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Masters Degrees (Philosophy Of Mathematics)

We have 114 Masters Degrees (Philosophy Of Mathematics)

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. It is ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report as the strongest department in the UK for mathematical logic, and the second strongest for philosophical logic.

Our MA draws on these strengths and is open to students with first degrees in philosophy (subject to a suitable background in logic) or mathematics. It consists of six taught units, examined by essay, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components, examined by essay, and a dissertation. You will take six taught units, normally three in each semester.

Core units
-Philosophical Writing and Research
-Axiomatic Set Theory
-Epistemology and Metaphysics
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Essay Unit

One optional unit
-Logic
-A second essay unit

Optional units can vary each year.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and twp will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of at most 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree.

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics have taken up careers as teachers and software developers. The IT industry has benefited from a number of graduates from this programme.

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who wish to specialise in philosophy of physics at a higher level, and for individuals with a background in physics or mathematics who wish to make a transition to philosophy and foundations of physics. The course consists of five taught units in philosophy, two taught master's units in physics, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components in philosophy and physics, as well as a dissertation.

Core units
- Philosophical Writing and Research Methods (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
- A mandatory, two-hour weekly seminar developing ideas, bibliographical and writing skills necessary for philosophical research. The unit is assessed by seminar contributions and presentations.
- Scientific Methodology and Epistemology (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit concerns core topics in scientific epistemology and metaphysics. The unit is examined on the basis of an essay of 5,000-6,000 words. As with all assessed essays, you may meet with a supervisor to discuss your work and to receive feedback on a draft essay.
- Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit covers philosophical issues related to basic physical theories, focusing on conceptual issues in the foundations of quantum theory and special relativity. We will cover topics such as the relativity of simultaneity; geometry and the causal structure of relativity physics; the conceptual structure of quantum mechanics, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen argument; the measurement problem and Schrödinger’s cat paradox of; locality and action-at-a-distance.
- Advanced Philosophy of Physics (Philosophy, 20-credit unit)
This unit will examine a selection of conceptual issues in the foundations of physical theory with particular focus on the physics of the mid-to-late 20th century. We cover topics such as: the arrow of time in thermal physics; the interpretation of quantum field theory; emergence and universality in condensed matter physics; fine tuning problems and inflationary cosmology; spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism; and time in quantum gravity.
- Foundations of Modern Physics (Physics, 10-credit unit)
Emphasis is placed on students developing an appreciation of the foundations of different areas of physics, and the unit assessment involves students writing an essay whose detailed subject is partly decided by the student. The lectures are divided into Classical, Spacetime and Quantum Physics.
- Relativistic Field Theory (Physics, 10-credit unit)
This course will give an account of the modern approach to special relativity and Lagrangian field theory, and their role in the covariant description of the classical electromagnetic field, and the relativistic quantum Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. Formative assessment is through problem sheets discussed in problems classes. Summative assessment is through a 2 hour written examination

Optional units (all Philosophy 20-credit units)
- History of Science
- Logic
- Philosophy and History of Mathematics
- Philosophy and History of Medicine
- Philosophy of Biology
- Philosophy of Psychology
- An individual, supervised research project

Please be aware that optional units may vary from year to year.

Careers

The MA in Philosophy of Physics is an ideal platform for further studies in Philosophy or Foundations of Physics. This course will also provide students with Maths and Physics backgrounds with an opportunity to develop verbal, written and argumentative skills that are highly valued by employers.

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The Department of Philosophy has outstanding research strength in the fields of philosophy of biology, philosophy of psychology and philosophy of cognitive sciences. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has outstanding research strength in the fields of philosophy of biology, philosophy of psychology and philosophy of cognitive sciences.

We are ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report as the strongest department in the UK for the philosophy of biology. The department is also home to a European Research Council project on Darwinism and the Theory of Rational Choice, which explores connections between biological and cognitive science research.

This MA builds on these outstanding research strengths. It is intended for graduates of philosophy, psychology and biology who wish to study philosophy of science with an emphasis on the biological and cognitive sciences. The programme focuses on philosophical issues arising from these scientific disciplines. The history of science is studied in terms of the philosophical debate about the nature of scientific method and knowledge.

You will be an active member of the department's flourishing research culture. All students are encouraged to participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the weekly Philosophy and History of Science research seminar, which often features well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. The department has strong links with both the School of Experimental Psychology and the School of Biological Sciences, with whom joint workshops and reading groups are organised.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components, examined by essay, and a dissertation. You will take six taught units, normally three in each semester.

