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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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Summary. MSc Construction, Business and Leadership (with specialist management pathways) at Ulster University gives you the unique opportunity to master the twin tracks of managing the construction process and leading a business organisation. Read more

Summary

MSc Construction, Business and Leadership (with specialist management pathways) at Ulster University gives you the unique opportunity to master the twin tracks of managing the construction process and leading a business organisation.

Construction professionals must perform well as leaders and managers in all sectors of the industry. This programme provides a vehicle for you to further your construction knowledge as well as hone your management and leadership skills to enhance your ability to deliver both project and business objectives.

Construction firms and Consultants are increasingly seeking highly qualified employees who can respond to client demands in a diverse range of areas from seeking out commercial opportunities, managing and delivering the project to operation and maintenance of the built asset. This programme provides you with the opportunity to specialise in one of three management areas to meet your career objectives:

  • Specialist Option 1: Construction Project Management
  • Specialist Option 2: Commercial Management
  • Specialist Option 3: Built-Asset Management

The programme is suitable for both graduates and working professionals from a range of fields including architecture, building, engineering, quantity surveying, structural engineering, facilities maintenance and town planning, amongst others.

Given the increasing demand for suitably qualified and skilled professionals in the industry, career opportunities are extensive within the public, private and voluntary sectors and previous graduates have been successful at local, national and international levels.

Programme Objectives

For the award of Master of Science in Construction Business and Leadership (with specialist management pathways) you will have:

….GAINED a general understanding of the fundamental tenets of management through the study of core disciplines (organisation and management, business management and finance, leadership, procurement, legal studies) and an in-depth comprehension of your chosen specialist pathway;

….ACQUIRED the necessary skills to undertake both independent and peer group learning; in the case of the former this will demand to review literature, data collection and the integration of theory and practice necessary for managerial reports, academic assignments and student presentations; in the case of the latter this will require working as part of a group to undertake the same tasks and possible assessment by peers;

….DEVELOPED skills in communication, teamwork, problem-solving, organisation (time management and task management), personal (self-awareness and self-appraisal) skills and information technology which will allow you to engage in interactive learning and the dissemination of information based on the acquisition and application of knowledge in your specialist area;

….APPLIED and integrated your knowledge of the core disciplines and option choices to a better understanding of the issues arising in the construction sector generally and in the sector or service in which they are employed. Specifically, this will involve you developing new theoretical and empirical perspectives and “testing” ideas for validity and robustness of peers and module tutors;

….CRITICALLY REFLECTED on existing management practice and suggest change in your areas of expertise; real-life topical managerial problems will provide the substance for case-study material in which analytical and conceptual skills acquired during the course will be utilised to improve practice.

Attendance

The course is offered in both full-time and part-time mode in block learning format and

each has a specific attendance pattern:

  • MSc Full-time – 1 calendar year
  • MSc Part-time – 3 years
  • PG Dip Full-time – 2 semesters
  • PG Dip Part-time – 2 years

The full-time mode requires all modules to be taken within one academic year (50 weeks) including the dissertation which is taken in Semester 3 (between May and September). In full-time block mode students attend 4 blocks of 5 consecutive days at approx. 3 week intervals across semesters 1 and 2 with attendance required for oral presentations and/or coursework submissions during the examinations period between semesters.

The periods between blocks are used to undertake assignments and coursework during which the student is encouraged to maintain contact with the Module Coordinator and classmates via on-line discussion forums such as Blackboard Collaborate.

Professional Accreditation

Your course is professionally accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

In addition, the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), Association for Project Management (APM), the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), and Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineering (CIBSE) have considered the award to be of significant assistance for individuals in gaining professional qualifications on a case by case basis.

Career options

Students who successfully complete this demanding programme will enhance their business leadership and management skills and competencies, and in doing so, will offer employers what they, and their clients, require.

Whilst most of our postgraduates find employment at local and national levels (Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland), increasingly opportunities are arising with international construction, consulting and client organisations.

Alumini of the programme are working as far afield as Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, China, Australia, New Zealand, Butan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, the Caribbean, Mexico, Guatemala, Venezuela, Peru, Israel, Jordan, Qatar, Bahrain, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Nigeria, Botswana, Kenya, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Poland, Estonia, Azerbaijan, Canada and the United States of America.

Others have opted to pursue a research path and have successfully obtained doctorates before embarking on an academic career.



