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Masters Degrees (Philosophy Of Economics)

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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If you're looking to develop your career in economics or econometrics this course provides you with analytical and technical skills you need for the profession, as well as a solid grounding in commerce. Read more
If you're looking to develop your career in economics or econometrics this course provides you with analytical and technical skills you need for the profession, as well as a solid grounding in commerce. The course will enable you to build your knowledge in one of the following specialisations: Applied Econometrics; Applied Economics and Econometrics or Business Economics.

You will engage in a comprehensive theoretical and practical curriculum across your chosen field and develop high-level expertise in applied economic and econometric tools.

The program also gives you the opportunity to undertake independent research in your chosen specialisation.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-economics-and-econometrics-b6001?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

- Applied econometrics
Your qualification will be a Master of Applied Econometrics

The specialisation in applied econometrics provides specialist knowledge, tools and skills to enable econometric and statistical analyses required in the business, economics and finance sectors.

- Applied economics and econometrics
Your qualification will be a Master of Applied Economics and Econometrics

The specialisation in applied economics and econometrics provides specialist knowledge, tools and skills in economics and econometrics to address important economic policy questions.

- Business economics
Your qualification will be a Master of Business Economics

The specialisation in business economics provides an advanced knowledge of the theories explaining and analysing economic policies - focusing on how individuals, households, firms and governments interact and how economies work, with an emphasis on economic regulation and policy.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Advanced preparatory, Part B. Mastery knowledge and Part C. Application studies All students complete Part B. Depending on prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

Part A. Advanced preparatory
These studies will introduce you to Economics and Econometrics at advanced undergraduate and graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field (that is, not in a field likely to prepare them for advanced study in this field). Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised degree or a graduate certificate in a cognate discipline will receive credit for this part.

Part B. Mastery knowledge
These units will develop your capacity as a critical and creative professional who is able to apply your knowledge of a specialised area to provide discipline based solutions.

Part C. Application studies
This will enable you to further develop your knowledge of your specialisation, or more broadly, or alternatively to select any units from across the university in which you are eligible to enrol. Some students use these electives units to provide a research pathway towards a Doctor of Philosophy course.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

About us

Monash Business School is home to one of the leading departments of Economics.

Since the 1970s, the term "Monash Economics" has been widely used to describe the liveliness and rigour inherent in our activities. We have demonstrated a strong track-record of excellence over the last 40 years. Our excellent international reputation is supported by our ranking or rating of:

- a rating of 4 (which is above world standard) in the latest Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) report for Economics

- no. 1 in the Asia-Pacific region for cognitive and behavioural economics; and development economics (RePEc)

The Department boasts more than 50 tenured economists undertaking work in virtually all major fields of economics.

Leading research and reputation
We have a vibrant research atmosphere in both theoretical and applied economics. Our particular strengths lie in development economics, behavioural and experimental economics, and macroeconomics. However, even within these broad areas, there is considerable heterogeneity in topics and techniques used.

Members of the department work individually and in collegiate teams, within the department and with other units of the Business School. A number of department members work collaboratively with colleagues in other universities, both in Australia and internationally.

Our Department also maintains particularly strong ties with the Centre for Development Economics and Sustainability, the Centre for Health Economics and the Monash Sustainability Institute. We have established other collaborative networks such as the South Asia Research Network (SARN) and the Monash Experimental Research Insights Team (MERIT), which further ensure the positive impact of our high calibre research.

Members of the Department have a distinguished publication record in numerous leading field journals as well as general interest journals, including the profession's most prestigious outlets. We also house excellent facilities. Our Monash Laboratory for Experimental Economics (MonLEE) laboratory enables us to complement field and artefactual field experiments with lab based activities.

Excellence in economic education
Economics provides training in logical thought and analysis which can be applied widely in every-day decision making, not just to matters that are usually labelled 'economic'. It was recognition of the meteoric rise of a new grouping of economists who emphasised the influence of economic policies on a rapidly changing world.

Continuing in this spirit, our Department's overarching goal is to prepare our students with a range of career options that are readily adapted to the issues of the day. These may be positions in industry, government, or in non-government and international organisations.

We achieve this by providing training in logical thought and flexible analytical skills which can be applied widely in every-day decision making – not just to matters which are typically labelled 'economics'.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-economics-and-econometrics-b6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more

The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

About this degree

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules

  • Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
  • Health Policy and Reform
  • Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules

Students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors. Please note that some modules fill up very quickly, so places cannot be guaranteed.

