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This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. Read more
This course offers a balanced and integrated education across the PPE disciplines. It is constructed around an interdisciplinary module on social decision making taught by staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments. The course provides you with a foundation in economics and research skills, and offers a wide range of philosophy and politics option modules.

Course Content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. You will also take a core 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' module, which prepares you for undertaking research, covering areas such as formulation of research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 80 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by Politics, Economics, Philosophy or PEP. These will include at least 20 credits from Politics and 20 credits from Philosophy.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour work week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer term and vacation working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

Career pathways for MA in PPE graduates are hugely varied, and have included accounting, the civil service, finance, international development, journalism, law, politics and research. The international dimension of the course allows students to pursue job opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

Read less
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics. Read more
Philosophical issues are deeply relevant in many areas of public life and often arise in public discussion. They include issues about ethics, economics and the law, as well as politics.

This course covers topics in ethics, political philosophy and social choice, and provides an understanding of economics and research training in philosophy. It allows students to study a range of options at the intersection of philosophy and public affairs.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take two of five 20 credit Philosophy/Political Philosophy modules: 'Topics in Theoretical Philosophy' or 'Analytical Political Philosophy', and 'Topics in Practical Philosophy' or 'The Challenges of Pluralism: Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives' or 'Topics in the History of Political Thought'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics, Philosophy and Politics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Philosophy and Public Affairs equips you for a range of careers in research and public life.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research. Read more
Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research.

The flexible structure of this course means it is suitable for a wide range of students with interests in politics and economics.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take one of two 20 credit international political economy modules: either 'Critical Theories of International Political Economy', or 'Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics or Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Economy prepares you for many careers in economics and politics, ranging from finance to international organisations and development. It also provides training for doctoral research in politics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. Read more
This course allows you to acquire training you will need for political research within an interdisciplinary programme in PPE. It is specifically aimed at students who need appropriate quantitative or qualitative research skills. These skills are required for you to be eligible for Research Council funded studentships in Politics and the Social Sciences. The flexibility of the course means you can choose to specialise in specific areas in politics and development studies, such as the politics of development or political economy.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take a 20 credit 'Political Research and Analysis' module, which considers the nature, practice and philosophical underpinnings of political research and analysis. You will also take a further 20 credit political research methods module: either 'Quantitative Methods of Data Analysis', or 'Qualitative Research Methods in Politics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Philosophy departments, including at least 20 credits from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy and Politics by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Research is aimed specifically at students who want to go on to pursue further research in the social sciences.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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The University of Guelph’s Graduate Diploma in Accounting is a four-month program that will give you advanced standing in the CPA Professional Education Program (PEP). Read more
The University of Guelph’s Graduate Diploma in Accounting is a four-month program that will give you advanced standing in the CPA Professional Education Program (PEP). The CPA designation is Canada’s pre-eminent accounting and business credential. In order to obtain the CPA, you must complete the prerequisite education requirements, the CPA PEP, the Common Final Examination (CFE) and 30 months of qualifying practical experience. Through this diploma, you will cover the core modules and elective modules in Assurance and Taxation of the CPA PEP, which will allow you to proceed to the CPA Capstone Modules 1 and 2. Upon successful completion of these modules, you will be eligible to write the CFE.

This diploma is ideal for students who:
-Want to fast track obtaining their CPA designation
-Have completed an undergraduate degree
-Want to further stand out in the competitive job market

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A profitable clinical and business approach to tooth preserving caries management in dental practice. The programme is designed for dentists and/or DCPs to develop and enhance Minimum Intervention preventive and tooth-preserving operative, patient and clinical practice management skills. Read more
A profitable clinical and business approach to tooth preserving caries management in dental practice.

The programme is designed for dentists and/or DCPs to develop and enhance Minimum Intervention preventive and tooth-preserving operative, patient and clinical practice management skills. Giving you the tools to maximise the clinical and financial potential of your dental practice

Key benefits

• Dentistry at Kings is a renowned centre of international excellence for teaching and research.
• Pioneers of teaching dentistry through a blended learning approach with over 20 years experience.
• Face-to-face training in years one & two, to learn and master latest techniques.
• Delivered by a team of highly specialised academic and non academic clinicians, many of whom are world-leaders in their field.
• Face to face training in year two to learn and master latest techniques.
• Contributes towards continuing professional development (CPD).
• Opportunity to network with other Distance Learning students in the UK and abroad, who are enrolled in the various specialties offered.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/advanced-minimum-intervention-dentistry-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description

Offered in response to the dental profession’s push towards a minimum intervention, preventive approach to caring for patients' oral health in both general and private practice, both in the UK and abroad, this unique and comprehensive flexible learning programme is designed for oral health care providers (dentist and/or DCP).