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Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

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The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young. Read more

About the course

The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young.

Its key organising principle is that understanding children requires the study of how their relations with others - peers, older and younger children, parents, teachers and other adults - inform their practices, identities and world views.

This course addresses the following issues from an anthropological perspective:
Do children of ‘different cultures’ live ‘different worlds’?
How does education impact upon children’s worlds and upon social and cultural practices more broadly?
How do everyday processes of learning – both formal and informal - help to shape children’s ideas of and engagement with society at large?
What is the role of schools in the transmission and acquisition of cultural values to children and youth?
And why are adults’ ideas about childhood and youth so important for what children learn and aspire to become?

The distinctiveness of this degree derives from an anthropological approach that focuses on the importance of children’s and youth’s perspectives, and on the role that education (formal and informal) plays in children’s learning processes and in the transmission and acquisition of cultural knowledge.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

Through an examination of ethnographic cases from around the world (including the UK), you will learn about the different ways in which childhood and youth are understood and conceptualised.

You will explore the different educational forms and processes through which cultural knowledge is transmitted and acquired, and how culture impacts upon these processes.

Course Content

The course is designed to show postgraduate students how anthropological approaches can be used to gain access to and understand children and young people's lived experience, their ideas about the world and themselves, and their relations with peers and adults. In so doing, it aims to provide a rigorous grounding in key anthropological ideas and research methods and to show how a comparative social analysis illuminates our understanding of ourselves and other people.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation*
Foundation Disciplines of Education*
Literature Policy and Analysis*
International Development, Children and Youth

Part-time

Year 1 compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning

Year 2 compulsory modules:

Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Special Features

Our course team has worked in countries across the globe including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

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Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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The Social Anthropology MRes is a taught postgraduate degree that provides high quality training in anthropology and anthropological research. Read more

About the course

The Social Anthropology MRes is a taught postgraduate degree that provides high quality training in anthropology and anthropological research.

The course is of particular relevance for those who wish to use such training as a foundation for PhD study or who are keen to enhance their careers through the acquisition of advanced knowledge and research skills. Accordingly, the MRes can be completed as a qualification in itself, or as the first stage in a four-year PhD programme.

For students with no previous anthropological training, it can also act as a conversion course to anthropology.

A unique feature of this programme is that students can design, in collaboration with academic staff, Guided Study Modules to focus on their particular areas of research interest.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The MRes/MPhil/PhD programme marries the best aspects of the traditional apprenticeship system of anthropology - students work with a leading anthropologist in their geographical area of interest and undertake a formal training programme concerned with developing broader anthropological skills in the context of social science as a whole.

Our students have been or are being funded by the British Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, the Commonwealth Scholarship Scheme, the World Health Organization, national and local governments as well as NGOs.

Course Content

The MRes consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Social Anthropology Research

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Anthropology of International Development
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology
The Anthropology of Childhood
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Guided Study Module
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Option modules

Year 2

Compulsory modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essays, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based on fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

Our course team has worked in countries across the globe including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a final dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

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The Master of Environment and Management (MEM) program is a graduate degree of interdisciplinary study in either the Master of Arts (MA) or Master of Science (MSc) designed to enhance strategic decision making in the environmental field. Read more
The Master of Environment and Management (MEM) program is a graduate degree of interdisciplinary study in either the Master of Arts (MA) or Master of Science (MSc) designed to enhance strategic decision making in the environmental field. The program emphasizes teamwork and focuses on technical, policy, and system and sustainability issues to prepare students to become environmental professionals who are effective leaders and managers. This is a two year program made up of 3 three-week on-campus residencies (mandatory) combined with online learning.

The MA/MSc in Environment and Management program helps students to:
-Assess the environmental, social, cultural, political, legal, and economic elements of enhancing and sustaining environmental health and ecosystem well-being
-Develop and evaluate goals, objectives and strategies for leadership and management of environmental issues through a range of perspectives
-Identify and use appropriate research, assessment and reporting methods for the investigation and analysis of environmental issues, problems, and projects
-Present a systems perspective on the implications of scale for options, actions and decisions respecting environmental sustainability, facilitate the learning and decision-making ability of others, and develop and model personal and team visions
-Prepare, communicate and implement action plans for environmental change

Who It’s For

Those from all levels of government, business, industry, consulting and non-governmental organizations who want to gain skills and credentials as leaders and managers to advance their current career or launch a new one. Students will pursue either a Master of Arts or Master of Science based on individual academic history and work experience.

