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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. Read more
The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. The Department’s senior staff support several research groups, covering various aspects of mental health and disorder throughout the life course.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvpcmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Psychiatry is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by an Advisor, to increase access to staff members and accommodate a diversity of viewpoints.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a group leader whose area of research most appeals to them.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. We also require our students to attend their research group’s research-in-progress/laboratory meetings, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. The supervisor and details of the proposed research project are determined during the application process.

Most research training is provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. The student should expect to receive one to one supervision at least weekly in term time.

The structure of the MPhil course enables the students to significantly develop their analytical and research skills, and is intended as preparation for further research.

The MPhil programme provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of research in psychiatry;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil in Medical Science (Psychiatry) degree is a one-year degree, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree.

However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Psychiatry course via the following options:

1. Complete the MPhil then continue to the three year PhD course:

If the student would like to continue with their research and has secured funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

2. Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil.

If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Pinsent Darwin Fund (managed by the Graduate School of Life Sciences)

Sims Fund (administered by Fees & Graduate Funding, Student Registry)

Other funding opportunities (e.g. through research grants) might become available depending on funds

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work. Read more

We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work.

The Department of Art at Goldsmiths has an international reputation for creativity, innovation, and cultural diversity. Our aim is to facilitate artists, curators and writers to make work and to reflect upon, debate and disseminate individual and collaborative practices, thus contributing to wider artistic culture and debate.

As an MPhil/PhD researcher, you will be contributing to the Department's research culture as well as to the wider Goldsmiths tradition: one that values interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge and understanding, supports inventive new practice and critical work, and contributes to the creation of a dynamic research environment both nationally and internationally.

MPhil/PhD research

The Department of Art supports the development of art research in and through Fine Art, Curating, Art Writing and across disciplines. We consider all elements of the MPhil/PhD to be sites of rigorous experimentation and encourage you to develop your research through processes of making, collaboration, investigation, study, inquiry, trial and error, analysis and speculation.

We understand that your research may change shape and subject matter as you make intertextual and interdisciplinary connections and as relevant modes of artistic, cultural, social, scientific and philosophical production become important to you throughout the course of your research. We work with you as you find the appropriate practice for pursuing your research and related form for consolidating and disseminating your findings.

It is important to note that the MPhil/PhD is not an extension of the MFA. The MFA is a professional degree geared specifically at the development of your art practice. Distinct from this, the MPhil/PhD is a 3-4 year (full-time) or 6-8 year (part-time) research project, the pursuit of which may involve your already-established practice, or require the development new modes of practice specific to the research project.

The PhD is also distinct from ongoing studio practice or a residency in that it asks you to place your work in relation to that of other practitioners, be they artists and other cultural workers, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, or others; be they in a contemporary and/or historical context. In this respect, the model of the PhD encourages you to follow your curiosity for – and make connections with and between – the thought and action of others.

Another major distinguishing quality of art research is the need to document process. For this, our researchers are encouraged to think expansively about how to do so. How might a process of documentation become a space for reflecting on decisions, however intuitive they are in the first instance? How might this process communicate something of the mode of enquiry that is pursued, as much as of the findings? How might this process, as much as the outcome of the research, reflect the complexity inherent in thinking, making, questioning and communicating art?

MARs

Based in the Department of Art, and linked to the MPhil/PhD Programme, is the Mountain of Art Research (MARs). MARs supports and promotes the development of innovative art research across a range of art practices including - but not limited to - studio, performance, film and video, curatorial, critical, art-writing, situated, participatory and interdisciplinary practice.

Committed to rigorous formal experimentation, maverick conceptual exploration and socially-engaged articulation, MARs emphasises the material ‘stuff’ of art research as much as its speculative possibilities and political imperative.

As both platform and ethos, the aim of MARs is to challenge received ideas and habits; to promote new ways of thinking and being both in and out of this world.

Through MARs we bring together researchers within Art, across disciplines, between institutions and beyond higher education for intentional, concentrated discussion and sharing of research.

Applications 

You will apply with a well-developed idea for an individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc. 

