case of good study results can be renewed for the second, final year.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy

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This course involves exploring the development of philosophy from Antiquity to early modern and modern times, with a particular emphasis on the genesis of modern scientific disciplines such as psychology, physics or chemistry, out of the traditional body of Aristotelian natural philosophy. Read more

Master's specialisation in History of Philosophy (Research)

This course involves exploring the development of philosophy from Antiquity to early modern and modern times, with a particular emphasis on the genesis of modern scientific disciplines such as psychology, physics or chemistry, out of the traditional body of Aristotelian natural philosophy.
There is no other academic discipline in which the past is so important as in philosophy: today's philosophers are still engaging with the pioneers of the field: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Wittgenstein. For this reason, the philosophy curriculum at Radboud University consists of a number of historical courses. The specialisation History of Philosophy covers the entire history of philosophy from the Presocratic philosophers up to today, divided into four periods: ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary.
Key authors for this specialisation are, in alphabetical order, Aristotle, Descartes, Epicurus, Galileo, German idealists, Hegel, Hobbes, Hume, Leibniz, Lucretius, Merleau-Ponty, Plato, Pomponazzi, Sartre, and Thomas Aquinas.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

Why study History of Philosophy at Radboud University?

- We offer a large choice of research courses in the history of philosophy.
- Our programme emphasises the importance of developing and using research skills.
- You will have a personal supervisor who will guide you during the entire programme.
- As a Research Master’s student, you’ll be affiliated with the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science, which has received top rankings in the field in past national evaluations (2006 and 2013).
- This is an excellent preparation for post-graduate life due to the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis: a publishable article and a PhD research proposal.
- Students have a high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad.
- There is an international climate: more than half of the teaching staff and Research Master’s students are from outside the Netherlands.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers investigate varied aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills; the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually, and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme is designed for people aiming to do research in the field. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. The majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that over 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our research in this field

All of the research related to this specialisation is embedded in the Centre for the History of Philosophy and Science. This internationally renowned centre is dedicated to the study of the historical interrelation of philosophy and the sciences. Many of the researchers affiliated with the centre investigate the evolution of natural philosophy since Aristotle and the development of the different natural scientific disciplines (such as physics, chemistry or psychology) since the seventeenth century. Although the centre is best known for its expertise in the ancient, medieval and early modern periods, the researchers also cover the entire period from the Aristotelian corpus up to contemporary philosophy.

The focus on natural philosophy is due to the consideration that, at least up to the eighteenth century, factors such as time, space, the motion of stars, and the nature of the human soul were all integral parts of (natural) philosophy. Nijmegen's Center for the History of Philosophy and Science is the only research centre in the world dedicated to the investigation of this historical development.

Thesis subjects in History of Philosophy

The centre is active in organising public lectures, seminars and colloquia, which students are very welcome to attend. Although many research Master’s students choose a topic related to the research activities of the Centre, this is not mandatory. Recent Master’s theses (publishable articles) were about the following themes:
- The use of history in utopian tales
- The Vatican censorship of Paracelsus
- Thought experiments in Locke and Leibniz
- The theme of flight in Plato and Philo of Alexandria
- Bergson’s method of intuition
- Chiffons of Clairvaux on the will
- Perceptual experience in Merleau-Ponty
- Agamben’s reading of Hegel

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/history

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who wish to specialise in philosophy of physics at a higher level, and for individuals with a background in physics or mathematics who wish to make a transition to philosophy and foundations of physics. The course consists of five taught units in philosophy, two taught master's units in physics, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Read less
Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together in an authentically interdisciplinary way leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

The programme follows an integrated approach with leading researchers in philosophy, the sciences and theology proving teaching on, respectively, the philosophical, scientific and theological dimensions of the programme.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Read more
Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision.

Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science, biophysics and computational biology. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1238/genetics#!overview

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate research students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Our research degrees are based around lab-based and computational research projects. MScs are based around one-year research projects (Full Time). In all our research degrees you undertake a single, focused, research project from day one, and attend only certain components of our transferable skills modules. Our research degree students are supervised by supervisory teams which comprise their main supervisor(s) as well as supervisory chairs that give independent advice on progression.