Participants in the Master of Arts/Master of Science in Environment and Management (MEM) program come from as far north as Iqaluit in the Canadian Arctic, as far south as Peru and as far east as Indonesia and China. Most participants are employed in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors, and represent a broad cross-section of the environmental sector.

Delivery Model

The Master of Arts/Master of Science in Environment and Management program consists of ten courses (seven on campus and three distance online through Internet technologies) and completion of a graduate thesis.

Distance courses are delivered through the innovative use of web-based technologies. Participants will draw upon web resources as well as more traditional print media, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to work towards the electronic submission of assignments.

Normally, students will take one distance course at a time, for a period of 10 - 12 weeks. Each distance course will require an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Students should expect to work hard during the residency period. The typical classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Homework, readings, and team meetings are done outside of these hours. There will be some activities in the evenings, as well as during the typical workday. In addition to the educational activities there are planned recreational events.

In general, the student will have secured the necessary approvals to enter the program from their employer. In most cases the employer will, therefore, be the sponsor and will provide the student with the support and mentorship necessary to complete the program. In some cases, the sponsor may not be the employer of a student, but may be an organization interested in supporting the direction and receiving the results of the thesis.

There are many variations of the sponsor-student relationship, and this can be discussed with the Program Academic Lead to find a mutually-supported solution. The sponsor should be prepared to take "ownership" of the graduate's thesis project as a credible and defensible work which will clearly reflect the student’s own values, concepts and creativity, and which will have been subject to peer review.

The thesis topic should be of specific interest to the sponsor and in general, to qualify as suitable thesis project material, the topic must fall clearly into categories such as: a scientific study of a particular environmental issue or procedure; a detailed and scientifically-based case study of the environmental issues central to a particular area or resource industry; or, an evaluation of the social, political, economic, or legal implications of particular environmental policies, regulations, and practices.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-Normally, six years of relevant work experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience.
-All flexible admission applicants will normally be required to take "Academic Writing and Critical Thinking" and obtain a minimum final grade of B (73%).

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This program will prepare you for the most demanding jobs in banking, consulting, and asset management. Program description. The complex financial times we live in demand greater modelling techniques and a deeper understanding of financial data. Read more

This program will prepare you for the most demanding jobs in banking, consulting, and asset management.

Program description

The complex financial times we live in demand greater modelling techniques and a deeper understanding of financial data. The Master in Finance at the Barcelona GSE is designed to meet these challenges, as it is a comprehensive program that covers all the important areas of finance and prepares you for the most demanding jobs in banking, consulting and asset management.

This program is unique because it offers better training on quantitative topics than most masters in finance, and has a broader focus than the typical master in quantitative finance.

Our graduates excel in the ability to design and implement complex financial models; understand the theory and bring it to the data. They outclass their peers with a more qualitative background (like an MBA), because they can work in a wider range of positions (risk management, derivatives trading, venture capital, wealth management, etc.). At the same time, our graduates are more versatile than students with a pure quantitative background, because they can reach beyond purely technical jobs.

The program offers interactive classes, intensive use of advanced statistical and mathematical software, in-depth case studies, presentations by finance professionals, and the support of an experienced team of career services officers.

A key advantage of our Master in Finance is that students can benefit from GSE top faculty teaching in a wide range of courses in their field of expertise. In particular, students with an interest in quantitative techniques can take electives in advanced econometric methods, optimization techniques, advanced programming, and machine learning, while students who are interested in economics topics can choose among the advanced economics courses in macroeconomics, monetary policy and exchange rates.

Degree

Upon successful completion of the program, students will receive a Master Degree in Economics and Finance awarded jointly with the Universitat Pompeu Fabra. The degree requires the successful completion of 60 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) credits of graduate courses (6 credits are equivalent to a 40 hour course), some compulsory and some elective. The students' final program must be discussed with and approved by the Master Director.

Who hires Finance Graduates?

