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Masters Degrees (Philosophy Of Law)

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With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. Read more
With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. The programme is also especially relevant to those seeking opportunities in the commercial world. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of the complexities of regulation.

A sound knowledge of international commercial law is increasingly necessary given the demands imposed by globalisation, whether
you wish to join a major law firm or be engaged in a company with european and international aspirations.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes critical analysis of different aspects of international commercial law. Leading the analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law involved in the programme have engaged in major research. This spans the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of international
commercial arbitration.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law and the Smurfit School of Business offer a wide range of modules for this Master’s programme. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme are modules such as: Corporate Governance; International Economic Law; International Commercial Arbitration; International Tax Law; International Aviation Law; and, Law of International Finance. Having completed six modules, students will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of International Commercial Law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful if you intend to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms, or want to work as an in-house legal adviser.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Corporate Governance which examines the legal and regulatory environment and the informational and market infrastructures which apply in Ireland and the wider EU to promote an understanding its importance to companies and their stakeholders.

- Insolvency Law which examines the legal principles relating to the insolvency of corporations and individuals in Ireland and other common law jurisdictions to develop an understanding of the legal mechanisms available for the distribution of the estates of insolvent debtors.

- EU Competition Law which offers a critical examination of how EU competition law governs particular actions of private market actors, considering the rationale behind this area of law and how it fits into the EU's economic order and philosophy.

- Regulatory Governance which offers insights into competing conceptions of regulatory governance and explanations both for emergence of and variety in regulatory regimes as well as normative arguments concerning arrangements for regulatory regimes.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM in International Commercial Law is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally. It is particularly useful for students wishing to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms or wishing to work as an in-house legal adviser.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/apply,80078,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas. Read more
The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas: Architecture, Communications and Media, English, Music and Philosophy. You will receive training in research skills and supervision from one or more academic specialists in their subject area(s).

The programme provides excellent preparation for you if you’re intending to undertake a PhD in the Arts and Humanities, but is also a good choice if you wish to pursue a research project for purposes of professional development or personal interest. You will become part of a community of active researchers and will be encouraged to pursue your own research interests in collaboration with an academic supervisor.

Key Facts

Internationally renowned
The department has a strong international reputation for its work in Philosophy of Language, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, History of Philosophy, Environmental Philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Moral and Political Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, and the Philosophy of Art.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
63% of our research outputs were rated world-leading or internationally excellent, and 37% were rated as internationally recognised.

Why Philosophy?

We offer a distinctive combination of unusual philosophical diversity in a close-knit atmosphere with excellent staff-student relations.

Our staff publish and lecture in a wide range of philosophical areas, including: Logic and Philosophy of Language; Metaphysics; Ancient Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Moral and Political Philosophy; Aesthetics; Buddhism and Indian Philosophy; Environmental Philosophy; Continental Philosophy; History of Philosophy and Literary Theory. We supervise research projects in all of these areas within our friendly, down to earth and vibrant postgraduate research community.

Experience the full breadth of our academics' expertise

Our staff publish and lecture in a wide range of philosophical areas, including: Logic and Philosophy of Language; Metaphysics; Ancient Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Moral and Political Philosophy; Aesthetics; Buddhism and Indian Philosophy; Environmental Philosophy; Continental Philosophy; History of Philosophy and Literary Theory. We supervise research projects in all of these areas within our friendly, down to earth and vibrant postgraduate research community.

Career prospects

Our programmes aim to equip students with the general and widely applicable analytical, argumentative and problem solving skills and abilities valued by employers. Some of our postgraduate students have gone on to a career in academic Philosophy, but a variety of careers are open to those obtaining postgraduate Philosophy degrees, including business, management, the law, the media, the arts, computing, the Civil Service and teaching.

The MRes Arts may enhance the career prospects of those working or wishing to work in fields associated with the study of Arts subjects or other areas of academic work and study, including teachers, librarians, and professional writers. While managerial positions often require the ability to conduct research or project-work and to demonstrate sustained and complex organisational skills in ways encompassed by this programme, its emphasis on oral and written communication skills as well as on IT-based presentation skills will be useful for many types of employment. Some students may want to take this course for its own sake and for the sake of personal development and the revitalization of subject awareness. Equally, the MRes is designed to prepare students too for further research at MPhil or PhD level, and to enable them to enter postgraduate study, thus offering a first step towards a career in academic teaching and research.

