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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. Read more
The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. The Department’s senior staff support several research groups, covering various aspects of mental health and disorder throughout the life course.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvpcmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Psychiatry is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by an Advisor, to increase access to staff members and accommodate a diversity of viewpoints.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a group leader whose area of research most appeals to them.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. We also require our students to attend their research group’s research-in-progress/laboratory meetings, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. The supervisor and details of the proposed research project are determined during the application process.

Most research training is provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. The student should expect to receive one to one supervision at least weekly in term time.

The structure of the MPhil course enables the students to significantly develop their analytical and research skills, and is intended as preparation for further research.

The MPhil programme provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of research in psychiatry;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil in Medical Science (Psychiatry) degree is a one-year degree, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree.

However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Psychiatry course via the following options:

1. Complete the MPhil then continue to the three year PhD course:

If the student would like to continue with their research and has secured funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

2. Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil.

If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Pinsent Darwin Fund (managed by the Graduate School of Life Sciences)

Sims Fund (administered by Fees & Graduate Funding, Student Registry)

Other funding opportunities (e.g. through research grants) might become available depending on funds

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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The Finance Phd program at Tilburg University has two phases. Read more

MSc specialization in Finance

The Finance Phd program at Tilburg University has two phases: a preparatory Research Master combining intensive coursework and research that culminates in the writing of a Research Master Thesis (which could later be built out into a chapter of the PhD thesis); and an advanced phase in which students devote all their time to research, at the end of which they complete their PhD dissertation. Most Research Master students are funded by grants given by CentER. PhD students are employees of the University and receive a gross salary of 83000.

Students who have not done graduate work in Finance or Economics before joining the program complete the Research Master in two years. The first year consists of Economics and Econometrics courses preparing the student to specialized work in Finance. The second year is devoted to the Finance Core (four advanced courses in Asset Pricing and Corporate Finance), a few elective courses, and the writing of a Master Thesis. Students who have done graduate work before joining the program are admitted directly in the second year.

After completing the Research Master, students are eligible to start the PhD phase of the program, which typically lasts three years. Supervision during this phase is very close: students often co-author no less than two papers with their supervisors, and write at least one single-author paper under their supervisor’s guidance. Our seminar series (the department hosts over 30 seminars a year with leading scholars from the US and Europe) exposes students to cutting-edge research in all areas of Finance.

Students in the second year of the PhD spend one semester visiting a top University abroad, funded by CentER. These visits provide an early exposure to the international academic scene, create new opportunities of co-authorship, and enrich the students’ network of contacts. Our students have visited Harvard, Yale, London Business School, Caltech, among others.

Most of our PhDs find jobs in Academia. We have a very successful history of placements at top universities in Europe and America, among them Chicago GBS, Toronto Rotman, Cambridge, HEC Paris. Our graduates also show an excellent record of publications, many of them publishing chapters of their theses in top journals shortly after graduation.

Career Perspective MSc specialization in Finance

If you follow the Research Master's program in Business - be it accounting, finance, information management, marketing, operations research, or organization and strategy - you are prepared to continue in a PhD program. More than 75% of the graduates continue at a PhD position at either Tilburg University or another university. 25% of the graduates start a professional career, mostly in the consultancy or financial sector.

The Research Master's program in Business in combination with the subsequent PhD studies enable our students to find jobs at universities around the world, at research institutes or in the banking and consultancy sectors.

In the PhD phase, most accepted PhD students become university employees earning a gross salary over more than Euro 85000 over three years and are granted pension rights.

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The following collaborative programs are available to students in participating degree programs as ​listed below. -Aboriginal Health, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD. Read more
The following collaborative programs are available to students in participating degree programs as ​listed below:
-Aboriginal Health, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Acr​oss the Life Course, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Asia-Pacific Studies, Anthropology, MA
-Diaspora and Transnational Studies, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Environmental Studies, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Ethnic and Pluralism Studies, Anthropology, MA, PhD
-Global Health, Anthropology, PhD
-Jewish Studies. Anthropology, MA, PhD
-Sexual Diversity Studies, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-South Asian Studies, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Women and Gender Studies, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
-Women's Health, Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD​

Overview

The Department of Anthropology offers research training and courses of instruction in five fields:
-Archaeology
-Evolutionary Anthropology
-Linguistic and Semiotic Anthropology
-Medical Anthropology
-Sociocultural Anthropology

The department offers a Master of Arts degree program in all five fields.

