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Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. There are no formal classes on site. Individual courses are offered in a non-traditional way with a distinguished faculty member critiquing your work of creative non-fiction, fiction, book of short stories or volume of poetry. The program is intended for students working on book-length projects. The program is customized to address the particular needs of your manuscript and may include assessments of your handling of plot, story, character, dialogue, pace and style, or may focus on the particular needs of the manuscript as determined by the writing advisor. Graduates have the satisfaction of completing a large body of work which may include all or parts of a novel, volume of short stories or a book of poetry. Students are also referred to writing competitions.

Humber is noted for its exceptional faculty including authors of world stature. This faculty list has included Edward Albee, Martin Amis, Peter Carey, Miriam Toews, David Mitchell, Nino Ricci, David Adams Richards, the late Timothy Findley, Paul Quarrington, the late Carol Shields and Alistair MacLeod. Forthcoming international authors include Samantha Harvey and Tim O’Brien.

A virtual café exists through Blackboard, Humber’s online learning system, to encourage writing students to interact and build a sense of community.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.
• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Canadians still love a good read. They spend 14 percent of their leisure time reading, half of which is spent reading books. The main goal of the program is to improve your writing and publication is a possibility for some. Graduates of this program may use their writing and editing skills in a wide variety of careers and professions in addition to writing books. Some of our graduates write for newspapers, magazines, television and other media. More than 300 Humber School for Writers alumni have published books of fiction or poetry and Dr. Vincent Lam, who won the 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize for his literary debut Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures, is just one of our distinguished former students. Other alumni have also been on the bestseller lists in Canada: Suzanne Desrochers for Bride of New France, Cathy Marie Buchanan for The Painted Girls and Eva Stachniak for Empress of the Night.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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This counselling course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor. Read more
This counselling course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor.

The PG Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. The course is part of a group of counselling courses delivered at the University of South Wales, which have an established national reputation for excellence.

The core integrative model taught is based on the relational approach comprising of three main elements: the Contemporary Relational Psychodynamic Approach, a Humanisitic-Existential approach and third wave elements of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy within a post modern/social constructionist overarching framework. The course facilitates students in developing a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of integrative counselling practice, with a view to them developing their own coherent, ethical and effective approach to counselling practice, which can be adapted for use in a wide range of work settings for short term and long term work. You will also be taken on a journey of self-discovery as the programme demands a high level of reflection and self-awareness.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1756-pg-diploma-integrative-counselling-and-psychotherapy

What you will study

The Postgraduate Diploma focuses on training as an integrative counselling and psychotherapy practitioner. On successful completion, you will be ready to work as a trained Integrative therapist.

Year One:
- Integrative Counselling Skills and Practice: Introduces the core model of the course and provides foundation theory & skills in humanistic/existential and relational psychodynamic counselling practice.

- Applied Integrative Practice: Introduces the foundations theory and skills of Cognitive Behavioural counselling and Mindfulness. Students learn to integrate these approaches in applied practice with client issues.

- Personal Development & Counselling Practice: This module runs throughout the year and places emphasis on personal development group work and skills practice within a sound ethical framework.

Year Two:
- Advanced Integrative Theory & Skills Practice: This module aims to further develop students understanding of core integrative theory taught in the course and how theoretical ideas can be applied to practice. Advanced research practices are introduced with a view to students being able to use research to inform their practice.

- Advanced Applied Practice: The emphasis of this module is on applied practice: showing students how the core integrative model taught can be used to work ethically with the range of client issues typically found in professional counselling practice. Research development is consolidated through students conducting a small-scale piece of research.

- Advanced Personal Development & Counselling Practice: This module runs throughout the year and places emphasis on personal development group work and skills practice within a sound ethical framework.

The Postgraduate Diploma is part of a three year MA Programme. After successful completion of the Diploma stage, which is two years, you can choose whether to proceed to the final Masters year.

