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Masters Degrees (Persuasive Communication)

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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more
The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

- The Research Master's program in Language and Communication is a two-year course of study offered jointly by Radboud University Nijmegen and Tilburg University. Both universities combine leading-edge research with excellent education. This program, with its strong emphasis on empirical study, is unique in the Netherlands.
- In this programme, students explore language and communication as an integrated whole. Communication in face-to-face and multi-modal interactions at work is a central theme. Other topics include understanding how the use of language shapes institutional, cross-cultural, and international interaction.
- The current partnership between the Faculties of Arts at Nijmegen and Tilburg intensifies fifteen years of collaboration in the Centre for Language Studies (CLS), which is closely linked to the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Baby Research Centre. Students can profit from these partnerships with state-of-the-art education and individual research opportunities.

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

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In the Master's degree in Communication and Information Science, you can choose between different programmes that focus on communication. Read more
In the Master's degree in Communication and Information Science, you can choose between different programmes that focus on communication:

* Information Science (English taught)
This programme is completely in English and focuses on the theory and the research of language, text and digital communication. Issues are eg. natural language processing, semantic web and digital communication.

* Digital Humanities (English taught)
The brand new master's track in Digital Humanities (start Sept 2016) equips you to look at culture, language and history through the lens of digital methods. It offers a systematic way to incorporate information technology in humanities research.

* Communication Studies (Dutch taught)
In this programme, the focus is on the form, function and effects of language and language use in communicative situations. In addition, discourse-analysis in the field of organisational, media, computer, persuasive and health communication will be discussed.

* Computer Communication (Dutch taught)
The programme Computer Communication focuses on the interaction between man and computer. In addition, the interaction between people themselves will be discussed, as well as the communication between people and organizations that goes via the computer.

* Communication and Education (Dutch taught)
In this programme you study the theory and practice of the development, education and training of language and communication skills of children, adolescents and adults. You will also learn about the research into, design of and professional skills for education and training.

Job perspectives

The Master's degree in Communication and Information Science prepares you for positions in research, education, training and consultancy.

Job examples

- Communications Advisor
- Communications Manager
- Communications Officer
- Journalist
- Marketing Manager
- Media Advisor
- Editor
- PR Officer
- Web Coordinator

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Business and public organisations operate today in a context marked by constant technological evolution, rapid social changes and increasing political and economic instability. Read more
Business and public organisations operate today in a context marked by constant technological evolution, rapid social changes and increasing political and economic instability. In such a dynamic and uncertain environment, communicating strategically becomes vital to the pursuit of an organisation’s mission and key goals, from the aim of promoting products and services to the need to respond to a crisis.

The MSc in Strategic Communication offers a cross-disciplinary education to current or aspiring communication professionals and leaders who wish to learn how to design, plan and implement effective and sound communication policies that promote the strategic goals of their organisation.

The programme combines a range of disciplines and perspectives to develop the conceptual and practical skills which are crucial for successful strategic communication. You will learn how to translate organisational goals into communication objectives, to analyse situations by identifying the relevant stakeholder groups, as well as regulatory constraints and ethical issues; to design spoken and written messages that are at the same time sound, persuasive and compliant; to exploit the potential offered by established communication technologies and new digital media to effectively engage targeted audiences.

Besides classroom modules, a dedicated seminar involving communication experts (‘Public relations and Investor Relations in practice’) will give you the unique opportunity to familiarize with the relevant professional contexts and to closely interact with specialists in the sectors. Through the final project, you will engage yourselves with an in-depth analysis of a case-study in strategic communication.

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A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence. Read more
A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence.

Course overview

English MA combines the study of literatures, linguistics, critical theory and creative writing. The course is incredibly flexible and you can pursue your personal goals for intellectual enquiry and literary exploration, with inspiration and encouragement from our widely-published lecturers.

There is a very clear link between teaching and research on the degree with all the modules above drawing on publications by the module leaders (all of whom were recognised as ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘Internationally Recognised’ in the recent REF).

You will first undertake an innovative introductory module called ‘Approaching Literature’ which allows you to study applied literary, critical and linguistic theory as a basis to your whole degree. There is then a wide choice of modules based on the research specialisms of the staff including: 'Gothic', 'Late Victorian Gothic', 'Writing the Borders', ‘Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’, 'Early Humans in Fiction', ‘Irish Literature 1790 to 1831’, ‘Critical Theory and Creative Writing’ and 'Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’.

