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Masters Degrees (Personality Disorder)

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MSc in Personality Disorder (Practice Development) aims to shed light on this complex area of practice for the mental health professional. Read more
MSc in Personality Disorder (Practice Development) aims to shed light on this complex area of practice for the mental health professional. Increasingly on the agenda since national policy developments such as ‘Personality Disorder: No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion’ (DoH, 2003), the impetus to acknowledge personality disorder as a mainstream mental health activity continues with NICE guidelines in 2009. Such guidance outlines the development of services for individuals with personality disorder in all settings, including primary and secondary care. It recognises the importance of increasing specialist knowledge and staff development. The MSc Personality Disorder through practice development is an innovative course, which provides students with an opportunity to enhance their understanding and practice within the area of personality disorder. Beyond this, it also aims to develop practitioners who can function at an advanced level and provide leadership and direct service development and planning for contemporary practice.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MSc Personality Disorder (Practice Development) is a part-time programme of study. This means that you can enrol for up to 4 modules per year. For many healthcare practitioners, working full-time, this would be a heavy workload. If you enrol for the MSc award at the start of your programme of study, you will be expected to complete within 3 – 5 years.

The course attempts to discuss the key themes in current thinking around personality disorder, including the following themes:
-Classification and nosology
-Models and theories of personality disorder
-Ideological, ethical, and philosophical issues
-Assessment processes
-Risk assessment and management
-Team working and communication
-Therapeutic environments and interventions
-Critiquing research
-Service development and design

The content reflects the need to develop evidence based practice and allows students to consider the main issues in the area of personality disorder.

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Increasingly on the agenda since national policy developments such as ‘Personality Disorder. No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion’ (DoH, 2003), the impetus to acknowledge personality disorder as a mainstream mental health activity continues with NICE guidelines in 2009. Read more
Increasingly on the agenda since national policy developments such as ‘Personality Disorder: No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion’ (DoH, 2003), the impetus to acknowledge personality disorder as a mainstream mental health activity continues with NICE guidelines in 2009. Such guidance outlines the development of services for individuals with personality disorder in all settings, including primary and secondary care. It recognises the importance of increasing specialist knowledge and staff development. The MSc Personality Disorder by Research is an innovative course, which provides students with an opportunity not only to enhance their skills and understanding of research issues, but also engage in research focusing specifically on personality disorder. The course recognises the centrality of linking practice to research as a major tenant of moving the agenda forward in personality disorder.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students will undertake a variety of assessments including essays, case study, student initiated project, critical dialogue, research proposal, and dissertation or dissertation by papers.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MSc Personality Disorder is a part-time programme of study. This means that you can enrol for up to 4 modules per year. For many healthcare practitioners, working full-time, this would be a heavy workload. If you enrol for the MSc award at the start of your programme of study, you will be expected to complete within 3 – 5 years.

The course attempts to discuss the key themes in current thinking around personality disorder, including the following themes:
-Classification and nosology
-Models and theories of personality disorder
-Ideological, ethical, and philosophical issues
-Assessment processes
-Risk assessment and management
-Team working and communication
-Therapeutic environments and interventions
-Research process
-Critiquing research
-Contextual methodology and design
-Service development and design

The content reflects the need to develop evidence based practice and allows students to consider the main issues in the area of personality disorder.

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The Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Personality Disorder can be studied as a stand-alone award, or can be taken as the first year of the MSc in Personality Disorder, for which there are two routes. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Personality Disorder can be studied as a stand-alone award, or can be taken as the first year of the MSc in Personality Disorder, for which there are two routes: MSc (Research) and MSc (Practice Development). Both are interprofessional learning environments and aim to meet the knowledge and understanding framework promoted by the Department of Health, to assist practitioners to gain the knowledge and skills required to work with the client suffering from a personality disorder to achieve recovery.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The PG Cert in Personality Disorder is delivered at 'Indigo', at Ashworth Hospital, Maghull. This means that you have access to their learning facilities as well as those at UCLan. (Subsequent years of the MSc programmes are delivered at UCLan's Preston Campus).

There are three marked assignments, an essay, a case study and a critical appraisal of a practice document.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The PG Cert in Personality Disorder is aimed at practitioners who recognise the complexities of the client group and who aim to increase capacity of the service to meet the client needs. You will be taught by academics with clinical experience in the field as well as a number of guest lecturers who are specialists in providing therapy for people with personality disorder. Service users also contribute to the delivery of the programme. The course is managed by academics, clinicians, past and previous students and service users. You will learn about the theoretical context of personality disorder as well as therapeutic approaches to assisting the person with a personality disorder to recovery. Case presentations and assignments that engage with your own practice are utilised to assist you to develop positive ways of working with this complex client group.