The Master of Science degree program is normally taken in three fields: Archaeology, Evolutionary Anthropology, and Medical Anthropology.

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The MPhil in Strategy, Marketing and Operations (SMO) is an intensive nine-month programme that prepares you for continuation to the CJBS PhD in the fields of Strategy, Marketing or Operations Management. Read more
The MPhil in Strategy, Marketing and Operations (SMO) is an intensive nine-month programme that prepares you for continuation to the CJBS PhD in the fields of Strategy, Marketing or Operations Management.

Educational aims of the programme:

- To prepare students for doctoral work in the areas of operations management or marketing at Judge Business School (JBS) (the programme is an integral part of the JBS PhD programmes in these disciplines)

By:
- providing teaching in research methodology, in particular in econometrics and mathematical modelling
- providing teaching in foundational subjects, such as economics
- providing research seminars in which students will learn about the current debates in the field and about the canonical literature that underpins these debates
- providing guidance on the structuring, writing and critiquing of academic research papers
- giving students the opportunity to experience research first-hand, either through an individual research project or a dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/bmjbmpmso

Format

Students have to complete 9 modules, covering research methodology (e.g. statistics, mathematical modelling, experimental research), foundation courses (e.g. micro-economics, game theory), and research seminars on subjects such as strategy, marketing, innovation, and operations and technology management.

Students may also apply to do a dissertation, in lieu of 3 modules, or a short individual research project, in lieu of 1 module.

Students receive qualitative feedback on their assessed performance and suggestions for improving their performance on the courses. Several courses have mid-term assessments to allow students to track their knowledge of the subject. Students are also welcome to approach lecturers for informal advice and guidance.

Assessment

- If dissertation option is chosen: 12,000 words.
- Short module on individual research project if chosen; 4000 words.

Assessment across the nine courses will be by written examination, project, or coursework, depending upon the nature of the particular course.

Faculty of Mathematics courses offered on the MPhil in SMO as electives are assessed exclusively by written examination.

Presentation features as an assessment component in a number of CJBS modules offered on the MPhil in SMO.

Continuing

Following their application for PhD continuation by the end of the first term, students will be interviewed by a panel of faculty members early in the second term. The PhD admissions committee will make PhD admission decisions on the basis of the interview report, the strength of the overall application, with particular weight on academic reference letters and the performance in the Michaelmas term MPhil courses, and the fit of the student's research interest with faculty expertise. Students will receive confirmation of a PhD offer in February. All admitted PhD students are fully funded. PhD offers are usually conditional on the final performance on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

ESRC scholarships (1+3, including 3 years of PhD funding).

Lyondell Basell scholarship in Operations (1+3, including 3 years of PhD funding).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Study for a higher degree by research in our well-respected Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre. During your studies, you are trained in research methods and complete a high level research project. Read more
Study for a higher degree by research in our well-respected Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre. During your studies, you are trained in research methods and complete a high level research project. We encourage and support you to present your findings at national and international conferences to help launch your academic career.

A higher degree by research involves training in research methods and a laboratory based high level scientific investigation. The nature of the work and the time it takes to finish the research means a research degree is demanding and needs great commitment.

Your research takes place with the Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre (BMRC). The BMRC has been established for over 15 years. We have over 40 postgraduate students enrolled on MPhil/PhD programmes, as well as a number of postdoctoral research assistants. This provides an active and stimulating research environment.

Whilst studying, postgraduate students are encouraged and supported to present their latest research findings at national and international conferences as part of the BMRC. You must present your results in a thesis, explain the methods used in your research and defend them in a viva voce examination.

