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This course is ideal for you if you wish to develop your career in language testing and assessment – whether or not you already have experience in this area – and is the only full-time, face-to-face course in the UK specialising in this area. Read more
This course is ideal for you if you wish to develop your career in language testing and assessment – whether or not you already have experience in this area – and is the only full-time, face-to-face course in the UK specialising in this area.

The cutting-edge theory combined with practical experience will give you the expertise you need, and you will enjoy the opportunity to pursue your research interests in our world-leading research centre in language assessment.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/ma-applied-linguistics-testing-and-assessment

Course detail

• Study a mix of cutting-edge theory and practical real-world applications, building your knowledge and experience of classroom testing, assessing learning outcomes, course evaluation, and institutional tests and exams
• Explore your research interests with CRELLA, our world-renowned Centre for Research in English Language Learning and Assessment; recognised as a leading UK-based centre for research with 100% rating for research impact in the 2014 REF
• Gain from access to the expertise of the English Language and linguistics team with an excellent track record of high-quality teaching
• Benefit from a course which opens up opportunities in organisations, universities and ministries worldwide; to work with exam boards like Cambridge Language Assessment, Edexcel, or Pearson; for an education authority as tests and assessments specialist; or for further doctoral study with CRELLA.

Modules

• Exploring Research: Concepts and Methods
• The Language System
• Statistics in Language Testing
• Principles & Practice in Lang Assessment
• Testing Language Knowledge & Receptive Skills
• Testing Productive and Integrated Skills
• L2 Materials Development
• Professional Practices
• Assessment and Accreditation
• Issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
• Dissertation in Testing and Assessment

Assessment

A range of assessment methods is used throughout the course with the main emphasis on summative assessment but with also some focus on formative assessment. They include: academic papers, oral presentations, test materials and procedures evaluation, production of tasks and tests, in-class tests and examinations and portfolios of practical tasks. Assessments aim to develop independent, critical thinking and serve to reinforce our research culture.

You can expect to produce a critique of theory and current practices, and to evidence your ability to make informed decisions. Feedback plays an important role in the course and you will engage in self-assessment and peer feedback, especially in formative and presentation assessments.

Research Ethics is an integral part of the course and together with training in statistics provides the foundations for the final dissertation: the culmination of the course which entails managing the research project from start to finish.

Careers

Given the highly specialised focus of the course, we anticipate that students will progress onto a position that involves language testing or assessment.

This may involve working with one of the well-known exam boards like Cambridge Language Assessment, Edexcel, or Pearson, or perhaps for an education authority as the specialist on tests and assessments.

Some graduates whose background includes language teaching may secure a position within an educational establishment as the authority on course evaluation and assessment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. Read more
A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. The course is taught by experienced TESOL Education staff within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

TESOL Quarter Scholarships - new from 2016/17
We are offering four “Quarter Scholarships” to overseas applicants for any TESOL degree for the academic year 2016-17. These are 25% tuition fee reductions – a saving of almost £3,500! All students paying overseas tuition fees and not in receipt of other funding are eligible.

Key information

-Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, MSc.
-Study methods: Part time, full time. Campus based.
-Duration: 1 year full time, 2 years part time.
-Start date: September.
-Course Director: Anne Lawrie.
-Location: Stirling Campus.

Course objectives

The TESOL Masters at the University of Stirling provides an advanced training and professional qualification for people presently engaged in any area of the teaching of English as a foreign or second language. It also offers professional development to people new to TESOL who are seeking a career change. On completion, you should possess the knowledge and practical classroom skills to be a confident, critically reflective and enterprising teacher.

About the Faculty

The Faculty of Social Sciences is a large interdisciplinary unit, combining teaching and research interests in: Dementia; Education; Housing Studies; Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology; and Social Work. We offer an established, research-led suite of taught postgraduate courses, including our world renowned Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) courses, ESRC-recognised courses in Social Research and diverse Doctoral opportunities.

Our externally accredited professional courses, such as Educational Leadership, Housing Studies and Social Work Studies, are designed to best equip our students with practical and transferable knowledge for the complex demands of professional practice. The Faculty is home to a vibrant and diverse community of academics and postgraduate students, where creative thinking and independent spirit is promoted and celebrated.