Learning and teaching methods

Classes include interactive theoretical lectures, experiential workshops, personal development groups, role plays, skills groups, digital recording of skills sessions for assessment and presentations. In addition, you will need to be in placement seeing ‘real’ clients for the duration of the course and will have to have completed a minimum of 100 hours counselling practice by the end of the two years.

Attendance:
This course takes 2 years part-time to complete.

The PG Diploma is taught over 30 days each academic year. For the 2014/15 academic year the main teaching day will be on a Wednesday. Year one of the programme starts with a two-day block (Wednesday 24th & Thursday 25th September) and finishes with a two-day block (Wednesday & Thursday) at the end of May. In addition, students will be required to attend a weekend workshop each academic year (in year one, this is residential) and two one-day summer workshops. We expect that students attend all teaching sessions, and there is a minimum requirement of 80% attendance in order to complete the course successfully.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

While more practice experience will be required to build the hours to achieve personal BACP accreditation, having successfully completed the formal training hours and assignments, graduates of the course will be ready to look for work in the field of counselling and psychotherapy.

Former students from the course have enhanced their career profile within their current employment or found new positions in the voluntary sector, in health settings, in Higher or Further Education, in Employment Assistance Programmes (EAPs), in business and in private practice. It is also possible to undertake further specialised training in order to work with children and young people, or to apply for a research PhD.

Assessment methods

A range of assessments are used at the PG Diploma stage of this course to test your knowledge, skills, self awareness and practice ability.

Year One: Two essays, Two skills assessments, practice portfolio, research presentation, personal development review and a supervisor’s report

Year Two: A skills assessment, a case study with client audio, an in-class research project and a research portfolio, a personal development review and a supervisor’s report.

Facilities

We offer a suite of five spacious, dedicated rooms used by the counselling / psychotherapy courses, and a digital recording system for use in class.

Personal Therapy

Students on the Postgraduate Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy are encouraged to have therapy to help with their personal and professional development as a counsellor. A course requirement is that students have a minimum of 10 hours personal therapy for each of the two academic years.

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Programme offers core, introductory modules followed by specialised topical modules on the latest aspects of communications technology. Read more
Programme offers core, introductory modules followed by specialised topical modules on the latest aspects of communications technology. Includes an individual research project. Ideal for careers in industry and commerce or further study.

Key benefits

- In depth understanding of the fundamental principles of today’s modern telecommunications systems providing the foundations for further study at PhD level or entrance to the job market in a growing telecommunications industry.

- Unrivalled location in the heart of London giving access to major libraries and leading scientific societies, including the IET.

- Access to speakers of international repute through seminars and external lectures, enabling students to keep abreast of emerging knowledge in the telecommunications field.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/mobile-and-personal-communications-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme offers introductory modules followed by specialised topical courses on the latest aspects of communications technology, including personal and mobile wireless communications, communication networks, advanced digital communications theory and techniques and communications signal processing. You will complete eight taught modules. You will also undertake a substantial individual project.

- Course purpose -

For students wishing to work in the telecommunications industry.

- Course format and assessment -

Lectures; tutorials; seminars. Assessed through: coursework; written examinations; and final project report.

Required modules:

- Individual Research Project
- Communication Theory
- Mobile & Personal Communications Systems
- Random Variables & Stochastic Processes
- Network Theory
- Antennas And Propagation
- Communications Theory
- Digital Communications
- Fundamentals Of Digital Signal Processing
- Individual Project
- Mobile And Personal Communications
- Random Variables And Stochastic Processes
- Telecommunications Networks

Career prospects

Careers in industry and commerce or academic research; further study.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Ranked 7th globally in the QS Distance Online MBA Rankings 2015. The Oxford Brookes Global MBA is the most flexible MBA programme available. Read more
Ranked 7th globally in the QS Distance Online MBA Rankings 2015

The Oxford Brookes Global MBA is the most flexible MBA programme available. Designed for the experienced professional, you can develop your management and leadership skills whilst working wherever you are in the world.