The advanced study of one or more Arts subject on this programme equips students with powers of fine discrimination and judgement that will set them apart in workplaces of many kinds. The skills it fosters are those which enable graduates to deal logically with the complex demands of a whole range of careers. These skills include:

- the ability to process large amounts of information
- the ability to organise disparate material into a coherent argument
- the capacity to compare many different views and come to a decision about the merits of each
- the independence to define a complex project and bring it to completion with minimal input.
- imaginative and creative responsiveness to problems
- powers of expression (both written and oral) which allow for the lucid delineation of nuanced ideas.

Such skills are essential for those considering careers in, for example, journalism, publishing, management, and the law. Graduates have gone on to work in a wide variety of professions. Our alumni include lecturers, communication specialists, broadcasters, writers, teachers, librarians, public relations managers and publishers.

MRes Arts students will have access to the University's Careers and Employability Service and to careers events at both School and University level. Supervisors and other academic staff will be able to provide guidance and support to students intending to progress to doctoral study and academic careers.

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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. Read more

Course outline

The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. It stresses the importance of interaction between staff and student, as well as between student and student. We believe this is an essential element in the development of effective lawyers in this area.

Following successful completion of the LLM in International and Commercial Law, you should have developed a range of skills, which include:

• A sound understanding of each of the chosen areas of the law
• Confidence in the analysis of complex case-law
• The ability to make your argument convincingly, orally and in writing
• The ability to take a co-operative approach to problem solving

Start dates

Students may take the LLM over

• 12 months starting in September; or
• 9 months starting in January.

Teaching methods

Seminars are the primary teaching method for this course. They encourage the development of clear analytical skills and create a forum where you can test your ideas against the arguments of your peers. Whether you enter the legal profession or business world you will find it is essential to have developed persuasive abilities. LLM options are taught in the form of three hours of seminars spread over each of the teaching weeks of the course. LLM seminars for subjects which are also taught at LLB level take place in two hour blocks every fortnight.

You are expected to read the cases and other materials relevant to the particular seminar in advance. At the seminar you will be asked to support your opinions and discuss your analysis of the area with your fellow students. In some modules you may be expected to make a presentation on a topic given to you by your tutor. Whilst these tasks may seem daunting at the beginning of the year, you will rapidly gain confidence as your debating skills develop.

Where seminars are on a fortnightly basis, the course will be supported by three hours of lectures per week during the lecturing period. Seminars will complement the lecture series.

Course material is available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Moodle. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Specialist designations

Students can select specific modules to have their LLM designated as specialising in:

• International Trade and Maritime Law;
• International Oil and Gas Law; or
• Financial Services Law

Each designation requires the following to be taken:

• 20 unit Advanced Legal Research module;
• 40 unit Core module; and
• 120 units of Options.

The modules currently offered for the designations are as follows:

International Trade and Maritime Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• International Intellectual Property (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Dissertation (40)

International Oil & Gas Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Oil and Gas Law and Policy (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Banking Law (40)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Dissertation (40)

Financial Services Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• Banking Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Securities Regulation (20)
• Dissertation (40)

*Subject to final approval

Non-designated LLM

Students who wish to have an LLM in International and Commercial Law without a designation must take

• Advanced Legal Research (20)

160 units of Options from

• Banking Law (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• Intellectual Property Law (40)
• International Human Rights (20)
• International Medical Law & Ethics (20)
• International Oil and Gas Laws and Policy (40)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40 units)
• Law of War (20)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Public International Law (40)
• Dissertation (40)

September start

The September start allows students to take more time to adjust to postgraduate studies. In the first term students must take the Advanced Legal Research module and choose Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery, Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights, or EU Competition Law. All the modules are then available from January onwards, subject always to there being sufficient students opting for them

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Our LLM in Law will place you in the jobs market armed with impressive expertise in the latest developments in a range of law specialisms. Read more

About the course

Our LLM in Law will place you in the jobs market armed with impressive expertise in the latest developments in a range of law specialisms. This course will allow you to tailor your study of law entirely to your needs and interests and direct your own study amid a wide array of options, choosing from areas of law such as the environment, human rights, international business, commerce, and technology.