  • Bioethics Governance
  • Comparative Human Rights Law
  • Law and Governance of Global Health
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Illness
  • Madness
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Ethics and Regulation of Research
  • Contemporary Political Philosophy
  • Normative Ethics
  • Politics and Ethics
  • Health Inequalities over the Life-course
  • From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
  • Death, Dying and Consequences
  • Disability and Development
  • Introduction to Deafhood
  • Global Health and Development
  • Anthropology and Psychiatry
  • Medical Anthropology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA

Funding

Applicants for this programme may be eligible for a number of funding opportunities including UCL graduate scholarships. The Health Humanities Centre can nominate one candidate to apply for a Wellcome Trust Master's Award.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Public Health Doctor, NHS (National Health Service)
  • MBBS Medicine (Graduate Entry Programme), Newcastle University
  • Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
  • PhD in Critical Theory, University of Brighton
  • Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability

The programme equips students with an ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the programme teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.



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Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. Read more

About the programme

The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. The objective is to develop competences in the core subjects of the Programme for European and third country economists with career aspirations in universities, government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and economic research departments of large industrial or commercial corporations. Third country students will especially profit from an increased awareness of the place of the EU in the world economy in general, and with respect to worldwide globalisation and international trade in particular.

Content

in the field of economics of globalisation, international trade and European economic integration. It provides a profound insight into the current scientific knowledge in this field and is supported by scientific research at the partner universities, both at these universities individually and in a network context. The Programme leads to an in-depth understanding in the following core fields: Advanced Microeconomics, Advanced Macroeconomics, Open Economy Macroeconomics and International Finance, Economics of Globalisation, Economics of European Integration, and International Trade: Theory and Policy. As a master degree in economics should also include a strong quantitative component, Applied Econometrics is taught as an additional core discipline.

Added value

The M.A. focuses on conveying the new insights that come from recent economic research with respect to the impact on the relations with the emerging economies in East Asia and Latin America of social evolutionary processes like trade globalisation, globalisation on international financial markets, globalised governance and the ‘knowledge economy’. In doing so, the M.A. programme adds to university excellence and yields European added value, thereby, at least indirectly, contributing to European competitiveness.

The M.A. programme also creates specific European added value and is completely in line with the Bologna declaration, the Berlin Communiqué and with EUA Joint Master Recommendations through 6 specific features:
- European integration is one of the two core subjects of the Master Programme Economics of Globalisation and European Integration;
- a joint European degree: 7 European universities from 6 EU countries, together with 2 universities from BRICS countries, jointly award a consortium diploma;
- ECTS: the joint degree programme in entirely conceived within the philosophy and practice of the ECTS grading system;
internal and external quality control is in place in accordance with ENIC-NARIC recommendations;
- mobility: students move during the academic year as a group over three locations to three different countries, at least two of which are European; there is also teacher mobility;
- language: students stay during the year in three different language environments and they are offered the possibility to receive free and credited language courses in the corresponding countries.

Structure

The study-programme is full-time and runs over one year. The language of instruction is English. Courses are taught by professors from all partner universities. Professors from all partner universities act as supervisors and evaluators of the final dissertation.
The Programme consists of 60 ECTS credits, the taught part of the programme consisting of 45 credits and the dissertation having a weight of 15 credits. One credit is roughly equivalent to 25 working hours (lectures, assignments and study time).
Optional, but credited, language courses are offered in each of the languages of the countries involved in the Consortium (English excepted).

More details on http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=96030

Degree awarded

The programme leads to a master degree called M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration.
The diplomas are certified jointly by the partners and are signed by the Rector, President or Vice-chancellor of each partner university.

Student profile

The programme is aimed at students with career aspirations in research, in government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and industrial and commercial corporations.

Admission requirements

The programme is open to students who have earned 240 ECTS credits in an economics or applied economics university study programme or have a bachelor degree in these areas that is considered by the Joint Studies Board to be equivalent.
Applicants who are enrolled in the final year of their academic programme should submit an official letter in English from their university confirming that they are expected to finalise their course at the end of the current academic year, and submit up-to-date authenticated transcripts with the results of the previous years.

The proficiency in English of the students of the participating universities is checked by the local academic co-ordinators. Students from other universities should submit proof of an internet-based TOEFL level of minimum 90 (or its equivalent in another TOEFL score system), or a IELTS grade of at least 6.5, or should submit proof of having studied at least one academic year in an English-language programme.

The selection procedure of all students (with and without an EM scholarship) is a common one. After having passed the eligibility check (see above) the candidates are first ranked according to their study results (GPA and/or class of degree). The weights used to differentiate those applicants who passed the eligibility tests, are the following: 30% for the type of diploma, 30% for the GPA average, 20% for fluency in English and 20% for the reputation of the home university based on the Shanghai ranking. This ‘reputation’ criterion is applied in conjunction with the requirement to strive for regional balance in the student population. The global intake of new students (with and without a scholarship) is limited to 45.