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The programme provides a focused qualification in working with people who have a diagnosis of personality disorder. There has been a significant shift in the current and future provision of care and support for people with personality disorder and those who work with them. Read more
The programme provides a focused qualification in working with people who have a diagnosis of personality disorder.

About the programme

There has been a significant shift in the current and future provision of care and support for people with personality disorder and those who work with them. This programme will give you the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge about the needs of people with personality disorder in a variety of settings. You will extend your knowledge, understanding and skills to support and meet the needs of the challenging experiences faced by people who are often stigmatised, isolated and rejected by society. You will be taught by lecturers with a wide range of knowledge about personality disorder from diverse perspectives. In addition, an important contribution will be made from clinical experts in the School of Forensic Mental Health (SoFMH) and the health sector across Scotland.

Your learning

You will study three modules at SCQF Level 9: Theory of Personality Disorder; Risk Assessment and Risk Management; and Interventions and Strategies for dealing with people who have personality disorder. The first two modules can be taken as stand-alone modules. If you wish to complete the Graduate Certificate you will need to complete all three modules.

Further study

On successful completion, further study options could include the Postgraduate Certificate in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or the MSc Vulnerability.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates of this programme will have broadened their knowledge of personality disorder and enhanced their professional credentials particularly for those in the community or forensic mental health settings, as well as criminal justice social workers and mental health practitioners working in the Scottish Prison Service or police custody settings.

State-of-the-art facilities

Our campuses are equipped with artificial simulated environments with contemporary healthcare technology, where you’ll learn in a realistic context, to put your knowledge into practice. The unpredictability of patient symptoms are mimicked using sophisticated software in a clinical ward setting, ranging from low to high dependency beds.

Investment in the Domus Initiative – an older adult artificial home environment – provides you with experience in caring for older people and dementia care. In a first for the Scottish university sector, we have established A Community Orientated Resource for Nursing (ACORN) where students can practice within a simulated primary care environment.

Lanarkshire and Paisley campuses also provide midwifery students with excellent learning and teaching environments with facilities and equipment that includes a birthing room with maternal simulator and a birthing pool for simulated water births.

Life-changing research

We work jointly with a range of partners, both nationally and internationally, on our research interests, and this directly informs teaching at UWS – which means that you’ll learn from the experts.

Our programmes are informed by practice and all of our academic staff are members of the School’s Institute of Healthcare Policy and
Practice. Some of our most recent initiatives include –

• the launch of a new resource, ‘Jenny’s Diary’, which will provide an invaluable tool for families and practitioners to help people with a learning disability understand their diagnosis of dementia

• the development of a new ‘Philosophy of Care’ in partnership with Broomfield Court Care Home in Glasgow, which will look at ways of enhancing the culture and care within a care setting

• we have collaborated with Ayrshire Hospice to launch the first University Hospice in Scotland to help improve the lives of people with life-limiting illness, their families, partners and carers across Ayrshire & Arran; and Ardgowan Hospice in Greenock, with it becoming a University Teaching Hospice and launching a two-year research project with the University aimed at revolutionising the way palliative
care is delivered to improve the patient journey

• the launch of Dumfries & Galloway Recovery College – the first of its kind in Scotland – which offers short courses designed to enhance self-belief, identify ambitions and encourage learning

• in partnership with Edinburgh Napier University and the University of Edinburgh, the mental health team lead research into the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical and academic performance in student nurses

• we are working with the Glasgow Improving Cancer Journey Programme to evaluate this groundbreaking intervention in cancer care in Scotland

• we have launched a new state-of-the-art microbiology lab which will form a research base in the fight against Healthcare Associated Infection

• a collaboration with a number of European partners to develop shared academic and practicebased programmes to prepare family health nurses in Europe

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This MSc provides the academic training required for a career as a forensic psychologist- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-forensic-psychology/. Read more
This MSc provides the academic training required for a career as a forensic psychologist- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-forensic-psychology/

Are you interested in training to become a forensic psychologist?

Or are you already working in the criminal justice or forensic mental health systems and keen to learn more about the theory and practice behind forensic psychology?

The programme will introduce you to a range of psychological theories, methods and processes within the context of the legal, criminal and civil justice systems.

Based at a research-led London university with strong links to forensic services, you’ll be taught by world-class researchers, and experienced practitioners from the NHS, and the prison and probation service.

Led by chartered forensic clinical psychologist Dr Caoimhe McAnena, the MSc also includes contributions from world-class researchers and practitioners who will teach on the programme and supervise research projects.

We have been awarded full British Psychological Society (BPS) accreditation, which will give you the opportunity to gain Graduate and/or Chartered Membership of the Society.

Placement

One of the major strengths of this course is our strong links with local forensic mental health services. For 2015 entry we offered up to five studentships that covered tuition fees and a placement opportunity, enabling students to study part-time while working part-time in an NHS or prison setting.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Fiona Gabbert.