Programme pathways

Within the overarching programme of MPhil/PhD in Art there are three different pathways for undertaking doctoral research, including:

Pathway 1: Thesis by Practice 

The thesis comprises a substantial body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice, presented as an integrated whole. This is accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project, and a written component of approximately 20,000-40,000 words for PhD (10,000-20,000 words for MPhil) offering a critical account of the research.

Pathway 2: Thesis by Practice and Written Dissertation 

The thesis comprises a body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice AND a written dissertation of 40,000-80,000 words for PhD (20,000-40,000 for MPhil), presented together as an integrated whole. The thesis will be accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project.

Pathway 3: Thesis by written dissertation

The thesis comprises a written dissertation of 80,000-100,000 words for PhD (40,000-50,000 words for MPhil), presented as an integrated whole.

Researchers will start on one of these three pathways when they apply and may change to a different option only up until the time of Upgrade.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our researchers have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world.



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Our Master of Philosophy (MPhil) with possibility to transfer to our Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) involves the systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge in your chosen academic disciplinary field or area of professional practice in business or economics. Read more

Our Master of Philosophy (MPhil) with possibility to transfer to our Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) involves the systematic acquisition and understanding of a substantial body of knowledge in your chosen academic disciplinary field or area of professional practice in business or economics.

Degree aims 

This degree aims to:

  • Provide you with the general ability to conceptualise, design and realise a project for the generation of new knowledge, and a deep understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry
  • Allow the creation of new knowledge, through original research and advanced scholarship, to extend the forefront of that disciplinary field or area of practice.

Course structure

You will learn to conceptualise, design and realise a project for the generation of new knowledge. Our degree will give you deep understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry. 

Unlike taught programmes (such as Bachelor's and Master's programmes), this degree provides a more critical and rigorous exploration of your particular subject area. It places much more emphasis on original research and the contribution to knowledge. 

You will attend taught courses in your first and second year to lay the foundation from which you will develop advanced research skills including the gathering, analysis and presentation of quantitative and qualitative data.

Supervisors

At the heart of this MPhil/PhD is the collaboration between you and your research supervisor. Our supervisors, your first point of contact in the faculty, are experts in your chosen area and will guide you through the process of: 

  • Defining the aims of your research project, and its expected deliverables
  • Outlining a suitable plan of work, monitoring its realisation, and helping you to keep your commitment to it
  • Guiding you to obtaining ethical approval to realise your research, if your study requires it
  • Identifying any further taught courses and training events (in addition to mandatory ones) to be attended in support of your research project.

Research

You are encouraged to contact us to discuss your research interests and you will graduate with a degree title that reflects your area of specialism. Your award will be based on the completion of a thesis.

We have expertise and can supervise research students primarily in the areas of human resource management, organisational behaviour, accounting and finance, financial services, critical and social research in accounting, public administration, public policy, political economy, applied economics, social and economic network analysis, international business, strategic management, supply chain management, knowledge management, IT strategies, entrepreneurship and innovation, marketing, tourism, and cultural, art and heritage industries. 

Research is seen as an essential activity for the Business School as a foundation for excellence in teaching, and as a basis to provide contract research and consultancy services to business and the wider community, both nationally and locally (especially within south-east London and Kent). 

Attendance

The normal route accepted by the University is to register first as MPhil student, and transfer to PhD after demonstrating sufficient progress in your research (usually after about 12-18 months from start). 

Attendance for MPhil is 18-36 months full-time and 30-48 months part-time; PhD is 36-60 months full-time and 48-72 months part-time.

For further information, guidance on how to apply and an application form, please visit http://www.greenwich.ac.uk/research/study.

Employability

We have developed strong relations with many academic institutions, research centres, and companies in the financial centres in London, including in the City, Canary Wharf, and Fenchurch Street. This offers you networking, mentoring and internship opportunities, making it a perfect location to develop your career. 