You can select topics for the MSc from any of the research areas covered in the Research Areas section.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Associated centres

- Kent Fungal Group

The Kent Fungal Group (KFG) brings together a number of research groups in the School of Biosciences that primarily use yeasts or other fungi as ‘model systems’ for their research. One strength of the KFG is the range of model fungi being exploited for both fundamental and medical/translational research. These include Bakers’ yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and yeasts associated with human disease, specifically Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

In addition to studying key cellular processes in the fungal cell such as protein synthesis, amyloids and cell division, members of the KFG are also using yeast to explore the molecular basis of human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as ageing. The KFG not only provides support for both fundamental and medical/translational fungal research, but also provides an excellent training environment for young fungal researchers.

- Industrial Biotechnology Centre

The School houses one of the University’s flagship research centres – the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC). Here, staff from Biosciences, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Computing and Engineering combine their expertise into a pioneering interdisciplinary biosciences programme at Kent, in order to unlock the secrets of some of the essential life processes. These approaches are leading to a more integrated understanding of biology in health and disease. In the Centre, ideas and technology embodied in different disciplines are being employed in some of the remaining challenges in bioscience. With such an approach, new discoveries and creative ideas are generated through the formation of new collaborative teams. In this environment, the Centre is broadening and enriching the training of students and staff in science and technology.

- The Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

The centre comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms. Drawing on a range of academic disciplines, CISoR's core philosophy is that the study of this fascinating field will advance further through a multidisciplinary approach. Impactful, excellent research forms the basis of CISoR’s activities including scientific advance, new products and processes, contribution to public policy, and public engagement.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/1238

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The MSc in Mechatronics is an integration of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. It has been specifically designed to fulfil the needs of modern industry requiring knowledge in both fields and incorporates a significant input from industry to complement its academic foundations. Read more
The MSc in Mechatronics is an integration of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. It has been specifically designed to fulfil the needs of modern industry requiring knowledge in both fields and incorporates a significant input from industry to complement its academic foundations.

The course specialises in enabling students to produce mechatronic components which increase performance and energy efficiency, as sought after by industries worldwide.

It will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Learning outcomes

By studying for our MSc in Mechatronics you will learn to:

- implement the concepts of mechatronics design principles to the solution of complex multi-physics engineering systems
- apply artificial intelligence and modern control and computer engineering techniques to improve the performance of modern equipments and devices

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/mechatronics/index.html

Collaborative working

The programme includes traditionally taught subject-specific units and business and group-orientated modular work. These offer you the chance to gain experience in design, project management and creativity, while working with students from other subjects.

You will complete your MSc through an individual research project under the supervision of two supervisors; one from the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering (http://www.bath.ac.uk/elec-eng/) and one from Mechanical Engineering (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/), assigned to one of our leading research centres (http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/research/index.html).

- Group project work
In semester 2 you undertake a cross-disciplinary group activity for your professional development, simulating a typical industrial work situation.

- Individual project work
In the final semester, you undertake an individual research project directly related to key current research at the University, often commissioned by industry.

Structure

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/me/me-proglist-pg.html#H) for more detail on individual units.

Semester 1 (October-January):
The first semester covers the fundamental principles of computational artificial intelligence, integrated engineering control techniques and mechatronic systems modelling and simulation.

- Five taught units
- Includes coursework involving laboratory or small project sessions
- Typically each unit consists of 22 hours of lectures, may involve a number of hours of tutorials/exercises and laboratory activity and approximately 70 hours of private study (report writing, laboratory results processing and revision for examinations)

Further advanced options will give you an in depth knowledge of how electrical and mechanical engineering can be integrated to effect state of the art technologies.

Semester 2 (February-May):
In Semester 2 you will study both technical specialist units and project-based units. You will develop your professional understanding of engineering in a research and design context. You will gain analytical and team working skills to enable you to deal with the open-ended tasks that typically arise in practice in present-day engineering.

- The semester aims to develop your professional understanding of engineering in a business environment and is taught by academic staff with extensive experience in industry
- Group projects in which students work in a multi-disciplinary team to solve a conceptual structural engineering design problem, just as an industrial design team would operate
- Individual project preliminary work and engineering project management units

Summer/Dissertation Period (June-September):
- Individual project leading to MSc dissertation, done under the supervision of two supervisors, one from the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering and one from Mechanical Engineering

- Depending on the chosen area of interest, the individual project may involve theoretical and/or experimental activities; for both such activities students can use the department computer suites and well-equipped and newly refurbished laboratories for experimental work. The individual projects are generally carried out under the supervision of a member of academic staff. A number of industrially-based projects are available to students

- Examples of typical projects include the design and control of autonomous robots; undersea tidal wave power generators; and the design and control of high speed mechanisms.