Why study LLM Law at Aberystwyth University?

96.5% of Aberystwyth Law School’s publications were judged to be of an internationally recognised standard or higher in the most recent research assessment – REF 2014

All members of academic staff in Aberystwyth Law School are active in research and publication and participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal and related fields

Aberystwyth is a multinational community. Aberystwyth Law School participates actively in international and European academic networks and frequently hosts visits by academics and experts from other countries

Expansive research is carried out within the Department across a range of research areas and within a range of research centres.
Postgraduates integrate into our research culture through Departmental research seminars and postgraduate conferences

Over the years a large number of well-known legal academics have taught in Aberystwyth Law School

Study nearby to the National Library of Wales, one of five UK copyright libraries.

Benefit from a mature and well-stocked library for Law and Criminology (Thomas Parry Library) and from generous information technology provision

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

Course structure

This course is a one year full-time programme. The academic year is divided into three semesters. In the first two semesters (September to May),you will complete 120 credits of your choice from the package of modules offered by Aberystwyth Law School (with the option of selecting up to 20 credits from another Department).

The taught part of the course is delivered through seminars and lectures, with a strong emphasis placed on independent study. In the final semester (June-September), you will complete a 15,000 word dissertation, and arrange your level of contact time with your assigned dissertation supervisor.

Course content

On this course you have the flexibility to choose from a comprehensive and wide range of optional modules, allowing you to tailor your study to your needs and interests. Whichever modules you take, you will be given a thorough grounding in legal theory and practice to make you ready for the rigorous demands of the modern legal workplace. This study of legal theory is then always balanced with the investigation of an array of fascinating case studies to illuminate your study and put you in touch with an authentic experience of legal cases.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within a specialism of your choice. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

Core modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

Aspects of Commercial Contracting
Climate Change Law and Policy
Contemporary Issues in Food Policy and Law
Criminology of International Conflict Personnel
Cross-Border Legal Issues on the Internet and Beyond
Democracy and International Law
Human Rights, Environment and International Business
International Commercial Law
International Copyright Law
International Humanitarian Law
Law and Gender
Negotiated Study Module
Philosophy of Human Rights Protection
Regulation of Business Cartels
The Law Relating to E-Commerce

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester

Skills

On this course you will gain a wealth of skills vital for success in legal and more general employment. You will:

• study the cutting-edge developments of many areas of law

• develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to urgent contemporary issues

• master a range of legal methodologies

• learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information from a fascinating array of fields

• learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build a winning argument based on your own rigorous research and analysis

• develop your abilities in structuring and communicating complex ideas efficiently

• develop your planning, analysis, presentation, project management and professional independence

• enhance your problem solving and creative thinking skills

• devise and sustain a self-initiated programme of study

• develop study and research skills

• work effectively with others

Careers

This course will be particularly attractive to those seeking careers in transnational corporations, specialist online trading, corporate lobby groups, international law firms, technology companies and a range of governmental and non-governmental organisations.

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Law is a highly competitive field and a masters qualifying law degree, or a postgraduate diploma in law, will make you stand out from the crowd. Read more
Law is a highly competitive field and a masters qualifying law degree, or a postgraduate diploma in law, will make you stand out from the crowd. Take your first step towards becoming a solicitor or barrister with a course that combines all the core modules required by the regulating bodies for both professions.

Taught by experienced tutors including trained solicitors and barristers with significant professional expertise in all areas of law, you will learn the theory and how to apply it in practice. Your research project gives you the opportunity to focus on an area of law that interests you, and the breadth of expertise in the department means that you will receive specialist support on a wide variety of topics, from medical negligence to terrorism or intellectual property.

Teaching is delivered in small face-to-face classes combined, where appropriate, with online lectures, enabling you to return to them as often as you need.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/law_qualifying_llm

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You could progress to the next stage of legal trainingby undertaking a Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Practice to train as a solicitoror the Bar Professional Training Course to become a barrister. Roles thatrequire a deep-rooted knowledge of the law will also be open to you, includingthat of a paralegal or a court reporter. You could also apply your lawknowledge in marketing, local government, mental health or social work.