The combination of online and on-campus study allows you to balance your MBA with your personal and professional life. Studying while working means you can apply the latest management thinking directly into your workplace. You can choose to study online with attendance at two face-to-face workshops, or you can choose a more blended programme of on-campus and online learning. You can decide how much face-to-face teaching works best for you.

The Oxford Brookes Global MBA’s principles of connections, collaboration and creativity shape modern leadership. With our global community of participants, you’ll work with people from different countries, cultures and industries. You’ll develop the skills to adapt to the challenges of your managerial future.

Accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/oxford-brookes-mba/

Why choose this course?

- We are accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA) and are ranked 7th globally in the QS Distance Online MBA Rankings 2015.

- Unrivalled flexibility makes the Oxford Brookes Global MBA more achievable. Whatever the demands of your current career we help you to balance your workload and study at times to suit you.

- Our diverse and experienced international MBA community provides impressive global networking opportunities. The diverse age range, different industries, varied professions and contrasting cultures means you access a wealth of experience during your MBA.

- The balanced ratio of male and female students offers a more even cohort than many other MBAs, creating an inclusive and realistic view of the modern working environment.

- You will learn and interact with our MBA community by engaging both face-to-face and online, giving you invaluable experience of today's global business environment by working in virtual teams.

- With a focus on personal and professional development, the Oxford Brookes Global MBA is a life changing experience. Oxford Brookes Global MBA students and alumni go on to influence decisions at the highest levels of their organisations.

Teaching and learning

This MBA programme provides a distinctive, collaborative learning experience. At the core, it emphasises working effectively in diverse teams, from different countries with different technical and organisational backgrounds, and develops your personal and professional competencies. You'll build a network of worldwide contacts and engage with live business projects, enabling you to apply your newly acquired expertise and knowledge directly to your workplace.

Our leading academics on the Oxford Brookes Global MBA programme provide up-to-the-moment, cutting-edge thinking, as well as experience of contemporary business problems. They employ a supportive, collaborative approach to your learning to help you maximise your potential.

Your study experience is highly personal, whether online or face-to-face. Wherever you are living or working during your studies, you are part of an integrated, international cohort of MBA students who network, share experiences and support each other in a collaborative environment.

We are more interested in you and your personal and intellectual development than where you are ranked amongst your peers in terms of ability and achievement. This approach is embedded in our teaching, learning and assessment on the MBA programmes.

Lectures and discussions, role-play exercises, learning packages and seminars are linked with selected case studies and assignments to strengthen your practical analysis and decision-making skills. Your learning experience will be greatly enhanced through the knowledge of life and work that you and your fellow students bring to discussion and debate.

You are put in groups for assessed work where you are presented with a series of leadership challenges. These are designed to stretch you intellectually, as well as providing opportunities for each student to take on a leadership role and receive feedback on their performance from their fellow students. The Developing Leadership Capability module provides a framework for further development of leadership capabilities within a safe and supported environment.

How this course helps you develop

We focus on your career and professional development, with an emphasis on management in practice, will enable you to take the next steps in your career, confident in your own knowledge and abilities.

We educate our students in 'the art and craft of management', equipping you to manage organisations, not simply learn management theory. Our focus is on individual development through collaboration and sharing of best practice.

We offer individual personal and career development guidance alongside a variety of activities which help you acquire the knowledge and skills required to lead and manage.

The Personal and Professional Development module focuses on your career and professional development and is embedded throughout the programme. This important module starts at your induction and culminates with an assessment of your Summative Reflective Action Plan at the end of your programme, which gives you a personal plan to guide you through your future career.

How you use your MBA, your progress and your future career are important elements within the Action Plan. It also helps you to make the most of your learning and development so you benefit from the MBA while studying as well as once you graduate.