Subjects covered

- Computational intelligence
- Control engineering
- Engineering systems simulation
- Power systems control
- Professional skills for engineering practice
- Signals & information

Career Options

Graduates with knowledge and training in both electrical and mechanical engineering are very much in demand in aerospace, automotive and manufacturing industries.

More and more of the hydraulic and mechanical aspects of these industries are being replaced by mechatronics components to reduce weight and increase performance and energy efficiency.

The career opportunities in the UK and worldwide are very significant. Jobs our recent graduates have secured include:

Product Research Development Engineer, KTP Associate, University of Bath, UK
Project Manager, Guandong Best Control Technology, PR China
Software Engineer, DIAGNOS, UK
Engineer, MAN Diesel & Turbo, USA

About the department

Bath has a strong tradition of achievement in mechanical engineering research and education.

We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

We offer taught MSc students the chance to carry out projects within outstanding research groupings.

Our research impact is wide and we are dedicated to working with industry to find innovative solutions to problems that affect all areas of society.

We are consistently ranked among the UK’s top 10 mechanical engineering departments in the annual league tables.

We believe in producing leaders, not just engineers.

We will give you the edge over your competitors by teaching you how technology fits into commercial settings. You will not only have access to cutting edge science and technology, we will also provide you with the skills you need to manage a workforce in demanding business environments.

For further information visit our departmental website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/pgt/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Read more
Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision.

Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science, biophysics and computational biologoy. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1235/biochemistry

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate research students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Associated centres

- Kent Fungal Group

The Kent Fungal Group (KFG) brings together a number of research groups in the School of Biosciences that primarily use yeasts or other fungi as ‘model systems’ for their research. One strength of the KFG is the range of model fungi being exploited for both fundamental and medical/translational research. These include Bakers’ yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and yeasts associated with human disease, specifically Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

In addition to studying key cellular processes in the fungal cell such as protein synthesis, amyloids and cell division, members of the KFG are also using yeast to explore the molecular basis of human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as ageing. The KFG not only provides support for both fundamental and medical/translational fungal research, but also provides an excellent training environment for young fungal researchers.

- Industrial Biotechnology Centre

The School houses one of the University’s flagship research centres – the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC). Here, staff from Biosciences, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Computing and Engineering combine their expertise into a pioneering interdisciplinary biosciences programme at Kent, in order to unlock the secrets of some of the essential life processes. These approaches are leading to a more integrated understanding of biology in health and disease. In the Centre, ideas and technology embodied in different disciplines are being employed in some of the remaining challenges in bioscience. With such an approach, new discoveries and creative ideas are generated through the formation of new collaborative teams. In this environment, the IBC is broadening and enriching the training of students and staff in science and technology.

- The Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

The centre comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms. Drawing on a range of academic disciplines, CISoR's core philosophy is that the study of this fascinating field will advance further through a multidisciplinary approach. Impactful, excellent research forms the basis of CISoR’s activities including scientific advance, new products and processes, contribution to public policy, and public engagement.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/index.html

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Research profile. Postgraduate study of Science and Religion invites you to bring together the two great truth-seeking disciplines and understand the ways in which they both challenge and inform each other. Read more

Research profile

Postgraduate study of Science and Religion invites you to bring together the two great truth-seeking disciplines and understand the ways in which they both challenge and inform each other. This interdisciplinary venture is more than the sum of its parts.

You will make use of the methods of historical study, philosophy, theology, and literary studies to assess state-of-the-art scientific research alongside well-established areas of debate.

Research supervision is offered by academic staff with interests in physics, cosmology and faith; reduction and emergence; consciousness and the soul; evolutionary biology, human uniqueness, and the 'image of God'; the laws of nature and the idea of 'ultimate reality'; science and the doctrine of creation; miracles and science; the Bible and science; science and religion in literature and the arts; ecology, ethics and theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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The MRes in Neuroscience is designed to provide advanced training in neuroscience research. Students conduct a year-long research project and learn relevant techniques and skills through course work. Read more
The MRes in Neuroscience is designed to provide advanced training in neuroscience research. Students conduct a year-long research project and learn relevant techniques and skills through course work. The overall aim is to give students the necessary skill set to succeed as independent research scientists.

Course information

The MRes in Neuroscience is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the School of Psychology and Neuroscience.

Highlights

- Intensive week-long introductory module prepares students for the course before the start of Semester 1.
- The course includes a streamlined taught component.
- Students have the opportunity to conduct a year-long project in a single laboratory.