You can also reach out to top employers through our dedicated Business School Employability Office (BSEO). Our team focuses on developing your employment skills through CV support, interview skills workshops and guidance through mentors to progress in the industry. This includes the opportunity to network with employers and recruiters at career fairs. The BSEO team was shortlisted for the Times Higher Education Leadership and Management Awards; which shows their dedication to actively support career development.

Helping graduates into careers is a very important part of our mission as a university. Job prospects for Greenwich graduates have been improving rapidly, with 93 per cent of 2014/15 Greenwich graduates looking for work were already in jobs or further study by January 2016 (according to latest national figures).

Ranking

Greenwich is one of the top two most globally diverse universities in the UK, US, Australia and New Zealand, by Hotcourses Diversity Index.

We have also been named as one of the "most international" universities on the planet by Times Higher Education magazine.

Assessment

You will be assessed through submission of a thesis and an oral examination. You will also have to pass three mandatory courses in year one, one optional course in year two and shorter preparatory training courses.

Professional recognition

This degree is accredited by the European Doctoral Programmes Association in Management and Business Administration, a prestigious body that aims to help its members increase the quality of their PhD programmes.

Careers

You can have a career in research, whether in academia or in the research and development departments of businesses or government bodies.



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The Aston Business School PhD programme has been designed to train researchers who aspire to become future academics or professional industry researchers. Read more

The Aston Business School PhD programme has been designed to train researchers who aspire to become future academics or professional industry researchers. Aston Business School specialises in the following subject areas:

  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Law
  • Marketing and Strategy
  • Operations and Information Management
  • Work and Organisational Psychology

Programme Structure

In the first year of the PhD programme you will undertake the taught Research Methods Course (RMC) as the foundation of your development as a professional researcher. You'll develop the necessary skills to both successfully complete your PhD, and to develop as a well-rounded researcher. You will also be able to take advantage of additional training in specific topics through our Summer School in Advanced Research Methods which helps to develop advanced skills in areas related to your specific topic. 

The RMC course is taught by our expert staff in management research and is designed to lead to the development of a Qualifying Report. The Qualifying Report is a presentation of the research topic of which you would be expected to provide academic motivation for the choice of your specific research question, explain what previous research has informed your approach, what research methodology and techniques you will adopt, and what theoretical and practical contributions your research is expected to make. This Qualifying Report will form the basis of your PhD dissertation.  You will be expected to defend your Qualifying Report through an oral examination processes, examined by two Aston Business School academic examiners, who are selected based on the relevance of their expertise to your research topic. Upon successful completion of this examination which takes place towards the end of the first year of study, you will then be allowed to proceed with your dissertation.

During the second year PhD students typically focus on data collection and analysis, which for some students is associated with travel to research sites where they collect their data. 

Year three is typically a writing up year when you will spend most of your time developing your dissertation and writing academic papers. We encourage all students to target top academic conferences obtain feedback on their research and use this feedback to target academic journals.



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The Finance Phd program at Tilburg University has two phases. Read more

MSc specialization in Finance

The Finance Phd program at Tilburg University has two phases: a preparatory Research Master combining intensive coursework and research that culminates in the writing of a Research Master Thesis (which could later be built out into a chapter of the PhD thesis); and an advanced phase in which students devote all their time to research, at the end of which they complete their PhD dissertation. Most Research Master students are funded by grants given by CentER. PhD students are employees of the University and receive a gross salary of 83000.

Students who have not done graduate work in Finance or Economics before joining the program complete the Research Master in two years. The first year consists of Economics and Econometrics courses preparing the student to specialized work in Finance. The second year is devoted to the Finance Core (four advanced courses in Asset Pricing and Corporate Finance), a few elective courses, and the writing of a Master Thesis. Students who have done graduate work before joining the program are admitted directly in the second year.

After completing the Research Master, students are eligible to start the PhD phase of the program, which typically lasts three years. Supervision during this phase is very close: students often co-author no less than two papers with their supervisors, and write at least one single-author paper under their supervisor’s guidance. Our seminar series (the department hosts over 30 seminars a year with leading scholars from the US and Europe) exposes students to cutting-edge research in all areas of Finance.