Other admission requirements

INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree.

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
-IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing.
-Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B.
-Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B.
-Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening.
-IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening.

For more information go to English language requirements: http://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses: http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx

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These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Read more
These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Most of the students are in-service health professionals working for example as doctors or laboratory staff, who take the courses in order to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases, or to update their current expertise.

The Infectious Diseases courses draw upon the School’s long tradition in the study of clinical and epidemiological aspects of infectious and tropical diseases. Providing a broad understanding of infectious diseases, together with developing strategies for their control and treatment, the courses will be of particular relevance to in-service health professionals, such as doctors or laboratory staff who either wish to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases or update their current expertise.

These courses are aimed both at recent graduates who wish to pursue an advanced degree, and at people who took their first training some time ago and wish to update their knowledge in this rapidly evolving field or who wish to change career direction.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec-infectiousdiseases.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- a comprehensive understanding of the role of biology of infective agents and hosts on the outcome of infection

- the use of this knowledge, in combination with epidemiological and public health approaches, to develop rational strategies for the control and treatment of infection

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

Elective modules (i.e. modules other than the IDM1 modules) are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/community-support-resources/current-students/examinations/examination-centres).

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html#seventh

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The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. Read more

Introduction

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills.
Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks.
You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques.

Accreditation

The BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, is the foremost professional and learned society in the field of computers and information systems in the UK. The Division of Computing Science and Mathematics is an Educational Affiliate of the BCS.
The MSc in Information Technology course is accredited by the BCS as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP) registration. CITP is the professional member level of the BCS ('partially meeting' is the normal level of accreditation for such MSc courses, and does not indicate a shortcoming! Additional training/experience is required for full registration.)

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Simon Jones

Course objectives

This is an intensive 12-month course which provides an opportunity for non-computing graduates to develop key specialist skills suitable for a career in Computing. It is ideal for those who wish to complement their knowledge and expertise with core computing skills in order to apply them to a new career. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry.
The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course.
By studying this course students will study in depth key topics including:
- software development
- enterprise database systems
- web technologies
- benefit from research-led teaching
- demonstrate acquired research and development skills by undertaking a substantial piece of software project work
- prepare for positions in the IT industry

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

The MSc in Information Technology will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Information Technology, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including health, IT software organisations, service enterprises, engineering and construction firms as well as in the retail sector.
Previous students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the Information Technology field in aconsiderable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major UK organisations, with Local Authority and Government bodies as well as in the field of Higher Education.
Here are some recent posts that IT students have taken up:
- IBM, Perth: Junior IT Specialist
- CAP-GEMINI, Glasgow
- AIT, Henley-on-Thames: Graduate Trainee Database Administrator
- Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh: MVS Team (Mainframe Support)
- British Airways, Hounslow: Programmer
- Ark Computing Solutions Ltd, Perth: Programmer/Developer
- Lancaster University, English Dept: Java programmer
- Rothes Infographics, Livingston: Trainee Software Developer

More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are:
- As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team.

- IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management.

- Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application.

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Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.
As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.
The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Dale Townshend

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.
Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.
The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.

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The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication provides a comprehensive and coherent approach to all forms of publishing. Read more

Introduction

The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication provides a comprehensive and coherent approach to all forms of publishing. The course covers the whole process of planning, editing, production, marketing and publication management in print and digital environments. It is dedicated to teaching the best current publishing practice, so the detailed content is updated each year as a result of the rapid changes that are transforming the industry worldwide.
The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world.
The MLitt in Publishing offers:
- Strong publishing industry links and networks
- Enhanced publishing career pathways
- International environment with a student cohort from all around the world
- Intensive publishing research environment

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full time - MLitt - 12 months; PG Diploma - 9 months; Part time - MLitt - 27 months; PG Diploma - 21 months;
- Start date: Full-time and part-time: September
- Course Director: Professor Claire Squires

Course objectives

In close contact with publishing businesses and the changing needs of the industry worldwide, the teaching team equips you with the qualities — intellectual and practical — that are needed for a successful working life in publishing and related organisations.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