You will negotiate the topic of your Masters dissertation to reflect your personal interests. We like to push boundaries and develop modules that combine our research expertise with an awareness of your future career prospects.

The market for places on postgraduate teaching qualifications is becoming increasingly competitive. Many of our students enrol on the MA to improve their subject specialism, thereby giving them a greater chance of success at securing a place on one of these courses. With this in mind, we are attentive to developments in the GSCE and A Level curriculums, in order that our students have relevant, research led subject knowledge to bring to bear on applications.

Through the channels of Spectral Visions Press students are invited to submit their work for publication. If selected original work will be published in one of our professionally assembled annual anthologies the last two of which are currently available on Amazon. Furthermore, many of our students have written articles, reviews and interviews for organisations such as the International Gothic Association; An International Community of Gothic Scholars; and other scholarly networks such as the Open Graves; Open Minds project, Sibeal, and Feminist Studies. These networking opportunities give our students valuable access to the wider academic community, and aid in employment and progression opportunities.

Your training in research skills, together with Masters-level critical thinking, will be transferable to many different types of employment.

We also offer a part-time English MA of this course, which may suit you if you want to combine studying for a Masters degree with other commitments. For more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/english-part-time/

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and supportive supervision. At MA level, responsibility for learning lies as much with you as with your tutor. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Approaching Literature (30 Credits)

Choose three optional modules from a list that may include the following modules
-Gothic (30 Credits)
-The 1790s (30 Credits)
-Late Victorian Gothic (30 Credits)
-‘What Ish My Nation?’: Postcolonial Irish Literatures (30 Credits)
-Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions (30 Credits)
-Reading ‘Ulysses’ (30 Credits)
-The Global City: Modern to Postmodern (30 Credits)
-Orientalism: Representations of the East in Western Travel Literature and Arab and Iranian Novels (30 Credits)
-‘Strange Country’: Irish Literature 1790 to 1831 (30 Credits)
-Critical Theory and Creative Writing (30 Credits)
-Early Humans in Fiction (30 Credits)
-Reading the Anglo-Scots Borders (30 Credits)
-Reading and Writing the Fantastic, the Marvellous and the Gothic (30 Credits)
-Irish Literature and the Supernatural (30 Credits)

Plus the compulsory dissertation
-Dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with your supervisor (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include seminars and discussion groups. We often have visiting speakers and a range of research seminars to enhance your learning opportunities. This includes our widely acclaimed Spectral Visions event, held annually at the University.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include mainly essays. Some options require oral presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to English and literature, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Project Muse, which provides over 180 full-text humanities and social sciences journals

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of occupations because it sharpens your skills of analysis and persuasive communication. At the same time it advances your intellectual development. A Masters degree in English is a qualification that is well-recognised by employers across all sectors. Past graduates have gained employment in areas such as:
-Teaching
-Media and journalism
-Civil Service
-Publishing
-Communications
-Freelance writing
-Arts and creative industries

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Confidence and competence are two essential skills required to effectively manage and lead within the current global economy. Read more
Confidence and competence are two essential skills required to effectively manage and lead within the current global economy. A Master of Global Management (MGM) degree from Royal Roads University is a generalist program designed to develop these skills, and more, to ensure you are ready to .manage across borders and bridge across cultures.

The Master of Global Management is an international business management degree designed specifically for professionals who want to perform with sensitivity and agility in the global workplace. We offer a practical program that provides employability training while creating connections with professionals from around the world. Graduates of this program are fully skilled, work-ready managers and leaders with a global perspective and cultural awareness and an understanding of the ways in which disciplines like accounting and law vary across global markets.