Core units
-Scientific Epistemology and Methodology
-Philosophical Writing and Research Seminar
-Philosophy of Biology
-Philosophy of Psychology

Optional units can vary each year but may include:
-History of Science
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Philosophy and History of Medicine
-Philosophy of Physics
-Individual, supervised research project

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and two will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree. You will have supervisory meetings with a member of staff who will also provide feedback on a draft of your work.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in Philosophy of Biological and Cognitive Sciences have gone on to careers in teaching and science administration. A number of MA graduates pursue further studies in either philosophy or science.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching A-Level Mathematics is designed for practising secondary Mathematics teachers who wish to develop or enhance their teaching at post-16 level. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching A-Level Mathematics is designed for practising secondary Mathematics teachers who wish to develop or enhance their teaching at post-16 level. The course was developed at Warwick University under the aegis of MEI. In addition to developing your subject knowledge, you will focus on the theoretical underpinning of learning advanced Mathematics and will explore the evidence base for the teaching of one mathematical topic in more depth.

If you are considering this programme, you may also be interested in the MSc Mathematics Education.

Facts

Mode of study: a series of full-day sessions, usually in pairs.

Duration: an academic year.

Location: Durham City campus.

How will I be taught?

The course is very 'hands-on'. Expert tutors come from both Durham University and the University of Warwick. You will work with peers on a range of problems and will reflect on both Mathematics and the appropriate pedagogy.

You will be assessed using a variety of methods, including a portfolio, written assignments, reports and presentations.

What will I learn?

The certificate is based on two modules: A-Level Mathematics Pedagogy and Classroom-based Enquiry in A-Level Mathematics.

A-Level Mathematics Pedagogy

The module introduces the theoretical and practical underpinnings of advanced Mathematics teaching and learning and introduces existing research findings in the area. It covers issues such as the role of questioning in the A-Level Mathematics classroom, visual representations of complex concepts, proof and reasoning and the role of ICT. The assessment involves the production of a portfolio (33%) outlining both the development of subject knowledge and practical teaching skills, as well as a written assignment focused on a key topic in the learning and teaching of A-Level Mathematics (67%).

Classroom-Based Enquiry in A-Level Mathematics

The module develops the skills associated with small-scale, classroom-based research methods to enable teachers to explore an aspect of teaching and learning around one mathematical topic in their own classroom. Building on an understanding of research methods gained from existing literature, the module will examine alternative pedagogies in A-Level Mathematics, assessment, the role of optional modules (such as statistics, decision and mechanics) in developing mathematical understanding, as well as methodological ideas such as action research. The module is assessed by a presentation on a chosen classroom-based enquiry topic (33%) and a written report of the methods and findings of the enquiry project (67%).

Who will teach me?

Bernard Murphy is the MEI Programme Leader for CPD. After 11 years in the classroom, in England and, through VSO, in Tanzania, he joined MEI in 2003 to set up the TAM programme at the University of Warwick. Most of his work now involves CPD related to the Mathematics A-Level. In addition, he was recently involved in a European Project 'Awareness of Big Ideas in the Mathematics Classroom', carries out reviews of whole Mathematics departments, regularly presents master classes to primary and secondary school pupils, has been an A-Level principal examiner and is an author of textbooks.

Mike Ollerton is mainly responsible for supporting teachers through the two Master's modules. Mike has worked on Master's programmes since 1998 in Cumbria (formerly St. Martin's, Lancaster), Warwick )from 2011) and more recently in Durham (2012).He has 20+ years of secondary school Mathematics teaching and is passionate about seeking ways to make the learning of Mathematics accessible and understandable. Since 2006, Mike has been a freelance consultant, working with may schools and running courses focusing on problem solving and investigative approaches. He is a long term member of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics.

James Frost is a member of the Durham University team that works alongside MEI in offering the TAM programme. His primary role resides within the practical teaching element of the course and thus, he is responsible for ensuring that the ideals and philosophy of the programme are evident within the classrooms of TAM students. James has 20 years' experience as a teacher and educator, working on BA, B.Ed and PGCE programmes both in the UK and overseas (St. Lucia). Currently studying for a doctoral qualification, James is particularly interested in the use of ICT in Mathematics classrooms, especially the role of multiple representational environments in developing mathematical understanding.

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This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. Read more
This programme is designed for graduates in mathematics, engineering, or science with excellent numeracy skills, wishing to pursue careers in the application of mathematics, in traditional areas such as engineering and science and in service areas such as finance and banking, where knowledge of modern applications of mathematics would be advantageous. The core philosophy of the programme is to equip students both with mathematics and its applications and with high-level scientific software and associated numerical skills. The Greenwich campus, near the financial district of Canary Wharf, enables the department to build ties with many modern engineering and applied mathematics practitioners enabling our students to become part of a wider group. The Leslie Comrie seminar series, inviting both academics and industrialists, allows you to interact with our external links creating an advantageous learning experience. We provide you the grounds for building a high profile of understanding of current research practices in the industry. Our classes contain interactive applications that enhance the learning experience by innovative teaching practices. Utilising research expertise within the department you will graduate with a strong understanding of numerical methods. You will also develop an understanding for further applicability in various fields of applied mathematics and engineering.