The curriculum includes the scientific basis of Cariology and disease pathology; detection, diagnosis, risk assessment and care planning for patients with complex dental health problems; prevention and control management strategies (including remineralisation) for patient groups and individuals; developing targeted marketing strategies to promote your practice and the MI care philosophy to patients using the latest social media frameworks; practice and business management skills; minimally invasive tooth preserving aesthetic clinical treatment of patients with caries and other restorative or aesthetic problems, and learning research methodology to enable completion of a useful practice-based research project.

- Intensive Face-to-Face Course

The course will feature two intensive face-to-face internships in year one (five days) and year two (seven days) of the programme, in London, when the participants will receive hands-on clinical training under expert supervision. The King's College London Dental Institute facilities at Guy’s Hospital and LonDEC provide delegates with some of the finest state-of-the-art dental teaching facilities available in the UK and Europe.

- Course purpose

The programme provides the latest evidence-based knowledge in Minimum Intervention care and minimally invasive tooth tissue preserving operative dentistry. It enables participants to integrate this patient care and oral health philosophy with suitable marketing and practice management strategies, into their general or private practice. It will develop team-care practice skills using DCPs where appropriate alongside other aspects of restorative dentistry and encourages practice-based research, with a hope to setting up UK or international clinical research networks.

- Course format and assessment

This flexible learning master's programme will be assessed through a combination of assignments, some written examinations, clinical case presentations and a dissertation. In the first two years, some modules are assessed by a combination of 60 per cent written examination and 40 per cent written assignments. For each module, you must complete a self-assessment exercise, a formative assignment and a final summative essay/assignment, to be entered into the end of year written examinations.

During the course, clinical work is also undertaken which is assessed by submission of clinical case presentations, both written or online. In the final year, you will be allocated a supervisor, undertake a research project and write a dissertation. If you fail an assessment element at the first sitting, you will be permitted one further attempt. Exams can be taken in London or, for overseas students, at centres in the student's country of residence.

Overseas examinations incur an additional fee payable to the Examinations Office. Further details of overseas exam arrangements and applicable fees can be viewed here: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/services/examinations/exams/pep/pep.aspx

Career prospects

It is expected that graduates from this programme will develop a profitable network of “MI” centred dental clinics offering team expertise and higher skill levels to manage their patients, using the patient-centred, team-care approach. It is hoped this qualification may be used as further specialisation in general dental practice, enhancing profitability and encouraging future practice-based research opportunities.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

Link to student blog http://kclamid.blogspot.co.uk/

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Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers. Read more

Why take this course?

Logistics and supply chain management bring together the business skills to manage the activities and flows of information between suppliers, manufacturers, logistics service providers, retailers and consumers.

This course focuses on the integration of analytical techniques for optimisation with the decision issues and technology relating to logistics and supply chain management.

This course is one of a small number selected as part of the HEFCE PEP Scholarship programme for 2014. Please visit the HEFCE PEP page to see full details of the scheme, eligibility criteria and how to apply.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Have access to ultra-modern computing facilities, and use specialist mathematical and statistical computing packages
Participate in practical sessions to solve real-life case studies using our simulation software
Develop the problem-solving, decision-making and interpersonal abilities essential to professional roles in this field

What opportunities might it lead to?

Logistics analysis is critical to success in both manufacturing and service industries. Competitive advantage will increasingly come from the supplier's ability to rapidly respond to changing customer needs, for which effective logistics are of prime importance. This means that there will be a range of companies and organisations in both the public and private sector, demanding for your skills and expertise.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Production management
Transportation management
Quality control
Distribution
Facilities planning
Supply chain management
Passenger transportation

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Students studying CILT accredited courses receive exemptions from the academic requirements for membership. Graduates of the MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management course at the University of Portsmouth with an overall average pass mark above 50% are eligible to apply for Chartered Membership (CMILT) once they have gained the necessary experience.