Teaching format

The course begins with a week-long intensive module which continues during Semester 1 with a weekly seminar series. Over two semesters, students will also complete two additional Honours-level modules.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practicals and guided independent study. The modules are assessed principally by written work and oral presentations.

During Semester 1 and 2, and during the summer months, students will conduct an original research project culminating in a written thesis, which forms the main component of assessed work.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development - http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/taught-programmes/neuroscience/#d.en.556406

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue (https://portal.st-andrews.ac.uk/catalogue/) which is for the 2016–2017 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2017 entry.

Compulsory modules

- Research Design in Neuroscience: intensive week-long module provides an introduction to designing and carrying out neuroscience research at the postgraduate level.
- Techniques and Skills in Neuroscience Research: examines state-of-the-art neuroscience techniques through critical analysis of primary literature.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules (optional modules may vary from year to year; see the University’s position on curriculum development (http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/taught-programmes/neuroscience/#d.en.556406)). Examples of optional modules include:

- Neurodegeneration and Aging: develops a detailed understanding of molecular neuroscience at the biochemical and molecular level.
- Motoneurons: From Physiology to Pathology: provides an in-depth knowledge of key aspects of neuronal function and potential dysfunction by focusing on motoneurons.
- Behavioural Neuroscience: allows students to access current research in the area of behavioural neuroscience. Possible topics include motivation, learning and attention.
- Vision: from Neurons to Awareness: develops an advanced understanding of the psychological processes involved in visual perception.
- Neural Basis of Episodic Memory: examines how the brain enables us to remember information from our personal experience.
- Neuromodulation: explores the diverse range of neuromodulatory mechanisms and outlines their importance in information processing in the nervous system.
- Synaptic Transmission: covers recent progress in understanding the morphology and ultrastructure of synapses, neurotransmitter corelease and recycling mechanisms, retrograde signalling, synaptic plasticity, the role of glial cells and the development of neurotransmission.
- Mechanisms of Behaviour: Integrating Psychological and Neuroscience Perspectives: explores some of the many physiological and neural systems that modulate patterns of behaviour in a range of species, including humans.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to take new modules in the academic year 2017-2018. The modules listed here are indicative, and there is no guarantee they will run for 2017 entry. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2017 entry. Take a look at the most up-to-date modules in the module catalogue.

Research project and thesis

Students will spend one year conducting an original research project culminating in a data-based thesis of not more than 15,000 words. The thesis will describe the research results obtained from the year-long research project and must be submitted by a date specified in August.

If students choose not to complete the thesis requirement for the MRes, there is an exit award available that allows suitably qualified candidates to receive a Postgraduate Certificate. By choosing an exit award, you will finish your degree at the end of the second semester of study and receive a PG Cert instead of an MRes.

After the MRes

Research degrees:

Many of our graduates continue their education by enrolling in PhD programmes at St Andrews or elsewhere.

The School of Psychology and Neuroscience offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree. The PhD comprises three years of full-time study and the submission of an 80,000-word thesis.

The Medical Research Council (http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/research-council/mrc/) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/research-council/bbsrc/) offers studentships for PhD research in health, biological and related sciences covering up to four years of funding and, in some cases, accommodation fees.

Careers:

A large number of Psychology and Neuroscience postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world. The School provides opportunities for students to gain academic experience by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and through conducting independent research.

In addition to pursuing careers in academia, postgraduates within the School have gone on to pursue careers in a variety of fields including industry, education and medicine.

The Careers Centre (http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers/) offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and provides resources specific for neuroscience students (https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/careers/students/careerdecisions/usingmydegree/neuroscience/).

Contact

School of Psychology and Neuroscience
St Mary's Quad
South Street
St Andrews
KY16 9JP

Phone: +44 (0)1334 46 2157
Email:

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The aim of the programme is to equip non-engineering graduates with a STEM background to meet the stringent demands of today’s highly competitive industrial environment. Read more
The aim of the programme is to equip non-engineering graduates with a STEM background to meet the stringent demands of today’s highly competitive industrial environment. On completion of these courses students acquire a broad understanding of Engineering with a focus on aerospace engineering.

The University has been running automotive degree courses for almost forty years and is very well-established within the automotive industry. We have some 250 undergraduate and postgraduate students reading automotive engineering so are one of the largest providers of automotive engineering degree courses in the UK. We have excellent facilities in automotive engineering technology including an automotive centre with engine test facilities.