This programme is suitable both for fresh graduates and also for experienced professional practitioners who wish to further their skills. The programme core modules cover modern mathematical skills together with applications across different industries, and there are optional professional modules directly related to research expertise within the Faculty. This ensures that students have an advanced understanding of both theory and practice in their selected specialist areas. Students will gain knowledge of mathematical skills and applications, computational skills, and relevant professional experience, related to traditional engineering and science modelling, modern enterprise applications, finance, and service industries. They will gain an understanding of emerging applications. There will be hands-on training in various development tools and in the use of computational software related to their professional direction. Assessment takes the form of 100% coursework, based on applications of current market practices. A supervised thesis project takes place at the end of the last teaching term during the summer months. Projects are allocated in March and students are invited to undertake a project that provides genuine insight in an area of the research interests within the department. The programme is also available on a part-time basis.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/maths/appmaths

Mathematics

Postgraduate mathematics students benefit from award-winning teaching and great facilities. Our programmes are informed by world-renowned research and our links with industry ensure our students develop the academic and practical skills that will enhance their career prospects.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Option Set 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Option Set 2
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Principles and Practice of Evacuation Modelling (30 credits)
Principles and Practice of Fire Modelling (30 credits)

Option Set 3

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

English Language Support Course (for Postgraduate Students in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)

Students are also required to choose 45 credits from this list of options.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

Students are also required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Enterprise Software Engineering Development (15 credits)
Software Tools and Techniques (15 credits)
Actuarial Mathematics and Risk Modelling (15 credits)
Financial Time Series (15 credits)
Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Inverse Problems (15 credits)
Mathematics and its Applications (30 credits)
Reliability and Optimisation (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Scientific Software Design and Development (15 credits)
Masters Project (Maths) (60 credits)
Computational Methods (15 credits)
Mathematics of Complex Systems (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Advanced Finite Difference Methods for Derivatives Pricing (15 credits)
Mathematical Approaches to Risk Management (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

100% coursework: a supervised thesis project (during the summer months).

Career options

Our graduates are equipped with the tools to involve in many engineering applications and computational engineering sectors such as reliability engineering, risk management, complex engineering systems, fire safety and finance. Our expert seminar series gives you the opportunity to interact with leading figures from industry and academia and undertake projects of current industry practice. A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and a milestone in your specialised career path leading to a professional career. The Department also offers a PhD programme which trains highly skilled candidates towards research careers in academia and industry. Our current collaborations for our PhD candidates lie with the STRIKE project for mathematical and computational applications.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas. Read more

Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas.

Working alongside some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff, you'll complete a research thesis of up to 40,000 words and emerge as an expert in your subject with highly developed research skills.

Victoria's MA is offered in more than 40 subjects. Most programmes are by thesis only but some include coursework and require a shorter thesis, and others you can complete doing mainly coursework and a research project.

A Master of Arts will give your career prospects a boost and open doors to new opportunities. Be a leader in a humanities or social science field and help make New Zealand a better place.

Available subjects

Duration

If you are doing an MA by thesis you'll normally need to complete it within 12 months, or two years if you're studying part time.

If you are doing your MA by coursework and thesis you'll normally be able to complete your degree within 12 months, but you can take up to one year and six months. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete this MA.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of a minimum of 30 hours a week for much of the year. If you can't commit this many hours you should enrol as a part-time student.



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The University of Bristol ranks among the top European institutions in the philosophy and history of science. We currently hold four major research grants to study Darwinism and Rational Choice, Epistemic Utility Theory, Homotopy Type Theory and a philosophy and medicine project on breathlessness. Read more
The University of Bristol ranks among the top European institutions in the philosophy and history of science. We currently hold four major research grants to study Darwinism and Rational Choice, Epistemic Utility Theory, Homotopy Type Theory and a philosophy and medicine project on breathlessness. Our expertise is in a broad range of areas related to the philosophy and history of the specific sciences, including physics, biology, mathematics, logic, medicine and psychology.

Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who have a first degree in philosophy who wish to specialise in philosophy and/or history of science at a higher level, and also for individuals with a background in pure science who wish to make a transition to philosophy and history of science or to explore foundational issues within the sciences.

The emphasis of the programme is on philosophical issues arising from specific scientific disciplines, with special emphasis on physics, biology and mathematics. The history of science is studied in terms of the philosophical debate about the nature of scientific method and knowledge.