- Solicitor
- Barrister
- Court reporter
- Paralegal

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will be taught by lecturers who have worked in some of the top UK firms, including DLA Piper, Eversheds, Walker Morris and Herbert Smith Freehills. As well as excellent academic teaching, our staff will provide you with professional and practical support to help you progress your career.

Law qualifying courses have been taught by our Leeds Law School since 1979 and many of our alumni now act as mentors to our students, helping them to get ahead by offering careers advice, work experience and even job opportunities.

A specialist study room, accessible only by students on our postgraduate courses, is fitted with computer terminals and legal texts. We also have a courtroom where you can put theory into practice in simulated trials.

Leeds is one of the largest legal centres outside London and offers a wealth of job and placement opportunities. You'll benefit from our close links with firms in the city and from the contacts and possible career opportunities provided by your professional mentor.

Indicative Core Modules

Foundations of Contract Law
Study the role of the law in defining, creating, imposing, regulating and enforcing freely negotiated and agreed contractual obligations between two or more contracting parties.

Foundations of Tort Law
Examine civil law liability for a wrong or 'tort', including negligence, occupier's liability and trespass to the person, considering how tort protects reputation and personal integrity.

Foundations of Public Law
Understand the relationship between the different organs of the State and the individual, including royal prerogative, human rights, judicial review and police powers.

Foundations of Equity & Trusts
Learn how and why trusts are created, their different and legal frameworks, the principles of equity affecting their creation and the use of trusts in practice.

Foundations of EU Law
Explore the founding principles of the law of the European Union to enable critical understanding of the nature and purpose of European developments and regulations.

Foundations of Property Law
Study the fundamental issues relating to the concept of property, its ownership, and the rights and obligations created by the ownership of land.

Foundations of Criminal Law
Understand the general principles of law governing criminal responsibility set within their social context, the concept of moral responsibility and the philosophy of punishment.

Independent Legal Research Project
You will explore and develop ideas on a legal topic of your choosing in a written submission.

Facilities

- Courtroom
Our Leeds Law School is located in our Portland building, close to the city’s legal quarter. Our students can hone their legal expertise in purpose-built facilities, including our very own courtroom.

- The Rose Bowl
The Rose Bowl has impressive teaching spaces, auditoriums, conference facilities and an outstanding local reputation as a business hub. The Rose Bowl puts our students at the centre of a dynamic business community.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Our LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage with the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law and to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance. Read more

About the course

Our LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage with the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law and to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance. By studying this course, you will tackle traditional subjects as well as new and emerging issues, such as the regulation of international society and the legal mechanisms of human rights during international and non-international armed conflicts. Your study will reflect the local, national and international nuances of this complex subject matter.

Why study Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at Aberystwyth University?

96.5% of Aberystwyth Law School’s publications were judged to be of an internationally recognised standard or higher in the most recent research assessment – REF 2014

All members of academic staff in Aberystwyth Law School are active in research and publication and participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal and related fields

Aberystwyth is a multinational community. Aberystwyth Law School participates actively in international and European academic
networks and frequently hosts visits by academics and experts from other countries

Expansive research is carried out within the Department across a range of research areas and within a range of research centres.
Postgraduates integrate into our research culture through Departmental research seminars and postgraduate conferences

Over the years a large number of well-known legal academics have taught in Aberystwyth Law School

Study nearby to the National Library of Wales, one of five UK copyright libraries.

Benefit from a mature and well-stocked library for Law and Criminology (Thomas Parry Library) and from generous information technology provision

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

Course content

On this course you have the flexibility to choose from a comprehensive and wide range of optional modules, allowing you to tailor your study to your needs and interests. Whichever modules you take, you will be given a thorough grounding in legal theory and practice to make you ready for the rigorous demands of the modern legal workplace. This study of legal theory is then always balanced with the investigation of an array of fascinating case studies to illuminate your study and put you in touch with an authentic experience of legal cases.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within a specialism of your choice. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

Core modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

Definitional Elements of Substantive International Crimes
Foundations of Public International Law
General Principles of International Criminal Liability and Defences
Human Rights in the Information Age
Institutions of International Criminal Law
International Business, Environment & Human Rights
International Humanitarian Law
Introduction to International Human Rights Law
Mental Health and Human Rights
Migration and Asylum Law
Sources of International Criminal Law
Study Skills
Subsistence and Welfare Rights
The Philosophy of Human Rights Protection
The Sociology of Human Rights Violations

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of coursework essays (120 credits). Each student will complete then a master’s dissertation (60 credits) which deals with an area of chosen study.