The development of skills and advancement of knowledge focus on:
-The selection of materials, process and techniques for the structural analysis and the design and construction of automotive components such as body and chassis, in relation to vibration and vehicle dynamics
-Understanding of alternative power train and fuel technologies, their impact on vehicle performance and environment
-The construction of CAE models and to assess implications of the results, the limitations of present techniques and the potential future direction of developments in the CAE field
-Appreciation of the need for process and product development relevant to the introduction of products in a cost effective and timely manner
-Critical review of the present knowledge base, its applicability, usage and relevance to enhance product and enterprise performance

Why choose this course?

This pioneering programme consists of a number of “specialist” Masters awards with an expectation that students will have studied a STEM related discipline to a Bachelor’s level or equivalent, as opposed to a “traditional” masters philosophy aimed at students from an engineering background. The programme offers options with separate entry routes for candidates transitioning from ‘Near STEM’ and ‘Far STEM’ disciplines:The Far STEM route is for first degrees where statistical analysis was a dominant feature of their analytical studies. Students will spend one to two semesters studying appropriate Level 4/5 modules in the first year then joining the Near STEM cohort (e.g., chemistry or biology). The Near STEM route is for admission of relevant first degree candidates and whose programme would have made extensive use of applied mathematics to design and explain engineering and/or scientific concepts (e.g., physics or maths).

Careers

The successful postgraduates of the programme will acquire the knowledge and understanding, intellectual, practical and transferable skills necessary for the analysis and synthesis of problems in engineering through a combination of experimental, simulation, research methods and case studies. They can expect to gain work in a range of disciplines within a variety of industries from specialist technical roles to positions of management responsibility.

Teaching methods

The School has a reputation for innovation in teaching and learning, where nearly all MSc modules are delivered through a combination of traditional face-to-face teaching and backup tutorial's using the University's StudyNet web based facility.
The online StudyNet is accessible 24/7 and allows students to access electronic teaching and learning resources, and conduct electronic discussion's with staff and other students. A heavy emphasis is placed on theory and practice, and the School has a policy of using industrial standard software wherever possible. The School also operate an open access laboratory, and computer policy, that will help students complete coursework and assignments, at a scheduled pace and on time.

Structure

Year 1
Core Modules
-Advanced Engines & Power Systems
-Automotive Chassis & Powertrain Technology
-Automotive Dynamics & Safety
-Automotive Materials & Manufacture
-CFD Techniques
-Dynamics
-Operations Management
-Operations Research

Year 2
Core Modules
-Individual Masters Project

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This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. Read more
This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. The core philosophy of the programme is to equip students both with mathematics and its applications and with high-level scientific software and associated numerical skills. The Greenwich campus, near the financial district of Canary Wharf, enables the department to build ties with many modern engineering and applied mathematics practitioners enabling our students to become part of a wider group. The Leslie Comrie seminar series, inviting both academics and industrialists, allows you to interact with our external links creating an advantageous learning experience. We provide you the grounds for building a high profile of understanding of current research practices in the industry. Our classes contain interactive applications that enhance the learning experience by innovative teaching practices. Utilising research expertise within the department you will graduate with a strong understanding of numerical methods. You will also develop an understanding for further applicability in various fields of applied mathematics and engineering.

This programme is suitable both for fresh graduates and also for experienced professional practitioners who wish to further their skills. The programme core modules cover modern mathematical skills together with applications across different industries, and there are optional professional modules directly related to research expertise within the Faculty. This ensures that students have an advanced understanding of both theory and practice in their selected specialist areas. Students will gain knowledge of mathematical skills and applications, computational skills, and relevant professional experience, related to traditional engineering and science modelling, modern enterprise applications, finance, and service industries. They will gain an understanding of emerging applications. There will be hands-on training in various development tools and in the use of computational software related to their professional direction. Assessment takes the form of 100% coursework, based on applications of current market practices. A supervised thesis project takes place at the end of the last teaching term during the summer months. Projects are allocated in March and students are invited to undertake a project that provides genuine insight in an area of the research interests within the department. The programme is also available on a part-time basis.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/maths/appmaths

Mathematics

Postgraduate mathematics students benefit from award-winning teaching and great facilities. Our programmes are informed by world-renowned research and our links with industry ensure our students develop the academic and practical skills that will enhance their career prospects.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Option Set 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Option Set 2
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Principles and Practice of Evacuation Modelling (30 credits)
Principles and Practice of Fire Modelling (30 credits)

Option Set 3

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Students are also required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Enterprise Software Engineering Development (15 credits)
Software Tools and Techniques (15 credits)
Actuarial Mathematics and Risk Modelling (15 credits)
Financial Time Series (15 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

100% coursework: a supervised thesis project (during the summer months).