In the MGM program, you will be given the choice of completing the program through four applied completion options: either the Global Management Project, the Internship Research Project, the Graduate Certificate in Project Management, or a unique Dual Degree with the Management Center Innsbruck (MCI) in Austria that allows you to obtain a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) International Business degree in addition to your MGM degree through blended learning. All four options emphasize “experiential learning” – the application of business knowledge to real-word situations. You will develop a broad range of international business skills while learning to work effectively with individuals from other cultures, regions, and ideologies. The applied completion options require you to utilize all the learning and knowledge attainted throughout the program and this will leave you with an intelligent and informed perspective about the world of business. The MGM is designed to be completed full-time on campus or through our blended learning program of online study and in-person residencies. The on-campus track can be completed in 12 or 18 months, and the blended learning path is designed for working students, and is completed in 19 months with a three-week residency in Victoria and a two-week residency on location in Asia. The MGM-MBA International Business Dual Degree option can be completed in 24 months, and includes a three-week residency in Victoria and one week in Innsbruck, Austria.

Who It's For

This masters' program is designed as a launch platform for a globally oriented career. Graduates will be prepared to excel as:
-An entry level position with a transnational corporation
-An effective manager in a multi-cultural environment
-A globally aware professional in a public or private organization
-A director of international marketing or international business development for a small or medium enterprise
-An entrepreneur with the ability to identify an international business opportunity, develop an international business plan, secure funding, and launch an international new venture
-A social entrepreneur starting their own NGO or serving as a program officer offshore

Outcomes

The Master of Global Management degree uses a holistic and integrative approach to deliver academic content and soft skills, such as self-awareness, problem solving, teamwork, and collaboration. At the end of your program, you’ll have hands-on experience with the graduate-level business skills and industry-recognized competencies required for success in today’s international business market.

Academic assessment in the Master of Global Management program focuses on international business skill and competency development. In addition to practical experience with the essential business skills needed to succeed in today's global market, you’ll learn and practice negotiation, risk assessment, persuasive communication, critical thinking, problem solving, active listening, effective rational and ethical decision-making, and much more - all through an international business lens.

The MGM program outcomes are informed by industry experts and are the basis for the design of each course and are used to assess your learning:
-Communicate Effectively – communicate effectively through writing, speaking, presenting, interviewing and using computer-based media.
-Think Critically – use a broad range of research methods and conceptual models to make judgments and draw conclusions.
-Solve Problems – use a range of processes, models and approaches (quantitative and qualitative) to make deductions, and to identify sound potential solutions, goals and actions.
-Work with Others - respect cultural diversity, share knowledge, work as members of a team and lead a team.
Innovation - recognize the need for innovation, initiate the process of generating innovation, assess the value of proposed ideas and solutions and implement innovations in an organization.
-Think Globally - recognize and respect cultural differences, learn from outside their own culture and predict how their actions will interact with the environment in which their organizations operate.

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This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. Read more
This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. The programme offers preparation not only for advanced research at PhD level but also for a wide range of other careers in which oral and written communication are important, such as the media, the legal profession, politics and public relations.

It is taught by members of the Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric in the Royal Holloway Classics Department, where there is a strong concentration of expertise in classical rhetoric and oratory. It offers opportunities for collaborative work with other RHUL departments. The programme includes a core course on Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric, incorporating training in a range of analytical and scholarly research skills. A wide range of optional courses is available (including courses offered by other London institutions) and there are opportunities to pursue independent projects in any aspect of ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric, either as a self-contained package (for the PGCert and PGDip) or as a preparation for embarking on a substantial piece of research work for the MRes dissertation. The MRes can be taken as a self-standing qualification or as a preparation for a PhD, while the programme as a whole offers valuable transferable skills for non-academic careers and for continuous professional development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/mresrhetoric.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The only course of its kind in a major UK university

- Combination of analytical and historical perspective

- Enhances ability to construct and present persuasive argumentation, as well as analysing and evaluating that presented by others

- Wide choice of taught courses, independent projects and dissertation topics

- Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric – a concentration of scholarly expertise and a magnet for visiting experts from abroad

- Access to world-class research resources in Classics and related disciplines in and around London

Course content and structure

The course contains five elements with credit values as shown below.

1. Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric (core course incorporating research methods: 40 credits)

2. EITHER: Oratory and Identity (40 credits) OR: An optional course or courses to the value of 40 credits to be chosen from a list of courses offered by the Department, or by another department at Royal Holloway, or by other London institutions as part of the Intercollegiate MA programmes in Classics, Ancient History, or Late Antique and Byzantine Studies.

3. Independent Project 1 (20 credits): e.g. a ‘pilot’ study of an area to be covered in more detail in the dissertation, a critical survey of scholarly literature on a relevant topic, a rhetorical analysis of a text, or a comparative rhetorical study of texts from different traditions, cultures or periods.

