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Masters Degrees (Persuasive Communication)

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more

The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

  • Radboud University offers this programme jointly with Tilburg University, so that our students can learn from and work alongside a large number of specialists. Our universities have experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication, multimodal messages and social media.
  • The programme is designed so that you can develop a unique professional profile by specialising in an area that meets your interests and research ambitions.
  • You’ll gain substantial hands-on research experience during two lab rotations, while you’ll also develop various research skills (incl. academic writing and grant proposal writing); the programme also challenges you to think about the valorisation process.
  • You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a selected group of highly motivated national and international students.
  • The Radboud campus in Nijmegen offers you a challenging research environment in which you could work together with specialists from four leading research institutes connected to this field: Centre for Language Studies, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Baby Research Centre, and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
  • Radboud University has excellent facilities for doing research, including the University Library with the largest collection in the field of linguistics in the Netherlands, and experimental labs and computer facilities with state-of-the-art equipment

General requirements:

  1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Communication Studies, in Linguistics, in a modern language or a related area with excellent grades. Your Bachelor's thesis or a dedicated research proposal will also need to demonstrate that you’re sufficiently talented for scientific research.
  2. Proficiency in English. Non-native speakers of English* need one of the following:
  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • A IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Strong motivation

You have to be able to demonstrate your motivation for and affinity with international academic research. A selection committee will evaluate the motivation of each applicant separately.

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language



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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. Earn your Master's degree in.  Strategic Communication for Marketing. Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

Earn your Master's degree in Strategic Communication for Marketing to learn how to create strategic, targeted communications that build meaningful connections between consumers and the brands they choose. You will gain the tools to understand how consumers think, make decisions, and act on these decisions. With two tracks to choose from—Creating Market Communication or Planning Market Communication—you can hone your skills in strategy, or focus more on content creation and practice. Whatever track you choose, you'll be granted opportunities to work with clients, develop solutions to address consumer problems, and create initiatives that build strong bonds between organizations and their markets.

Program Details

As a student in the Strategic Communication for Marketing program, you'll have a chance to:

  • Conduct research and analyze data to identify marketing challenges and opportunities
  • Develop marketing and communication plans that connect to measurable business objectives and integrate elements of digital advertising, social media, PR, promotion, branding, direct marketing, and more
  • Customize your program through electives based on your interests and experiences 
  • Collaborate and create persuasive presentations that demonstrate how your plans will positively influence an organization’s standing in the markets served

Program Options

We offer two tracks in our 40-credit graduate program: Planning Market Communication, which emphasizes overall strategy and planning, and Creating Market Communication, which focuses on content and implementation. The program can be completed in one and a half to two and a half years, or in one year with our accelerated full-time one-year cohort option. The program consists of three core courses, three required track courses, and four electives.

With the program electives, you will have the opportunity to emphasize consumer research/behavior, global brand management, digital marketing, or managing the creative process.

One-Year Cohort Option

With the accelerated one-year cohort option, you will complete the same required core courses and a balanced curriculum of additional courses, finishing with the Capstone.

The cohort model focuses on building a strong community. You will take all your classes with the same group of fellow students, giving you lots of opportunities to collaborate and build strong relationships. After you graduate, your cohort becomes the foundation of your professional network, promoting growth and advancement well into your career. 

The Emerson Advantage

A Communication Focus

Our students will become skilled communicators who are adept at expressing powerful ideas and create compelling messages for target audiences. The program exposes students to the total marketing landscape. This unique approach closely aligns with the needs of organizations to effectively listen to and communicate with the target audience. We teach the methods and equip you with the tools necessary to effectively position a company for success in their marketplace.

Our program connects the creative and empathetic communication expertise of the marketer to the needs of the market. Strategic Communication for Marketing is the link between brand creators and the markets they serve. 

With today’s technology dramatically expanding the marketing and communication landscape, it is even more important to have a broad understanding of the building blocks used to create truly integrated marketing and communication plans.

Career Outlook

Upon graduating from Strategic Communication for Marketing, you will be prepared to create cohesive communication plans for a business with positioning that resonates with your customers. You'll be equipped with a deep knowledge of evolving strategies and media that can be used together to tell the stories of organizations operating in a global marketplace. In a competitive landscape where information is accessible in higher quantities and across more platforms than ever before, it is essential for businesses to hire marketing communication professionals who are not only great storytellers, but are also innovative problem solvers who can command today's tools and technology and seamlessly adapt to those of tomorrow.

In Demand in Today’s Market

Our program will prepare you for a career in marketing that can apply to virtually any type of business or company. Graduates of our program have pursued careers in advertising account management, account planning, public relations, marketing research, brand management, and interactive marketing. They have worked with such companies as Arnold Worldwide, the AMP Agency, Bose, Communispace, Digitas, Deutsch, Ogilvy, IBM, Lexis Nexis, New Balance, Puma, and Smash, among others.