Reflective assignments and coaching and leadership challenges provide you with the practical experience to develop your critical thinking skills and leadership capability. At MBA Community events, industry visits and the MBA Summer School you have opportunities to soak up knowledge from industry experts and network with executives.

Careers

We make sure you are well supported for your future career during your MBA programme. As well as the Personal and Professional Development Module, which helps you develop and action plan to guide you through your career, you’ll benefit from our links with industry and working with companies on live commercial projects.

The Business School Alumni Association offers careers advice, events and networking appointments for personal development. As a programme we also benefit from the strong links between alumni and faculty.

Research highlights

Oxford Brookes' Business School has a strengthening research culture and support an expanding research community of research active staff and research students with wide-ranging interests in many specialist areas within the general field of business and management.

Our Business School comprises three distinct departments, each with their own research areas:
- Accounting, Finance and Economics
- Business and Management
- Marketing

Our researchers have been extremely active in disseminating their findings with numerous publications in refereed journals and papers have been presented at conferences in the UK and overseas. Best-selling textbooks have been written in subjects such as marketing, e-marketing, research methods, accounting, financial management and corporate governance.

We have also secured many research grants, often in partnership with other organisations. Researchers have been able to attract funds from such diverse organisations as:
- British Academy
- Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development
- Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
- Economic and Social Research Council
- Learning Skills Councils
- The Leverhulme Trust
- The EU
- The Wellcome Trust.

We have also successfully bid for significant Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) grants, often for research programmes dealing with the processes of learning and teaching, and dissemination of good practice throughout the higher education sector. In addition, we have undertaken consultancy and research to produce reports designed to provide information and competitive advantage to commercial clients.

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The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist.

Who is it for?

The DPsych aims to develop ethical, reflective and professional practitioners of counselling psychology who work collaboratively with their clients to provide high-quality psychological services, drawing on evidence-based psychological practice in the context of a therapeutic relationship characterised by trust, respect, and appreciation for the subjective experience of the person and individuality of the client and their unique world view.

Our programme seeks to sit at the interface of science and practice. We value reflective professional practice and development of practice through the rigor of top class research.

You are equipped to work with a wide range of complex presenting issues; with individual adults and children, couples, families, groups and organisations; short and long term; in single and multi-professional contexts; and through transferring psychological skills to others in multidisciplinary teams.

You are actively supported during your studies by the course team to develop your own personal theory of the evolution, maintenance and resolution of psychological problems, based on your reading, lectures, practical skills workshops, personal development, collaborative learning and clinical and research experience.

We want you to have a stimulating, challenging, inspiring and personally supportive professional training environment in which to develop your knowledge and skills and further develop as a person and professional. We view you as active contributors to your learning and to the overall success of the course, treating each of you with respect and working with you in a genuinely collegial atmosphere as a developing professional.

Objectives

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist registered with the HCPC, and Chartered Psychologist with the BPS.

Our professional, clinical and academic training is combined with the opportunity to develop your own portfolio of placement experience. This equips you to build a successful and fulfilling career in a broad range of settings, including:
-The NHS (e.g. inpatient settings, community mental health teams, specialist services such as early intervention, with different clinical populations e.g. older adults)
-The independent hospital sector
-Forensic settings including HMPS and probation
-Organisations in areas such as occupational health
-The Third (voluntary) sector
-Industry
-Government
-Private practice (including Employee Assistance Programmes)
-Academic and research settings

Placements

In addition to the taught components of the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course, you are also required to complete 400 hours of professional face-to-face client practice in placements and 45 hours of indirect client work; frequent clinical supervision; personal development; 40 hours of personal therapy (at least 15 hours in Year 1); and various pieces of assessment throughout the three years, including a doctoral thesis.

Who arranges the placements?
It is your responsibility to find and arrange your own placements, although advice and support is offered by the Placements Co-ordinator and personal tutors. If your application is successful, on acceptance of a place on the course you will be sent further information about finding placements and available opportunities.