4 . Independent Project 2 (20 credits): similar in scope to Project 1 but may also be a more creative type of project, e.g. a piece of original rhetorical composition, a reconstrution of the performance of a historical speech, or similar. Supporting audi-visual materials may be submitted as part of the project.

5. Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece of independent research on a topic in either ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric.

Students for the MRes take all five elements as shown above. Students for the PGDip take elements 1, 2, 3, and 4. Students for the PGCert take element 1 and at least one of elements 2, 3 or 4.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of the foundations of rhetorical theory and practice

- an appreciation of the history of rhetorical theory and practice in the European tradition from Classical antiquity to modern times

- an appreciation of the applicability of rhetorical approaches to the study of communication in the modern world

- knowledge and understanding of such other areas of language, literature, history, politics, culture, or ideas as may be appropriate in order to pursue the chosen research project(s) to an advanced level

- the acquisition of appropriate knowledge of advanced scholarship in the chosen area(s).

- the ability to understand and analyse concepts relating to rhetorical theory and practice

- the ability to engage critically and at an advanced level in rhetorical analysis of texts (e.g. argumentation, character-projection, emotional strategies, structure, use of language)

- the ability to engage in the study of rhetoric and communication as historical and/or contemporary phenomena in human societies

- the ability to conduct research independently at an advanced level

- the ability to articulate and present arguments at an advanced level with clarity and persuasiveness

- the ability to engage in debate on scholarly issues, respecting the views of other participants

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including principally coursework essays, independent projects, and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The MRes course is a new course and is designed to equip you with skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication which will be valuable in a wide range of careers, as well as providing a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

Graduates from the Classics Department are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in law, the media, politics, advertising, business, and the armed forces, as well as school and university teaching. We have also attracted mature students from a wide variety of previous careers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The designers in demand today innovate by explicitly linking business disciplines with communication design, grounded in empathic understanding of the user context. Read more
The designers in demand today innovate by explicitly linking business disciplines with communication design, grounded in empathic understanding of the user context. In order to create valuable courses of action, they generate thick descriptions, structured plans, compelling deliverables and persuasive arguments. In the User Experience (UX) Design graduate certificate program, learning is situated to simulate the pace and pressures of business environments and responds to the imperative for orderly, meaningful and accessible communication. You will employ the work-practice of prototyping concepts in order to describe ways to effectively integrate digital services with materials-based products and environments. You will conduct field research and make significant discoveries to create value for corporate clients and their customers. You will convert your prior academic achievements into a portfolio of design projects preparing you to launch a career as a UX design professional. The program fosters the practical discipline, relevance and currency essential in today’s growing UX job market.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Facilitate team processes towards effective completion of user experience design projects.
• Represent a linked sequence of observed evidence, collected data, qualitative research findings, interpretations and proposed design solutions to stakeholders to solicit support and commitment.
• Assess requirements of a user experience design project, in order to increase corporate acceptance, usability and effectiveness.
• Present persuasive arguments in support of user experience projects which balance user needs with business objectives.
• Design a complex user experience project which considers a business uncertainty and plans for multiple outcomes.
• Manage projects using current and proven methodologies to coordinate the work of a multi-disciplinary user experience design team.
• Adapt recommendations and courses of action in accordance with explicit and implicit cultural, professional and ethical constructs involved in solving user experience design problems.
• Factor and refactor research methods and insight-generating frameworks in order to facilitate, inform and guide team problem-solving.
• Resolve uncertainties and create shared purpose with stakeholders using iterative prototyping.
• Evaluate, adjust and communicate design decisions in alignment with financial, technical, and usability factors.

Modules

Semester 1
• UXD 5000: Human-Centred Rhetoric
• UXD 5001: Empathic Research Frameworks
• UXD 5002: Human-Centred Design Methods
• UXD 5003: Organizational Sociology
• UXD 5004: Quality Assurance for Interactive Systems
• UXD 5005: Deliverables for UX Researchers
• UXD 5050: Work Placement A

Semester 2
• UXD 5501: Capstone Project 1 - Agile Practice
• UXD 5502: User Experience Architecture
• UXD 5503: Prototyping Design for Experience
• UXD 5504: Design for Change
• UXD 5505: Capstone Project 2 - Continuous Delivery in User Experience Design
• UXD 5550: Work Placement B

Work Placement

The work placement is a total of six weeks – three in Semester 1 and three in Semester 2.