The MLitt in Publishing Studies is delivered through interactive lectures, seminars, workshops (including sessions in the Publishing Computer Lab) and one-to-one teaching.
Assessment is based on a range of practical and academic activities, including the creation of a physical publishing product (a book, magazine, e-book or app), marketing plans, presentations, and a dissertation. Students have opportunities to undertake work experience and internships, and to go on industry visits and field trips. There is also a weekly series of visiting speakers.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Career opportunities

The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has over 30 years of graduates now working in the publishing and related industries. Entry level jobs our students have gone into in recent years include:
- Publicity Assistant, Canongate
- Publicity Assistant, Faber & Faber
- Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
- Events & Marketing Assistant, The Bookseller
- Sales & Marketing Assistant, McGraw Hill
- Production Assistant, Oxford University Press
- Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press
- Production Editor, Cicerone Press
- Publishing Assistant, Cengage Learning
- Web editor, Digital Publishing Department, China Social Sciences Press
- Foreign Rights Specialist, Suncolor Publishing Group
- Web Editor, BooksfromScotland.com

Some of our alumni who have worked in the publishing industry have gone onto the following job roles:
- Group Sales Director and President (Asia Region), Taylor & Francis
- Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland
- Managing Editor, Little Island Books
- Higher Education Texts and eBook Sales Manager, Taylor and Francis (Asia Pacific)
- Director, World Book Day
- Production Editor, Taylor & Francis
- Founder and Publisher, Tapsalteerie and Lumphanan Press

Employability

The MLitt in Publishing Studies is built around developing and enhancing publishing careers for its students. The focus of the modules is on building skills and understanding of the contemporary publishing industry, with constantly updated content and access to industry expertise. All students have the opportunity to undertake work placements, with host organisations in recent years including:
- Alban Books
- Barrington Stoke
- Bloody Scotland International Crime Writing Festival
- Canongate Books
- Fledgling Press
- Floris Books
- Freight Books
- HarperCollins
- Luath Press
- Octopus Books
- Oxford University Press
- Saraband Books
- Tern Digital

Industry connections

The Centre is supported by an Industry Advisory Board, with members from Floris Books, Freight Books, Publishing Scotland, Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Further industry support is provided by our regular visiting speaker series, and the internships and work placements provided for our students. The Centre is a Network Member of Publishing Scotland.

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The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. Read more

Introduction

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. The course combines training in psychological theory with practical skills development, preparing our students for a future career in psychology. Individual modules provide a thorough introduction to quantitative and qualitative research, the analysis and interpretation of data, and a critical skeptical approach to psychological science.

Opportunities for practical hands-on skills development are built in, ranging from low-tech observational assessment to high-tech eye-tracking, and including training on giving oral presentations. A self-reflective approach to personal development is encouraged, and students on this course are an integral part of Stirling Psychology's research community, housed within a dedicated MSc office. The course will appeal to students wishing to develop a career in psychological research, either working towards a PhD in Psychology, or working in the wider public, private or third sector.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor David Donaldson

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

The primary aim of the course is to provide advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology. The course develops the theoretical understanding and practical and interpersonal skills required for carrying out research. Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. Students are based in a dedicated MSc office, or within an appropriate research group, and allocated a peer mentor. Students have an academic supervisor in Psychology who supports and guides their development - including the research dissertation project. Our aim is to encourage students to make the complex transition to become a fully independent research scientist.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based.

Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

The individual module components provide 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course is designed as a springboard for a career in psychological research and is ideal for students wishing to pursue a PhD in psychology. The course incorporates training in a wide range of skills that are required to conduct high-quality research in psychology, and students are encouraged to develop applications for PhD funding through the course.

One essential part of the course is the requirement to carry out a Placement (typically in an external company, charity or third sector organisation). This provides a fantastic opportunity to develop relevant work-based employment skills, and to develop a network of contacts relevant to future career goals. Students benefit hugely from the Placement experience, combining skills and experience with personal and professional development.

Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) graduates are well placed for careers in clinical and health psychology, educational psychology and teaching, human resources management and personnel, etc. The skills gained are also readily transferable to other careers: the course positions students for the growing expectation that graduates have a good understanding of human behaviour, are able to interpret and analyise complex forms of data, and to communicate ideas clearly to others.

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Course description. The course offers students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing international business and commerce. Read more
Course description
The course offers students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing international business and commerce. It covers fundamental legal aspects of international business, such as the law of corporations and corporate governance, the law of international trade transactions, international financial, securities and banking law, competition law and intellectual property. The course aims at providing a solid basis in these fields as well as giving students the opportunity to explore topical issues, such as the implications of the recent financial crisis, corporate social and environmental responsibility, the role of brands in globalization, global economic governance, and the legal challenges of business operation and foreign investment in a development country context.

Coursework and assessment
Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.
The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits).

Course unit details
The LLM in International Business and Commercial Law requires the study of taught course units to the value of 120 credits. At least 60 credits of these course units must be within the area of International Business Law and are to be selected from a designated list. In addition, students write two research papers worth 30 credits each, at least one of which must be within the area of International Business Law.
It will typically offer a wide choice of course units, including Corporations and International Business Law ; The Principle and Practice of Corporate Governance ; Conflict of Laws in Business and Commerce; International Sale of Goods ; International Carriage of Goods by Sea ; International Financial Services Regulations; Banking and Payment in International Sales; Banking and Payment in International Sales along with other optional course units.

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

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Course description. This course aims to provide you with knowledge and understanding of substantive intellectual property law in its European and international context and to equip you with the theoretical framework necessary to analyse critically the intellectual property law regime. Read more
Course description
This course aims to provide you with knowledge and understanding of substantive intellectual property law in its European and international context and to equip you with the theoretical framework necessary to analyse critically the intellectual property law regime. It also aims to encourage students to develop research skills in intellectual property law. It is a self-contained twelve month course for those whose training in legal techniques has equipped them to proceed directly to the study of postgraduate level subjects within the scope of the programme. Its focus is on UK law and policy within a European, International and comparative context. It provides a thorough grounding in substantive intellectual property law and the economic, social and theoretical basis of the subject.

Coursework and assessment
Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.
The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits).

The LL.M in Intellectual Property Law has three core course units: Trade Mark Law & Policy ; Patent Law & Policy ; and Copyright Law & Policy . These core course units constitute 75 credits of the 120 taught credits required for the course.
In addition to these core areas, you will be required to study other course units, selected from a range of options, that either cover specialist or peripheral areas of intellectual property law or that complement the study of intellectual property

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

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Course description. The aims of this course are to introduce you to the major regulatory and contractual issues in international financial services law and to relate these to broader business law issues. Read more
Course description
The aims of this course are to introduce you to the major regulatory and contractual issues in international financial services law and to relate these to broader business law issues. The contemporary problems and challenges to banking regulation and the global architecture of international finance will be addressed too. The course is suitable for graduates in law seeking careers in legal practice in any developed or developing country with a financial services or business law profile. It is also suitable for those looking to work directly in the financial services industry, especially those interested in compliance issues.
Coursework and assessment
Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.
The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits).

Course unit details
Students take taught course units to a total value of 120 credits. This involves taking one core course unit ( International Financial Services Regulation ) of 30 credit value, and the remaining 90 credits from an approved list of commercial law options. Each individual course unit is of either 15 or 30 credits value.

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

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Course description. The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more
Course description
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of healthcare and legal professionals and those in related fields. Students gain an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts.

Coursework and assessment
Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the two 30 credit Core course units. In addition, MA students must submit a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation by independent research (60 credits). The part-time MA students undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

The awards of the MA is classified according to Pass/Merit/Distinction.

PG Dip available upon enquiry

Course unit details
Students will be required to complete three Core course units and three Options. The Core course units are:
Philosophical Bioethics (30 credits)
Medico-Legal Problems (30 credits)
Global Health, Law and Bioethics (15 credits)
Students will then choose three Options.
MA students must also successfully complete a dissertation by independent research of 12,000-15,000 words (60 credits), which is undertaken over the summer months of the programme (June-September).