Module Details

Supply chain management is a philosophy, the implementation process and the control of this process through which different entities within a supply chain aim to streamline their activities to improve the overall effectiveness and efficiency of meeting final customer requirements. A variety of different techniques will be investigated, ranging from conceptual frameworks, analytical approaches, to computer-based models.

Here are the units you will study:

Supply Chain Management: This unit enable you to develop advanced skills so that you can deal with problems of supply chain management across different products, locations, and companies. The types of problems studied in this course are encountered in industry (e.g. retail, discrete or continuous production and logistics service providers) as well as in service organisations (e.g. banks, hospitals and law firms). Managers dealing with such problems are known under various titles, including production, operations, supply (chain), inventory, purchasing, distribution or logistics managers.

Logistics Modelling: Most problems arising in the fields of logistics and supply chain management have sufficient complexity and detail that they require the use of sophisticated modelling techniques. This unit looks at two of the most commonly used methodologies for modelling and solving logistics problems: simulation and heuristic techniques. In both cases a computer package is used to assist solution. The techniques will be demonstrated with a range of case studies drawn from the field of logistics including transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning and vehicle routing.

Operations Management: This unit teaches operations management techniques that are relevant to logistics. The commonly used techniques of linear and integer programming will be taught using Microsoft Excel based methods for solution. You will look at case studies covering production planning, transportation, logistics planning and supply chain configuration. You will also be taught about locating facilities such as factories, distribution centres, cross docking centres and retail outlets. The effective scheduling of labour force and machines will be demonstrated, and current state-of-the art production planning models will be covered.

Strategic Logistics: This unit looks at the field of logistics from a strategic point of view. A number of quantitative techniques for strategic decision making such as decision analysis, multi-criteria decision analysis, data envelopment analysis and queuing theory are introduced in the context of logistics applications. The topic of strategic decisions in transportation modelling is then covered. The unit is completed by the analysis of a number of case studies relating to different applications of logistics with respect to financial, environmental, societal and economic objectives.

Project (Masters Logistics): This unit allows you to conduct research into a larger scale or challenging logistics problem. The project may be practical or theoretical and may arise either from the supervisor's research interests or from your own desire to study a particular topic or situation. Typical areas of logistics in which the project will be conducted include (but are not limited to) transportation, supply chain configuration and management, warehouse design and layout, container port layout, production planning, green logistics, facility location and vehicle routing.

Programme Assessment

Our enthusiastic team of lecturers have a wide range of industrial and research experience, ensuring that you graduate with cutting-edge knowledge. You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical computer-based sessions, laboratory and project work.

We assess you in a several ways, but a large portion of the assessment is based on a major project at the end of the year. Here’s how we assess your work:

Examinations
Coursework
Laboratory assignments
A dissertation

Student Destinations

Logistics and transportation are important to any firm where customer service is a strategic objective – whether its core focus is on products or services.

When you graduate from this course you could find employment in a wide range of logistics-related careers. Not only in the traditional areas of manufacturing logistics, distribution and supply chain management, but also postal and express delivery, the fire and rescue emergency operations and even the military and defence industry.

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The major theme of the programme is the analysis of individual and collective decisions which will be studied from the perspective of the three disciplines involved. Read more
The major theme of the programme is the analysis of individual and collective decisions which will be studied from the perspective of the three disciplines involved. Students will learn how to combine insights from political science, economics and philosophy in order to solve decision problems arising in such diverse areas as politics, corporate governance, international relations and others.
The programme is research-oriented and aims to provide a thorough and rigorous training in modern theories and methods in political science, economics and philosophy.

In the first three semesters students attend disciplinary courses in political science, economics and philosophy as well as interdisciplinary seminars in economics and political science or philosophy.
The fourth semester is devoted to the Master's thesis.

Part-time studies are possible under special circumstances.