Do placements have to be in London?
No, you can undertake your placements wherever is convenient for you as long as you ensure your supervision is from appropriately qualified professionals. Supervisors should be registered with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a 'Practitioner Psychologist', 'Registered Psychologist', 'Counselling Psychologist' or 'Clinical Psychologist'. All placements arrangements need to be approved by your personal tutor.

Supervision
Supervision should normally be in the ratio of one hour of supervision for every 8 hours of counselling work in Years 1 and 2, with a minimum of one hour of supervision per fortnight. In Year 3, supervision should be in the ratio of one hour for every 8 hours of counselling work, with a minimum of two hours of supervision per month.

Teaching and learning

A wide range of learning and teaching methods are used, including lectures, group discussion, group work, role play, trainee presentations, supervised clinical practice, personal therapy and personal development activities.

Assessment

You will be assessed through role plays, learning logs, skills assessments, essays, process reports, client studies, examination, critical literature review and DPsych portfolio.

Student focus

We want your time on the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course to be as inspiring, challenging and stimulating as it can be. As part of our dedication to enhancing the overall student experience, we support you throughout your studies in many different ways:
-Personal Tutors
-Student-staff liaison committees
-Placements Co-ordinator

Modules

Year one:
-Context, Diversity and Standards in Professional Practice (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 1 (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 2 (30 credits)
-Professional components of counselling psychology (45 credits)
-Personal and professional development (15 credits)
-Cognitive behavioural approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Person-centred approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Psychodynamic approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Professional development and supervision (15 credits)

Year two:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (45credits)
-Systems and Systemic Psychological Therapies in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Psychopathology: Clinical Skills and Critical Approaches (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis one (30 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Contemporary Developments in Psychological Approaches (15 credits)
-Specialist group supervision (15 credits)
-Psychometrics A: Ability and Aptitude Training (15 credits)

Year three:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (60 credits)
-Psychometrics B: Personality Measures (15 credits)
-Negotiating Relationships: Advanced Skills (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis two (45 credits)
-Integrative and Pluralistic Approaches to Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Specialist Group Supervision (15 credits)
-Supervising, Consulting and leading in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)

Career prospects

Counselling Psychology graduates are typically employed in a variety of settings, including NHS primary, secondary or tertiary care, the prison service, schools and voluntary agencies.

Employers of recent graduates include:
-St Bartholomews Hospital
-South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
-Central & North West London NHS Trust
-City, University of London
-Maggie's Cancer Centre
-Imperial College London
-Roehampton University
-London Metropolitan University
-Homerton University Hospital
-The Priory
-Capio Nightingale Hospital

Job titles included Consultant Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, High Intensity Therapist, Lecturer, and Practitioner Psychologist.

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The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Typically this might include teachers, practicing artists, community workers, arts administrators, or recent graduates in Fine Art who wish to further their professional practice.

The MFA is designed to respond to students who already have a practice and who are able to readily determine where they are in relation to a field and its histories of practices and ways of working. It is the role of the MFA to work outwards, as it were, towards a context for the students practice.

​The student focus will be on their development of Art Practice relevant to the CSAD Subjects of: Fine Art; Textiles; Ceramics; Artist Designer Maker; and Illustration.

The MFA curriculum is designed so that students in the field of Fine Art:
- Kick-start a career or develop an idea
- Develop professional skills
- Become able, professional and directed
- Have a trajectory towards progression to a future Professional Doctorate

Course Content

The MFA programme is offered as One Year Full Time.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MFA students:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits).
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits)
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits)
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits. All students must attend the year-long Research & Ideas Seminars which happen on a weekly basis.)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing the Context module (60 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.
- On competing the Context and Exploration modules (120 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing Realisation in addition to the above, (180 credits in total) students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (Master of Fine Art).