You will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. All students are encouraged to participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and the weekly Philosophy and History of Science research seminar, which often features well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you are encouraged to present your own work, and where you will learn to develop argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

You will take six taught units (two compulsory and four optional).

Core units
-Scientific Methodology and Epistemology
-Philosophical Writing and Research Seminar

Optional units
-History of Science
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Philosophy and History of Medicine
-Philosophy of Biology
-Philosophy of Physics
-Philosophy of Psychology
-An individual, supervised research project
Please be aware that optional units may vary from year to year.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and two allows you to progress to writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree. You will have supervisory meetings with a member of staff who will also provide feedback on a draft of your work.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in Philosophy and History of Science have taken up careers in teaching, the IT sector and scientific administration.

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The global shortage of qualified civil engineers includes specialists in water engineering and this MSc programme helps redress this imbalance by providing graduates with an advanced knowledge and skill base to equip them for senior industry roles. Read more

About the course

The global shortage of qualified civil engineers includes specialists in water engineering and this MSc programme helps redress this imbalance by providing graduates with an advanced knowledge and skill base to equip them for senior industry roles.

Brunel’s MSc in Water Engineering is unique in providing specialist knowledge on the critical sub-topics of water and wastewater management and engineering, desalination systems, building water services engineering, industrial waste water management, and water in health care.

The programme demonstrates the links between theory and practice by including input from our industrial partners and through site visits. This is a key aspect for establishing a competitive and high added value course that provides adequate links with industry.

Features of the course include:

Students’ skills in gathering and understanding complex information from a variety of sources (including engineering, scientific and socio-economic information) will be developed in an advanced research methods module. 

Issues relating to risk and health and safety will be introduced in the research methods module and built on in specialist modules. 

Generic modules in financial and project management will underpin specialist modules focusing on water engineering topics.

Real problem-solving examples – starting from basic principles, to the identified problem, the solution, the implementation process and was implemented and the end result. 

Real case studies – demonstrating how environmental and economic sustainability is considered within civil engineering, particularly in water resources management.

Aims

Problems associated with water resources, access, distribution and quality are amongst the most important global issues in this century. Water quality and scarcity issues are being exacerbated by rising populations, economic growth and climate change*.

Brunel's programme in Water Engineering aims to develop world class and leading edge experts on water sustainability who are able to tackle the industry’s complex challenges at a senior level. During the programme you will also learn about the development and application of models that estimate the carbon and water footprint within the energy and food sector.

The MSc is delivered by experienced industry professionals who bring significant practical experience to the course – and the University’s complete suite of engineering facilities and world-class research experience are set up for development and engineering of advanced systems, testing a variety of processes, designs and software tools.

*Recent figures indicate that 1.1 billion people worldwide do not have access to clean drinking water, while 2.6 billion do not have adequate sanitation (source: WHO/UNICEF 2005). 

Course Content

The primary aim of this programme is to create master’s degree graduates with qualities and transferable skills for demanding employment in the water engineering sector. Graduates will have the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development and acquiring new skills at the highest level.

Specific aims are as follows:

- To provide education at postgraduate level in civil engineering. 
- To develop the versatility and depth to deal with new, complex and unusual challenges across a range of water engineering issues, drawing on an understanding of all aspects of water engineering principles. 
- To develop imagination, initiative and creativity to enable graduates to follow a successful engineering career with national and international companies and organisations. 
- To provide a pathway that will prepare graduates for successful careers including, where appropriate, progression to Chartered Engineer status.

The programme will provide opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding of:

- The principles of water engineering, including fluid mechanics, hydrology, and sustainable design. 
- Specialist areas that impact on the successful application of water engineering knowledge projects, e.g. sustainable construction management, financial management and risk analysis. 
- The interplay between engineering and sustainability in complex, real-world situations.

At the cognitive level students will be able to:

- Select, use and evaluate appropriate investigative techniques.
- Assemble and critically analyse relevant primary and secondary data.
- Recognise and assess the problems and critically evaluate solutions to challenges in managing water engineering projects.
- Evaluate the environmental and financial sustainability of current and potential civil engineering activities.

Personal and transferable skills that students develop will allow them to:

- Define and organise a substantial advanced investigation. 
- Select and employ appropriate advanced research methods. 
- Organise technical information into a concise, coherent document.
- Effectively employ a variety of communication styles aimed at different audiences. 
- Plan, manage, evaluate and orally-presented personal projects. 
- Work as part of, and lead, a team.