Modules & Structure

Overview

The course will cover the assessment and treatment of offenders, risk assessment methods, and treatment of offenders with mental health and personality disorders.

There will be a focus on criminal investigations by examining psychological issues in eyewitness identification, investigative interviewing of witnesses and suspects, psychological profiling and detecting deception.

You'll also explore legal and criminological concepts relevant to contemporary social issues and organisations. Issues relating to ethics, human rights, professional practice and research will be emphasised to provide a firm grounding for further professional training and practice.

By completing this programme you will:

Develop your knowledge and understanding of the application of psychology to processes in the criminal and civil justice system (eg investigation, trial, the work of the expert witness)
Develop a thorough knowledge of psychological theories and interventions in relation to a range of specific client groups, such as sexual and violent offenders, people with personality disorder and mental health difficulties, juveniles and victims of crime
Be introduced to a range of psychometric instruments used widely within forensic psychology, and develop your skills in interpreting and communicating the outcome of these assessments
Develop the knowledge and skills required to undertake forensic psychological research, including the design, implementation and interpretation of service evaluations, clinical audit, and outcome research within forensic settings

Structure

The programme is comprised of 5 core modules totalling 150 credits and 2 option modules totalling 30 credits.

The core modules will include:

Psychology and Law
Investigation in Forensic Psychology
Assessment and Intervention in Forensic Psychology
Applied research design and analysis
Research project

Two option modules may be selected from a range of courses offered in the Department of Psychology, for example:

Addictive Behaviours
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Self and Relationships
Psychology and Education
Social-Moral Development

Professional training

This new programme aims to satisfy the academic component of professional training in forensic psychology. Accreditation by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as meeting the requirement for Stage One of the BPS Diploma in Forensic Psychology has been applied for. When accredited, successful completion will allow you to enrol in the BPS Qualification in Forensic Psychology (Stage Two) with the aim of achieving the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP) Qualification in Forensic Psychology, and becoming a Chartered Psychologist with the DFP and Practitioner Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will be well-qualified a wide range careers in:

-the criminal justice system
-health services
-civil society

Relevant career opportunities are available in the:

-prison and probation service
-NHS
-police and voluntary sector organisations

Many of these posts will be training positions to allow the completion of the Stage Two qualification in Forensic Psychology described above.

Other entry requirements

Subject to having GBC accreditation, completion of this Masters course will fulfil the requirements of Stage 1 training to become a Chartered Psychologist. For non GBC candidates the qualification will not be recognised as fulfilling Stage 1 DFP training, but will apply retrospectively if GBC is obtained at a later date.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama. Read more

Summary

Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama.

The MA Dramatherapy programme at Roehampton offers unique training within the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. Drawing heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of “rites of passage” and the importance of “myth”, the programmes offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy at various levels.

On this course, you will learn to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process for a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You will also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally-recognised professional qualification.

The programme consists of three stages, which offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy. In Stage One, you will be introduced to basic theatre skills and use these creatively to work with established stories and characters. This progresses into an exploration of the personal identifications that we have with stories and myths, and an understanding of the deep foundations within many cultural traditions of using ritual, drama and performance for the enhancement of health. In Stage Two, the focus moves on to employing drama and theatre processes as vehicles for exploring our own inter-personal and internal ‘dramas’.

Stage Three is where you will conduct your own piece of practical investigation or research into the literature and theory-base of dramatherapy practice. The Dramatherapy programme will provide you with a broad range of skills enabling you to pursue your own research interests across a wide spectrum of dramatherapy practice and theory.

Content

You will study a range of topics including how to crafting therapeutic drama stories, understanding the individual and group process, Ritual Theatre, working with myths, paratheatrical explorations and the art of structure when working in dramatherapy.

Our research areas include individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist; and the multidisciplinary team.

Alongside the experiential focus of the training, the programme also aims to develop the necessary understanding and reflective capacity required to practice as a professional dramatherapist. This is achieved through workshops, lecture series and clinical application seminars, as well as through assessed clinical placements.

We also offer introductory courses which provide a useful background to those working in related professions or anyone simply wishing to find out more about the work. For information on our Introduction Courses, Summer Schools and Foundation Course in Dramatherapy, see the Psychology Short Courses.

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The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Working collaboratively with NOMS Cymru (National Offender Management Services, Wales), helps keep the programme up to date with strategy development and policy decisions. Regular contributions from practitioners within the Principality enable students to understand more about services within Wales and their impact on our society locally. We also have many national contributors who share their extensive knowledge and experience.​

Due to the popularity of this programme you should submit your application at the earliest opportunity, and at the very latest by 29th July. ​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology---MSc-.aspx

​Course Content​​

Forensic Psychology is the practice and application of psychological research relevant to crime, policing, the courts, the criminal and civil justice system, offenders, prison, secure settings, offender management, health and academic settings as well as private practice.