More information can also be found on the webpage: http://www.wiso.uni-hamburg.de/msc-pep

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This program is designed to encourage the development of critical thinking, analysis and communication skills. By facilitating personal growth and the ability to adapt and respond to a complex and changing environment, the program helps you acquire advanced knowledge in accounting and related aspects of business. Read more
This program is designed to encourage the development of critical thinking, analysis and communication skills. By facilitating personal growth and the ability to adapt and respond to a complex and changing environment, the program helps you acquire advanced knowledge in accounting and related aspects of business.

Upon successful graduation from the Goodman MAcc CPA pathway program:

You will have completed the CPA PEP program in 7 months of full-time study, instead of 2 years of part-time study.
You will have completed all four CPA elective modules (Assurance, Tax, Finance and Performance Management) and have exceeded the elective requirements of CPA Ontario.
You will have completed two integrated capstone modules designed to prepare you for the CFE.
You will proceed to write the Common Final Evaluation (CFE) in the September immediately following your graduate program.
You may have chosen to complete a four month co-op work term which will count toward your CPA practical work experience requirement.

MAcc Curriculum

The integrated and innovative coursework in the MAcc ensures that you receive an unparalleled accounting education. Throughout the program, critical thinking, analysis and communication skills are developed through the use of case study analysis, student discussion, presentations and research papers.

MACC WITH CPA PATHWAY

Goodman’s MAcc CPA Pathway will allow you to complete all of the required courses and modules for the CPA designation. Upon graduation from the MAcc CPA Pathway, graduates will proceed directly to the CFE.

In the first term of the MAcc, you will take four courses that map to all of the CPA electives (Assurance, Finance, Tax & Performance Management), plus one general business elective. In the second term of the MAcc, you will be required to complete two program specific graduate accounting courses, one general business electives and two CPA Capstone courses (Integration and Team Management & Integration and Analysis) which focus on CFE examination preparation.

The MAcc CPA pathway program will be completed over seven months (January to July).

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Are you a dance practitioner, choreographer or teacher wishing to deepen your practical knowledge and critical engagement with dance? Join a vibrant research community with opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaborations. Read more
Are you a dance practitioner, choreographer or teacher wishing to deepen your practical knowledge and critical engagement with dance? Join a vibrant research community with opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaborations. You’ll grow in confidence as a researcher with the ability to generate new ideas, connections, approaches and critical perspectives.

This programme is also available as a Research Masters (ResM). Further details are available on these pages.

Key features

-Take advantage of our stunning, new, purpose-built performing arts facility, The House.
-Learn from highly skilled and internationally renowned practitioners and scholars. Work within the Performance, Experience and Presence (PEP) research group which greatly informs the teaching on this programme.
-Make use of the close links we have fostered with leading dance companies and professional artists while you’re with us, and gain extra experience that will open up your career prospects. Devon now has a regional and national dance agency, Dance in Devon, and the programme draws on this expertise and dance activity.
-Benefit from training on the programme which explicitly embeds the skills identified by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, preparing you for MPhil/PhD programmes.
-Join BA Dance students to take dance technique classes; the theatre and performance department also hosts a number of extra-curricular classes and performance opportunities that are open to you.
-Engage with Plymouth’s vibrant theatre and performance scene with Peninsula Arts, Theatre Royal Plymouth and Barbican Theatre Plymouth, alongside events and training workshops arranged by the department itself. In the past, our nationally and internationally acclaimed visitors have included Jonathan Burrows/Matteo Fargion, Russell Maliphant, Hofesh Shechter, Jordi Cortés (DV 8), Yael Flexer, Rick Nodine, and Kirstie Simson.
-Choose to study full time or part time to fit in with your career plans or other commitments. This programme is also available as a Research Masters (ResM).
-Be part of a lively interdisciplinary arts and research community where you’ll mix with staff and students from across the arts faculty, creating opportunities for collaborative performance and practice-based research.

Course details

All MRes and ResM students study the modules, researching dance and research in the arts and humanities. You’ll also attend individual tutorials with your supervisor and regular research seminars. Both programmes lead to either a written thesis or one combining critical writing with creative/professional practice. While the MRes can only be studied full-time (12 months), the ResM is available either full or part-time. Having completed your taught modules in Year 1 (whether full or part-time), your following year will involve an agreed tutorial schedule and work plan. You may attend additional training, workshops and research seminars. As a full time ResM student, you’ll submit your thesis after 18 months (part-time, after 24 months) or pay a nominal sum for up to six months additional ‘writing up’ time (part-time, 12 months). Your viva takes place following submission of your thesis. To discuss which route is best for you, contact the programme leader.