Typical Modules

Each taught module will count for 15 credits, approximating to 150 learning hours. The Master's programme can be taken full time, over 12 months. The first eight months of the full time course will eight taught modules. For the final four months, students will complete a dissertation counting for 60 credits. Modules cover:

Sustainable Project Management
GIS and Data Analysis
Water Infrastructure Engineering
Risk and Financial Management
Hydrology & Hydraulics
Water Treatment Engineering
Water Process Engineering
Research Methods
Civil Engineering Dissertation

Teaching

Our philosophy is to underpin theoretical aspects of the subject with hands-on experience in applying water engineering techniques. Although you may move on to project management and supervision roles, we feel it important that your knowledge is firmly based on an understanding of how things are done. To this end, industrial partners will provide guest lectures on specialist topics.

In addition to teaching, water engineering staff at Brunel are active researchers. This keeps us at the cutting edge of developments and, we hope, allows us to pass on our enthusiasm for the subject.

How many hours of study are involved?

Contact between students and academic staff is relatively high at around 20 hours per week to assist you in adjusting to university life. As the course progresses the number of contact hours is steadily reduced as you undertake more project-based work.

How will I be taught?

Lectures:
These provide a broad overview of the main concepts and ideas you need to understand and give you a framework on which to expand your knowledge by private study.
Laboratories:
Practicals are generally two- or three-hour sessions in which you can practise your observational and analytical skills, and develop a deeper understanding of theoretical concepts.
Design Studios:
In a studio you will work on individual and group projects with guidance from members of staff. You may be required to produce a design or develop a solution to an engineering problem. These sessions allow you to develop your intellectual ability and practice your teamwork skills.
Site visits:
Learning from real-world examples in an important part of the course. You will visit sites featuring a range of water engineering approaches and asked to evaluate what you see.
One-to-one:
On registration for the course you will be allocated a personal tutor who will be available to provide academic and pastoral support during your time at university. You will get one-to-one supervision on all project work.

Assessment

Several methods of assessment are employed on the course. There are written examinations and coursework. You will undertake projects, assignments, essays, laboratory work and short tests.

Project work is commonplace and is usually completed in groups to imitate the everyday experience in an engineering firm, where specialists must pool their talents to design a solution to a problem.

In this situation you can develop your management and leadership skills and ensure that all members of the group deliver their best. Group members share the mark gained, so it is up to each individual to get the most out of everyone else.

Special Features

Extensive facilities
Students can make the most of laboratory facilities which are extensive, modern and well equipped. We have recently made a major investment in our Joseph Bazalgette Laboratories which includes hydraulic testing laboratory equipment and facilities such as our open channel flow flumes.

Personal tutors
Although we recruit a large number of highly qualified students to our undergraduate, postgraduate and research degrees each year, we don’t forget that you are an individual. From the beginning of your time here, you are allocated a personal tutor who will guide you through academic and pastoral issues.

World-class research
The College is 'research intensive' – most of our academics are actively involved in cutting-edge research. Much of this research is undertaken with collaborators outside the University, including construction companies, water utilities, and other leading industrial firms. We work with universities in China, Poland, Egypt, Turkey, Italy, Denmark and Japan. This research is fed directly into our courses, providing a challenging investigative culture and ensuring that you are exposed to up-to-date and relevant material throughout your time at Brunel.

Strong industry links
We have excellent links with business and industry in the UK and overseas. This means:
Your degree is designed to meet the needs of industry and the marketplace.
The latest developments in the commercial world feed into your course.
You have greater choice and quality of professional placements.
We have more contacts to help you find a job when you graduate.

Visting Professors 
The Royal Academy of Engineering - UK’s national academy for engineering has appointed senior industrial engineers as visiting professors at Brunel University London.
The Visting Professors Scheme provides financial support for experienced industrial engineers to deliver face-to-face teaching and mentoring at a host of institutions. Our engineering undergraduates will benefit from an enhanced understanding of the role of engineering and the way it is practised, along with its challenges and demands. 

Women in Engineering and Computing Programme

Brunel’s Women in Engineering and Computing mentoring scheme provides our female students with invaluable help and support from their industry mentors.

Accreditation

This course has been designed in close consultation with the industry and is accredited as a designated 'technical' MSc degree by the Join Board of Moderators (JBM). The JBM is made up of Institution of Highways and Transport and the Institution of Highway Engineeres respectively.

1. This means this course provides Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer who holds a CEng accredited first degree (full JBM listing of accredited degrees).
2. As a designated ‘technical’ MSc, it will also allow suitable holders of an IEng accredited first degree to meet the educational base for a Chartered Engineer.

