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As we make our way around the world we are continually making decisions and performing actions that are driven by our sense organs. Read more

Introduction

As we make our way around the world we are continually making decisions and performing actions that are driven by our sense organs. Our perception of the world is not just sensory information, but instead an interpretation based on what our brain expects as well as what it is being told by sense organs. Understanding and measuring perception distinct from sensation is a complex task.
The course will explore methods by which it is possible to measure perception with varied content, depending on the specific interests of the student. Lectures from academic staff will form a course introducing the main methods of measuring perception, considering the strengths and weaknesses.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Ross Goutcher and Dr Elena Gheorghiu

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

In addition to broad training in psychological methods, this course ensures that students acquire an understanding of how to measure perceptual experience in a bias-free manner, including the basic framework for understanding such measurements. Students also acquire practical experience in making measurements of perceptual experience through a research project and opportunity to conduct a placement in a laboratory context.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Lectures, seminars and workshops are used to deliver a coherent course of study. Teaching methods are adapted to suit the aims of each module and to provide students with the range and depth of learning required by their needs. Students are able to pick a route through the course that fits their interests and needs as a self-motivated learner.

Teaching emphasises the importance of systematic empirical research, whether in the laboratory or in the field, as appropriate to the problem at hand.

Across the course, students experience a range of different forms of assessment. Specific assessment within the Perception in Action course is a research report. Students will conduct and report (6,000 words) on a small research project involving a measurement of perception. The student will be responsible for the whole process: design of study, programming and other practical aspects of doing the research; data collection and analysis. The main assessment of the report will consider the quality of the research, the level of understanding about measurement of perception, and the competence of the procedures used in the research. The report will also be assessed for clarity and conciseness.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

This course prepares you for a research career involving perception in action and is ideal if you intend to study for a PhD in Psychology.

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Targeted action. there is more to it than you think. How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?. Read more

Master's specialisation in Perception, Action and Control

Targeted action: there is more to it than you think
How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?
How do you perceive colour under constantly changing lighting conditions? How does a tennis player prepare himself to return a ball which yet has to be played? And what role do eye and head movements play in this? How are we able to write?
Catching a ball, grabbing a cup, writing down a sentence: these are all targeted actions that you often perform without thinking about them. Performing perceptuomotor tasks as a team such as in sports, understanding the actions of others, joint action in collaborative and competitive contexts: these are examples of hot topics in social neurocognition in which Nijmegen scientists are highly interested.
To patients who suffered a brain haemorrhage automatic actions come not so naturally any more. They find it extremely difficult to perform them. Why is that? Which neurocognitive processes play a role in these actions? That is what researchers who study perception and action want to discover.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

If you have successfully completed the specialisation Perception, Action and Control you will have ample experience in current research and analysis techniques in perception, three-dimensional motor research, psychophysiological studies, neuroimaging and electromyographical studies. You will also be able to apply formal theories on and models of perceptive functions, sensomotor functions, and complex actions in your research.
With this educational background you may find a position with one of the industrial or non-industrial research institutes in the Netherlands or abroad (e.g. traffic research, man-machine interaction, etc.). Also in health care there is an increasing demand for cognitive neuroscientists, for example, in rehabilitation centres.

Our approach to this field

Perception, Action & Control is a central research area within different faculties of Radboud University. It is aimed at the three basic components of current Cognitive Neuroscience: modelling (e.g. in physics), designing and conducting behavioural studies (e.g. in psychology) and measuring the neurobiological foundations of behaviour. The various research groups of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour that study these processes use a wide range of modern research facilities which enables them to provide natural stimuli and measure complex everyday behaviour. The close cooperation between the various disciplines also characterises the content of the courses in this specialisation.

Our research in this field

Researchers working on Perception Action and Control study sensorimotor mechanisms, their cognitive and social components, their clinical implications, and their relevance for robotics.

The PAC theme is closely integrated with the RadboudUMC themes Disorders of movementand Stress-related disorderslead by Bas Bloem and Aart Schene respectively. An overview of RadboudUMC themes can be found here https://www.radboudumc.nl/Research/Themes/Pages/default.aspx .