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The MSc Strategic Communication offers a cross-disciplinary education to current or aspiring communication leaders who wish to learn how to design, plan… Read more
The MSc Strategic Communication offers a cross-disciplinary education to current or aspiring communication leaders who wish to learn how to design, plan and implement effective and sound communication strategies that fulfil an organisation's mission, vision and long-term objectives.Through a combination of research-driven knowledge, practical skills, and professional insights, the programme prepares students for a career in business, public and third-sector institutions or in communication consultancy.Business firms, public institutions and non-profit organisations operate today in an increasingly complex environment marked by hyper-digitalisation, media fragmentation, ambiguous market and political conditions at global levels, and growing public scepticism. In such context, there is growing market demand for communication experts who can help organisations to (re)build trust, enhance reputation and, more in general, realise their strategic goals.The MSc Strategic Communication at the University of Liverpool in London offers a cross-disciplinary education with a distinctive focus on:1.How corporate leaders, governments, public institutions, NGOs and even celebrities make use of narrative and argument to build consensus and dialogue with stakeholders and to (re)construct their identity, reputation and trustworthiness, especially in crisis situations.2.The role of digital media, particularly social media, in enhancing strategic communication and informing strategic planning.3.The contexts and practices of strategic communication (e.g. financial communication and investor relations; political campaigns; crisis management; branding, policy change, takeover and mergers): how they are shaped through discourse and how discourse affects them.The programme combines a range of conceptual and practical skills which are crucial for successfully managing a variety of strategic communication activities, such as defining and effectively sharing the mission, vision and values of an organisation, responding to a crisis, launching new products and services or supporting strategic initiatives like mergers, event promotions, and campaigns for political elections, health prevention or policy change.Students will learn how to translate organisational goals into communication objectives, to analyse situations by identifying and segmenting the relevant stakeholder groups, as well as regulatory constraints and ethical issues; to design spoken and written messages that are at the same time sound, persuasive and compliant; to exploit the potential offered by established communication technologies and new digital media to effectively engage stakeholders.Practical projects include a variety of activities like designing and delivering effective public speeches, building a digital media campaign and the writing of digital communications for live briefs.Besides classroom modules, a dedicated seminar involving communication experts from the Public Relations and Investor Relations industry offers the unique opportunity to familiarise yourself with the relevant professional contexts and to closely interact with specialists in the sectors. Through the final project, students will engage with an in-depth analysis of a case-study in strategic communication.Modules are organised and delivered in blocks of intensive full-day teaching. By enrolling as part-time students, experienced professionals in the London area can more easily reconcile classroom attendance with work commitments.More information on current activities involving staff and students can be found in our blog Masters of Strategic Communication.Read more about the Department of Communication and Media on their webpages, including the internationally acclaimed research which feeds insights directly into teaching.

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Who is it for?. Our proposed programme is designed to provide a foundation to those who will determine the scope and direction of data analytics research within their organisation, and communicate the research outcomes to the ultimate decision-makers. Read more

Who is it for?

Our proposed programme is designed to provide a foundation to those who will determine the scope and direction of data analytics research within their organisation, and communicate the research outcomes to the ultimate decision-makers. Our graduates are trained to participate in the strategic management process, improve the organisation’s financial performance and help design the effective measures of performance of an organisation for which evidence-based data become a strategic asset in the decision-making process. Therefore, the primary goal is to provide an insight into business data analytics and prepare the students to develop the set of skills and attitudes that will evolve into effective leadership skills.

Objectives

This programme is subject to approval later in the year. Course content may change.

The main purpose of the programme is to develop a comprehensive set of skills and to encourage the positive attributes that are essential to becoming a successful business analyst.

The degree is committed not only to imparting specialist skills, but also to developing the so-called "soft skills” which are important in influencing people and organisations. As well as obtaining effective and persuasive communication skills, you will also learn about ethics-related issues, which are another key ingredient to responsible leadership.

Structure

  • Extract valuable information from the data in order to create a competitive advantage
  • Make use of analytical skills to evaluate and solve complex problems within the organisation’s strategic perspective
  • Present and explain data via effective and persuasive communication
  • Show commercial focus and the ability of strategic thinking
  • Demonstrate depth and breadth of using analytical skills to interrogate data sets
  • Illustrate professional integrity and show sensitivity towards ethical considerations.

Pre-study modules

The MSc in Business Analytics starts online in the summer before the beginning of term 1 with three pre-courses which ensure that every student has the minimum specific background required by all other modules. These subjects are key elements of your course and you are strongly encouraged to complete the modules before you arrive at Cass in order to avoid being at a disadvantage.