To get an MPhil you must critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic and display an understanding of suitable research methods. For a PhD you must also make an independent and original contribution to knowledge.

BMRC staff work in collaboration with UK and international scientists as well as clinical colleagues at a number of UK hospitals.
We have a broad range of facilities including:
-Q-TOF-MS with electrospray and imaging MALDI options along with LC and associated equipment for proteomic analysis.
-Synaption mobility mass spectrometer.
-Single cell recording electrophysiology laboratory.
-Real time PCR.
-Flow cytometer with cell sorter.
-Cell culture facilities for bacterial and mammalian cells.
-Confocal microscopy suite.
-DNA microarray scanner.
-Biacore facility.
-NMR.

In the 2008 RAE Assessment, the BMRC was submitted under Unit of Assessment 12 - Allied Health Professions and Studies - which included 21 staff from BMRC and eight from the Centre for Health and Social Care. 65 per cent of the research in the joint submission was considered to be internationally recognised. When measured by the quality of its research and weighted by the number of staff submitted in this unit of assessment, Sheffield Hallam University was rated 16th out of the 42 post-92 universities who submitted (figure obtained from Research Professional). In terms of the publications submitted for consideration by the RAE panel, 75 per cent of these were of an international standard.

Evidence of the growth in research activity in the BMRC between RAE 2001 and RAE 2008 is the doubling of the number of staff returned in 2008 compared with 2001 and a three-fold increase in income. We currently have six postdoctoral researchers and 40 PhD students in BMRC, with 30 successful PhD awards being made during the period 2008-13.

Split MPhil or PhD options for international students

A split MPhil or PhD is a research degree programme for international students wishing to study from their home country university. You register for a Sheffield Hallam University PhD or MPhil degree and spend some time studying in Sheffield but are substantially based in your home country.

The balance of study between Sheffield Hallam and the overseas university is agreed between you and your supervisors, depending on the needs of your research programme, but will not exceed three months per annum in UK.

The benefits for students studying on the split PhD scheme include:
-You can complete fieldwork or laboratory work in your home country, in an area directly linked to your professional or career development interests.
-Access to local facilities and supervisory support in your home country combined with the expert supervisory guidance of our academic staff.
-Short, intensive periods of face-to-face working with a dedicated supervisory team in Sheffield, while enjoying the educational, social and cultural benefits of studying in the UK.

See the website for further information: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-research-degrees--biomolecular-sciences-research-centre

Course structure

MPhil
Full time – 2 years research
Part time – 3 years research

This course can be developed into a PHD, see the website for further information: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mphilphd-research-degrees--biomolecular-sciences-research-centre

Split PhD/MPhil for international students

Students normally spend most of their time in their home country but come to the University for a minimum of two weeks and a maximum of three months a year.

Research training
When you begin your research, we allocate you a director of studies and a supervisor. Regular meetings between you and your supervisors are scheduled, with targets set for written and oral presentation of research progress. The research courses include:
-University student induction.
-Research methods module
-Bioscience Forum

Assessment
-Thesis followed by viva voce examination.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.5 with 6.0 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level. An offer of a research degree place may be made subject to a completing our Pre-sessional English for Academic Purposes course.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The University academic year begins the first week of September, and the academic year is divided into a 13 week first term - September, October, November - and a 14 week (including reading week in mid-February) second term - January, February, March. Read more

Graduate Programs

The University academic year begins the first week of September, and the academic year is divided into a 13 week first term - September, October, November - and a 14 week (including reading week in mid-February) second term - January, February, March. There is a formal examination period scheduled at the end of each term. The four month summer term is devoted to research. The usual period for completing an MSc is two to two and one half years while that for a PhD is about five years. All students accepted for the MSc or PhD will be offered a package of funding which includes a research assistantship and a teaching assistant ship - two years guaranteed for the MSc, five years guaranteed for the PhD.

The normal times for a student to begin their programme of study are September 1 or January 1. It is also possible to begin May 1 upon Departmental approval and agreed supervisor selection.