It looks at the role of environmental, psychosocial, and socio-cultural factors that may contribute to crime or its prevention. The primary aim of Forensic Psychology as an academic discipline is to develop understanding of the processes underlying criminal behaviour and for this improved understanding to impact on the effective management and rehabilitation of different groups of offenders in all settings within the criminal justice system.

The first aim of the programme is to provide students with a thorough and critical academic grounding in the evidence relating to environmental, cultural, cognitive and biological factors that may contribute to a wide variety of forms of offending. The programme will encourage students to consider the role and limitations of causal explanations for offending in the development of offender treatments, services and policy.

The second aim of the programme is to introduce students to the basic professional competencies for working in the many settings where forensic psychology is practiced, including skills related to inter-disciplinary working, risk assessment, ethics, continuing professional development, report writing and differences in practice when working with offenders, victims, the courts and the police.

The programme aims to produce Masters degree graduates with the ability to understand the limitations of the conceptual underpinnings of interventions and assessments used in forensic psychology and who are able therefore to engage in critical evaluation of the evidence base upon which their own practice will eventually be based. The programme will specifically avoid providing any formal supervised practice. Its aim is to produce reflective scientist-practitioners who will be ready to engage with the next stage of training (i.e. BPS Stage 2 or HCPC route) towards registration as a Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Students will complete the following taught modules and will also be required to conduct a novel, supervised research dissertation with participants preferably drawn from a forensic setting:

Research Methods and Design (30 credits)
The aim of this module is to extend students knowledge and experience of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Topics covered include: randomised control trials, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, Power analysis, Regression, Non parametric methods, interviews, discourse analysis, grounded theory, reflective analysis and psychometric evaluation.

Forensic Mental Health (20 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical examination of the relationship between mental illness, personality disorder, learning disability and criminal behaviour. The module will encourage students to view the mental health needs of offenders in the broadest possible context and to appreciate the inter-disciplinary nature of services available to mentally disordered offenders, difficulties in accessing those services and problems for custodial adjustment presented by specific psychiatric diagnoses

Professional Practice and Offender Management (20 credits)
The focus of this module is the professional practice of forensic psychology. The module builds on the groundwork laid by earlier modules and covers professional skills and the types of interventions that a practicing forensic psychologist may engage in. The topics covered by this module include ethics, report writing, working with other agencies, and working with offenders and victims.

Psychological Assessments and Interventions (20 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the reduction of re-offending by convicted criminals. The central focus of the module is the 'what works' literature. A range of topics will be covered demonstrating the broad application of psychology to offender rehabilitation in the Criminal Justice System, and within Wales particularly. These topics include: (1) Offender assessment: risk, need and protective factors (2) factors affecting response to treatment; (3) ethical issues of compulsory treatment; and (4) interventions for a range of offending behaviours.

Theories of Criminal Behaviour (10 credits)
The module aims to examine the contribution made by biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives to our understanding of the aetiology of criminal behaviour. It will explore psychological theories of a variety of offending behaviours such as: violence, aggression, domestic abuse, sex offending, vehicle crime, fire setting as well as gangs and gangs membership.

Legal Psychology (10 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the law, and the central focus of the module is evidence. A range of topics will be covered, demonstrating the broad application of psychology within the legal system. These topics include the interviewing of suspects and witnesses, vulnerable victims, offender profiling and the detection of deception.

Addiction and Psychological Vulnerabilities (10 credits)
This module informs students about different factors that may contribute to psychological vulnerability in offenders and victims. A variety of topics will be covered, including issues around the concept of addictive behaviours, vulnerability and the protection of vulnerable adults, including factors which may increase vulnerability to offending and victimisation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Teaching on the MSc Forensic Psychology Programme is predominantly conducted in small groups and adopts an interactive approach. The Research Methods and Design module and the Dissertation workshops are the only part of the programme which is taught in a larger group of around 40 to 50 students as opposed to between 10 and 20 students on the core modules. As a result teaching involves a range of discussions, activities, evaluations of papers, case studies and role play exercises. The focus within the programme is on both content and key skills to develop specialists in the field of forensic psychology with flexible generic skills. These experiences also help to foster student development and confidence as independent life-long learners.

Student learning is promoted through a variety of learning and teaching methods. These include: lectures, workshops, online learning through the virtual learning environment, Moodle, as well as self directed learning. Each student will have an allocated personal tutor to support them through their period of study.

As this programme is accredited by the BPS, there is a requirement for students to attend at least 80% of the taught sessions for the programme.

Assessment

The MSc is assessed by a range of different coursework assignments – e.g. presentations, reports, essays, reflective reports, academic posters, research proposal. There are no examinations.