  • Introduction to Python
  • Introduction to R Programming
  • Professional Ethics and Good Academic Practice

Term 1

Core modules:

  • Leadership and Organisational Behaviour
  • Network Analytics
  • Data Visualisation
  • Quantitative Methods

Term 2

Core modules:

  • Analytics Methods for Business
  • Machine Learning
  • Revenue Management and Pricing
  • Strategic Business Analytics

Term 3

In term three you will study:

  • An applied research project (20 credits)
  • Four electives (10 credits each).

Research Project

  • Applied research project

Assessment

To satisfy the requirements of the degree course, students must complete:

  • Eight core modules (15 credits each)
  • Four elective modules (10 credits each)
  • One applied research project (20 credits).

Assessment of modules on the MSc in Business Analytics, in most cases, is by means of coursework and unseen examination. Coursework takes a variety of formats and may consist of individual or group presentations/reports, set exercises or unseen tests.

Induction weeks

There is a compulsory two week induction programme just before Term 1 starts, which is a dedicated introduction to the course and to business analytics. You are required to complete a number of induction workshops at the beginning of the course as follows:

  • Team building
  • Career induction and careers fair
  • Professional development skills.


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In the Master's degree in Communication and Information Science, you can choose between different programmes that focus on communication. Read more
In the Master's degree in Communication and Information Science, you can choose between different programmes that focus on communication:

* Information Science (English taught)
This programme is completely in English and focuses on the theory and the research of language, text and digital communication. Issues are eg. natural language processing, semantic web and digital communication.

* Digital Humanities (English taught)
The brand new master's track in Digital Humanities (start Sept 2016) equips you to look at culture, language and history through the lens of digital methods. It offers a systematic way to incorporate information technology in humanities research.

* Communication Studies (Dutch taught)
In this programme, the focus is on the form, function and effects of language and language use in communicative situations. In addition, discourse-analysis in the field of organisational, media, computer, persuasive and health communication will be discussed.

* Computer Communication (Dutch taught)
The programme Computer Communication focuses on the interaction between man and computer. In addition, the interaction between people themselves will be discussed, as well as the communication between people and organizations that goes via the computer.

* Communication and Education (Dutch taught)
In this programme you study the theory and practice of the development, education and training of language and communication skills of children, adolescents and adults. You will also learn about the research into, design of and professional skills for education and training.

Job perspectives

The Master's degree in Communication and Information Science prepares you for positions in research, education, training and consultancy.

Job examples

- Communications Advisor
- Communications Manager
- Communications Officer
- Journalist
- Marketing Manager
- Media Advisor
- Editor
- PR Officer
- Web Coordinator

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This programme offers knowledge and expertise to prepare for research in linguistics and language and communication, as a PhD researcher, or in professional or commercial spheres. Read more
This programme offers knowledge and expertise to prepare for research in linguistics and language and communication, as a PhD researcher, or in professional or commercial spheres.

You will receive a grounding in relevant foundational research methods and theoretical paradigms before choosing from a variety of modules that examine the use of language and visual media in professional practice, and consider how language is employed in creating our identities, in interacting with others and in the ideological construction of discourses in a range of social and institutional contexts.

Distinctive features:

Our Centre for Language and Communication Research has a well established reputation in a broad range of teaching and research areas, including sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multimodality, forensic linguistics, systemic functional grammar, phonology, and lexical studies.

The full-time programme carries Advanced Course Recognition from the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) as a postgraduate research training scheme.

Structure

The MA in Language and Communication Research is a modular programme that can be completed in one year by full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

Stage one comprises the taught element of the programme while stage two involves a supervised dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words between May and September.

Core modules:

Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Qualitative Research Methods (optional for part-time students)
Quantitative Research Methods (optional for part-time students)
Research Experience
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Phonology
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

Teaching

Teaching is delivered by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research across a broad spectrum of interrelated issues.

You will be taught core knowledge and understanding through lectures, small-group seminars and group discussion.

Teaching for core modules combines discussion of theoretical issues and the practical challenges of qualitative and quantitative analysis of language/communication data, while teaching for optional modules provides further theoretical discussion with some focus on the development of practical research skills.

Intellectual Skills are promoted via lectures, seminars and group discussions individual supervision and guidance for research undertaken in planning and writing the dissertation. You will also learn via one-to-one supervision of individual ‘research experience’ projects and dissertations.

The learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

You will be encouraged to explore our excellent library resources and expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Assessment of the taught component is by coursework only.

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You are encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate their analyses to areas of personal interest.

Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments. Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for disabled students, if any, are noted in the Module Descriptions.

The second part of the MA is examined by dissertation, supported by individual supervision.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much enhanced career prospects. Example employers in the UK include Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Poetry Wales Magazine, Teach First, and Welsh Government, with jobs that include Crime Intelligence Analyst, Creative Writing Lecturer, Librarian, Poet, Recruitment Consultant, Teacher, and Writer.