Students in the second year of the PhD spend one semester visiting a top University abroad, funded by CentER. These visits provide an early exposure to the international academic scene, create new opportunities of co-authorship, and enrich the students’ network of contacts. Our students have visited Harvard, Yale, London Business School, Caltech, among others.

Most of our PhDs find jobs in Academia. We have a very successful history of placements at top universities in Europe and America, among them Chicago GBS, Toronto Rotman, Cambridge, HEC Paris. Our graduates also show an excellent record of publications, many of them publishing chapters of their theses in top journals shortly after graduation.

Career Perspective MSc specialization in Finance

If you follow the Research Master's program in Business - be it accounting, finance, information management, marketing, operations research, or organization and strategy - you are prepared to continue in a PhD program. More than 75% of the graduates continue at a PhD position at either Tilburg University or another university. 25% of the graduates start a professional career, mostly in the consultancy or financial sector.

The Research Master's program in Business in combination with the subsequent PhD studies enable our students to find jobs at universities around the world, at research institutes or in the banking and consultancy sectors.

In the PhD phase, most accepted PhD students become university employees earning a gross salary over more than Euro 85000 over three years and are granted pension rights.

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We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work. Read more

We support innovative art research across a range of modes and practices that seek to contribute to wider cultural and artistic fields through original, critical work.

The Department of Art supports the development of art research in and through Fine Art, Curating, Art writing and across disciplines. We consider all elements of the MPhil/PhD to be sites of rigorous experimentation and encourage you to develop your research through processes of making, collaboration, investigation, study, inquiry, trial and error, analysis and speculation.

We understand that your research may change shape and subject matter as you make intertextual and interdisciplinary connections and as relevant modes of artistic, cultural, social, scientific and philosophical production become important to you throughout the course of your research. We work with you as you find the appropriate practice for pursuing your research and related form for consolidating and disseminating your findings.

It is important to note that the MPhil/PhD is not an extension of the MFA. The MFA is a professional degree geared specifically to the development of your art practice. Distinct from this, the MPhil/PhD in Art is a 3-4 year (full-time) or 6-8 year (part-time) research project, the pursuit of which may involve your already-established practice, or require the development new modes of practice specific to the research project.

The PhD is also distinct from ongoing studio practice or a residency in that it asks you to place your work in relation to that of other practitioners, be they artists and other cultural workers, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, or others; be they in a contemporary and/or historical context. In this respect, the model of the PhD encourages you to follow your curiosity for – and make connections with and between – the thought and action of others.

Another major distinguishing quality of art research is the need to document process. For this, our researchers are encouraged to think expansively about how to do so. How might a process of documentation become a space for reflecting on decisions, however intuitive they are in the first instance? How might this process communicate something of the mode of enquiry that is pursued, as much as of the findings? How might this process, as much as the outcome of the research, reflect the complexity inherent in thinking, making, questioning and communicating art?

MARs 

Based in the Department of Art, and linked to the MPhil/PhD Programme, is the Mountain of Art Research (MARs). MARs supports and promotes the development of innovative art research across a range of art practices including - but not limited to - studio, performance, film and video, curatorial, critical, art-writing, situated, participatory and interdisciplinary practice.

Committed to rigorous formal experimentation, maverick conceptual exploration and socially-engaged articulation, MARs emphasises the material ‘stuff’ of art research as much as its speculative possibilities and political imperative. As both platform and ethos, the aim of MARs is to challenge received ideas and habits; to promote new ways of thinking and being both in and out of this world.

Through MARs we bring together researchers within Art, across disciplines, between institutions and beyond higher education for intentional, concentrated discussion and sharing of research.

Applications 

You will apply with a well-developed idea for and individual research project that you have begun to plan artistically as well as to contextualise with reference to contemporary and historical examples of artworks, exhibitions, designs, social, political and philosophical ideas, etc.