Research methods include theoretical analysis, psychophysical and behavioural studies, neurophysiological techniques, neuroimaging, clinical and pharmacological interventions, developmental and genetic approaches.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

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You can enter these programmes either with an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology, or with no previous anthropological experience but the desire to convert your academic focus into anthropology. Read more

MRes programmes

You can enter these programmes either with an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology, or with no previous anthropological experience but the desire to convert your academic focus into anthropology. The MRes aims to provide a firm foundation in the methods and methodologies of social anthropology and the human sciences, to serve as a basis for knowledgeable and skilled research in Social Anthropology. You are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes throughout.
• These programmes foster a critical outlook and the creative application of knowledge and skills.
• Teaching is carried out by means of lectures to subject specific and generic courses, complemented by seminars, supervisions and reading groups.
• You are expected to take an active part in classes, which provide the opportunity for practical work and formative assessment.
• The benefits of studying here are the close links between the research interests and teaching in the Department and the close integration to research centres: Centre for Amerindian & Caribbean Studies, Centre for Pacific Studies and the Centre for Cosmopolitan Studies.

MRes in Anthropology, Art and Perception

• Masters training for postgraduate research into Anthropology of Art, Material Culture and Visual Expression.
• Explore new ways of thinking anthropologically providing you with important, cutting-edge research tools for future research.
• Take perception and the senses as a starting point and draw on themes which extend across the subject boundaries between art and anthropology.
• Themes include:
– apprenticeship and practice-based research.
– the role of community and co-operation in both making and use.
– observation through drawing, photography, sound and film.
– heritage.
– the role of anthropology in design and contemporary art.
– commonalities between anthropological field work and contemporary arts practice.

Postgraduate community

Many students are from abroad and are undertaking a varied range of taught courses and research programmes. Those returning from, or preparing to go into, the field form an active community with a wide range of diverse geographical and substantive interests.

You will participate in annual workshops organised by the Department, jointly with the Anthropology departments of the universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow under the Scottish Training in Anthropological Research (STAR) programme. These workshops provide opportunities for informal presentations of research proposals, discussions relevant to your fieldwork preparations (e.g. ethics, data collection, writing field notes). The exploration of creative ways of learning is held in a relaxed yet focused environment, together with members of staff and PhD students from each of the universities. The training workshops last for
four days and take place in a beautiful countryside location. They act as complementary elements of the postgraduate training programme, and are organised in consultation with postgraduate students themselves, according to their perceived needs and wishes. In addition, there are shorter workshops which take place throughout the year and are designed to develop theoretical perspectives in anthropological research.

Facilities

The Department of Social Anthropology occupies an extensive suite of offices on North Street and in St Salvator’s Quad. It is well situated in the centre of town and at the geographical heart of the University. The Centre for Amerindian Studies has its own set of rooms within the Department, including a reading room that holds a library for Latin American and Amerindian studies. Within Social Anthropology there is also a museum collection of ethnographic objects, and a common room that includes a general anthropological class library, providing a space that is shared by both staff and postgraduates. The Departmental libraries, along with the main library, which holds a fine anthropology collection, include materials from all ethnographic regions of the world.

Weekly research seminars are organised by both the Department and sometimes by the Centres, and include speakers from outside St Andrews and abroad, thus enriching the intellectual environment. Social anthropologists from other UK departments, and beyond, visit and contribute to our series of seminars, and to workshops and conferences arranged by staff members and by research students. We endeavour to create a warm and friendly atmosphere and this also contributes towards maintaining a high quality of teaching and intellectual exchange.

Teaching methods

Taught postgraduate programmes in Social Anthropology are small class format modules, in which formal lectures are combined with seminar style teaching and student-led group work. Every taught postgraduate student is assigned an individual supervisor from among the anthropology staff, who works with them closely to develop a topic and direction for the end of degree dissertation.

International conferences

An important element in fostering the Department’s reputation has been a series of international conferences, each of which has considered an important contemporary theoretical issue within the discipline. These have dealt with, for example, the Anthropology of Violence; Power and Knowledge; Localising Strategies; the Concept of the Market; the Problem of Context; Kingship; the Anthropology of Love and Anger; Ways of Knowing; an Epistemology of Anthropology. The Ladislav Holy Memorial Trust plays an important supportive role for many of these conferences. From time to time distinguished scholars are appointed to the St Andrews Visiting Professorship in Social Anthropology, and each year members of the international academic community join the Department to follow postdoctoral work and other research endeavours. Such visiting scholars greatly enhance the thriving research environment.