Application form: http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=93777

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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Understand and have your say in the challenges that globalisation presents. From the sustainability of economic growth to the eradication of poverty, you will identify the impact of globalisation on the world around us. Read more
Understand and have your say in the challenges that globalisation presents. From the sustainability of economic growth to the eradication of poverty, you will identify the impact of globalisation on the world around us.

We will help you achieve an understanding of diverse issues such as the changing nature of international competition, trade, migration and global governance. You will expand your knowledge of modern political economy and explore global consumption as an engine of growth. You will debate the recent financial crisis, discussing how it began, the definition of crisis and how the world has responded.

You will gain an understanding of how international political economy differs from economics. As well as measuring economic growth, you will also understand its distribution of costs and benefits, together with its social, political and environmental impact.

This is an opportunity for you to embrace and interrogate aspects of politics, sociology, history, philosophy and geography in relation to economic globalisation.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalpoliticaleconomy_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Employment opportunities are available in the UK and overseas working for Non Government Organisations, the public sector, international organisations and the media. Employers will value your ability to think and work independently and challenge conventional wisdom in order to solve complex problems. Our expert staff are well associated with many major organisations, which will benefit you when looking for a career in this field.

- Government Policy Advisor
- Economist
- Social Researcher

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course is aimed at students who already work or have aspirations to pursue careers in campaigning organisations, internationally oriented Non-Governmental Organisations, international organisations and government departments, as well as graduates interested in further academic study.

Like all our courses, our MA incorporates employability, personal effectiveness and the development of research skills throughout our modules. You will also benefit from our links with relevant stakeholders and employers, and will have access to the diverse and research active teaching team drawn from across our University.

Core Modules

Political Economy of Crisis and Global Governance
Explore the role of crisis in capitalist development, covering conceptual understandings of crisis as well as investigating several historical episodes of capitalist crisis.

Political Economy of Globalisation
Consider a variety of contemporary issues such as the globalisation of production and finance and the politics of competitiveness and migration, as well as associated issues of cultural and social change.

Theories of International Political Economy
You will be intoriduced to the main theoretical approaches to IPE, starting with classical theories of political economy and then the emergence of the orthodox and more radical contemporary theories of IPE.

The Global Consumer Economy
Analyse and critically evaluate the pivotal role of the global institution of marketing and the ways in which it amplifies the drivers of, and relaxes the constraints on, abundant spending.

Developing and Managing Projects
Consider how projects fit within organisations and how they are developed, funded and managed. You will be introduced to the essential components, including planning, evaluation, ethics and governance issues, and stakeholder engagement.

Research Methods
You will also undertake a research methods module before completing a significant piece of independent study on a topic of your choice.

Dissertation
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

[[Facilities]
- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research. Read more
Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research.

The flexible structure of this course means it is suitable for a wide range of students with interests in politics and economics.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take one of two 20 credit international political economy modules: either 'Critical Theories of International Political Economy', or 'Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics or Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Economy prepares you for many careers in economics and politics, ranging from finance to international organisations and development. It also provides training for doctoral research in politics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. Read more
This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. These skills are required for you to be eligible for Research Council funded studentships in Politics and the Social Sciences. The flexibility of the course means you can choose to specialise in specific areas in politics and development studies, such as the politics of development or political economy.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take a 20 credit 'Political Research and Analysis' module, which considers the nature, practice and philosophical underpinnings of political research and analysis. You will also take a further 20 credit political research methods module: either 'Quantitative Methods of Data Analysis', or 'Qualitative Research Methods in Politics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Philosophy departments, including at least 20 credits from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Research is aimed specifically at students who want to go on to pursue further research in the social sciences.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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There has been an increasing interest in happiness in many disciplines including healthcare, philosophy, psychology, economics and ethics. Read more
There has been an increasing interest in happiness in many disciplines including healthcare, philosophy, psychology, economics and ethics.

At the same time the concepts of wellness health, illness and disease have become issues of controversy.

This programme focuses on happiness and its overlap with health and wellbeing asking questions such as: What is happiness and health? How does illness affect our understanding of what matters? Do our views about death and mortality affect how happy we are?

You will explore issues at the intersection of philosophy, ethics, psychology and medicine, which have important implications for policy and health care. This programme is aimed at graduates with a background in philosophy, psychology, theology, health sciences, medicine or social sciences.

We also offer this programme by distance learning.

Taught by experts – you will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy. We are ranked second among all Philosophy departments in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

Flexibility – the wide range of modules on offer allows you to both identify and explore your specific interests.