Career options

Our graduates are equipped with the tools to involve in many engineering applications and computational engineering sectors such as reliability engineering, risk management, complex engineering systems, fire safety and finance. Our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to interact with leading figures from industry and academia and undertake projects of current industry practice. A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and a milestone in your specialised career path leading to a professional career. The Department also offers a PhD programme which trains highly skilled candidates towards research careers in academia and industry. Our current collaborations for our PhD candidates lie with the STRIKE project for mathematical and computational applications.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

Read less
The aim of the programme is to equip non-engineering graduates with a STEM background to meet the stringent demands of today’s highly competitive industrial environment. Read more
The aim of the programme is to equip non-engineering graduates with a STEM background to meet the stringent demands of today’s highly competitive industrial environment. On completion of these courses students acquire a broad understanding of Engineering with a focus on aerospace engineering.

The University has been running automotive degree courses for almost forty years and is very well-established within the automotive industry. We have some 250 undergraduate and postgraduate students reading automotive engineering so are one of the largest providers of automotive engineering degree courses in the UK. We have excellent facilities in automotive engineering technology including an automotive centre with engine test facilities.

The development of skills and advancement of knowledge focus on:
-The selection of materials, process and techniques for the structural analysis and the design and construction of automotive components such as body and chassis, in relation to vibration and vehicle dynamics
-Understanding of alternative power train and fuel technologies, their impact on vehicle performance and environment
-The construction of CAE models and to assess implications of the results, the limitations of present techniques and the potential future direction of developments in the CAE field
-Appreciation of the need for process and product development relevant to the introduction of products in a cost effective and timely manner
-Critical review of the present knowledge base, its applicability, usage and relevance to enhance product and enterprise performance

Why choose this course?

This pioneering programme consists of a number of “specialist” Masters awards with an expectation that students will have studied a STEM related discipline to a Bachelor’s level or equivalent, as opposed to a “traditional” masters philosophy aimed at students from an engineering background. The programme offers options with separate entry routes for candidates transitioning from ‘Near STEM’ and ‘Far STEM’ disciplines:The Far STEM route is for first degrees where statistical analysis was a dominant feature of their analytical studies. Students will spend one to two semesters studying appropriate Level 4/5 modules in the first year then joining the Near STEM cohort (e.g., chemistry or biology). The Far STEM route is for first degrees where statistical analysis was a dominant feature of their analytical studies. Students will spend one to two semesters studying appropriate Level 4/5 modules in the first year then joining the Near STEM cohort (e.g., chemistry or biology).

Careers

The successful postgraduates of the programme will acquire the knowledge and understanding, intellectual, practical and transferable skills necessary for the analysis and synthesis of problems in engineering through a combination of experimental, simulation, research methods and case studies. They can expect to gain work in a range of disciplines within a variety of industries from specialist technical roles to positions of management responsibility.

Teaching methods

The School has a reputation for innovation in teaching and learning, where nearly all MSc modules are delivered through a combination of traditional face-to-face teaching and backup tutorial's using the University's StudyNet web based facility.
The online StudyNet is accessible 24/7 and allows students to access electronic teaching and learning resources, and conduct electronic discussion's with staff and other students. A heavy emphasis is placed on theory and practice, and the School has a policy of using industrial standard software wherever possible. The School also operate an open access laboratory, and computer policy, that will help students complete coursework and assignments, at a scheduled pace and on time.

Structure

Year 1
Core Modules
-Automotive Materials & Manufacture
-CFD Techniques
-Computing for Business and Technology
-Dynamics
-Engineering Application of Mathematics
-Engineering Fundamentals
-Mechanical Experimental Engineering
-Mechanical Science
-Operations Management

Year 2
Core Modules
-Advanced Engines & Power Systems
-Automotive Chassis & Powertrain Technology
-Automotive Dynamics & Safety
-Automotive Electrical Systems
-Integrated Product Engineering
-Operations Research

Read less
This course is aimed at engineering graduates who wish to work in the automotive industry, with particular focus on the design, performance and operation of automotive powertrains and vehicle systems. Read more
This course is aimed at engineering graduates who wish to work in the automotive industry, with particular focus on the design, performance and operation of automotive powertrains and vehicle systems.