Skills

On this course you will gain a wealth of skills vital for success in legal and more general employment. You will:

• study the cutting-edge developments of many areas of law
• develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to urgent contemporary issues
• master a range of legal methodologies
• learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information from a fascinating array of fields
• learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build a winning argument based on your own rigorous research and analysis
• develop your abilities in structuring and communicating complex ideas efficiently
• develop your planning, analysis, presentation, project management and professional independence
• enhance your problem solving and creative thinking skills
• devise and sustain a self-initiated programme of study
• develop study and research skills
• work effectively with others

Careers

This course will be particularly attractive to those seeking careers in transnational corporations, specialist online trading, corporate lobby groups, international law firms, technology companies and a range of governmental and non-governmental organisations.

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This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. Read more
This Masters is especially designed for students who don't already have a Philosophy degree. It will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of analytic philosophy, for instance, moral and political philosophy, the history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and philosophy of mathematics and language. The MLitt is also exceptional in providing a fast-track route into a PhD in Philosophy.

Why this programme

◾If you have a degree (or equivalent) in any other field, whether science, social science, arts or humanities, but an interest in philosophy, then the Philosophy MLitt will allow you to develop your philosophical interests in a variety of different courses as well as undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice.
◾If you want to do a PhD in Philosophy but don't already have a Philosophy degree, then the MLitt will allow you to apply straightaway for the PhD.
◾We offer courses to bring you up to speed in a wide variety of philosophical topics, including ethics and politics, the history of philosophy including Russell, Wittgenstein and the Scottish Enlightenment, philosophy of mind - including consciousness, perception, the emotions, pain and pleasure - philosophy of language, and philosophy of mathematics.
◾You will work closely with an expert member of staff on a master’s dissertation on a topic of your choice.
◾MLitt students are encouraged to attend and participate in research seminars, workshops, conferences and reading groups hosted by the Centre for the Study of Perceptual Experience, the Forum for Philosophy and Religion, and the Forum for Quine and the History of Analytic Philosophy. Students will also present their work at the weekly postgraduate seminar where they will receive feedback from postgraduate students and staff. We also host an annual reading party in the Highlands at which students present papers and are coached on their writing and presentation skills.
◾Philosophy at Glasgow University has an illustrious history of original thinkers going against the grain of orthodoxy. Its past professors include such giants of empiricism as Adam Smith and Thomas Reid.

Programme structure

The Philosophy MLitt has three components:

1. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy (40 credits)

2. A choice of four of the following courses (20 credits each):
◾Aesthetics: philosophical questions about art and beauty
◾Origins of analytic philosophy including Russell and Wittgenstein
◾Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment including Hume and Reid
◾Philosophy of mind: consciousness, emotions, pain and pleasure
◾Moral philosophy: philosophical questions about value and well being
◾Political philosophy: philosophical questions about justice and the state
◾Metaphysics including existence, natural laws and the nature of time
◾Philosophy of language including meaning, translation and truth
◾Philosophy of mathematics: the nature and existence of numbers and sets

3. A dissertation on a topic of your choice guided by individual support from an expert supervisor (60 credits).

Career prospects

Philosophy students at Glasgow receive rigorous and personalised training in problem solving skills, writing skills, presentation and research skills.

All these skills are widely applicable and recognised to be exceptionally valuable in a wide range of careers, including journalism, teaching, the Civil Service, local government, business, publishing, law, and the arts.

You will also be well equipped to carry onto a further degree in philosophy such as the PhD.

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Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. Read more
The Philosophy MA enables students to benefit from the acknowledged expertise of UCL's lively, close-knit intellectual community, and also access the stimulation and dynamism of London's wider philosophical community. The programme offers the flexibility for recent graduates in the subject to study chosen topics in greater depth.