Careers

Social Anthropology graduates have characteristics many employers seek and a Social Anthropology degree provides openings to a wide range of careers.
• Private organisations: can use the skills of social anthropologists doing research for urban planning, working with health organisations, doing market research for advertising companies, training employees who will be working in international divisions, or working within human resource departments.

• Government agencies: can employ social anthropologists as policy researchers, research analysts, evaluators, managers, planners and policy makers.

• International organisations: can employ anthropologists in projects in various countries around the world as researchers and cultural brokers.

• Non-profit agencies: can employ social anthropologists as advocates, administrators, evaluators and researchers.

• Graduate employers: 70% of graduate jobs are for students from any discipline. Social anthropologists successfully move into teaching, law, finance, HR, marketing, PR etc.

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The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more
The combined specialisation in Speech and Hearing Sciences provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of speech and hearing research, and their technological applications.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules and then have the opportunity to specialise in speech and hearing sciences. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
-Development of Speech Perception and Production
-Introduction to Speech Sciences
-Experimental Phonetics
-Phonetic Theory

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Options include:
-Deafness, Cognition and Language
-Second Language Speech Learning
-Web Programming for Psychology and Language Sciences
-Stuttering
-Advanced topics in Speech Perception
-Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This conversion course is designed for students who intend to become professional psychologists. Read more
This conversion course is designed for students who intend to become professional psychologists. The main purpose of the course is to allow graduates in disciplines other than psychology, and psychology graduates whose undergraduate degree is not professionally recognised, to gain a qualification in psychology that confers eligibility for graduate membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and establishes the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/psychology-msc/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, perception and motion analysis (PuMA) lab and perception lab.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

- Dedicated study and social-working space for postgraduate students.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, research seminars, workshops, tutorials, supervised seminar presentations, and independent reading and research. Diverse teaching methods are employed to aid the quality of learning opportunities for students' understanding of psychology.

Approach to assessment

Summative assessment methods include:
- coursework assessments
- individual and/or group presentations
- class tests
- exam grades.

Formative assessment methods include:
- coursework feedback processes
- informal tutor discussion
- peer feedback.

Specialist facilities

The Department of Psychology, Social Work and Public Health boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, Perception and Motion Analysis (PuMA) labction research lab, visual perception lab (incorporating eye tracking technology), and an EEG suite. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their MSc is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in psychology (eg educational, occupational and clinical psychology). Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology. Read more
Our specialised research interests in psychology include evolutionary psychology, perception and cognition, animal behaviour, neuroscience, social psychology and forensic psychology.

We offer MPhil supervision in the areas of psychology covering Newcastle's research strengths:

Clinical and health psychology

We research developmental disorders of perception and cognition, and the development and assessment of cognitive models of, and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for:
-Bipolar disorder
-Psychosis
-Anxiety
-Developmental disorders

Behaviour and evolution

We carry out studies of animal and human behaviour including:
-The evolutionary psychology of mate choice
-Attractiveness and co-operation
-Evolutionary approaches to personality

Visual perception and human cognition

Our research includes:
-Perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Development psychology

We focus on how different cognitive skills develop in children, from memory systems to learning in school. We have particular strength in developmental disorders such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Forensic psychology

Our research includes:
-Investigative interviewing of victims
-Witnesses and suspected offenders of crime, including eye-witness testimony
-Sexual offending, including historical allegations of sexual abuse
-Communication in legal contexts

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Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?. Read more
Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?

Our MSc Psychology is an advanced fast-track conversion course for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than psychology, or for those whose undergraduate Psychology degree was not accredited by the British Psychological Society.

This course combines the award of a Masters with eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society. The GBC is the minimum academic qualification required to work as a professional psychologist, so passing our course demonstrates that you have studied and acquired an advanced understanding in Masters-level study in psychology. With this qualification you will also be eligible to apply for professional training in any branch of professional psychology.