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A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence. Read more
A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence.

Course overview

English MA combines the study of literatures, linguistics, critical theory and creative writing. The course is incredibly flexible and you can pursue your personal goals for intellectual enquiry and literary exploration, with inspiration and encouragement from our widely-published lecturers.

There is a very clear link between teaching and research on the degree with all the modules above drawing on publications by the module leaders (all of whom were recognised as ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘Internationally Recognised’ in the recent REF).

You will first undertake an innovative introductory module called ‘Approaching Literature’ which allows you to study applied literary, critical and linguistic theory as a basis to your whole degree. There is then a wide choice of modules based on the research specialisms of the staff including: 'Gothic', 'Late Victorian Gothic', 'Writing the Borders', ‘Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’, 'Early Humans in Fiction', ‘Irish Literature 1790 to 1831’, ‘Critical Theory and Creative Writing’ and 'Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’.

You will negotiate the topic of your Masters dissertation to reflect your personal interests. We like to push boundaries and develop modules that combine our research expertise with an awareness of your future career prospects.

The market for places on postgraduate teaching qualifications is becoming increasingly competitive. Many of our students enrol on the MA to improve their subject specialism, thereby giving them a greater chance of success at securing a place on one of these courses. With this in mind, we are attentive to developments in the GSCE and A Level curriculums, in order that our students have relevant, research led subject knowledge to bring to bear on applications.

Through the channels of Spectral Visions Press students are invited to submit their work for publication. If selected original work will be published in one of our professionally assembled annual anthologies the last two of which are currently available on Amazon. Furthermore, many of our students have written articles, reviews and interviews for organisations such as the International Gothic Association; An International Community of Gothic Scholars; and other scholarly networks such as the Open Graves; Open Minds project, Sibeal, and Feminist Studies. These networking opportunities give our students valuable access to the wider academic community, and aid in employment and progression opportunities.

Your training in research skills, together with Masters-level critical thinking, will be transferable to many different types of employment.

We also offer a part-time English MA of this course, which may suit you if you want to combine studying for a Masters degree with other commitments. For more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/english-part-time/

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and supportive supervision. At MA level, responsibility for learning lies as much with you as with your tutor. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Approaching Literature (30 Credits)

Choose three optional modules from a list that may include the following modules
-Gothic (30 Credits)
-The 1790s (30 Credits)
-Late Victorian Gothic (30 Credits)
-‘What Ish My Nation?’: Postcolonial Irish Literatures (30 Credits)
-Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions (30 Credits)
-Reading ‘Ulysses’ (30 Credits)
-The Global City: Modern to Postmodern (30 Credits)
-Orientalism: Representations of the East in Western Travel Literature and Arab and Iranian Novels (30 Credits)
-‘Strange Country’: Irish Literature 1790 to 1831 (30 Credits)
-Critical Theory and Creative Writing (30 Credits)
-Early Humans in Fiction (30 Credits)
-Reading the Anglo-Scots Borders (30 Credits)
-Reading and Writing the Fantastic, the Marvellous and the Gothic (30 Credits)
-Irish Literature and the Supernatural (30 Credits)

Plus the compulsory dissertation
-Dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with your supervisor (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include seminars and discussion groups. We often have visiting speakers and a range of research seminars to enhance your learning opportunities. This includes our widely acclaimed Spectral Visions event, held annually at the University.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include mainly essays. Some options require oral presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to English and literature, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Project Muse, which provides over 180 full-text humanities and social sciences journals

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of occupations because it sharpens your skills of analysis and persuasive communication. At the same time it advances your intellectual development. A Masters degree in English is a qualification that is well-recognised by employers across all sectors. Past graduates have gained employment in areas such as:
-Teaching
-Media and journalism
-Civil Service
-Publishing
-Communications
-Freelance writing
-Arts and creative industries

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Overview. This programme has been carefully developed for students who are interested in gaining advanced knowledge of psychological theory as this relates to social and political issues and the potential for such knowledge to generate progressive social change. Read more

Overview

This programme has been carefully developed for students who are interested in gaining advanced knowledge of psychological theory as this relates to social and political issues and the potential for such knowledge to generate progressive social change. The degree programme will equip you to engage critically and analytically with these issues and help you to develop novel ways of thinking about yourself, those around you and society at large. The theoretical and applied nature of this programme will offer you the opportunity to study how psychology helps interpret some of the most pressing social and political issues facing human society in

 the 21stCentury and how it can contribute to tackling some of them.

In addition to your taught components, you will have the opportunity to undertake a dissertation project on a topic of your choice under the direct supervision of a member of staff. You will be able to use quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method approaches.