Your Career

Typical careers for graduates include user experience architect, user experience researcher, user experience designer, information architect, content strategist, communication designer and information designer.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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By combining cutting edge thinking with practical project work, MA Advertising will enable you to develop the essential skills and experience to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry. Read more

Introduction

By combining cutting edge thinking with practical project work, MA Advertising will enable you to develop the essential skills and experience to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry.

You'll be encouraged to develop your own creativity, produce creatively persuasive advertising work and gain an in-depth critical insight into advertising and its role in shaping society and culture.

Course content

MA Advertising combines cutting edge thinking with practical project work, enabling you to develop the intellectual abilities and gain the relevant experience needed to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry.

This blend of academic rigor with practical experience is designed to give you in-depth critical insight into advertising and improve your understanding of the impact the media, society and culture has on individuals and organisations and in turn the role advertising plays in shaping society and culture.

MA Advertising fosters an enquiring and analytical approach to the study and practice of advertising and you’ll develop your intellectual, imaginative, creative and aesthetic skills and improve your personal professionalism and independence of judgment. You will address the nature of consumer behaviour and psychology including the role of persuasion and influence and critically assess methods for researching and measuring them. You will be encouraged to develop your own creativity and produce high quality and creatively persuasive advertising work.

You will explore your practice in ‘creative laboratory’ conditions, productive dialogue with theory and through critically supportive engagement with tutors and your peers. Your learning will be inspired and supported by an expert community of experienced academics, external specialists and practitioners from the highest levels of the industry.

Benefit from being immersed in the vibrant energy and creative community of London College of Communication; from photography exhibitions to film screenings, animation shows to interactive design installations, and masterclasses delivered by experts across the creative industries. Our emphasis on practice-based creativity and learning by doing will provide a unique and inspirational context for your own work both on the course and in your future career.

If you are interested in a career in advertising, the creative, cultural, or communication sectors, in professional research and analysis, or, more broadly, you want to become a more critical and strategic thinker, or continue your studies at doctoral level, MA Advertising is for you.

Structure

Phase One

Runs from your induction in September until January. You will take two units of study, which run in parallel: Creative Industry (40 credits) and Innovative Methods (20 credits).

Phase Two

Commences on your return in January and continues until the end of the spring term when you break for Easter. Two units running in parallel: Creative Laboratory (40 credits) and Technological Futures (20 credits).

Phase Three

Represents the culmination of your studies. Here you will engage in a self-generated research project, either through combining practice with theory or in a dissertation.

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This postgraduate programme brings theory to life through its exciting work placement element and applied learning focus, enabling participants to apply acquired knowledge and competencies in a real-world workplace environment. Read more

What is the Masters about

This postgraduate programme brings theory to life through its exciting work placement element and applied learning focus, enabling participants to apply acquired knowledge and competencies in a real-world workplace environment.

This programme equips graduates with the attributes required by business, to make an immediate contribution to the organisation through the work placement experience element of the programme.

The Industrial Placement is of four months duration, from May to August, and will afford the student a unique opportunity to implement and reflect on the theories learned on the programme. It will complement the student’s education and broaden the skill set. A range of multi-national companies, together with large and medium indigenous enterprises have agreed to be part of the placement process. Work placement is recognised by prospective employers and students alike as being a very sought after aspect of an academic programme.

The other new aspect of this programme is the module ‘Communication for Professional Life’. As communication skills are generally deemed an integral element of enquiry-based learning, this module will prepare graduates for executive and leadership scenarios which require negotiation and persuasive expertise and ability with the written word.

What will I be able to do when I finish the course?
In a job market increasingly featuring primary honours degree holders, this Masters Programme with its work experience element significantly increases the graduates’ chances of recruitment by highly attractive employers. The MB is aimed at producing creative, flexible and dynamic individuals, who can take up or enhance roles as business practitioners in the business environment in Ireland or overseas. A Master of Business is an internationally recognized qualification and opens the door to many careers.