Programme pathways

Within the overarching programme of MPhil/PhD in Art there are three different pathways for undertaking doctoral research, including:

Pathway 1: Thesis by Practice 

The thesis comprises a substantial body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice, presented as an integrated whole. This is accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project, and a written component of approximately 20,000-40,000 words for PhD (10,000-20,000 words for MPhil) offering a critical account of the research.

Pathway 2: Thesis by Practice and Written Dissertation 

The thesis comprises a body of studio practice, curatorial practice and/or art writing practice AND a written dissertation of 40,000-80,000 words for PhD (20,000-40,000 for MPhil), presented together as an integrated whole. The thesis will be accompanied by a considered form of documentation, as appropriate to the project.

Pathway 3: Thesis by written dissertation

The thesis comprises a written dissertation of 80,000-100,000 words for PhD (40,000-50,000 words for MPhil), presented as an integrated whole.

Researchers will start on one of these three pathways when they apply and may change to a different option only up until the time of Upgrade.

Skills

Our art programmes aim to equip you with the necessary skills to develop independent thought and confidence in your practice. In addition, these skills are of use in other career paths you may wish to follow.

Careers

Our researchers have been successful in many fields including media, museums, galleries, education, the music business and academia. Many have continued to be successful, practising artists long after graduating, and have won major prizes and exhibited around the world.



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MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher. Read more

MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher.

You will graduate from the course able to access the full range of research in relation to your chosen specialism of education (pathways in human geography, international development, and planning and environmental management are also available), with the necessary practical skills to design, conduct and develop research studies.

The course complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award). The course is therefore ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

A distinctive aspect of the course is that the strong focus on developing your research skills is combined with the opportunity to study one of the four pathway fields of education, human geography, international development, and planning and environmental management.

We believe that developing deeper and new understandings of your chosen field requires a thorough understanding of research methodology. Conversely, developing a deeper understanding of research methods is inextricably linked to the context in which research is conducted.

You will therefore study four mandatory research methods units and four units taken from the Education pathway - which will be a mix of mandatory and elective units.

You will study and learn alongside peers from the three other related fields - fields that share strong traditions of interdisciplinary and mixed methods approaches. The course will therefore allow you to develop interdisciplinary connections within SEED, and draw upon the significant expertise from our departments in Education, Geography, Global Development, and Planning and Environmental Management.

In addition, you will attend some of the introductory PhD research training lectures, which will be supported by seminars and tutorials. This will provide you with a taste of life as a PhD student.

Aims

  • Prepare you to evaluate, use and carry out research in a critical and self-critical manner.
  • Promote understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of different research approaches and of an applied social researcher.
  • Develop analytical skills appropriate to study at postgraduate level to enrich the academic community.
  • Enable you to develop a thorough understanding of the contextual and substantive issues in Education, and how this relates to knowledge production within Education.
  • Support the acquisition of cognitive, practical and transferable skills that are appropriate for postgraduate study and relevant to applied social research and practice in the UK and overseas.
  • Develop the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for employment as a researcher or as a practitioner researcher inEducation, or for progression to postgraduate research (PhD).

Coursework and assessment

You will conduct a small scale piece of empirical research of relevance within your pathway field and use this as the basis for your dissertation. The emphasis of the dissertation will be on the use of methodology in the context of:

  • tracing the application of certain methods to the investigation of particular issues
  • discussing how that methodology functioned in practice
  • research reflexivity.

You will be expected to report on the findings of the study, although the scale of the work will necessitate modest aims and outcomes, given that you will require space to provide in-depth methodological critique and potentially also methods development as an outcome of their study.

It will also be possible you to choose to undertake a literature-based dissertation, in which case there will be an expectation that a formal review methodology will be used to conduct the review.

The form the dissertation ultimately takes will reflect the particular study conducted, and its structure will be negotiated and agreed your supervisor. All dissertations undertaken will be required to contribute to meeting the ESRC's research training criteria.

Scholarships and bursaries

MSc Research Methods complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award). 

It is ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

It will also be of interest to people who are considering a career in research in one of the pathway fields.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

MSc Research Methods is ideal if you are considering PhD study and/or a career in research in education.



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MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher. Read more

MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher.