Our graduates have the technical and managerial skills and expertise that are highly sought after by the automotive industry.

Our course will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Many distinction-level graduates from this programme stay on for a PhD, often funded in part by the University of Bath.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/automotive/index.html

Learning outcomes

By studying our MSc in Automotive Engineering you will:

- Understand the vehicle design process and the operation and performance of important sub-systems
- Analyse current and projected future environmental legislation and the impact this has on the design, operation and performance of automotive powertrain systems
- Analyse in detail the operation and performance indicators of transmission systems, internal combustion engines and after treatment devices.

Collaborative working

The programme includes traditionally taught subject-specific units and business and group-orientated modular work. These offer you the chance to gain experience in design, project management and creativity, while working with students from other subjects.

- Group project work
In semester 2 you undertake a cross-disciplinary group activity for your professional development, simulating a typical industrial work situation.

- Individual project work
In the final semester, you undertake an individual research project directly related to key current research at the University, often commissioned by industry.

Structure

See programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/me/me-proglist-pg.html#B) for more detail on individual units.

Semester 1 (October-January):
The first semester of our course allows students to choose from a range of fundamental and more advanced lecture courses covering the analysis methods and modelling techniques that are used in the simulation, design and manufacture of modern vehicles and powertrains.

- Five taught units
- Includes coursework involving laboratory or small project sessions
- Typically each unit consists of 22 hours of lectures, may involve a number of hours of tutorials/exercises and laboratory activity and approximately 70 hours of private study (report writing, laboratory results processing and revision for examinations)

Semester 2 (February-May):
In Semester 2 you will study both technical specialist units and project-based units. You will develop your professional understanding of engineering in a research and design context. You will gain analytical and team working skills to enable you to deal with the open-ended tasks that typically arise in practice in present-day engineering.

- The semester aims to develop your professional understanding of engineering in a business environment and is taught by academic staff with extensive experience in industry
- Group projects in which students work in a multi-disciplinary team to solve a conceptual structural engineering design problem, just as an industrial design team would operate
- Individual project preliminary work and engineering project management units

Summer/Dissertation Period (June-September):
The full time summer project gives students the opportunity to develop their understanding of aspects of the automotive material covered in the first semester, through a detailed study related to the research interests and specialisations of a member of the academic staff. The students will often be working as part of a larger group of researchers including postgraduates, research officers and undergraduates and as such have access to the state of the art automotive test facilities within the department.

- Individual project leading to MSc dissertation
- Depending on the chosen area of interest, the individual project may involve theoretical and/or experimental activities; for both such activities students can use the department computer suites and well-equipped and newly refurbished laboratories for experimental work. The individual projects are generally carried out under the supervision of a member of academic staff. A number of industrially-based projects are available to students

Subjects covered

- Heat transfer
- Engineering systems simulation
- Engine & powertrain technologies
- Professional skills for engineering practice
- Vehicle engineering
- Vehicle dynamics & aerodynamics

Career Options

Our MSc graduates now work all over the world in various industries, while a number of them pursue their Doctorates in universities worldwide. Recent graduates have secured jobs as:

- Calibration Engineer, Ford Motor Company Ltd
- Product Engineer, Renault
- Engineering Consultant, D'Appolonia

Companies which have hired our recent graduates include:

British Aerospace
Airbus UK
Intel
Ricardo
Cambstion
Panama Canal Authority
Moog Controls Ltd

About the department

Bath has a strong tradition of achievement in mechanical engineering research and education.

We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

We offer taught MSc students the chance to carry out projects within outstanding research groupings.

Our research impact is wide and we are dedicated to working with industry to find innovative solutions to problems that affect all areas of society.

We are consistently ranked among the UK’s top 10 mechanical engineering departments in the annual league tables.

We believe in producing leaders, not just engineers.

We will give you the edge over your competitors by teaching you how technology fits into commercial settings. You will not only have access to cutting edge science and technology, we will also provide you with the skills you need to manage a workforce in demanding business environments.

For further information visit our departmental website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/pgt/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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The aim of this master program is to train future teachers, researchers and entrepreneurs, to provide an understanding of the digital transformations happening in education and to help them design relevant and challenging projects. Read more

Take action to promote education

The aim of this master program is to train future teachers, researchers and entrepreneurs, to provide an understanding of the digital transformations happening in education and to help them design relevant and challenging projects.