Employability & Careers​

An MSc in Forensic Psychology is the first step (stage one) in gaining Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). The MSc in Forensic Psychology will provide the knowledge base and applied research skills that will provide the foundation for stage two of the chartered process that requires a minimum of two years of full-time supervised practice with an appropriate client group.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This two-year part-time course offers experienced clinicians and practitioners from a range of professional backgrounds a unique opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge and skills in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Read more
This two-year part-time course offers experienced clinicians and practitioners from a range of professional backgrounds a unique opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge and skills in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Our aim is to foster a community of practitioners with the expertise to deliver high quality MBCT to patients, and to contribute to the development and dissemination of this innovative approach to mental and physical healthcare.

The course is offered by the Oxford Mindfulness Centre at the Oxford University Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education. Successful completion of the course leads to an award of a Master of Studies by the University of Oxford.

Oxford has been internationally recognised as a centre of excellence in cognitive therapy (CT) research, treatment development and dissemination for nearly 20 years. It has an unusually rich concentration of acknowledged experts in CT and a first class reputation for providing high quality training courses and clinical supervision. A growing team of Oxford clinicians and researchers now specialise in MBCT, and have successfully developed and delivered a range of MBCT training events, including introductory workshops, masterclasses, residential training retreats, a foundational training course, and a Master of Studies degree course. The Masters programme was initiated by Professor Mark Williams, one of the founders of MBCT, and the team includes Professor William Kuyken, a leading figure in the development of MBCT and the current Director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-mindfulness-based-cognitive-therapy

The Rationale for the Course

MBCT was developed by John Teasdale, Mark Williams and Zindel Segal as a manualised, class-based skills training programme for people with recurrent depression. It integrates elements of cognitive therapy with intensive practice of mindfulness meditation, with the aim of helping people to relate differently to pain and distress. Randomised clinical trials support its efficacy in preventing relapse in people who have experienced repeated episodes of depression, and it is now recommended in the guidelines of the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) as a cost-effective treatment of choice for this increasingly common problem.

Because its central principles are transdiagnostic, MBCT holds promise as a helpful intervention in a wide range of settings and with a broad range of problem areas, both physical and emotional. Preliminary research suggests that mindfulness-based approaches can be helpful to patients with problems as diverse as chronic pain, psoriasis, cancer, health anxiety, chronic fatigue syndrome, stress, generalised anxiety disorder, psychosis and bipolar disorder where there is a history of suicidal thoughts or behaviour.

MBCT has attracted a great deal of interest within the mental health and behavioural medicine communities. However opportunities to extend preliminary learning and to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for becoming aneffective teacher are limited. This means that practitioners wishing to use the approach with their clients have great difficulty in accessing appropriate training and supervision. The Oxford course is designed to address this need. It offers an opportunity for in-depth learning, and aims to create a body of clinicians with the knowledge and skills they require in order to teach, develop and disseminate MBCT effectively.

Programme details

The course is taught, part-time, over two years, and is organised in nine three-day teaching blocks (held in Oxford) and three residential training retreats (four days and seven days in Year I and seven days in Year II). In addition to the taught component, students will need to set aside 6-7 hours per week for private study, personal practice of MBCT, completion of written assignments. Participants on courses with similar demands confirms that this time is crucial to completing the course successfully.

On successful completion of the taught components of the course and associated assignments, the award of the Master's degree is made by the University of Oxford, under the aegis of its Continuing Education Board.

Course Content

The course addresses the theoretical basis of MBCT, including relevant aspects of cognitive and clinical psychology, as well as aspects of Buddhist psychology and philosophy on which MBCT draws. It also provides opportunities for students to develop the practical skills they need in order to translate knowledge and understanding into competent MBCT practice, that is, students are expected to develop for themselves the understanding and skills they will be teaching to patients. (This is analogous to the requirement for experience of personal therapy in the education of psychodynamic psychotherapists).

The course covers four main topic areas:

- Theory, including: relevant cognitive science (e.g. attention, memory, judgement, metacognition, executive function); clinical theory (e.g. cognitive theories of the development and maintenance of emotional disorder and the principles underlying MBCT); relevant aspects of Buddhist psychology and philosophy and their contribution to MBCT

- Research related to the ongoing development of MBCT, and investigating the areas of theory outlined above

- Clinical applications in a range of problem areas, for example, depression, chronic fatigue, pain, psychosis and borderline personality disorder

- Practice including the development of personal experience of mindfulness meditation, the capacity to relate this experience to theory and research, and the skills needed to instruct patients/clients in MBCT, drawing on relevant theory, research and clinical literature

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You will gain an insight into how to use CBT creatively and collaboratively with clients and how to assess, formulate, provide interventions and evaluate your work with clients. Read more
You will gain an insight into how to use CBT creatively and collaboratively with clients and how to assess, formulate, provide interventions and evaluate your work with clients. This course focuses on interventions with clients who have anxiety and depression right through to people with addictions, personality disorder and schizophrenia as well as other complex needs. There are opportunities to study new developments in CBT, family interventions and how CBT is used with people who have physical health issues.