Learning & Teaching

The MFA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MFA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MFA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MFA Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours).
- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours).
- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits). Design practice, Website / blog & reflective commentary / report (Personal Development Plan/Portfolio - PDP)/ 4,000 words.
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits) Portfolio Submission: Substantial body of practical work. PDP: 1,000-2,000 words
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits) Final body of work in the form of a public presentation through exhibition. A 3000 word Critical Paper and Viva Voce.
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits). Assessed through PDP undertaken in the other modules.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group) after each lecture, exploring the theme of the lecture and allowing students to clarify their understanding. These sessions may also be run as workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run.

This may include, for example, communal writing (via computer and data projector) or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

The MFA programme acts as a gateway for students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers or architectural technologists, leading towards a career or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MFA programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. It goes without saying that the MFA programme develops increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

The MFA is particularly focused on students who have already commenced their professional practice, designed about the provision of opportunities for ‘learning in employment’, and thus by implication exhibit the qualities necessary for employment.

All students’ will complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements. Read more
We offer research supervision across a broad range of topics. We are especially interested in applications that include proposals to investigate the social dimensions of environmental issues in the countries in which we have area expertise, and topics in environmental politics and environmental movements.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/125/personal-social-services

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR):

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe. It has received top ratings in Research Assessment Exercises, and most recently had 70% of its work judged as either “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” in terms of its “originality, significance and rigour”.

The School supports a large and thriving postgraduate community and in 2010 distributed in excess of £100,000 in Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards, and in University and SSPSSR bursaries and scholarships to new students.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Course structure

Research programmes involve writing a thesis on a particular topic with specialist supervision. You are given research training, which is tailored to the particular needs of your research and takes into account any training you have previously received. You also have opportunities to attend modules on relevant subjects on a non-assessed basis to fill any gaps in your background.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The atmosphere in the School is informal and friendly and has at its centre a lively and diverse postgraduate community. The weekly staff/postgraduate seminar series is designed to introduce you to the work of major scholars from the UK and abroad, and there is also a wide range of other seminar and workshop series each academic year.

Our postgraduate students have access to dedicated office space within the department and are able to take advantage of excellent library and computing facilities. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to expand their experience by teaching part-time in the School.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Social Policy; Journal of European Social Policy; Voluntas; Social Policy and Administration; and Social Policy and Society.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The School of Health and Social Care has a long standing and well deserved reputation for providing high quality education and training and for undertaking research that makes a difference and is the largest provider of Continuous Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) for the health and social care workforce in the South East of the UK. Read more
The School of Health and Social Care has a long standing and well deserved reputation for providing high quality education and training and for undertaking research that makes a difference and is the largest provider of Continuous Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) for the health and social care workforce in the South East of the UK.

The School has over 400 teaching/research staff and a student body of over 7000 and have campuses in Southwark, South London and Havering in Essex. The Southwark campus hosts a state of the art facility including 14 inter-professional skills laboratories and the Havering campus provides high quality educational facilities.

The School works with a variety of healthcare professionals including Bands 1-4 workers, nurses, midwives, social workers and many allied health professionals. The CPPD Portfolio includes a range of programmes, modules, study days and bespoke projects all meeting the needs of our service colleagues. Our programmes are designed and implemented in collaboration with service colleagues supporting the development of a workforce that is not only fit for the here and now but will be able to lead and innovate into the future.

Most of these programmes are clinically focused and are becoming increasingly work based. Programmes, modules, study days and bespoke projects are designed to be flexible and offer a variety of delivery modes including e-learning, all underpinned by a robust research and practice based culture.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/cppd-cpd-health-social-care

Modules

Our CPPD Portfolio is flexible, allowing you to study and reach your goals at your own pace. You may wish to try one module at a time, or apply for a whole year,but the flexibility that we offer allows you to meet the demands of your work and personal life, whilst studying for your future career.

Can't find a module that suits the needs of your workforce? We offer a variety of bespoke opportunities, created in partnership with managers to meet the demands of the ever changing climate of healthcare.