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Applicants must have the following academic qualifications. (a) An honours Bachelor degree (major award at Level 8 on the National Framework of Qualifications) or a major award at Level 9 or a major award at Level 10 on the National Framework of Qualifications, and. Read more

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have the following academic qualifications:
(a) An honours Bachelor degree (major award at Level 8 on the National Framework of Qualifications) or a major award at Level 9 or a major award at Level 10 on the National Framework of Qualifications, and

(b) one of the following sets of second level qualifications:

(i) in the Leaving Certificate Examination from 1969 onwards: a grade C3 or above in Higher Level Irish; a grade D3 or above in Mathematics (Ordinary or Higher level); and a grade C3 or above in English (Ordinary level) or grade D3 or above in English (Higher level); or

(ii) in the Leaving Certificate Examination prior to 1969, Honours in Irish and passes in English and Mathematics; or

(iii) in the Northern Ireland GCSE and GCE A Level Examinations: a Grade C at GCE A Level Irish; a Grade C at GCSE Level in both English and English Literature or Grade B at GCSE Level in either; and a Grade D at GCSE Level in Additional Mathematics or a Grade C at GCSE Level in Mathematics.

Applicants must provide evidence to the Higher Education Institution that their degree is placed as a major award at the appropriate level on the National Framework of Qualifications. Applicants must meet all entry requirements by Friday 3rd July 2016 and provide documentary evidence of meeting these requirements.

Please note that a minimum entry requirement of a H2.2 Bachelor Degree at Level 8 will apply from September 2016.

Alternatives to second-level qualifications in Irish, English or Maths:
A Pass in a University First Arts Examination in Irish, English or Mathematics will be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination GCE/GCSE requirement for the relevant subject.

In the case of Irish, a Grade C in the Matriculation Examination (which existed up to 1992) will also be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCE/GCSE requirement. In addition, the following are accepted as satisfying the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCE/GCSE requirement:
· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, Level C1, NUIG

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, Level B2, NUIG

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, NUI Maynooth

· Teastas Eorpach na Gaeilge (TEG) at Level B2, NUI Maynooth

· Diploma in Arts (Applied Irish), University College Cork

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge Fheidhmeach, UCD

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge (An Ghaeilge sa Saol Comhaimseartha), University of Limerick

· Diploma in Irish at the University of Ulster

In the case of Mathematics, a Pass in that subject in the Matriculation Examination will also be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCSE requirement.

Eligible applicants will be required to undergo an Interview and an Oral Irish Examination. Applicants who get a "fail" grade in either the Interview or oral Irish Examination will be eliminated from the competition. The purpose of the Interview is to ascertain the suitability of the applicant for participation in a primary teacher education programme.

The Oral Irish Examination will comprise:
- conversation on everyday topics and on books read by the applicant; and
- reading correctly and intelligently a suitable passage of prose or poetry and explaining the matter read.

Applicants should note that a high standard of fluency is required in the Oral Irish Examination and should prepare for the examination accordingly.

Applicants will be advised by the relevant Centre (Dublin and/or Limerick) of the date, time, venue, etc, of their Interview and Oral Irish Examination and must attend these examinations at their own expense. The location will be either Dublin and/or Limerick.

Overview

The Professional Masters of Education (Primary) is a full-time, two year course designed to equip student-teachers with the range of knowledge and skill related to the profession of primary school teaching and its curriculum. The course structure enables student-teachers to make real connections between the theory and practice of education. This is achieved through the blend of methodology and foundation discipline courses on offer.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/froebel-department-primary-and-early-childhood-education/our-courses/professional-master-education-primary

Course Structure

The course comprises aspects of teacher education such as foundation studies (e.g. psychology, sociology, history and philosophy of education), professional skills development (e.g. developing high levels of competency in professional English, Mathematics and Irish) and curriculum and methodology (e.g. pedagogy associated with the primary school curriculum).

Career Options

The Professional Masters of Education (Primary) is designed to prepare students to be primary school teachers in the Republic of Ireland.

How To Apply

Applications to Froebel Department of Primary and Early Childhood Education, Maynooth University and Marino Institute of Education, Dublin should be completed online at maestro.mie.ie/appcentre this system will open at 5pm on January 30.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 5p.m. on Friday, 10th March.

All applicants should also note the selection procedure detailed here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/froebel-department-primary-and-early-childhood-education/professional-masters-education-primary-teaching

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers. Read more

Why take this course?

Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers.

This course focuses on the integration of analytical techniques for optimisation with the decision issues and technology relating to logistics and supply chain management.

This course is one of a small number selected as part of the HEFCE PEP Scholarship programme for 2014. Please visit the HEFCE PEP page to see full details of the scheme, eligibility criteria and how to apply.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Have access to ultra-modern computing facilities, and use specialist mathematical and statistical computing packages
Participate in practical sessions to solve real-life case studies using our simulation software
Develop the problem-solving, decision-making and interpersonal abilities essential to professional roles in this field

What opportunities might it lead to?