The Department offers MSc and PhD degrees - each degree requires graduate courses and research work reported in a thesis. Each degree requires 12 credits of course work, unless the candidate already holds an approved MSc. Most courses are worth 3 credits.

Students are generally encouraged to complete all their course requirements in their first year if possible in order to allow a more efficient use of time for their research projects. A one credit pass/fail seminar course is part of the requirements. An individual programme is designed by consultation between the graduate advisor, the student's supervisor (if known), and the student at the time of his or her arrival. There are no entrance or cumulative examinations.

Students accepted into the MSc program may transfer directly to a PhD degree program after one year without completing their MSc, provided they have completed in the first year a minimum of 12 credits of course work with an overall average of at least 80%, 9 credits of 80% standing, and one of the seminar courses CHEM 540A, 540B or 540C.

The progress of each PhD student is evaluated once a year at a meeting of the faculty. A supervisory committee is formed for each student; this committee normally consists of the research supervisor and three other faculty members, one of whom is chosen by the student. In their second year, PhD students are required to pass a comprehensive examination. This exam consists of an oral report of their research progress and questioning on their work and the background related to it - this meeting is normally the last requirement before the thesis and must be passed in one or two attempts to achieve candidacy.

At the completion of the thesis, both MSc and PhD students must defend their results and thesis at a formal oral defense. In the case of PhD students an external examiner, chosen in consultation with the supervisor and the graduate advisor, is also asked by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to review the thesis.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Chemistry
- Subject: Science
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

Research focus

Biological & Medicinal Chemistry, Catalytic Processes, Chemical Physics, Chemical Synthesis, Environmental Chemistry, Interfacial and Surface Chemistry, Materials & Polymer Chemistry, Molecular Spectroscopy, Nuclear and Radiochemistry

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CentER's Research Master's program in Economics offers two years of graduate level coursework and research training in economics. Read more

Research Master in Economics

CentER's Research Master's program in Economics offers two years of graduate level coursework and research training in economics. It prepares you for PhD dissertation research. The program is intergrated with CentER's three-year PhD program to comprise the five-year Graduate Program in Economics.

The first year of the Research Master's program in Economics is fully devoted to rigorous training in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics. It equips you with a sound basis in economic and econometric theory and methods.

The second year of the Research Master's program in Economics is evenly split between specialized coursework and a first major research paper, the Research Master thesis. This year allows you to explore the many research areas available at CentER, to fully develop your research interests, and to match up with one or more advisers that share your interests.

Career Prospects Research Master in Economics

The Research Master's program in Economics is fully dedicated to preparing students for PhD thesis research at CentER. To this end, we limit the inflow to a small number of excellent students with a sincere interest in pursuing a PhD at CentER. We expect most of these students to successfully complete the Research Master in Economics and we expect that many of them will continue with PhD thesis research at CentER.

However, the graduates of the Research Master's program in Economics that do not continue with a PhD project, may also start a professional career, typically at government organizations (National Departments, Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, regional organizations) and in the consultancy or financial sector.

After completing the PhD, many students participate in CentER's academic job placement procedure and find jobs at universities, research institutes, and government institutions around the world, as well as at private companies.

In the PhD phase, most accepted PhD students become university employees earning a gross salary over more than Euro 85000 over three years and are granted pension rights.

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Our MPhil/PhD in Life Sciences is a cross-disciplinary research programme designed to enable you to develop your research skills by focusing on a specialist set of research questions. Read more
Our MPhil/PhD in Life Sciences is a cross-disciplinary research programme designed to enable you to develop your research skills by focusing on a specialist set of research questions.

This MPhil/PhD programme is designed to teach you more than just how to conduct scientific research, it also aims to develop your ability to communicate your findings effectively. This MPhil/PhD programme will also provide an opportunity for you to significantly develop your oral and written communication skills.

You can benefit from training courses provided by the University to develop key skills in research. Under the guidance and advice from your PhD supervisors you will be encouraged to present talks and seminars on your work both at the University of Lincoln as well at national and international meetings and conferences. Under the guidance of your PhD supervisors you will also be expected to produce progress reports, develop your ability to write up your work for publication in peer-reviewed journals, and ultimately to effectively communicate your research and thesis.