Our staff have a wide range of research interests, so you gain a critical and detailed understanding of the core areas of psychology, plus some specialisation, and learn research methods to an extent which will enable you to devise, carry out and analyse an empirical research project. Topics studied include:
-Visual and auditory perception and cognition
-Language, concepts, memory and attention
-The relation between brain and behaviour
-Developmental psychology
-Social psychology

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both graduates who have recently completed their studies, and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Recent graduates of MSc Psychology have found employment as a research assistant at the Anna Freud Centre, a clinical psychologist for the NHS, a child psychologist for Children First and a lecturer at the University of Surrey. Other graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Brain and Behaviour
-Personality and Individual Differences
-Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology I
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology II
-Advanced Social Psychology
-Advanced Developmental Psychology
-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)

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Studying the cognitive and neural basis for diverse brain functions such as perception, action, language, attention and memory. Thanks to advanced brain-imaging techniques, scientists are now able to observe the human brain in action. Read more

Overview

Studying the cognitive and neural basis for diverse brain functions such as perception, action, language, attention and memory.

Thanks to advanced brain-imaging techniques, scientists are now able to observe the human brain in action. Cognitive neuroscientists therefore no longer have to rely solely on patients with brain damage to ascertain which parts of the brains are involved in which tasks and functions. They can now conduct targeted experiments on healthy persons. As a result, the discipline has gained tremendous momentum over the past twenty years.

This research Master’s programme is open to students with Bachelor’s degrees in Linguistics, Physics, Biology, Medicine, Mathematics, Behavioural Sciences, Artificial Intelligence or a related discipline. It offers an in-depth theoretical background by internationally renowned scientists in the first year. The second year is dedicated to elaborate practical training in setting up, conducting and reporting research in cognitive neuroscience. A large majority of our graduates gain a PhD position, while other graduates find jobs in the commercial sector or at research institutes.

Why study Cognitive Neuroscience at Radboud University?

- This Master’s programme is located within the world-renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, located on the campus of the Radboud University, with a research staff of over 500 scientists.

- Nijmegen is one of the foremost centres of cognitive neuroscience in the world. Hundreds of scientists from various faculties and top institutes have joined forces on the Radboud University campus. Besides the Donders Institute there is the Radboud university medical centre and the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. Their researchers work together very closely, exchange expertise and share state-of-the-art research equipment to unravel the workings of the human brain.

- This competitive programme provides a sound balance of theory and practice. Our selective approach guarantees excellence, especially during the research training period.

- The Radboud University campus holds a large array of state-of-the-art equipment, like labs with fMRI, MEG, EEG and eye-tracking equipment. Master’s students are free to use these, enabling you to do any type of research in this field you’d want to.

- The programme has its own, student-driven, scientific journal; based on the Stanford Exchange: Proceeding of the Master’s Programme Cognitive Neuroscience.

Specialisations

The research Master’s programme offers four specialisations that coincide with the research themes of the Donders Institute:
- Language and Communication
Studies the acquisition, understanding and production of language, and their biological underpinning.

- Perception, Action and Control
Studies basic sensorimotor aspects as well as the cognitive, contextual and social components of perception-action coupling.

- Plasticity and Memory
Studies the mechanistic underpinnings and behavioural consequences of long-term changes in neural structure and function.

- Brain Networks and Neuronal Communication
Studies the interaction between and within groups of neurons, and with the outside world

Quality label

This programme was recently rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Our approach to this field

We have deliberately created a high admission threshold to ensure that all our students are highly motivated and have the ability to work at an advanced level. All applications are screened individually to make sure the new students meet our stringent entry criteria and help maintain the current standards of excellence.

- Multidisciplinary
Once admitted to the programme, you can expect to be trained as a multidisciplinary scientist. We offer a multi-disciplinary programme that closely involves scientists from various faculties and research institutes on campus, who come from all over the world. Their research has gained national and international recognition for its high quality. In the Master’s programme you’ll attend lectures by these top scientists. They will also supervise your practical training and the writing of a Master’s thesis in the second year.

The research you’ll become a part of addresses cross-disciplinary challenges. Besides studying the basic topics of your specialisation, you may also choose to help improve brain-computer interfaces, a hot topic with applications in medicine and information technology. Apart from being very exciting, it’s also logical that various disciplines are merging.

Our research in this field

A unique multi-disciplinary Master’s programme
Are you interested in the human brain? Would you like to conduct research into the workings of the brain and join an enthusiastic, international group of top researchers? Radboud University offers a multi-faculty Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience. The programme takes two years and is of course of a scientific orientation. There is a strong emphasis on experimental research. After all, what counts is hands-on research experience. This Master’s programme is unique in Europe.

The Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience is primarily focussed on training you as a researcher and if possible, a top researcher, because research institutes and businesses around the world desperately need highly qualified and motivated young researchers. Moreover, since cognitive neuroscience is a rather young discipline, much in this field has not yet been explored. There are many challenging questions that need to be answered. So there is plenty of room for new discoveries!

This competitive programme provides a sound balance of theory and practice. We enrol about 50 students per year. Our selective approach guarantees excellence, especially during the research training period.

Career prospects

This Master's programme will give you the qualifications you need to go on to get a PhD position. About 80-90% of our graduates take on a PhD project in Nijmegen or in other parts of the world. Others find jobs in the commercial sector or in research institutes.

Each year there are, on average, about 12 PhD positions available at the graduate schools Donders Graduate School for Cognitive Neuroscience (DGCN) and the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns

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This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgment and behaviour. Read more
This MSc focuses on how individuals construe the social world and the processes that underlie social judgment and behaviour. The programme draws on the research of outstanding academic staff working in the areas of social psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science to provide unique, cutting-edge perspectives on humans as social beings.

Degree information

The programme provides an understanding of how the human emotional, cognitive and neural systems have evolved to sustain social coordination and adaptation to the environment. Key topics include: social perception, motivation, attitudes, embodiment, emotion, social judgment and decision making, and social neuroscience.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Understanding Individuals and Groups
-Social Cognition, Affect, and Motivation
-Current Issues in Attitude Research
-Social Neuroscience
-Research Statistics
-Social Cognition: Research Methods

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Knowledge, Learning, and Inference
-Applied Decision-making
-Principles of Cognition
-Human Learning and Memory
-Social Psychology
-The Psychology of Health
-Organisational Psychology
-Cognitive Neuroscience
-Consumer Behaviour
-Consulting Psychology
-Business Psychology Seminars
-Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive Processes
-Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational Research
-The Brain in Action
-Programming for Cognitive Science
-Judgment and Decision-making
-Talent Management
-Judgment and Decision-making

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and seminars. The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences has advanced technology for the study of socio-cognitive processes, including fMRI, eye-, speech- and motion tracking equipment for dyadic and group settings, as well as a 360o video camera. Assessment is through coursework, online assessment and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have taken up positions in research, marketing, teaching, and management consultancy.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Business Director, Mindshare
-University Lecturer, Northumbria University and studying PhD Self-perception, Northumbria University
-Marketing Director, Evolution Ticno
-Market Researcher, Carnegie Consulting
-Research Consultant, Behaviour Change Partners

Employability
On completion of this programme students will have acquired an understanding of the processes involved in the construction of the social reality, in particular how cognitive and affective processes guide social judgement and behaviour, and how these processes are implemented in the brain. The students will have acquired methodological skills to design and carry out socio-cognitive research which will enable them to address real-world social problems and/or pursue an academic career. In addition, they will have acquired knowledge related to theoretical and philosophical issues underlying psychological research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

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The University has a long history of face research. Read more

Introduction

The University has a long history of face research. Our internationally renowned team of experts study almost all aspects of face perception, including low level visual processing, adaptation, gaze perception, social perception such as mate preference and attractiveness, mechanisms of recognition and forensic aspects such as unfamiliar face matching and eye witness recovery of memories for faces. This research has led to EvoFIT, a unique system for constructing facial composites of offenders by witnesses and victims of crime, which has a suspect identification rate ten times higher than traditional methods used by police. You will become part of this vibrant research community as you study the key research methods related to face research and will put your learning into practice during a month-long placement.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor Peter Hancock

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

This course facilitates understanding of this diverse subject whilst allowing students to focus the majority of their efforts in face research, an area for which Psychology at Stirling has long been internationally renowned.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology.

Part-time students take the same modules spread over two years.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The course provides advanced training for a career involving face research. It is intended primarily for students who already have a degree in Psychology or an allied discipline who intend to proceed to a PhD in this field.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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The MSc Environmental Modelling is designed as a broad-based curriculum that extends from the technical detail of environmental process modelling to critical analysis of the role of modelling within decision-making processes and the relevance of modelling to risk perception and management. Read more
The MSc Environmental Modelling is designed as a broad-based curriculum that extends from the technical detail of environmental process modelling to critical analysis of the role of modelling within decision-making processes and the relevance of modelling to risk perception and management.