A further unique feature of this degree programme is that it involves you in the design and implementation of an Action Research Projectthat is aimed at bringing a tangible, positive change on or off campus in collaboration with your fellow students and under the supervision of your Module Leader.

Course Aims

  • Above all, we aim for this programme to have a positive professional and personal impact on you. 
  • An important aim of this programme is to develop your knowledge of research evidence and theory as this relates to a range of social and political issues.
  • The programme is aimed to provide you with opportunities to experience hands-on how research and theory (e.g., through the Action Research Project and your own dissertation project of choice) can be used to bring about social change in local communities and society at large.
  • To develop a range of advanced research skills.
  • Empower writing and presentations skills necessary to articulate your arguments and disseminate psychological theory and research.
  • To assist you to develop as a competent, empowered, and employable psychologist.

Course Content

Our MSc Psychology programmes are designed to foster a vibrant and collaborative peer culture amongst our MSc students. Several of our modules are shared by all four of our MSc psychology programmes. We also know it’s vital that you develop the advanced specialised skills you will need to pursue careers in your chosen fields. Throughout your MSc degree you are supported and encouraged to focus your work to help you conduct in-depth explorations of your specialist subjects and personal interests.

You will be taught by staff who are research active, some of whom are globally recognised for their research and impact, but also who genuinely care about using psychology to address major social issues and challenges in contemporary society. Our research activities, applied networks outside academia, and importantly our belief in your potential to develop as a powerful and yet thoughtful agent of social change will keep you engaged with this programme and ensure it equips you to undertake a wide range of professions. 

Our staff offer expertise in various research areas, including (but not limited to): Crowds, riot, hooliganism and policing, protection of young people, cyber psychology and bullying, inter-group and inter-ethnic conflict and relations, wellbeing and inclusion, social justice for marginalised communities, critical and creative methodologies, gender inequality and cultural definitions of motherhood, the social construction of reality, the negotiation of power and authority in interaction, persuasive communication, victimhood, reconciliation and intergroup forgiveness, trust, prejudice reduction, social identity, collective action, the social and psychological dimensions of health and well-being, self-harm and suicide, terrorism and radicalisation, refugee integration, social influences on learning and effectiveness in the classroom – including the study of the relationship between gender and subject choice.

In addition to your dissertation project, you will participate in designing and implementing an Action Research Project with the aim to bring about a tangible, positive change on or off campus in collaboration with your fellow students and under the supervision of your Module Leader. This unique feature will provide you hands-on experience in understanding the psychology of organising social change.

Teaching & Assessment

The course is of one year duration for full time and two years for part-time.

The course is assessed through written coursework, unseen examination, verbal presentation of research, and independent research written up as a dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme. Limited support is available for research-related expenses.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/

or

http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Closing Date

31st May 2018



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Built on a solid research foundation, the curriculum offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules enabling you to tailor the programme to your own specific interests. Read more
Built on a solid research foundation, the curriculum offers a broad and highly flexible suite of modules enabling you to tailor the programme to your own specific interests. The MA Language and Linguistics also offers a broad-based but advanced introduction for those new to the study of language, linguistics and communication, as well as building on topics that will be familiar to those who studied language and linguistics an undergraduate level.

The MA in Language and Linguistics enables you to develop knowledge and research skills over the course of the programme. We support you to become an independent and active learner, able to understand key issues in the different sub-fields of language and linguistics. Throughout the course you will improve your research skills by being given specific training in research methodology, planning your own work and being involved in ongoing research projects led by various members of staff. You will also gain a thorough understanding of different theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to explore the linguistic structures of a language.

We develop your ability to undertake linguistic analysis confidently and effectively; to collect, evaluate, synthesise and interpret qualitative and/or quantitative data; and to critique arguments and research. The curriculum also develops important work-related skills, such as the ability to communicate clearly and persuasively and to work both independently and in collaboration with others.

The structure of the MA enables you to develop expertise in specific areas of linguistics and language study. Particular strengths in the Centre for Language and Communication Research are discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, systemic functional linguistics, corpus linguistics, forensic linguistics, intercultural communication and professional communication. The wide range of subject modules available ensures that you develop a strong foundation in the discipline area whilst also having the flexibility to pursue your own specific research interests within that area.

We aim to give our students experience of excellence in teaching and learning at an advanced level, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that the Centre is home to world-leading research in linguistics and communication.

Distinctive features

• Access to an established research training programme making it possible to continue to PhD, should you wish

• Provision of an integrated foundation in research activities and bases in order that you are prepared for research activities

• Hands-on experience of working on an established staff research project in order to gain practical insights into the ways that research works in authentic team contexts

• Optional modules which form the bulk of the programme and provide a vital foundation for later dissertation-writing

• Situated in the lively Centre for Language and Communication Research, where we regularly host talks from visiting academics from around the world, Advanced Research Residencies and Summer Schools, and where a range of reading and research groups run on topics including sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, systemic functional linguistics and forensic linguistics.