Core modules
-MARE700 Research in the Arts and Humanities
-MAPR710 Researching Dance
-MARE701 Masters Thesis in the Humanities and/or Performing Arts

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Experience the Goodman MBA. We believe that the ways of doing business are changing. we focus on partnerships, not competition; passion, not routine; and priorities and values, not only the bottom line. Read more
Experience the Goodman MBA

We believe that the ways of doing business are changing: we focus on partnerships, not competition; passion, not routine; and priorities and values, not only the bottom line. We’re here to help you thrive by encouraging a collaborative environment, faculty mentorships, and community involvement. And we’ll never waver from our belief that you matter as an individual.

A Goodman MBA will provide you with the academic knowledge, real world experience and the confidence to use your skills to make a difference.

You’ll be adaptive and relevant, ready for any challenge your future holds. We offer you the flexibility to specialize in your area of interest and include the foundational courses that make an MBA graduate a true success.

Your success as an MBA grad is rooted in our focus on a strong integrative and practical approach to management, and a desire for you to succeed as an individual and as part of our community. Our diverse program is composed of classmates from around the world and across Canada. This diversity of ages, academic backgrounds and professions, combined with small class sizes, encourages a collaborative, not competitive environment.

Compare MBA pathways

There are three ways to earn a Goodman MBA:

1. Are you a young professional looking to change industries or enhance your credentials? Consider our full-time MBA. This program includes an optional paid co-op terms where you can gain valuable skills, link theory to practice and make important connections. It’s a great opportunity to network and experience a new industry. Our MBA students hold co-op positions such as business analyst, marketing assistant, consultant and corporate initiatives intern.

2. Are you an internationally educated professional that wants to gain Canadian business knowledge? Consider the MBA (ISP).

3. Are you a working professional that wants to expand your business knowledge or develop new expertise? Consider the part-time MBA. Our program works with your busy schedule. Part-time students typically take between one or two weekly courses each semester and have the option of taking their courses in the evening or during the day. We will offer you individualized recommendations so you can develop a program plan that meets your interests and needs. As a part time student you are also eligible for advanced standing.

Curriculum

Goodman’s MBA curriculum is designed to combine the strength of a comprehensive core curriculum with the ability to specialize in key functional areas of business. You will develop practical strategies to help you become a dynamic leader with knowledge and expertise to succeed in your career.

The general stream provides you with a flexible program plan and the ability to take a variety of elective courses in different fields. The general stream is ideal if you have a wide range of interests, or are planning on working in general management and want to gain a competitive edge.

The Goodman MBA program consists of 20 courses, of which 14 courses are required and 6 courses are elective.

We offer six specializations:

ACCOUNTING/CPA ACCREDITED PATHWAY

The CPA/MBA program offers a CPA-Accredited stream that provides graduates with advanced standing in the CPA Professional Education Program (CPA PEP) to the end of Core 2. The new accredited stream allows non-accounting university graduates to pursue an MBA and an accounting designation at the same time. Goodman is currently the only business school in Ontario to offer a combined MBA and CPA program.

BUSINESS ANALYTICS

The Business Analytics stream is designed to provide students with the logical, analytical, and critical thinking skills needed to prepare them for analysis and decision-making positions in a variety of industries and fast-growing professions. This field has increased in popularity in recent years due to the increase in data available to organizations from customer loyalty programs, e-commerce transactions, and even sensory data from machines.

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

The operations management specialization includes a focus on project management, quality management, logistics and supply chain management. Courses will cover many of the topics required for the Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) and the Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM) professional designations from APICS -The Association for Operations Management (formerly the American Production and Inventory Control Society).

FINANCE

This specialization is ideal for those seeking a focus mainly on investments and portfolio management. This program has a high degree of correlation with the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Designed to provide you with a strong foundation in the theory and practice of HR. This specialization provides you with the majority of the course work necessary for the CHRP designation.

MARKETING

Provides you with an integrated managerial approach to marketing that helps you apply the theoretical principles of marketing to practical, real world problems. Emphasis is placed on issues that relate to marketing in the global business world.

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