By bridging the divide between science and decision-making across a range of modelling contexts, this course adopts a truly interdisciplinary approach to the subject of environmental modelling. The inclusion of strong vocational and professional elements, in addition to traditional academic approaches, is intended to ensure that graduates are suitably equipped to enter a range of environment-related employments.

Key benefits:

• Maximise your employability potential by developing environment-sector knowledge and skills that employers want
• Develop the interdisciplinary expertise that will enable you to excel in your career
• Extend your network of contacts by working on projects in both an academic and business context

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/environmental-modelling

Suitable for

This course is ideally suited to students who wish to enter or are already employed in environment sector roles such as consultants, environmental managers, Government, and national and multinational businesses. The course also provides an excellent foundation for those wishing to undertake postgraduate research.

Programme details

For the full-time September entry option:

Semester 1 – September to December
Semester 2 – January to May
Semester 3 – June to September

For the part-time September start option:

- Year 1 -

Semester 1: Modelling Environmental Processes (30 credits)
Semester 2: Research and Professional Practice (30 credits)

- Year 2 -

Semester 1: Risk: Perception & Management (30 credits)
Semester 2: Modelling and Visualisation Applications (30 credits)

- Year 3 -

Semesters 1 & 2: Dissertation (60 credits)

Format

This course offers a blended learning experience designed to cater for a range of learning styles:

• Lectures, tutorials and seminars are supported by in-class exercises
• Pre- and post-session study is administered through the Virtual Learning Environment
• Practical classes enable you to develop your environmental modelling skills
• Case studies and business-focused projects develop your professional and subject-specific skills
• Field work and site visits develop your practical, observational and analytical skills
• You also have the opportunity to discuss and exchange professional experiences with the course team and invited specialist speakers

Module titles

• Modelling Environmental Processes
• Risk: Perception & Management
• Modelling and Visualisation Applications
• Research and Professional Practice
• Dissertation

Assessment

Each module is assessed individually through coursework, comprising individual essays or group report presentations.

Career potential

This course is particularly suited to those who wish to pursue a career with an environmental modelling focus, which is a priority area for environment-sector employers in both the UK and abroad. The course will also prepare you to enter a broad range of environment sector roles, including consultancy, business, research and Government. Graduates of this course will also be well placed to continue to a PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves. What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research)

Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves: What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?
Traditionally, philosophy of mind is part of the analytical method in philosophy. Recently, however, a more phenomenological approach to typical questions in the philosophy of mind has provided a refreshing new look on old topics. Additionally, the advance of cognitive neuroscience is providing a new method to address old questions. Philosophy of Mind and Cognition in Nijmegen combines traditional analytical theorizing with insights from phenomenology and the empirical sciences.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.
The research carried out in this section (‘cognitiefilosofie') covers a number of traditional topics: mental causation, perception of, for example, colour, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, theories of mind, mental content and the nature of folk-psychology.
These subjects are specifically addressed against the backdrop of the idea that cognition is essentially embodied. This is the basic premise of the 'embodied embedded cognition paradigm', the 'enactive' approach to cognition and specific body-based forms of neurophenomenology.
Three smaller research projects take place within this section: (1) 'The Bisected Mind', the idea that folk psychology can be regarded as an interpretation of body-based behavioural tendencies and tries to reconcile indeterminacy of mental state attribution with mental realism (Slors). (2) 'Phenomenal Consciousness and Mental Causation', which addresses the problem of the causal efficacy of phenomenal states as well as the possibility of a science of consciousness (van de Laar). (3) 'Colour Perception', which aims to reconcile different theories on the nature of colour and colour perception by developing the idea that the concept of colour is multi-layered, instead of monolithic (van Leeuwen).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

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This programme is aimed at building your knowledge and developing expertise in a range of digital creative media topics, so as to be able to help understand, design and develop creative media applications which are growing in popularity including smart phone applications. Read more

INSTITUTE FOR DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

This programme is aimed at building your knowledge and developing expertise in a range of digital creative media topics, so as to be able to help understand, design and develop creative media applications which are growing in popularity including smart phone applications.
User interaction techniques with human perception and quality of users’ experience assessment methods are also included in the programme. Specific modules dedicated to gaming technologies, 3D media processing and users’ perception evaluation, creative media context and practices are taught by the leading experts in the area. You will also benefit from experience in 3D creative media and studio environments first-hand, all of which will provide a unique opportunity to engage with advanced research motivated problems in the exciting topics related to digital creative media.