Structure

The programme is offered in full-time mode over one academic year or part-time mode in two years. You will need to complete 180 credits - 120 credits in taught modules and 60 credits in the dissertation. The dissertation can only be undertaken on successful completion of the taught element of the course. Each stage is weighted at 50% of the overall mark.

In the taught stage, you will take a mixture of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits. The core module base is focussed on research training and experience.

You will submit a proposal for the dissertation during the latter part of the taught stage. This proposal must be accepted before undertaking the dissertation.

Core modules:

Language Testing and Assessment (part-time only)
Qualitative Research Methods
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics (part-time only)
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy
Digital Literacies

Teaching

During the taught stage, you will be taught mostly through weekly seminars / workshops, where you will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of particular topics related to language and linguistics.

You will be able to discuss concepts and ideas in small groups and open class discussions, to consolidate and get feedback on your individual learning, and to develop communication skills in informal group discussions and oral presentations.

Depending on your prior experience, you might be encouraged to attend the lectures for various undergraduate modules as well. You will be taught through weekly or fortnightly supervision sessions in Research Experience. These will offer the opportunity for structured but independent learning of practical skills. Teaching will be varied and responsive.

All modules within the MA in Language and Linguistics make extensive use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can access discussion forums and find course materials.

During the dissertation stage, you will conduct independent research on a topic of your choice with regular supervision from a member of staff.

Assessment

The taught modules within this programme are assessed through a variety of methods, including academic essays, linguistic analyses, analytical reports, research projects and oral presentations. Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will often be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest.

The emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments.

Career prospects

This programme will offer preparation for all careers where language is used for any purpose, for example, to influence or persuade, inform, educate or entertain. Gaining an MA will demonstrate higher abilities in research and communication.

Examples of future work destinations include research, teaching, speech and language therapy, publishing, writing, editing, information design, librarianship, as well as professional jobs, such as banking and HR, and public sector jobs, such as those in the civil service or local government. However, the degree is not limited to these possible directions and offers a good preparation for roles in a variety of fields which involve reasoning, critical and evaluative work, verbal and written skills, assimilation of information, communicative skills such as an awareness of linguistic variation, as well as some quantitative skills and skills in presenting information using technology.

You may also choose to undertake further study in the form of a PhD.

Placements

The Research Experience module offers the opportunity to work with a member of staff on an ongoing, authentic research task within part of a larger research study. This is a distinctive form of study and offers the opportunity to gain hands-on research experience and to reflect systematically on that experience. Findings from the Research Experience module will feed directly into ongoing work in the Centre for Language and Communication Research.

There are no formal study abroad opportunities associated with this programme

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Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching. Read more
Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching.

The programme incorporates three broad areas of study: research methodology; language description and comparison; and specialised topics in language and social life, foreign language teaching and multimodality.

Distinctive features:

Our Centre for Language and Communication Research has an international reputation as a field leader in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multimodal communication, systemic functional linguistics, forensic linguistics, and formulaic language.

Structure

Students can complete a Postgraduate Diploma or an MSc in Applied Linguistics. The course can be taken on a full-time basis or part-time basis. You will complete the programme in 1 year for full-time study and in 2 years for part-time study.

There are three compulsory modules in the Applied Linguistics programmes. You will also select three further modules from a pool of optional modules.

• PGDip core modules:

Language Description
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Phonology

• PGDip optional modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same as PGDip core modules with the addition of a dissertation.

• MSc optional modules:

Same as PGDip.

Teaching

The teaching for each module combines discussion of theoretical issues with training in analytical methods often based on texts of your own choosing.

Learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

You are expected to do the reading and other relevant preparation to enable them to take a full part in these activities and are encouraged to explore the resources of the library as appropriate.

Assessment

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will often be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest.

Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments. Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for disabled students, if any, are noted in the Module Descriptions.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study in the School is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much-enhanced career prospects while many UK students use the qualification to travel to new countries, often as teachers of English, or to begin academic careers of their own.

Outside education and academia, the principle avenues of employment for graduates are speech therapy, the creative and media sector, administration and publishing.

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By combining cutting edge thinking with practical project work, MA Advertising will enable you to develop the essential skills and experience to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry. Read more

Introduction

By combining cutting edge thinking with practical project work, MA Advertising will enable you to develop the essential skills and experience to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry.

You'll be encouraged to develop your own creativity, produce creatively persuasive advertising work and gain an in-depth critical insight into advertising and its role in shaping society and culture.

Course content

MA Advertising combines cutting edge thinking with practical project work, enabling you to develop the intellectual abilities and gain the relevant experience needed to succeed within this dynamic and challenging industry.