Degree information

The programme allows students to develop an advanced knowledge of problems in contemporary analytic philosophy, the history of philosophy and the study of value. It provides students with an understanding of a representative range of central philosophical debates and of the nature of philosophical problems, and encourages them to develop and defend their own viewpoint.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), six optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - these modules introduce students to graduate study in philosophy. Students will give short presentations on central topics and classic papers which form the basis of discussion.
-Research Preparation in Philosophy 1
-Research Preparation in Philosophy 2

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Global Justice and Health
-Texts from Early Modern Philosophy: Hume
-Early Wittgenstein
-Epistemology
-Self-Knowledge
-Philosophy of Mind
-Moral Responsibility and Moral Dilemmas
-Kant
-Greek Philosophy
-Nineteenth Century Philosophy
-Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science
-Metaphysics of Science
-The Self in Early Analytic Philosophy
-Sartre’s Philosophy
-Epistemology of Disagreement
-Equality
-Recent Work in Practical Philosophy
-Graduate Studies in the Philosophy of Language
-Perception and its History

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in any area of philosophy taught and approved by the Department, leading to in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of seminars, lectures, and supervisions. Students' performance is assessed through examinations, presentations, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have become successful lawyers, journalists, theatre directors and novelists among other careers. Those who perform sufficiently well on the MA can expect to pursue further research in philosophy in London or elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Assistant, Universität Zürich (University of Zurich) / Université de Fr
-Paralegal, marshall levine associates
-DPhil Population Health, University of Oxford
-GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), City University London
-PhD Philosophy, King's College London

Employability
The programme equips graduates with the skills to analyse complex ideas, develop independence of judgement and originality of thought, evaluate arguments rigorously, present views lucidly both orally and on paper, and question orthodox views. The programme provide an ideal basis for future academic study and many graduates proceed to research degrees in the UK and abroad.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department has strengths in philosophy of mind, language, political and moral philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology and the history of philosophy.

Our students benefit significantly from our location in London, which is one of the international centres of philosophical activity. London is home of a number of renowned journals (Philosophy; Mind & Language; Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society) and hosts regular visiting speakers from across the world. Over 60 philosophers are active in London making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

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The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. Read more

About the course

The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course builds upon this exhaustive academic foundation with the exploration of real case studies that underline the importance of this area of work – for example, it analyses the necessarily comprehensive human rights legislation and its violations in potentially harrowing detail in order to define the criminal activity ahead of prosecution. The teaching of this subject reflects the important truth that this area of law is rooted in the reality of life and death. Every study will take into account the humanitarian, economic and political perspectives.

This course will equip you with the skills and research practices required to assimilate, evaluate and critically appraise large sections of legal knowledge. You will have the opportunity to prove your newly-acquired expertise in writing your Master's dissertation. This is also your opportunity to select particular specialism – a major topic or issue in the field of international law and criminology of armed conflict. This project topic may have a direct influence on your career trajectory; previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have often reported that their dissertation was a significant asset in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Aberystwyth Law School recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

This degree will suit you:

•If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance for human life and security
• If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to conflict and criminality in conflict
• If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
• If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course content

Core modules:

Criminology of International Conflict Personnel
Dissertation
International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Public International Law

Optional modules:

Climate Change Law and Policy
Contemporary Issues in Food Policy and Law
Human Rights, Environment and International Business
Law and Gender
Philosophy of Human Rights Protection

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of international law and the criminology of armed conflict. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Study skills

You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information regarding criminology and armed conflict. You will refine your professional practices by engagement with challenging exercises and case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any legal or unrelated professional workplace.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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Gain a solid foundation in law and fast track your career on this transformative Graduate Diploma. Start your future in law here. Read more
Gain a solid foundation in law and fast track your career on this transformative Graduate Diploma. Start your future in law here.

Who is it for?

Students come from leading institutions across the world and from a range of undergraduate disciplines including history, economics, English, and policy, philosophy and economics. Students often know whether they want to become a barrister or work as a solicitor when they arrive, but some students use the programme as a means to make that decision. A significant proportion of our GDL students go on to become barristers.

Objectives

The City Law School’s Graduate Diploma in Law programme is nationally renowned. Since its inception in 1977, it has trained students at an extremely rigorous level, covering the seven core foundation subjects that are prerequisites for progression to professional legal training.

The programme is unique in that it introduces students to legal ethics as well as covering the core content. Students are encouraged to think about their reasons for practising law, and how they will find value in practice. The course has also been designed to be accessible and student-focused; at The City Law School we welcome students’ questions and offer significant one-to-one support.