Education is now globalized: teaching supports of all kinds are available at all time and everywhere. If it is stimulated by digital economy, education must also compete with it.

Schools are urged by society to encourage students’ creativity and eagerness to learn, to inspire them to undertake and share, to develop their lucidity, critical thinking and sense of solidarity. But this goals can’t easily be reached, in a context of social crises, growing inequalities and demographic needs.

It is a challenge we are ready to take-up: education is in need for new entrepreneurs, teachers and researchers, and ideally, people with these three characteristics all at once.
We are looking for talented students with a particular interest for exploration, experimentation and research.

Our candidates must have the desire to work together on exciting collaborative projects and to contribute now to tomorrow’s education.

Career opportunities

A business/job in a startup or an institution

At the exit of the master, graduates

– Become instructional designers, editorial managers or project managers in startups and publishers

– Create an educational company in Europe, Africa, America or Asia …

– Take a teaching assignment

– Begin a thesis and join a laboratory.

Publics

At the entrance of the Master, students are

– Sociology students in educational sciences, biology, cognitive science, design, computer science, engineering sciences,

– Practicing faculty physicians involved in educational innovation. All are passionate about education and believe that its future is crucial for the future.

For some students, it is a step aside for a project.

This is the case of doctors who want to take time to imagine a serious game, design a simulator to train surgeons, embarking on a participatory science research, manufacture objects connected in a OpenLab for their research. .

This is the case of teachers who seek a breath for a job they love and want to re-imagine.

For others it is the beginning of a research curriculum that requires knowledge about learning in a digital society and that will combine several disciplines, computer science, cognitive science, physics, biology, humanities and social.

For others still, designers, artists, hackers is a creative field, for sustainable development, sharing economy, the development of “common” knowledge.

All meet, to discuss the tech ed (Education and technology) with 3 fields of expertise:

– The educational philosophy and anthropology of knowledge, digital humanities, social sciences

– Digital techniques, experimentation

– Entrepreneurship, project management,

Application information

There are few steps to follow before becoming a Master EdTech student.

You must fill the application form, which is quite long and require some preparation and specific pieces of information, make sure you have everything that is needed.

Please note that you will be asked to attached some documents:

- your curriculum vitae
- letters of recommendation
- ID photo
- a copy of your last diploma*
- a copy of your grades transcript for this diploma*

*If you do not have these documents yet, please not they will be required as soon as you have them.

If you are selected, you will receive an authorization to register as a student of Paris Diderot University (http://www.univ-paris-diderot.fr/english/sc/site.php?bc=accueil&np=accueil&g=m) or Paris Descartes University (http://www.parisdescartes.fr/).

The administrative registration is personal and under appointment. You must handle the copies of your documents and pay the fees corresponding to your situation (typically around 500€ for the year including social security).

Should you have additional questions, do not hesitate to contact us.

Our People

http://cri-paris.org/aire-edtech-master/people/

RESEARCH EDTECH

Education through research is based on 5 pillars

The open science: open source, open access, research methods in big and open data, participatory science and citizen science, the role of communities in the creation of knowledge.

The learning by doing: project, prototype, test, analyze, document and share in scientific prototyping OpenLab CRI: DiY, design, education and research.

The peer to peer: learning communities, collective challenges, training cooperation, sharing with social enterprises in the ecosystem of the CRI: HelloTomorrow Challenge, Make Sense, Synlab, CoDesign-It and projects hosted in OpenLab , exploring the vast international community that works for equal access to education

Entrepreneurial Spirit: project acceleration, creativity, design, technological autonomy (introductory programming methods, creation of connected objects, creation of digital media), student status can entrepreneur.

The philosophical and ethical framework that gives meaning to education, the history of ideas and institutions, the analysis of the concept of innovation, an organizational approach of thought for education in the present world.

The EdTech master teaches to research: teaching is based on the questioning and the project of each student. Problem solving, experimentation and interpretation are based on the analysis of the scientific literature.

It introduces the digital industry training: content design, learning strategy, platform design, working in project mode. Internships (laboratory, company or association, in educational institutions), and stakeholders closer student researchers, startupeurs, social entrepreneurs, professors, all education stakeholders.

It meets the needs of experienced teachers or training by inviting them to work the key points of education in the digital society: new responsibilities and new forms of educational intervention, addressing societal and scientific challenges such as “living together “, health, nutrition, mobility, climate, pollution, future cities.

Why EdTech?

http://cri-paris.org/aire-edtech-master/why/

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