This blend of academic rigor with practical experience is designed to give you in-depth critical insight into advertising and improve your understanding of the impact the media, society and culture has on individuals and organisations and in turn the role advertising plays in shaping society and culture.

MA Advertising fosters an enquiring and analytical approach to the study and practice of advertising and you’ll develop your intellectual, imaginative, creative and aesthetic skills and improve your personal professionalism and independence of judgment. You will address the nature of consumer behaviour and psychology including the role of persuasion and influence and critically assess methods for researching and measuring them. You will be encouraged to develop your own creativity and produce high quality and creatively persuasive advertising work.

You will explore your practice in ‘creative laboratory’ conditions, productive dialogue with theory and through critically supportive engagement with tutors and your peers. Your learning will be inspired and supported by an expert community of experienced academics, external specialists and practitioners from the highest levels of the industry.

Benefit from being immersed in the vibrant energy and creative community of London College of Communication; from photography exhibitions to film screenings, animation shows to interactive design installations, and masterclasses delivered by experts across the creative industries. Our emphasis on practice-based creativity and learning by doing will provide a unique and inspirational context for your own work both on the course and in your future career.

If you are interested in a career in advertising, the creative, cultural, or communication sectors, in professional research and analysis, or, more broadly, you want to become a more critical and strategic thinker, or continue your studies at doctoral level, MA Advertising is for you.

Structure

Phase One

Runs from your induction in September until January. You will take two units of study, which run in parallel: Creative Industry (40 credits) and Innovative Methods (20 credits).

Phase Two

Commences on your return in January and continues until the end of the spring term when you break for Easter. Two units running in parallel: Creative Laboratory (40 credits) and Technological Futures (20 credits).

Phase Three

Represents the culmination of your studies. Here you will engage in a self-generated research project, either through combining practice with theory or in a dissertation.

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Want to master the art of persuasion? If you’re also looking for a postgraduate degree course that equips you with the transferable skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication, then this course is for you. Read more

Want to master the art of persuasion? If you’re also looking for a postgraduate degree course that equips you with the transferable skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication, then this course is for you.

The only course of its kind to be offered by a major UK university, this one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric is designed for all students, not just those with a background in classics. It is ideal for those looking for onward progression into a career or further studies where an ability to construct and deliver persuasive arguments, as well as analyse and evaluate those presented by others, is key.

Combining both ancient and modern fields of research, the course is taught at the Centre of Oratory and Rhetoric in the Royal Holloway Classics Department. With the primary emphasis on the practice of oratory, the course draws on the department’s scholarly expertise to deliver a core module on Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric plus a wide range of complementary optional courses. Add to that access to experts in rhetoric and oratory from around the world as well as world-class research resources and we guarantee MRes Rhetoric students will finish the course equipped with a range of analytical and research skills, fully adept in the art of persuasion. 

Course structure

Core modules

  • Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric
  • Independent Project on Rhetoric 1
  • Independent Project on Rhetoric 2
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Oratory and Identity

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. 

Your future career

Graduates of classical degrees have much to offer potential employers having developed a range of transferable skills, both practical and theoretical, whilst studying with us. With up to 90% of our most recent graduates now working or in further study, according to the Complete University Guide 2015, it’s true to say our graduates are highly employable.

In recent years, PhD graduates, many of whom have progressed from our MA programmes, have taken up academic positions at Oxford, Bristol and Roehampton Universities. Outside of academia, our graduates have embarked on teaching careers in the UK and overseas, undertaken archaeological and museum work and pursued careers in journalism, finance, politics and the arts.

With the MRes Rhetoric course designed to equip you with the skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication graduates are best placed for continuing onto PhD studies or for pursuing non-academic careers, especially those involving communication (such as law, politics, the media, advertising, or teaching).



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Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. Read more
Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. You will learn to critically evaluate expert testimony on forensic matters and to consider the role of expertise in legal systems more generally.

You will receive a grounding in research methods and issues and debates in forensic linguistics. You will acquire tools for evaluating and examining a range of legal language in relation to issues such as power and comprehensibility. You will also develop skills in research and writing at higher degree level and learn to engage with the legal system as a site of social life where important decisions are made through language.

On successful completion of the programme you will have achieved the following outcomes:

• the application of descriptive data analysis skills in a wide range of spoken and written discourse contexts within the legal process, including emergency calls, police interviews, courtroom interaction, judicial judgments;

• a critical understanding of investigative data analysis skills in both spoken and written discourse contexts, including such areas as disputed authorship and plagiarism detection;

• critical understanding of the work of linguists as advisers and activists on legal systems and settings.

Structure

Students can complete either a PGDip or an MA in Forensic Linguistics. Both courses can be completed in year by full-time study or 2 years by part-time study.