Employability

Unusually for a University, we offer programmes for all levels of healthcare staff. These include study days,diplomas and foundation degrees for staff working in bands 1-4, top-up degrees for healthcare professionals wishing to become graduates, specialist modules,master's programmes and professional doctorates for a variety of healthcare professionals.

Professional links

Our CPPD portfolio has been designed in partnership with our service colleagues to ensure that it meets the developing needs of the health and social care workforce. We work with a number of world-renowned NHS Trusts to design and deliver our CPPD Portfolio.

Teaching and learning

Our CPPD is innovative and contemporary to meet the future needs of the healthcare workforce. We are constantly developing our portfolio in line with the changes to the health and social care systems and developing new ways to meet the demands for education. Much of our portfolio is inter-professional, supporting the plans for integration of healthcare services.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Master of Design (MDes) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Design (MDes) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Design. Typically this might include teachers, practicing designers, design consultants, project co-ordinators, or recent graduates in Design who wish to further their professional practice.

The MDes is designed to respond to students who already have a practice and who are able to readily determine where they are in relation to a field and its histories of practices and ways of working. It is the role of the MDes to work outwards, as it were, towards a context for the students practice.

​The student focus will be on their development of Design Practice relevant to the CSAD Subjects of: Architectural Design and Technology; Product Design; Graphic Communications; Textiles; Ceramics; Artist Designer Maker; and Illustration.

The MDes curriculum is designed so that students in the field of Design:
- Kick-start a career or develop an idea
- Develop professional skills
- Become able, professional and directed
- Have a trajectory towards progression to a future Professional Doctorate.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/mdes.aspx

Course Content

The MDes programme is offered as One Year Full Time

The following Modules will be undertaken by MDes students:
- ART7006: Context (60 credits).
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits)
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits)
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits. All students must attend the year-long Research & Ideas Seminars which happen on a weekly basis.)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing the Position module (60 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.
- On competing the Position and Exploration modules (120 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing Realisation in addition to the above, (180 credits in total) students will be awarded a Masters Degree (Master of Design).

Learning & Teaching

The MDes is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team.

The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process. There are opportunities for all MDes students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP.

At several key stages in the MDes programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MDes Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods.

Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours).
- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours).
- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- ART7006: Context (60 credits). Design practice & Website / blog & reflective commentary / report (PDP)/ 4,000 words.
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits). Portfolio Submission: Substantial body of practical work. PDP: 1,000-2,000 words
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits). Final body of work in the form of a public presentation through exhibition. 3000 word Critical Paper and Viva Voce.
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits). Assessed through PDP undertaken in the other modules.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group) after each lecture, exploring the theme of the lecture and allowing students to clarify their understanding. These sessions may also be run as workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run. This may include, for example, communal writing (via computer and data projector) or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

The MDes programme acts as a gateway for students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers or architectural technologists, leading towards a career or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MDes programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. It goes without saying that the MDes programme develops increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

The MDes is particularly focused on students who have already commenced their professional practice, designed about the provision of opportunities for ‘learning in employment’, and thus by implication exhibit the qualities necessary for employment.

All students’ will complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design.

Typically this might include teachers, aspiring artists or designers, aspiring academics, or recent graduates in Fine Art or Design who wish to further their professional practice. It will also cater for those students with first degrees outside Art & Design who wish to convert their career path by following a more theoretical route in Art and Design.

The MA Art and Design is designed as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module [RS]) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design will align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design curriculum is designed so that students:
- Explore and develop concepts, skills or philosophies
- Develop creative skills
- Have a trajectory towards progression to MPhil/PhD

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/ma.aspx

Course Content

The suite of Master of Art (Art and Design) pathways currently offered is:
Art History through Practice
Art, Science & Technology
Design Futures
Ecologies
Fashion Design Futures
Philosophy

Learning & Teaching

The MA Art and Design is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the fine-art/design expertise in a respective fine-art/design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA Art and Design students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA Art and Design programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Art and Design Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other rel