Key benefits:

• Route to become and accredited cognitive behavioural psychotherapist
• Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) has a crucial role to play in health and social care provision today
• Delivered by a highly qualified team of psychotherapy and counseling staff from a variety of professional backgrounds

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/cognitive-behavioural-psychotherapy

[[Suitable for: ]]

A wide range of people including cognitive behavioural psychotherapists, and anyone who would like to enhance their existing knowledge and skills in CBP

Programme details:

This course runs part-time for half a day per week over three years, or full-time for two half days per week. Depending on your level of experience and professional interests you can choose to study a variety of modules.

Format

Learning is delivered via blended learning methods including seminars and master classes, critical analysis of case studies, relevant literature and research and reflection on practical applications. Use of video/audio, role play and skills assessment are essential to this course in years one and two to ensure competency of the student in practising CBT. The use of Blackboard as a learning resource is also an important element in all of the modules on the course. It is anticipated that a generous part of this work will be focused on enhancing self-awareness and using CBT tools and techniques on the self using self-help texts and interactive activities. It is anticipated that if the students can use some CBT tools on themselves that this increases self-awareness of their own interpersonal issues and also assists in practicing methods on themselves prior to using these with clients.

Modules

Core:

• Introduction to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (30 credits)
• Frontiers of Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy (30 credits)
• Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Anxiety Disorders and Addictive Behaviour (30 credits)

One module from:

• Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Complex Cases (30 credits)
• Family Interventions (30 credits)
• Psychosocial Interventions (30 credits)
• Mindfulness based approaches with CBT (30 credits)
• CBT for children and young people (30 credits)
• Clinical supervision (30 cred

Assessment

• Tutor and peer practical in-class assessment
• Case studies
• Reflective assignments and portfolios of learning

Career potential:

On completion of this course you will be able to work with clients with many different needs in a variety of settings, including prisons, voluntary agencies, education settings and religious communities.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This module is designed for health or social care-professionals working with people with severe and enduring mental health difficulties that have so-called “complex” care needs. Read more
This module is designed for health or social care-professionals working with people with severe and enduring mental health difficulties that have so-called “complex” care needs.

This module can help further develop your therapy skills with a focus on working with people with a diagnosis of psychosis and personality disorder. It draws upon a range of psychological therapies, including recent innovations in strengths-based cognitive behavioural therapy and ‘third wave’ or ‘contextual’ psychotherapeutic practice, acceptance and commitment therapy, schema therapy, mindfulness and principles of positive psychology.

Why Bradford?

The key to what differentiates the University of Bradford offer for specialist skills and post-registration development (SSPRD) in Mental Health practice is flexibility and quality. Bradford also seeks to be responsive and innovative in the development and delivery of its SSPRD courses to meet the continually changing demands of clinical practitioners. We now offer, for example, a new module in Aspects of Mental Health Care and Psychological Wellbeing for Health Professionals. This is specifically for health care professionals not from a mental health background to enhance their understanding of working with people’s mental health difficulties to develop and bring those skills to your clinical area.

The very latest research, policy, guidelines and best-practice are synthesized in the delivery of these courses by highly experienced clinical-academics.

For those practitioners with a firm mental health foundation we offer a postgraduate certificate in cognitive behavioural therapies in our Professional Healthcare Practice programme, co-delivered by clinicians who are the lead in their clinical area and well versed in the complexities of integrating psychological approaches into nursing practice.

Our learning materials are further informed by the Scottish Recovery Network and NHS Education for Scotland that have been at the forefront of developing this kind of clinical practice.

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.
The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Learning activities and assessment

Topics covered include:
-Collaborative Case Formulation
-Schema Therapy
-Mindfulness
-Values Based Approaches
-Strengths Focused Approaches
-Integrating Positive Psychology
-Working with Change Difficulties
-Self-Practice

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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Are you a registered health or social care professional looking to develop your advanced practitioner knowledge and skills within mental health practice?… Read more
Are you a registered health or social care professional looking to develop your advanced practitioner knowledge and skills within mental health practice? Our MSc Advanced Professional Practice (Mental Health Practitioner) is a clinically-focused specialist pathway designed to develop enhanced mental health assessment and intervention skills for nurses and other healthcare professionals to effectively support people who are suffering from mental health problems, in their recovery journey.