What subjects will I study?
Leadership & Strategy
Corporate Governance, Ethics and Social Responsibility
Research Methods
Financial Analysis & Investment Appraisal
Dissertation
Strategic Marketing Management
Strategic Human Resource Management
Entrepreneurship & Innovation Management
Communications for Professionals
Work Placement

Exit Award:
The MB and Postgraduate Diploma (Embedded Exit Award) programmes are designed for graduates of Bachelor of Business Honours Degrees (Level 8) or equivalent. Students who successfully complete 60 credits of the MB programme will be eligible for the Postgraduate Diploma in Business (Level 9) should they opt to leave the programme.

What are the entry requirements

Graduates of programmes in Engineering, Science, Design and other disciplines are required to have completed the Higher Diploma in Business in Management (Level 8) or equivalent to be eligible for admission to the MB programme.

All applicants will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Criteria to be considered will include academic qualifications, recognition of prior learning and or the applicant’s performance in GMAT or equivalent. Lifelong Learning reserves the right to require applicants to attend for an interview to determine their suitability for the programme.

For non-native English speakers: IELTS (6.0) or equivalent is required.

Graduate Profile:
Liviu Claudiu Dosoftei | Masters in Business

My name is Liviu, and I have successfully graduated from the Master of Business Programme. If you’re wondering how to wisely spend one year of your life, I strongly recommend that you enrol for the MB (Master of Business) Programme available at Institute of Technology Carlow. It will be the place where all the long hours of study and the tremendous effort you put in during the Bachelor Degree will start to make sense. To me, it did reveal whole new ways and a few different perspectives from which I now analyse a business. Being able to acquire a Master Degree is hugely important for my future as well as for my personal development. Therefore, I have no second thoughts in recommending the MB Programme to all of you interested in expanding your knowledge in the business area.

For further information contact

Martin Meagher
BComm, MBA, FCA, MA
Head of Department
e:
t: 059-9175303

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This programme welcomes students to a lively intellectual and cultural scene. You will study with a group of world-class Victorianists whose expertise ranges across many aspects of literature and culture, and you’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries. Read more
This programme welcomes students to a lively intellectual and cultural scene. You will study with a group of world-class Victorianists whose expertise ranges across many aspects of literature and culture, and you’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries.

Why this programme

-Our library has outstanding holdings in Victorian primary and critical sources, and Glasgow has a wonderful Victorian heritage: this makes the city a fantastic place to be studying the period’s literature and culture.
-We have an international reputation for research and teaching in Victorian literature.

Programme structure

The programme involves taught sessions over two ten-week teaching periods, plus a period of research and writing over the summer. You will study core and optional courses, and undertake supervised study of a specialised topic of your choice, researching and writing a 15,000 word dissertation.

You can choose optional courses from the range of Victorianist subjects; or, with the convenors’ permission, you may select from any MLitt course offered in the College of Arts.

Alongside the core and optional courses, you will take a research training course which will prepare you to work on your dissertation and to prepare a proposal and funding application for PhD work, should you choose to pursue doctoral research.

In conjunction with the core courses we also offer an exciting series of workshops tailored to research on Victorian topics, including tours of Glasgow University’s Special Collections, workshops on electronic resources, and field trips to sites of special interest such as the Murray Collection in the National Library of Scotland, Robert Owens’ New Lanark, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

You will have the opportunity to meet and learn from visiting scholars from the UK, Europe and the United States. In recent years, Victorianist visitors have included John Bowen, Matthew Campbell, Kate Flint, Ann Heilmann, Antonija Primorac, Herbert Tucker and Julian Wolfreys.

The programme is made up of three components:
-Core courses: taught over two ten-week teaching periods, from October to December and January to March.
-Optional courses: also taught in ten-week blocks. Full-time students usually study one topic course in each semester.
-A dissertation: written during the final phase of the course, from April to September.

Core and optional courses

Core courses - our core courses introduce you to the different types of writing that developed across the Victorian period, and then encourage you to see how these engage with various ‘historical flashpoints’, such as changes in property law, sexual behaviour, science and technology, and imperial government.
-Core course 1: Genres and Canons
-Core course 2: Victorian Literary History

Option courses - we offer a range of option courses. Not all are available every year as two are offered in each term. With permission from the relevant convenors, you may choose relevant courses from other taught Masters in the College of Arts, including from Modernities: Literature, Theory and Culture, American Studies, and Religion, Theology and Culture.
-Explaining Change: Science & Literary Culture, 1830-1880
-Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900
-Neo-Victorianism
-Victorian Séance: The Literary Occulture of Nineteenth-Century Britain
-Writing Empire
-Fictions of Adultery

Career prospects

You may develop skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. The programme also provides an excellent platform for PhD studies.