Logistics analysis is critical to success in both manufacturing and service industries. Competitive advantage will increasingly come from the supplier's ability to rapidly respond to changing customer needs, for which effective logistics are of prime importance. This means that there will be a range of companies and organisations in both the public and private sector, demanding for your skills and expertise.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Production management
Transportation management
Quality control
Distribution
Facilities planning
Supply chain management
Passenger transportation

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Students studying CILT accredited courses receive exemptions from the academic requirements for membership. Graduates of the MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management course at the University of Portsmouth with an overall average pass mark above 50% are eligible to apply for Chartered Membership (CMILT) once they have gained the necessary experience.

Module Details

Supply chain management is a philosophy, the implementation process and the control of this process through which different entities within a supply chain aim to streamline their activities to improve the overall effectiveness and efficiency of meeting final customer requirements. A variety of different techniques will be investigated, ranging from conceptual frameworks, analytical approaches, to computer-based models.

Here are the units you will study:

Supply Chain Management: This unit enable you to develop advanced skills so that you can deal with problems of supply chain management across different products, locations, and companies. The types of problems studied in this course are encountered in industry (e.g. retail, discrete or continuous production and logistics service providers) as well as in service organisations (e.g. banks, hospitals and law firms). Managers dealing with such problems are known under various titles, including production, operations, supply (chain), inventory, purchasing, distribution or logistics managers.

Logistics Modelling: Most problems arising in the fields of logistics and supply chain management have sufficient complexity and detail that they require the use of sophisticated modelling techniques. This unit looks at two of the most commonly used methodologies for modelling and solving logistics problems: simulation and heuristic techniques. In both cases a computer package is used to assist solution. The techniques will be demonstrated with a range of case studies drawn from the field of logistics including transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning and vehicle routing.

Operations Management: This unit teaches operations management techniques that are relevant to logistics. The commonly used techniques of linear and integer programming will be taught using Microsoft Excel based methods for solution. You will look at case studies covering production planning, transportation, logistics planning and supply chain configuration. You will also be taught about locating facilities such as factories, distribution centres, cross docking centres and retail outlets. The effective scheduling of labour force and machines will be demonstrated, and current state-of-the art production planning models will be covered.

Strategic Logistics: This unit looks at the field of logistics from a strategic point of view. A number of quantitative techniques for strategic decision making such as decision analysis, multi-criteria decision analysis, data envelopment analysis and queuing theory are introduced in the context of logistics applications. The topic of strategic decisions in transportation modelling is then covered. The unit is completed by the analysis of a number of case studies relating to different applications of logistics with respect to financial, environmental, societal and economic objectives.

Project (Masters Logistics): This unit allows you to conduct research into a larger scale or challenging logistics problem. The project may be practical or theoretical and may arise either from the supervisor's research interests or from your own desire to study a particular topic or situation. Typical areas of logistics in which the project will be conducted include (but are not limited to) transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning, green logistics, facility location and vehicle routing.

Programme Assessment

Our enthusiastic team of lecturers have a wide range of industrial and research experience, ensuring that you graduate with cutting-edge knowledge. You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical computer-based sessions, laboratory and project work.

We assess you in a several ways, but a large portion of the assessment is based on a major project at the end of the year. Here’s how we assess your work:

Examinations
Coursework
Laboratory assignments
A dissertation

Student Destinations

Logistics and transportation are important to any firm where customer service is a strategic objective – whether its core focus is on products or services.

When you graduate from this course you could find employment in a wide range of logistics-related careers. Not only in the traditional areas of manufacturing logistics, distribution and supply chain management, but also postal and express delivery, the fire and rescue emergency operations and even the military and defence industry.

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The Department of Mathematics at York offers the opportunity to study for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), as well as the degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Mathematics, in a thriving research environment. Read more
The Department of Mathematics at York offers the opportunity to study for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), as well as the degree of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Mathematics, in a thriving research environment. You should first have a look at our research (https://www.york.ac.uk/maths/research/), where you will find for each area a list of staff members and their research supervision interests, from which you can click through to individual staff pages. You may like to make email contact to discuss a possible project, but many students come to us with no definite project or supervisor - feel free to apply anyway.

Prospective students

In order to apply for a place on one of our research degrees (PhD, PhD (with Foundation Phase), MPhil or MSc by Research), we ask that you first submit an online application. We cannot accept a CV or any other documentation in place of a formal application. When you apply for a place on one of our research degrees, you should submit an explanation (in your own words) of why you wish to undertake a research degree in your chosen field. This document should be at least 250 words in length. It would be helpful if you could complete the personal statement section of the application form with an explanation of any relevant experience or any other information which you feel might be helpful to the selectors.