Key features

-A contemporary and dynamic programme responsive to the changing health and social care environment; including telehealth and sustainability
-Develop clinical skills in contemporary, evidence based mental health assessment, formulation and interventions.
-Engage in reflective practice to support person centred and recovery orientated ways of working.
-Experience a number of formative and summative assessed role play interactions to boost confidence and transfer these skills into your practice.
-Undertake modules which will enable you to achieve a named pathway award in Mental Health to support your career development.
-Embed independent and supplementary prescribing into your masters degree (subject to profession).
-Opportunities to study in an inter-professional setting with inter-professional core and optional modules delivered by an academic team with extensive experience as well as a close relationship with clinicians contributing to teaching.
-Be equipped to take on lead roles in management, clinical practice and/or education.
-Part time programme offering flexible delivery and exit points to support a learner centred approach.

Course details

Postgraduate certificate - to achieve a postgraduate certificate, you will need to earn 60 credits by undertaking three core modules.

Postgraduate diploma - to achieve a postgraduate diploma, you will need to earn 120 credits by undertaking up to six modules: three core, one pathway specific and up to two optional.

Master of Science - for a full masters degree, you will need to earn a total of 180 credits. You will study the same core modules as the postgraduate diploma, with two further core modules in the final year.

Year 1
-APP701 Advancing Practice in Context
-APP702 Advancing Research Knowledge in Practice 1
-APP705 Advanced Psychosocial Assessment and Formulation

Year 2
You must gain 20 credits from a pathway specific module and 40 credits from optional modules in Year 2 to gain a postgraduate diploma. Examples of the pathway specific and optional modules available:
-APP706 – CBT interventions for mental health professionals (mood disorders)
-APP707 - CBT interventions for mental health professionals (psychosis)
-APP708 – Working with families (psychosis)
-APP709 – Working with people with a diagnosis of personality disorder
-HEA577 – Supplementary prescribing
-HEAD709 – Non-medical prescribing: Independent and supplementary prescribing for designated allied health professionals (physiotherapists and podiatrists)
-NMP702 - Non-medical prescribing: Independent and supplementary prescribing for nurses and midwives

Final year
-APP703 - Advancing research knowledge in practice 2
-SPP701 – Substantive professional project

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Modules are selected from the following. Read more

Modules

Modules are selected from the following: PSYC6106 Evidence-based Treatments for Anxiety Disorders (or 10 CATS version), PSYC6107 Evidence-based Treatments for Anxiety Disorders (or 20 CATS version), PSYC6088 CBT Theory and Skills II, PSYC6089 CBT for Depression, PSYC6092 CBT for Personality Disorders, PSYC6091 CBT for Psychosis, PSYC6095 CBT Supervision 1: Evidence-Based Treatments for People with Axis I Problems (Anxiety and Depression), PSYC6096 CBT Supervision 2: Disorder-Specific Treatments for people with anxiety disorders, PSYC6097 CBT Supervision 3: Evidence-Based Treatments for People with Depression, PSYC6098 CBT Supervision 4: Introduction to Working with People with Personality Disorders, PSYC6099 CBT Supervision 5: Further Skills for Working with People with Personality Disorders, PSYC6100 CBT Supervision 6: Introduction to Working with People with Psychosis, PSYC6101 CBT Supervision 7: Further Skills for Working with People with Psychosis, PSYC6125 Supervisory Skills Module, PSYC6126 Working with SIM

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The MSc Advanced Clinical Practice offers registered practitioners a flexible, bespoke and student-centred programme of study that aims to meet their personal and professional development needs as they progress within their role towards advanced expert practice. Read more
The MSc Advanced Clinical Practice offers registered practitioners a flexible, bespoke and student-centred programme of study that aims to meet their personal and professional development needs as they progress within their role towards advanced expert practice.

The Master of Science Award at the University of Lincoln is underpinned by the four framework pillars of advanced clinical practice as outlined by Health Education East Midlands (HEEM); Clinical Skills, Management and Leadership, Education and Research.

It is fundamental to this programme that each bespoke student pathway will contain a minimum level of each pillar in order to be deemed competent, however the individual route-way the practitioner takes will be determined by their own clinical practice role.

Within the award the ‘Clinical Skills’ pillar will always be the most prominent and each combination of modules aims to continuously promote the core principles of Advanced Clinical Practice as defined by HEEM; Autonomous practice, critical thinking, high levels of decision making and problem solving, values based care and improving practice.

All modules below are available as a stand-alone, credit bearing, short course in order to support flexibility in professional development.