Beyond learning how do conduct solid research science, and the specialist skills that you are expected to develop due to your subject discipline (e.g. how to work in a molecular laboratory or conduct animal cognition experiments) the process of studying for a research degree can provide transferable skills in problem solving, time management, independent and team work, and communication.

How You Study

This research programme relies on your independent study and research, supervised by an advisory panel of academic staff. The nature of this research will be specific to the subject. A PhD programme is expected to investigate a novel question and provide a novel contribution to science.

Most students are initially enrolled on an MPhil programme. After one year, if sufficient progress can be demonstrated, students have the option to transfer to a PhD programme.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these may vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

Each student will have at least one monthly formal meeting with their supervisors where progress will be discussed. After three months you are expected to provide an outline of your research proposal, which will be evaluated. After the first year you may apply for transfer to a PhD programme via a written report and you will be orally examined.

Both the MPhil and PhD are awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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If you are looking for a research degree at a world-class institution with an excellent track record for securing funding, our MPhil/PhD could be the opportunity for you. Read more

Summary

If you are looking for a research degree at a world-class institution with an excellent track record for securing funding, our MPhil/PhD could be the opportunity for you. This degree is designed to appeal to a range of people who are looking to undertake research related to health or social care.

You will enrol on the MPhil at the start of this programme, then undergo a process to upgrade to a PhD at an appropriate point in your studies. You will be assigned at least two members of supervisory staff with experience and expertise in your particular area of research.

Throughout your studies, you will have the opportunity to participate in doctoral-level research training and complete structured activities related to your research. You will also be entitled to attend a series of research forums, facilitating the development of your knowledge and enabling you to be part of the wider research community.

Visit our website for further information...



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This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students wishing to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MA Res) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training programme]. In the latter case, the MA Res therefore serves as a shortcut into the PhD. It is designed to train students in research skills, including language training, to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines.

Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The student must successfully complete the following core course:

Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011)
This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration.

A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs.

The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 277kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/file93546.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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With independent research on topics in Mathematics and Statistics, the MASDOC doctoral training programme spans four years and comprises an innovative taught-course component and PhD. Read more
With independent research on topics in Mathematics and Statistics, the MASDOC doctoral training programme spans four years and comprises an innovative taught-course component and PhD
research of the highest standard.

The MSc offers you a broad base of tools to embark on your research project via both taught and research training components. You’ll benefit from close contact with world-class researchers right from the start, helping you to make informed decisions on future research topics and supervisors for your PhD. You’ll focus on research areas including Analysis, Applied Mathematics, Numerical Analysis, Probability and Statistics, but the entire programme is very flexible and you can specialise in different themes and techniques.

Our graduates are highly valued by employers in industry, business or government organisations, and in laboratories where highlevel mathematical modelling and analysis are essential tools. You’ll also be well-positioned to embark on an academic career.

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Would you like to learn how to use novel mathematics to tackle real-world problems? This MSc and PhD-combined course bridges three key areas. Read more
Would you like to learn how to use novel mathematics to tackle real-world problems? This MSc and PhD-combined course bridges three key areas: Complexity Science; Systems Biology and Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research.

The taught element of the course will equip you with the necessary skills required for the PhD, during which you can work on specialist mathematical solutions to global challenges. You’ll have the opportunity to identify real-world systems and explore how they can benefit from mathematical techniques. As your studies progress, you’ll become open to new ways of thinking, combining cutting-edge mathematical skills with the ability to understand and model real-world systems. You’ll also learn how to analyse complex data sets, work well in multidisciplinary teams and become an effective communicator.

Throughout the course, you’ll benefit from the first-hand expertise of our collaborative partners from industry, finance and health. As a result, you’ll graduate with excellent employment prospects and the relevant experience to work at the forefront of academic and industrial research.

Applications for MSc only are welcomed but there is no Research Council funding available for this option so applicants would need to source their own funding.

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