Prospective students should be aware that they may be invited to participate in an interview (either face-to-face or by Skype) as part of the selection process. Applicants whose first language is not English should therefore be sufficiently fluent in English to speak confidently about their intended area of research and engage in an academic conversation about their mathematical background and interests, even if they have not already met the English language entry requirement (see below) by the time they submit their application.

The Department of Mathematics supports the principles laid out in the London Mathematical Society Good Practice Scheme. We value diversity and aim to create an inclusive community where everyone is treated with dignity and respect regardless of individual characteristics such as age, gender, disability, religion or ethnicity.

The Department is firmly committed to women's progression in mathematics and holds the Bronze Award of the Athena SWAN programme for women in science. Seven of our lecturers and professors are women, along with about 40% of our students. Our female graduates work in fields as diverse as medical statistics, defence and the financial industry, and for employers such as BAE Systems and Microsoft. York is a great place for a woman to study and graduate in mathematics.

MPhil

The MPhil is a research degree by thesis, the minimum period of study being two years. The thesis must be submitted before the end of the third year of study. Extensions beyond this may only be granted in exceptional circumstances.

Applications for part-time study will be considered from UK/EU applicants.

Students who may be interested in studying for a research degree over one year should refer to the course page for the MSc (by Research) in Mathematics: https://www.york.ac.uk/maths/postgraduate/pg-research-courses/msc-by-research/

Continued registration on any course is conditional upon satisfactory academic progress and attendance.

Supervision

Throughout the course of study every research each student will have a supervisor (alternatively, two members of staff may jointly supervise a student) who will guide their work. In addition, progress is monitored by the student's Thesis Advisory Panel in two meetings each year.

The MPhil and PhD may be taken part-time over a period longer than the corresponding full-time period. Please indicate this on your application form if you are interested in this option. However, students from outside the European Union should note that only full-time students are eligible to apply for a Tier 4 student visa.

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Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Read more
Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision.

Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science, biophysics and computational biology. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1238/genetics#!overview

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate research students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Our research degrees are based around lab-based and computational research projects. MScs are based around one-year research projects (Full Time). In all our research degrees you undertake a single, focused, research project from day one, and attend only certain components of our transferable skills modules. Our research degree students are supervised by supervisory teams which comprise their main supervisor(s) as well as supervisory chairs that give independent advice on progression.

You can select topics for the MSc from any of the research areas covered in the Research Areas section.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Associated centres

- Kent Fungal Group

The Kent Fungal Group (KFG) brings together a number of research groups in the School of Biosciences that primarily use yeasts or other fungi as ‘model systems’ for their research. One strength of the KFG is the range of model fungi being exploited for both fundamental and medical/translational research. These include Bakers’ yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and yeasts associated with human disease, specifically Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

In addition to studying key cellular processes in the fungal cell such as protein synthesis, amyloids and cell division, members of the KFG are also using yeast to explore the molecular basis of human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as ageing. The KFG not only provides support for both fundamental and medical/translational fungal research, but also provides an excellent training environment for young fungal researchers.

- Industrial Biotechnology Centre

The School houses one of the University’s flagship research centres – the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC). Here, staff from Biosciences, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Computing and Engineering combine their expertise into a pioneering interdisciplinary biosciences programme at Kent, in order to unlock the secrets of some of the essential life processes. These approaches are leading to a more integrated understanding of biology in health and disease. In the Centre, ideas and technology embodied in different disciplines are being employed in some of the remaining challenges in bioscience. With such an approach, new discoveries and creative ideas are generated through the formation of new collaborative teams. In this environment, the Centre is broadening and enriching the training of students and staff in science and technology.

- The Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Reproduction (CISoR)

The centre comprises several like-minded academics dedicated to the study of reproduction in all its forms. Drawing on a range of academic disciplines, CISoR's core philosophy is that the study of this fascinating field will advance further through a multidisciplinary approach. Impactful, excellent research forms the basis of CISoR’s activities including scientific advance, new products and processes, contribution to public policy, and public engagement.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/1238

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This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. Read more
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. The course provides you with a foundation in economics and research skills, and offers a wide range of philosophy and politics option modules.

Course Content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. You will also take a core 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' module, which prepares you for undertaking research, covering areas such as formulation of research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 80 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by Politics, Economics, Philosophy or PEP. These will include at least 20 credits from Politics and 20 credits from Philosophy.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour work week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer term and vacation working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

Career pathways for MA in PPE graduates are hugely varied, and have included accounting, the civil service, finance, international development, journalism, law, politics and research. The international dimension of the course allows students to pursue job opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

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