  • Consulting
  • Financial Services
  • Research and Academic Institutions
  • Government and Authorities
  • Other Industries

Examples of recent Finance placements:

  • Accenture - Junior Consultant Finance and Risk Management (Brussels, Belgium)
  • Bain & Company - Associate Consultant (Johannesburg, South Africa)
  • Blackrock - Analyst (Edinburgh, UK)
  • Central Bank of Peru - Senior Investment Strategist (Lima)
  • Central Bank of Uruguay - Risk Analyst (Montevideo)
  • European Central Bank (ECB) - Financial Stability Expert (Frankfurt, Germany)
  • GCV Gaesco - Graduate Quantitative Analyst (Madrid, Spain)
  • KPMG - Junior Analyst Transfer Pricing (Barcelona)
  • Palladio Finanziaria S.P.A - M&A Intern-Investment banking (Milan, Italy)


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Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. Read more

About the course

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars.

On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline.

The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It is suited for those interested in critically assessing the policies and practices of international development and humanitarian assistance to war-affected regions from an anthropological perspective.

It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development).

It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

You will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Anthropology of International Development
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Optional

Dept. of Social Sciences, Media and Communications (Anthropology)
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Dept of Politics, History and Law
Globalisation
Dept of Clinical Sciences
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Young Lives in the Global South
International Development, Children and Youth
Brunel Law School
Minority and Indigenous Rights
The United Nations Human Rights Regime
Theory and Practice of Human Rights
The Migrant, the State and the Law
Brunel Business School
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Anthropology of International Development
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Year 2

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Special Features

While its approach is anthropological, this degree offers genuine multi-disciplinary possibilities by drawing on modules from Politics, Health Sciences, Law and Business.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the multiplicity of issues arising from critical shifts in global policy across the following key themes:

The ways in which economic anthropologists have enhanced our understandings of livelihoods in ways that are dramatically different to dominant approaches in economics.
The hazards and limitations of relying solely upon biomedical interventions to alleviate suffering and sickness.
The ostensibly positive relationship between education and development, and the role of education as a vehicle for eradicating illiteracy and lowering fertility and mortality rates.

An exploration of such themes together will make it possible for students to think and engage in new and critical ways about the relationship between anthropology and development.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay and practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise). A final dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based on fieldwork in the UK or abroad, is also required. There are no examinations.

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The Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program will prepare you to teach students in the United States and throughout in the world. Read more
The Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program will prepare you to teach students in the United States and throughout in the world. A campus-wide focus on cultural diversity will introduce you to a community of learners in a local context. You will learn the intricacies of linguistics and teaching from specialists who have lived, worked and taught throughout the world. You will have the opportunity to put your skills to work in an assistantship at St. Cloud State's English as a Second Language Program or the Intensive English Center, a program that trains more than 100 English language learners from more than 15 countries each year. These two centers offer 50 assistantships each year.

Program Highlights

Courses available in the on campus and online.
The licensure program is available on campus or online.
22 percent students are from diverse U.S. backgrounds and 28 percent are international students.
Graduates receive professional credentials.
The on-campus program can be taken in conjunction with a K-12 ESL licensure for the state of Minnesota.
50 graduate assistantships available for qualified applicants.
The federally-sponsored TEACH Grant program offers up to $4,000 per year for students seeking K-12 ESL licensure​.
1+1 options offered in conjunction with partner institutions in Germany, Peru and Korea.

Program Distinctions

​Graduates have gone on to teach throughout the United States and 19 other countries.
​The program's nine faculty hold the highest degrees in their fields and have a combined 100 years of teaching experience.
More than 300 students have completed the program.
10 percent of graduates continue on for doctoral studies.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/construction-project-management/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

- Students are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.

- There are four intensive study periods during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers. Whether you have a degree in a construction related discipline such as Civil Engineering or Architecture, or have a strong background working in construction, if you want to be a Construction Project Manager this is the course for you.

- Our graduates have an exemplary employment record and now span the globe, working in countries including India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, Middle East and China.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

- Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

Careers

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector. Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module
Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. Read more
The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. NRI has a rapidly growing programme of research at MPhil and PhD level on social-scientific and interdisciplinary topics relating to development in the South and in Europe. The institute provides a vibrant research environment for MPhil and PhD students in development studies with students from a number of countries and a variety of backgrounds in research, government and non-governmental organisations. Students are also actively encouraged to network with peers from other universities in the UK.

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on a number of themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Particular interests include participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation, agricultural service delivery, performance and impact assessment methodologies, community based natural resource management, land tenure, urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages, pastoralism, vulnerability to disasters and climate change. The Food and Markets Department works on many economics-based development issues. Important themes include the performance of agricultural markets, value chains, international standards and agricultural trade, micro-finance, enterprise development and poverty reduction, ethical trade and corporate social responsibility.