You will graduate from the course able to access the full range of research in relation to your chosen specialism of international development (pathways in education, human geography, and planning and environmental management are also available), with the necessary practical skills to design, conduct and develop research studies.

The course complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award). The course is therefore ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

A distinctive aspect of the course is that the strong focus on developing your research skills is combined with the opportunity to study one of the four pathway fields of education, human geography, international development, and planning and environmental management.

We believe that developing deeper and new understandings of your chosen field requires a thorough understanding of research methodology. Conversely, developing a deeper understanding of research methods is inextricably linked to the context in which research is conducted.

You will therefore study four mandatory research methods units and four units taken from the international development pathway - which will be a mix of mandatory and elective units.

You will study and learn alongside peers from the three other related fields - fields that share strong traditions of interdisciplinary and mixed methods approaches. The course will therefore allow you to develop interdisciplinary connections within SEED, and draw upon the significant expertise from our departments in Education, Geography, Global Development, and Planning and Environmental Management.

In addition, you will attend some of the introductory PhD research training lectures, which will be supported by seminars and tutorials. This will provide you with a taste of life as a PhD student.

Aims

  • Prepare you to evaluate, use and carry out research in a critical and self-critical manner.
  • Promote understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of different research approaches and of an applied social researcher.
  • Develop analytical skills appropriate to study at postgraduate level to enrich the academic community.
  • Enable you to develop a thorough understanding of the contextual and substantive issues in international development, and how this relates to knowledge production within international development.
  • Support the acquisition of cognitive, practical and transferable skills that are appropriate for postgraduate study and relevant to applied social research and practice in the UK and overseas.
  • Develop the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for employment as a researcher or as a practitioner researcher in international development, or for progression to postgraduate research (PhD).

Coursework and assessment

You will conduct a small scale piece of empirical research of relevance within your pathway field and use this as the basis for your dissertation. The emphasis of the dissertation will be on the use of methodology in the context of:

  • tracing the application of certain methods to the investigation of particular issues
  • discussing how that methodology functioned in practice
  • research reflexivity.

You will be expected to report on the findings of the study, although the scale of the work will necessitate modest aims and outcomes, given that you will require space to provide in-depth methodological critique and potentially also methods development as an outcome of their study.

It will also be possible you to choose to undertake a literature-based dissertation, in which case there will be an expectation that a formal review methodology will be used to conduct the review.

The form the dissertation ultimately takes will reflect the particular study conducted, and its structure will be negotiated and agreed your supervisor. All dissertations undertaken will be required to contribute to meeting the ESRC's research training criteria.

Scholarships and bursaries

MSc Research Methods complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award).

It is ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

It will also be of interest to people who are considering a career in research in one of the pathway fields.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

MSc Research Methods with International Development is ideal if you are considering PhD study and/or a career in research in international development.



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MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher. Read more

MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher.

You will graduate from the course able to access the full range of research in relation to your chosen specialism of planning and environmental management (pathways in education, human geography and international development are also available), with the necessary practical skills to design, conduct and develop research studies.

 The course complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award). The course is therefore ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

A distinctive aspect of the course is that the strong focus on developing your research skills is combined with the opportunity to study one of the four pathway fields of education, human geography, international development, and planning and environmental management.

We believe that developing deeper and new understandings of your chosen field requires a thorough understanding of research methodology. Conversely, developing a deeper understanding of research methods is inextricably linked to the context in which research is conducted.

You will therefore study four mandatory research methods units and four units taken from the planning and environmental management pathway - which will be a mix of mandatory and elective units.

You will study and learn alongside peers from the three other related fields - fields that share strong traditions of interdisciplinary and mixed methods approaches. The course will therefore allow you to develop interdisciplinary connections within SEED, and draw upon the significant expertise from our departments in Education, Geography, Global Development, and Planning and Environmental Management.

In addition, you will attend some of the introductory PhD research training lectures, which will be supported by seminars and tutorials. This will provide you with a taste of life as a PhD student.