Stage 1 - Core
-Pathophysiology for Healthcare (30 credits)
-Assessment, Diagnosis and Clinical Judgement in Practice (30 credits)

Stage 2 - Optional
-People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (15 credits)
-Best Interests Assessor (15 credits)
-Professional Development Portfolio (15 credits)
-Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (15 credits)
-Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (15 credits)
-Assessment and Management of Minor Illness and Minor Injury (30 credits)
-Advanced Urgent Care (30 credits)
-Enhanced Practice in Acute Mental Health Care (30 credits)
-Older Adult Mental Health (30 credits)
-Proactive Management of Long Term Conditions (30 credits)
-Non-Medical Prescribing (60 credits)

Stage 3
-Service Evaluation for Clinical Practice (15 credits)
-Service Transformation Project (45 credits)
OR
-Non-Medical Prescribing (60 credits)

How You Study

Blended teaching and learning is used wherever possible in recognition that students on this programme are working professionals and students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning.

As a student on the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice you will be allocated a named Personal Tutor who will endeavour to support you throughout the programme.

Students are expected to nominate a named Clinical Supervisor who will act as a critical friend, teacher, mentor and assessor throughout the programme. This is designed to provide you with a framework of stability and support in order to fully contextualise your learning and role within your professional service area.

This individual may, if appropriate, act as the Designated Medical Practitioner should you undertake the Non-Medical Prescribing certificate as part of your overall Award. The University will provide the opportunity for your nominated Clinical Supervisor and/or Designated Medical Practitioner to undertake training, guidance and ongoing support to help fulfil their role.

Due to the nature of this programme weekly contact hours may vary. Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study, exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend at least two - three hours in independent study. For more detailed information specific to this course please contact the programme leader.

Taught Days module 1: Pathophysiology for Healthcare (30 credits)

Every Thursday commencing 23/02/17 for 10 weeks

Further module timetables to be confirmed.

How You Are Assessed

In line with the learning and teaching strategy for the MSc Advanced Clinical Practice, the assessment and feedback strategy is also based upon the pedagogical philosophy of Student as Producer. The work assessed throughout this Award will be topical, current and will endeavour to be relevant to the student’s professional working practices. Assessments have been designed to be robust, innovative and fit for purpose; therefore allowing you the opportunity to demonstrate that you are consistently competent and capable of the role, both academically and in real-life, complex and dynamic service environments.

Assessments will be undertaken by a range of appropriately experienced and competent assessors, including academic staff, medical practitioners and experienced healthcare professionals, and it is through this collaborative and inter-professional assessment process that the University seeks to gain full assurance that the student is fit for practice as an Advanced Practitioner in their clinical service area.

Assessment methods are likely to include, but are not limited to, written assignments, exams, presentations and projects to test theoretical knowledge, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), case based assessments, direct observation of clinical skills and the development of a clinical competence portfolio. Formative assessments will be conducted whenever possible, aiming to prepare you for the assessment process and to provide developmental feedback to support the learning process. Formative assessment activities are integrated into the programme and focus crucially on developing the autonomy and research capacities of students in line with the Student as Producer ethos. The formative assessment process will promote student engagement and collaboration, to enable peer learning and knowledge discovery and exchange to take place between students, staff and professional colleagues in service areas.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Interviews & Applicant Days

Applicants will be screened in terms of professional suitability, professional references and eligibility for funding and sponsor approval (if required) prior to being made an offer on the programme.

If an applicant has applied for Non-Medical prescribing as part of the programme they will need to also undergo an interview process and meet the individual entry criteria for that programme.

Modules

-Advanced Urgent Care (Option)
-Assessment and management of minor illness and minor injury (Option)
-Assessment, Diagnosis and Clinical Judgement in Practice
-Best Interests Assessor (Option)
-Enhanced practice in acute mental health care (Option)
-Older Adult Mental Health (Option)
-Pathophysiology for Healthcare
-People, Personality and Disorder in Mental Health Care (M) (Option)
-Prescribing Effectively (Option)
-Prescribing in Context (Option)
-Proactive management of long term conditions (Option)
-Professional development portfolio (Option)
-Service Evaluation for Clinical Practice (Option)
-Service transformation project (Option)
-Supporting Learning and Assessment in Practice (Masters Level) (Option)
-The Consultation (Option)
-Therapeutic Interventions for Mental Health Recovery (Level M) (Option)

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Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. Read more
Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology.

We offer MPhil supervision in the areas of psychology covering Newcastle's research strengths:

Clinical and health psychology

We research developmental disorders of perception and cognition, and the development and assessment of cognitive models of, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for:
-Bipolar disorder
-Psychosis
-Anxiety
-Developmental disorders

Behaviour and evolution

We carry out studies of animal and human behaviour including:
-The evolutionary psychology of mate choice
-Attractiveness and co-operation
-Evolutionary approaches to personality

Visual perception and human cognition

Our research includes:
-Perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Development psychology

We focus on how different cognitive skills develop in children, from memory systems to learning in school. We have particular strength in developmental disorders such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Forensic psychology

Our research includes:
-Investigative interviewing of victims
-Witnesses and suspected offenders of crime, including eye-witness testimony
-Sexual offending, including historical allegations of sexual abuse
-Communication in legal contexts

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