We welcome applications from potential students from either a social or natural scientific background. We can offer full-time or part-time registration, with students based on our campus in Medway or in their home countries, or some combination of the two.

Recent research project topics include:

- Forbidden (Sacred) Lakes and Conservation: The Role of Indigenous Beliefs in the Management of Wetland Resources in the Niger Delta, Nigeria

- Farmer organisations and their impacts for pro-poor growth among smallholder farmers in Malawi

- Understanding the influence of livelihood features on cassava value chains

- Rural territorial dynamics in North East Brazil: the Jiquiriçá Valley in Bahia

- Pro-poor market-based approaches for economic recovery in post-conflict countries: the case of Liberia

- Cross-borrowing and its impact on microentrepreneurs' repayment performance and well-being in Peru.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/devstudies

What you'll study

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Career options

Postgraduate research students from NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of built environment professionals.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme (15 months if starting in January), and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (27 Months if starting in January) and is extendable up to a maximum of 5 years.

Why choose this course?

Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme. Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers - and our graduates go on to further their careers locally, nationally and globally. Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

This course in detail

There are two modes of delivery for the MSc CPM: full time on campus or distance learning, and there are two entry points - September or January.

Extensive online learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site to which students have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, email, telephone and Skype.

Intensive Study Periods - all students attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections within the industry and the open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff.

The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are some of the major features.

Applied or Problem Based Learning - We have responded to requests from industry to make our postgraduate education more practical by using an ‘applied’ approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations.

As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach.

Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern.

For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Careers and professional development

All of our distance learning students are employed full time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many graduates are employed globally - including in India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, the Middle East and China.

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Increase your expertise and make a positive contribution to development practice around the world. Examine the theories and practices associated with inequalities in world development, and investigate the enormous differences between the living standards of people worldwide and what we can do about them. Read more

Increase your expertise and make a positive contribution to development practice around the world. Examine the theories and practices associated with inequalities in world development, and investigate the enormous differences between the living standards of people worldwide and what we can do about them.

Look at the relationships between people and institutions, developed and developing societies, and consider the effect these relationships have on the processes of social, political, economic and environmental transformation.

Postgraduate Development Studies is designed to suit people from a wide range of disciplines and occupations. If you have work experience in community and international development, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region, or want to work in the area in the future, postgraduate Development Studies is a good choice for you.

Overseas research opportunities

You'll be encouraged to spend some time in a developing country as part of your postgraduate study—you can complete your Master's thesis based on your work in a developing country.

Past research has been done in countries such as Cambodia, Chile, the Cook Islands, Indonesia, Laos, Peru, the Philippines, Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu.

Current issues and possible research areas in Development Studies include:

  • environmental change
  • gender equity
  • globalisation
  • human rights
  • inequality
  • international aid
  • participation and democracy
  • poverty.

You'll be part of an active and dynamic culture of world-class research. Work with experienced staff who are internationally renowned in their fields. Choose an area of research that interests you.

Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies

If you're wanting to study without doing a thesis, you can enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies (PGDipDevStud).

It's a great option if you're already in the workforce and are looking to update or build your skills, or if you're a recent graduate wanting to expand on your undergraduate degree.

Duration

The Master of Development Studies can be completed in two years of full-time study or in four years if you are studying part time.

The Postgraduate Diploma will take you one year of full-time study or two years part time.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

How you'll study

You should plan your course of study with the programme coordinator before you enrol.

Master's programme

The first year of the Master of Development Studies consists of four core courses. You'll look at the theories of development, professional practice and technique, and the concepts and tools of development policy.

Development Research (DEVE 514) will prepare you for your thesis. You'll cover research methodology for development fieldwork and put together a full research proposal for your thesis, which you'll submit at the end of the course.

You'll also do a further 60 points of approved 400- and 500-level courses. You'll need to work towards an average of B+ grades in your first year.

In your second year you'll research and write your thesis. Your thesis has a maximum of 40,000 words which is around 120—150 pages.

Diploma programme

The PGDipDevStud follows the same requirements as the first year of the Master's—five core courses and a further 60 points of approved 400- and 500-level courses.

With permission from the programme coordinator, you may be able to replace DEVE 514 with another approved course.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.