Aims

  • Prepare you to evaluate, use and carry out research in a critical and self-critical manner.
  • Promote understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of different research approaches and of an applied social researcher.
  • Develop analytical skills appropriate to study at postgraduate level to enrich the academic community.
  • Enable you to develop a thorough understanding of the contextual and substantive issues in planning and environmental management, and how this relates to knowledge production within planning and environmental management.
  • Support the acquisition of cognitive, practical and transferable skills that are appropriate for postgraduate study and relevant to applied social research and practice in the UK and overseas.
  • Develop the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for employment as a researcher or as a practitioner researcher in planning and environmental management, or for progression to postgraduate research (PhD).

Coursework and assessment

You will conduct a small scale piece of empirical research of relevance within your pathway field and use this as the basis for your dissertation. The emphasis of the dissertation will be on the use of methodology in the context of:

  • tracing the application of certain methods to the investigation of particular issues
  • discussing how that methodology functioned in practice
  • research reflexivity.

You will be expected to report on the findings of the study, although the scale of the work will necessitate modest aims and outcomes, given that you will require space to provide in-depth methodological critique and potentially also methods development as an outcome of their study.

It will also be possible you to choose to undertake a literature-based dissertation, in which case there will be an expectation that a formal review methodology will be used to conduct the review.

The form the dissertation ultimately takes will reflect the particular study conducted, and its structure will be negotiated and agreed your supervisor. All dissertations undertaken will be required to contribute to meeting the ESRC's research training criteria.

Scholarships and bursaries

MSc Research Methods complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award).

It is ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

It will also be of interest to people who are considering a career in research in one of the pathway fields.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

MSc Research Methods with Planning and Environmental Management is ideal if you are considering PhD study and/or a career in research in planning and environmental management.



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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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What will I study?. Twelve compulsory research training sessions will cover aspects of research design, values in research, and research practicalities. Read more

What will I study?

Twelve compulsory research training sessions will cover aspects of research design, values in research, and research practicalities.

Alongside this, you will devise and complete a programme of related studies, tailored to your own learning and skills needs.

How will I study?

Research degrees are centred on independent study, allowing you a great deal of control over the pace and direction of your individual research project, with the expert guidance and support of your supervisor(s).

Research training takes place every Wednesday from October to December in the first year, and in the spring semester in subsequent years, and will equip you with the skills you will need to complete your PhD and prepare for a future research career.

How will I be assessed?

The first element of the PhD will be assessed through the production of a research proposal, a project management plan and a skills development portfolio. You will also undertake a viva voce examination.

Approximately halfway through your studies, your progress will be assessed through a second viva. Your final thesis will be assessed through a further viva.

Who will be teaching me?

Being a research degree, you will not be taught but your research project will be supervised by a team comprising experts from across the university who have international research profiles in their discipline.

The completion of your individual research project will be supported by regular supervision meetings with an expert in your chosen field of study.

What are my career prospects?

The skills and experience acquired through a PhD will provide ideal preparation for pursuing a research-based career.



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Course outline. We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Read more

Course outline

We currently offer the opportunity to gain a postgraduate degree by research at the level of MSc, MPhil or DPhil (PhD). Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis. The minimum periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

  • MSc – 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
  • PhD – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

The Psychology Department fosters a culture of collaborative, multidisciplinary research, and you will join a vibrant community that includes regular work-in-progress seminars to foster an active research environment. You will join one of our four research hubs described below, all of which are engaged in inter-institutional collaborations, including some with non-academic partners such as health-care providers and music conservatoires.

We are happy to consider research proposals on a wide range of topics relevant to our hubs, but may also be looking to fill specific research roles in some areas. Contact us below for more details.

Our Research Hubs

‘CREATE’ (Centre for Research into Expertise Acquisition, Training and Excellence)

The main focus of the centre is the exploration of the drivers of excellence in performance (whether cognitive, creative or practice-based). We welcome applications from potential MSc and DPhil candidates across a wide range of related topic areas, including:

  • Insight and creativity
  • The drivers of performance excellence and expertise development (e.g. in music, theatre, puzzle-solving, board-games and medicine)
  • Hobbies, motivations and characteristics of niche populations
  • Music psychology
  • Time perception and those with ‘natural’ time-keeping abilities

We have a number of external collaborative projects in the areas of creativity and performance, and also work with internal colleagues in Applied Computing and the University of Buckingham Medical School.