Programme Aims

a) Develop students’ knowledge and expertise in multimedia signal capturing, rendering, coding, processing, and adaptation through practical application analysing and evaluating problems and responding to challenges in real time.
b) Develop students’ critical thinking to assess the development, evaluation and implementation of high-end home and low-end mobile media applications in response to addressing real world problems/opportunities.
c) Develop students’ critical thinking to assess media applications through user interaction techniques, human perception and quality of experience assessment methods.
d) Use action-based learning to provide individuals and teams with employment skills essential to the digital/tech industry.

Programme Structure

To complete the MSc Digital Creative Media students must complete 8 x 15 credit modules. Students must also choose and complete 4 of the 6 optional modules. Students will pick a second subject from the list of nominated second subject modules offered by the other Institutes in the first semester. All students must complete a Dissertation worth 60 credits.

Assessment

Modules are assessed primarily by exams and also include a combination of group exercises, presentations and time-constrained coursework and assignments with varying levels of weighting depending on the nature of each module.

Career Prospects

Graduating from this programme will provide students with job opportunities in media technologies and creative industries (e.g., studios, film and music makers), broadcasters as well as communication industries and service providers. Graduates will also have the knowledge required to enter a wide research field related to creative media including their design and applications.
Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MRes or PhD programme.

Compulsory Modules

-Collaborative Project
-Media and Creative Industries: Context and Practices
-Second Subject Module
-Dissertation
-Media Design and Production

Optional Modules

Choose four modules only:
-Media Processing and Coding
-Advanced 3D User Environments
-Internet of Things and Applications
-Introduction to Programming and MatLab
-Media Cloud Applications and Services
-Creative Industries in a Global Perspective
-Gaming Technologies and Systems

Second Subject Modules

Choose one module only:
-Design Thinking
-Media and Creative Industries: Critical Perspectives
-Principles of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management
-Business Model Development
-Introduction to Diplomacy
-Sports Media and Marketing

Find more information on modules here http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/institutes-programmes/msc-digital-creative-media/

For more information on fees, please see our fees and finance page: http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/fees-finance/

Scholarships

We are investing over half a million pounds (£0.5m) in our scholarship and bursary scheme to support your studies at Loughborough University London in 2017. This package of support celebrates and rewards excellence, innovation and community. Our ambition is to inspire students of the highest calibre and from all backgrounds and nationalities to study with us and benefit from the wider Loughborough University experience and network. Our range of scholarships, bursaries and support packages are available to UK, EU and international students.View the sections below to discover which scholarship options are right for you.

What's on offer for 2017?
Inspiring Success Programme
-For unemployed and underemployed* graduates living in the East London Growth Boroughs of Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets or Waltham Forest
-Award value: 100% off your tuition fees
-We are joining forces with The London Legacy Development Company to offer a two day programme of specialist support for graduates, including workshops, skills seminars and networking opportunities to increase students' employability and support those looking to enter into postgraduate education.
-Eligibility: At the end of the programme, eight students will be selected for a 100% scholarship to study a masters course of their choice at our London campus in September 2017.

Dean's Award for Enterprise
-For students looking for the skills and support to launch a new business
-Award value: 90% off fees to launch your business idea
-Eligibility: The award will be given at the discretion of the Dean and the Senior Leadership Team, based on a one-page submission of your business idea.

East London Community Scholarship
-For any students who obtained their GCSE’s or A-levels (or equivalent qualifications) from The Growth Boroughs – Barking and Dagenham, Greenwich, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest
-Award value: 50% off your tuition fees
-Eligibility: Competitive scholarship based on one-page submission showing your contribution to our community.

Alumni Bursary
-For all Loughborough University alumni
-Award value: 20% off your tuition fees
-Eligibility: International and UK/EU alumni holding a current offer for LoughboroughExcellence Scholarship
-For international and UK/EU high achieving students
-Eligibility: Any student holding a high 2:1 or first class undergraduate degree or equivalent from a recognised high quality institution will be considered.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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