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The international master on “Control for Green Mechatronics” (GREEM), within the “Robotics and Control” mention of the French Ministry of Education, promotes a high-quality educational offer in the area of design and control of mechatronic systems with a particular focus on two points. Read more

The international master on “Control for Green Mechatronics” (GREEM), within the “Robotics and Control” mention of the French Ministry of Education, promotes a high-quality educational offer in the area of design and control of mechatronic systems with a particular focus on two points: their functional performances and their energetic efficiency. The consideration of the energy efficiency makes the GREEM international master very singular and very innovative and makes it answer a real actual societal matter which is the effect of technological devices to the ecology. After graduation, the students will have mastered the area of green mechatronics where they will be able to design new or re-design existing mechatronic systems, to model and simulate them, to calculate controllers for their automation and their performances improvement, and to setup networks of mechatronic systems, all together with consideration of the energy efficiency. Furthermore, international experience possibility is offered to the students: exchanges with partner universities at the international level are possible with eventual dual-degree, internships at the international level are encouraged, a great part of the courses are given in English, and French language and culture courses are given for non-francophone students. 

Program structure

The master program lasts two years and includes a total of 120 ECTS. The two years are split into four semesters (S7, S8, S9 and S10) which include several features such as: two industrial certifications (Schneider and Siemens), in excess of 50% of the courses given in English, French course offered to non-francophone students, 3-days labs in another city (in Poligny which is a small and original city of the Jura department where winery is also well known), seminars by researchers, research labs visiting, students project in robotics for national competition, possibility of international exchange ...

The global content is given below.

Master-1:

S7 semester (30 ECTS):

  • Digital signals, systems and control
  • Micromechatronics
  • Technologies in control
  • Systems engineering
  • Modeling of mechatronic systems
  • Siemens certification

S8 semester (30 ECTS):

  • Robotics
  • Industrial computing
  • Linear multivariable control
  • Methodologies tools
  • Optimization
  • French or foreigner languages
  • Energy microtransduction
  • Schneider certification

Master-2:

S9 semester (30 ECTS):

  • Numerical computation and simulation
  • Multiphysic microsystems and applications (biomed and accoustic)
  • Nonlinear and robust control
  • Energy based modeling and control
  • 3D design and manufacturing of mechatronic systems
  • Mechatronic systems network energy management

S10 semester (30 ECTS):

  • Microrobotics
  • Energy harvesting in mechatronic systems
  • INTERNSHIP (21 ECTS)

The master is also supported by the internationally renown research center FEMTO-ST (http://femto-st.fr/).

International partners and dual-degrees

Exchanges with international universities (Canada, Mexico, Peru, Qatar...) are possible during the curriculum. Dual-degree of Master is possible with some of the partner universities. 

After the GREEM master program

The career prospects of the students are very high because mechatronic systems are found and increasingly developed in a very wide range of applications. The fact that today’s problematic, like energy consumption in technological devices, is particularly tackled in this master will make the graduated students very attractive to industry at the international level. Furthermore, high skills and specialized students will have been educated making them the best candidates for research and PhD programs in the fields of mechatronics at large, of control, of robotics...

Site of training

The site of training is Besançon, a French old city that combines old stones buildings, French culture, various activities from sports to cultural, and students life. Approximately 10% of the population are students or interns in Besançon city and in its agglomeration. The center of applied languages (CLA, http://cla.univ-fcomte.fr/) which is a part of the university (UFC/UBFC) is one of the most important center for learning languages in France and hosts approximately 4000 interns per year coming from various countries for some days or for several months. Public transportation is very practical and the old-city is doable by walks.

Entry requirements (Students profiles)

The applicant should have a level of English and a background on “control systems” following the UFC/UBFC criterias. Additionally to these, the motivations and the professional project of the applicant are also examined carefully.

Several applications are possible.

- Entering directly in Master-1 at the UBFC: application is made through eCandidat (https://scolarite.univ-fcomte.fr/ecandidat/).

- Entering in Master-2: this is possible for those who have at least the level of Master-1 and who have very good tracks in the required background.

- Entering through a partner university: students from one of the partner universities who would like to enroll the GREEM master within a dual-degree track can be informed by the contact person at these universities.

For particular cases or for more information about the application, feel free to contact us, (Micky Rakotondrabe). 

Scholarships

Every year, a very limited number of UBFC scholarships could be offered on the basis of tracks and academic records. Application to such scholarships must be done no latter than the beginning of Master-1.



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