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – staff within the Department of Philosophy are very approachable and happy to offer additional advice on academic performance.

Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involve mainly small-group seminars allowing you to really get to grips with the learning material.

Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating Department where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars and events such as our weekly speaker series and various workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. Read more
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. The course provides you with a foundation in economics and research skills, and offers a wide range of philosophy and politics option modules.

Course Content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. You will also take a core 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' module, which prepares you for undertaking research, covering areas such as formulation of research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 80 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by Politics, Economics, Philosophy or PEP. These will include at least 20 credits from Politics and 20 credits from Philosophy.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour work week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer term and vacation working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

Career pathways for MA in PPE graduates are hugely varied, and have included accounting, the civil service, finance, international development, journalism, law, politics and research. The international dimension of the course allows students to pursue job opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

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This new master’s program combines high-level economics with application-oriented courses in business and finance. Economics is thereby taught based on the foundations of the Austrian School. Read more

Business and Austrian economics

This new master’s program combines high-level economics with application-oriented courses in business and finance. Economics is thereby taught based on the foundations of the Austrian School. Entrepreneurial Economics is the first English-taught master’s program in Europe that is solidly rooted in the Austrian tradition. However, besides the Austrian focus this program also committed to methodological pluralism, since all relevant schools of thought are included in the curriculum.

Austrian economics, by its very nature, is entrepreneurial economics. No other school of thought investigates markets under the paradigm of human action and constant change. Combining classes in business and Austrian economics is thus a natural step. Together, they build a first-class education portfolio that teaches theoretical understanding, entrepreneurial thinking and independent decision making. These skills, in combination with the general analytical competence that this program conveys, lay the foundation for many promising career paths.

The program

The core of this program is formed by a comprehensive education in Austrian Economics. This school of thought – rooted in the Vienna of the late 19th century – provides until today the most comprehensive approach to the social sciences. Humans are generally being regarded as individual entrepreneurs who influence their living conditions trough target-oriented actions.

This paradigm sharply contrasts with the model of the “homo oeconomicus”, which is central to mainstream economics. The homo oeconomicus allows for a mathematization of economics, but at the same time overemphasizes equilibrium thought, thus leaving no room for entrepreneurial actions. The Austrian School, in contrast, makes the „homo agens“ the centerpiece of analysis and thus assumes a process-oriented view. Instead of mathematical formalization the conceptual analysis of human action becomes the dominant scientific principle. Using this approach the Austrian School develops a holistic and philosophical understanding of economics.

The main goal of this program is to convey this economic understanding to students so as to shape entrepreneurial personalities who are able to think both theoretically and application-oriented. In assuming the Austrian perspective entrepreneurial spirit is stimulated immensely, since this perspective is directly linked to independent thinking and a liberal social philosophy. Beyond that, this study program comprises an application-oriented part that focuses on the relevant methods of business management and thus offers the best possible preparation for a professional career. The degree of practice orientation can be further increased if a student decides to do an internship instead of a research project or if he decides to write the master´s thesis in cooperation with a company. Also, special leadership trainings as well as extracurricular studies are offered so as to further support the development of entrepreneurial personalities.

Also from an academic point of view this program is highly ambitious. It intentionally refuses to adopt the methodological imperative that characterizes modern mainstream economics, but rather takes students to the research frontier in Austrian Economics. At the same time, however, the program does not limit itself to explaining the Austrian perspective, but also teaches competing ideas and approaches, such as, for example, the neoclassical or the Keynesian view. Thereby, the students gain a unique methodological expertise and learn to understand the originality of the respective approaches. With such knowledge they are well prepared to pursue a Ph.D., as science generally commences with an understanding of the controversies that govern the debate. In addition, having completed this program, the students also possess economic knowledge that is significantly superior to the formal training of mainstream economists.

Careers

The graduates of this program are highly qualified for various professions in the private sector. With their deep understanding of the economy the graduates of this program have a particular strategic competency and are therefore suitable for numerous tasks within consultancy firms, strategy departments, and medium-sized businesses, who all seek independent-minded people.

Such strategic competencies are especially important in the area of change management, a field that is nowadays often addressed using “Embedded Entrepreneurial Teams”. Economists with a profound knowledge of the financial and banking system are also sought after in the finance sector. The graduates of this program are well-prepared to start a career in any of these areas because they are able to critically discuss various opinions and provide strong and convincing arguments. In general, however, the graduates with a master´s degree in Entrepreneurial Economics and Management should consider themselves as entrepreneurs on their own behalves with personal business goals and ideas that they can put into practice.

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