• PGDip core modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Forensic Linguistics II
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Project in Forensic Linguistics

• PGDip optional modules:

Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Phonology
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same modules as PGDip PLUS dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words.

• MSc optional modules:

Same modules as PGDip

Teaching

Core knowledge and understanding is delivered via lectures and small-group seminars.

The teaching for core modules combines discussion of theoretical issues and practical challenges raised by the forensic setting, while the teaching for optional modules provides further theoretical discussion with some focus on the development of practical research skills. Sessions rely on your good preparation.

Core knowledge and understanding are also delivered via one-to-one or very small group supervision of individual projects. Intellectual Skills are promoted via lectures, seminars and group discussions, as well as small-group supervision and guidance for research undertaken in a small, team research project.

The learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

The programme will be assessed by such means as essays, data analyses, critical reviews, posters and oral presentation. Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly work presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

Formative work is offered for one of the modules, in which you may undertake forms of assessment that may be new to you. Other modules offer a series of assignments with the express intention that you might learn cumulatively. Elsewhere, you are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader on the main ideas and plans for your assignments.

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest or experience.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to further study (e.g. a PhD or law degree) or have pursued careers in a number of relevant areas such as policing, the courts and Government as well as careers in areas without a forensic connection.

Employers for graduates from this programme include: local government departments, police forces, secondary schools, language schools, universities, banks, solicitors and utility companies.

Career destinations include: crime intelligence analyst, crime analyst, specialist police interviewer, emergency call handler, lawyer, lecturer, teacher, programme administrator, research assistant, PR executive, marketing executive and writer.

Graduates from this programme also move on to non-legal careers and find that the legal and linguistic focus of their studies provides their employers with something a little unusual. Graduates in the job market have also benefited from the training in processing and using information thoughtfully, writing effectively and speaking convincingly which is essential to good postgraduate study.

Placements

We encourage students to make contact with local organisations in order to explore the opportunity of short placements. We provide work experience through the project module where you will work on an authentic research project.

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This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). Read more

This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). You will study with world-class experts in Victorian literature whose interests range across many aspects of literature and culture. You’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries and have the opportunity to meet with visiting scholars from around the UK, Europe and the United States.

Why this programme

  • At the height of the nineteenth century, during the two Great Exhibitions of 1881 and 1901 in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow was often called the ‘Second City of the Empire’. This M.Litt. offers a chance to come and study Victorian literature in this impressive historical city with its fantastic heritage.
  • You will be taught by a team of highly qualified researchers and lecturers with an international reputation for research and teaching in Victorian literature.
  • You will benefit from direct access to our outstanding holdings of Victorian primary and critical sources within the Special Collections of the University Library and the Hunterian Gallery and Museum.
  • We offer an exciting series of workshops tailored to research on Victorian topics, including tours of Glasgow University’s Special Collections, workshops on electronic resources, and field trips to sites of special interest such as the Murray Collection in the National Library of Scotland, Robert Owen’s New Lanark, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Three optional courses

You’ll also write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Victorian 1: Writing the Times
  • Research Training Course
  • Optional course

Semester 2: January to March

  • Victorian 2: Writers, Readers, Publishers
  • Optional course
  • Optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Find out more about core and optional courses.

Part-time students: programme structure

Teaching methods

Teaching will be by a combination of 90-minute seminars for the core and option courses and 45-minute supervisions for the dissertation. You will also be given the opportunity to attend relevant lectures in the undergraduate programme, particularly where your first degree has not given you a wide background in Victorian literature. There may be occasional workshops on humanities computing in the STELLA laboratory. The teaching sessions will be designed throughout to maximise student involvement, and there will be a range of opportunities for informal contact among staff and students outside teaching hours.

Career prospects

You’ll develop a wide range of skills sought by many employers, including:

  • the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information 
  • confident and persuasive oral and written communication
  • problem solving through creative and critical thinking.

The programme also provides an excellent platform for PhD studies.



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Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. Read more
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. This course has been designed to provide an intensive training in the relevant economic and legal concepts and techniques to equip you with the tools that will help you successfully design, implement and assess environmental policy in a variety of settings.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempepl

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence of theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory and complete a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words. Taught modules may be assessed by either written examination or coursework or by a combination of assessment formats.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Fundamentals of environmental economics
- International environmental law I
- Environmental values
- Environmental policy assessment and evaluation
- International environmental law II
- Energy and climate change
- Rural environment: property, planning and policy
- Economic development and land use policies
- Climate change policy and land development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Feedback and guidance is given to assist students in developing and drafting the dissertation research project. Feedback sessions are arranged by module leaders following examinations.

Assessment

A dissertation of between 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Assessment of subject modules varies and includes written examinations, individual and group project work. Some modules may be assessed in more than one format.

Assessment of subject modules varies, written examinations are used for some modules, these will normally be two-hour papers.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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