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Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. Read more
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. This course has been designed to provide an intensive training in the relevant economic and legal concepts and techniques to equip you with the tools that will help you successfully design, implement and assess environmental policy in a variety of settings.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempepl

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence of theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory and complete a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words. Taught modules may be assessed by either written examination or coursework or by a combination of assessment formats.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Fundamentals of environmental economics
- International environmental law I
- Environmental values
- Environmental policy assessment and evaluation
- International environmental law II
- Energy and climate change
- Rural environment: property, planning and policy
- Economic development and land use policies
- Climate change policy and land development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Feedback and guidance is given to assist students in developing and drafting the dissertation research project. Feedback sessions are arranged by module leaders following examinations.

Assessment

A dissertation of between 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Assessment of subject modules varies and includes written examinations, individual and group project work. Some modules may be assessed in more than one format.

Assessment of subject modules varies, written examinations are used for some modules, these will normally be two-hour papers.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Read more
This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Further details are given on our website.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemplec

Course detail

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

This is a research degree, students will be expected to attend Departmental Research Methods training sessions unless they can demonstrate that they have previous experience in this area.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A thesis of 30,000 words

Continuing

- Approval of an application to continue to the PhD will depend on three criteria:
- Availability of a supervisor
- Approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- Successful completion of the MPhil programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. Read more
This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. They will normally be those aspiring to and who have good prospects of proceeding to the PhD prior to an academic career.

Candidates study two modules chosen from a list of options taught by the Department of Land Economy. They are also required to attend the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) Training programme, which is compulsory, and to complete a 20,000 word dissertation, supervised by one of the academic staff within the department. The dissertation will review the literature and develop research hypotheses, and possibly involve some preliminary data collection and analysis. The SSRMC programme is described on their website. Candidates must take six SSRMC core modules and undertake a research methods essay as part of this programme. It is anticipated that the research training provided by the SSRMC plus the dissertation (20,000 words) and the choice of specialised modules from the other Land Economy MPhils will provide the necessary and sufficient background for commencing PhD research.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempler

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

Students are required to take two taught MPhil modules from the range offered within the Department and to complete taught modules offered by the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre.

Students will receive up to four hours of supervision for each taught module and additional supervision relating specifically to their dissertation.

Each MPhil module typically consists of 16 hours of lectures, students undertaking the MPhil in Land Economy, Research take two modules equating to 32 hours across the year. Taught components offered by the SSRMC vary in length, more details on contact time can be found on the SSRMC webpages.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A dissertation of 20,000 words.

An essay of no more than 4000 words as assessment of research methods teaching. Students also take two optional modules which will be assessed by coursework. Assignments or practical assessments may be set for modules offered by the SSRMC.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

- Availability of a supervisor
- The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Read more
In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Across Europe increased economic and monetary union is emphasising the need for Member States to consider how those involved in urban and regional government can tackle the spatial disparities in economic growth and development that have been such an entrenched feature of the last 20 years.

In the Far East and North America a similar level of interest is being shown in how governments can best ensure more geographical balance in development. The design and implementation of spatial policies to manage the process of growth requires professionals with a multidisciplinary skill base and an international perspective on best practice.

This course is therefore designed to equip you with the analytical skills required to:

- Understand the factors that lead to variations in regional growth and development and to understand the consequences of regional imbalance
- Assess the scope for policy intervention to manage regional growth
- Design efficient and effective policies to manage growth at the regional level
- Understand how best to implement growth and regeneration policies
- Evaluate policy achievement and monitor and assess the effectiveness of policy initiatives.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemppgr

Course detail

The course emphasises the importance of adopting a multidisciplinary approach both to understanding the nature of growth and regeneration problems as well as creating successful policy solutions.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Urban and environmental planning I
- Issues in public policy and regeneration and economic tools for spatial planning
- Urban and environmental planning II
- Real estate development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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