Centre for Health and Relationship Research (CHR)

The main aim of the hub is to study the impact of the interpersonal world and support structures on health and well-being in clinical and non-clinical settings. This overarching focus has led to the study of topic areas such as:

  • Prevalence, impact of and psychosocial challenges facing people following spinal cord injury
  • Biopsychosocial understanding of pain and developing interventions for successful pain management
  • Social norms as a predictor of health behaviours in young people
  • Social factors affecting uptake of health behaviours
  • The role of social support in living well with chronic conditions

Together, these projects represent a body of work which seeks to fight patient isolation and to understand health experiences in the context of a social world. The hub aims to identify methods for supporting patients as they live with long-term conditions, including through developing interventions, assessment techniques and knowledge dissemination. With connections and active research work taking part at four local NHS hospitals, we can offer excellent opportunities for research studies with tangible impact.

Cyber and Interpersonal Behaviour Research (CIBR)

The CIBR research hub in the Department of Psychology offers diverse research opportunities in the following areas:

  • Cyberpsychology, including cyberbullying and other online risks
  • Motivations and social effects of gaming
  • Cyber versus real world behaviour
  • Social inference and emotion regulation
  • Interpersonal relationships, including dating, rejection, relationship maintenance and break down
  • Mental resilience and its relationship to social support

The aim of the research in this area is to explore human behaviour, social experiences and group dynamics in both online and offline contexts.

Psychology of Educational Development (PED)

In this hub, we study the cognitive processes, behavioural issues and developmental factors that affect learning, and how learning environments and individual differences influence educational outcomes. With a focus on the resilience, creativity and happiness of learners, as well as on Specific Learning Difficulties which might impact upon academic performance, we welcome applicants to study a wide range of topics with us, including:

  • Children with Specific Learning Difficulties
  • Bullying and Cyberbullying in schools
  • Educating for Creativity
  • Children's understanding of Science
  • Excellence in Performance and Academic achievement
  • Resilience, Wellbeing and Positive education

For more information, and to apply online, visit us here: http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/sciences/msc/psychology

Or contact us by email below.

Visit the MSc / MPhil / DPhil Psychology page on the University of Buckingham website for more details!



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CentER's Research Master's program in Economics offers two years of graduate level coursework and research training in economics. Read more

Research Master in Economics

CentER's Research Master's program in Economics offers two years of graduate level coursework and research training in economics. It prepares you for PhD dissertation research. The program is intergrated with CentER's three-year PhD program to comprise the five-year Graduate Program in Economics.

The first year of the Research Master's program in Economics is fully devoted to rigorous training in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics. It equips you with a sound basis in economic and econometric theory and methods.

The second year of the Research Master's program in Economics is evenly split between specialized coursework and a first major research paper, the Research Master thesis. This year allows you to explore the many research areas available at CentER, to fully develop your research interests, and to match up with one or more advisers that share your interests.

Career Prospects Research Master in Economics

The Research Master's program in Economics is fully dedicated to preparing students for PhD thesis research at CentER. To this end, we limit the inflow to a small number of excellent students with a sincere interest in pursuing a PhD at CentER. We expect most of these students to successfully complete the Research Master in Economics and we expect that many of them will continue with PhD thesis research at CentER.

However, the graduates of the Research Master's program in Economics that do not continue with a PhD project, may also start a professional career, typically at government organizations (National Departments, Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, regional organizations) and in the consultancy or financial sector.

After completing the PhD, many students participate in CentER's academic job placement procedure and find jobs at universities, research institutes, and government institutions around the world, as well as at private companies.

In the PhD phase, most accepted PhD students become university employees earning a gross salary over more than Euro 85000 over three years and are granted pension rights.

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