From Martha Spurrier, Director of Liberty, to Dinah Rose, the QC Barrister who helped Julian Assange fight his extradition from the UK to Sweden, our alumni set the benchmark for legal practice across the world. Our academic team is also globally renowned and includes Professor Panos Koutrakos, the Jean Monnet Professor of European Law and Joint Editor of European Law Review, and Professor Martin Dixon, Specialist in Land Law from Queens’ College Cambridge.

Placements

Placements are not a formal requirement of the programme, but gaining experience of legal practice is encouraged. If students secure a mini pupillage, (a week in chambers), we support this use of their time.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything City has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules.

The City Law School has its own dedicated administration team and you also have access to two legal libraries, one at the Gray’s Inn campus and the other based on site at our Northampton Square campus.

Within the Gray’s Inn library you will find rooms for group study sessions and rooms for recording demo advocacy sessions.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The seven foundation subjects and additional legal ethics course are taught over one year by lectures and tutorials which occupy around 16 hours each week. Every week you will attend a two-hour lecture in six of the seven foundation subjects (Contract law lectures are in an online format) and a tutorial in each subject every fortnight.

In addition to The City Law School's own lecturers, you will also be taught by visiting lecturers from other prestigious institutions, including Cambridge and Oxford. There will also be time for personal study to prepare for lectures and tutorials. Instruction in the use of legal materials and in legal research methods (including use of electronic retrieval systems) is also an integral part of the course. The City Law School's award-winning Lawbore website also offers an online portal of resources from a legal link directory to a careers and alumni blog.

As a student at City, University of London you will have unlimited access to City's Careers, Student Development & Outreach service where dedicated careers advisors will provide you with tailored advice. Our strong links with the profession mean that we can bring the legal world to you.

Throughout the year we organise a variety of events, so you can build your network and meet representatives from leading solicitors’ firms and barristers’ chambers.

At The City Law School we run an annual internal mooting competition where you can act as a counsel to argue a point of law before a judge. Mooting is a great way to develop your research and analysis skills whilst also learning how to structure and present a legal argument.

Another way in which you can gain invaluable experience and develop your legal skills is to volunteer with one of our pro bono organisations. Pro bono work gives you an excellent opportunity to use your time and knowledge to offer legal advice to those who may otherwise not have access it.

Assessment

Formal assessment is based on written examinations held at the end of the course; formative coursework set throughout the year will help to prepare you for these examinations. You will be awarded City's Graduate Diploma in Law upon successful completion of coursework and examinations.

Modules

In just one year, you will study the seven core foundation subjects that you would cover during a qualifying undergraduate law degree. The academic programme and examinations are of first-degree level with some elements of Masters level study, and involve work that is normally covered by undergraduates over at least 18 months. A strong emphasis is placed on developing your analytical and research skills to make sure you are fully prepared for practice.

Foundation subjects - the seven foundation subjects are taught over one year.
-(LD3002): Contract law (30 credits)
-(LD3003): Criminal Law (30 credits)
-(LD3004): Equity and trusts (30 credits)
-(LD3005): European Union law (30 credits)
-(LD3006): Land law (30 credits)
-(LD3001): Public law (30 credits)
-(LD3007): Tort law (30 credits).

In addition to the foundation subjects, you take another academic law subject unique to City: Introduction to legal ethics. This subject directs your attention towards the ethical challenges which lawyers might face in practice and to the values that characterise the profession.

You will also take a 10 credit English Legal System module and a five Credit Research Requirement module. You also have the option to convert the GDL to an LLB degree by taking further law modules.

Career prospects

By successfully completing this course students are qualified to progress to either of the two professional courses that all UK lawyers are required to take: the Legal Practice Course (LPC) for solicitors and the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) for barristers.

As a School we are ambitious for our students. You can progress to the LPC if you are looking to be a solicitor, or choose the BPTC if you see yourself working as a barrister. The School’s graduates are guaranteed a place on our LPC and we strongly advise you to apply for our BPTC.

Throughout the year we hold regular careers events for aspiring solicitors and barristers. At these events, you have the opportunity to network with representatives from a range of leading firms and chambers.

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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