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

Fees
For entry in the academic year beginning September 2015, the tuition fees are as follows:
MA (full-time)
UK/EU students (per annum): £6,500
International students (per annum): £14,500
MA (part-time)
UK/EU students (per annum): £3,250
International students (per annum): £7,250

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Course description. The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is provided by The School of Law. Students complete 5 course units and an independent research dissertation. Read more
Course description
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is provided by The School of Law.
Students complete 5 course units and an independent research dissertation.
This programme aims to provide the highest quality training in healthcare ethics and health law.
Students will gain an expert knowledge and understanding of ethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts. You will cover a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia.
Although no attendance at the University is required for this programme, we do encourage all students to attend Study Days that are held each year, as a way of meeting both staff and fellow students involved in the programme. Students are also encouraged to participate in online discussion groups.
Students are also provided with one-to-one tutorial support from staff at the Centre via email, telephone or on campus throughout the programme.

Coursework and assessment
At the end of each of the course units for our distance learning courses, students are required to submit an essay of 4,000 words (for course units to the value of 15 credits) or 7,000 words (for course units to the value of 30 credits).
MA students are also required to submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words on a subject of their choice.

Course unit details
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law is comprised of 5 course units and an independent research dissertation. The delivery of these course units is via interactive learning texts which guide you through the areas of study and point you in the direction of further reading.
Students complete one course unit at a time so that they can focus on the issues in hand. You get around 3.5 months to complete each 30 credit course and 2.5 months for the 15 credit courses allowing plenty of time to complete the work while working full time, for instance. Each course unit is made up of 10-15 sections, which represent the equivalent of (approximately) an hour-and-a-half lecture with reading (usually around 2-3 papers or chapters).

PG Dip available upon enquiry

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

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The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management (EAM) examines the principles, procedures and methods of EAM against the background of current UK, European and international environmental policy. Read more
The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management (EAM) examines the principles, procedures and methods of EAM against the background of current UK, European and international environmental policy.

The course covers the complementary roles of natural resource management and planning within core areas of EAM such as Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA), as well as new and evolving fields such as mitigation banking, climate change adaptation, environmental inequality, ecosystem services, and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and sustainability appraisal.

The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI). On completing the course, students are ideally placed to undertake the exams for the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA) Associate Membership.

Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/environmental-assessment-and-management/

Why choose this course?

- Staff that teach on the MSc have published widely, including authoring the leading textbooks in Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment

- Our teaching is always informed by the latest developments in theory and in practice. The teaching team regularly undertake related applied research and consultancy work with respected environmental consultancies such as ERM, WSP, and Land Use Consultants, as well as the European Union, UK public sector bodies and NGOs.

- The course has excellent links with the professional practitioner community. Our contacts from industry provide valuable inputs via guest lecture sessions that serve to bring real-world experience to the programme, in addition to providing the opportunity for you to meet with potential employers.

- Potential employers are familiar with the programme content and delivery and regularly approach the course team in search of our graduates

- There are regular opportunities to gain real world experience, ranging from dissertation research placements with the RSPB, TVERC and consultancies, and applied coursework with Grundon, to voluntary work with the Environmental Information Exchange.

- Excellent feedback from employers, "Both our environmental and planning teams have recruited graduates from the Oxford Brookes MSc courses. We find that the graduates from these courses have a wide range of interests and are well rounded candidates in terms of their environmental and planning knowledge." - URS

Professional accreditation

The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This means that on graduation, students can progress to complete the Assessment of Professional Competence programme of RICS in order to become full members.

The course is also accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) as a specialist Master's programme. Students who wish to progress to Chartered Membership of the RTPI with the MSc EAM must also complete an accredited PG Diploma qualification in spatial planning - please refer to http://www.rtpi.org.uk for further information regarding accreditation.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods used in the programme reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with EAM. Lectures provide the essential background and knowledge base for each module and workshops, seminars and project work provide opportunities for analysis and synthesis of this information.

The programme will also offer site visits, where appropriate, to provide direct experience of the important issues in environmental assessment and management.

A wide range of staff are involved in teaching on the programme. Most are from the Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

Our contacts from industry provide valuable inputs via guest lecture sessions including speakers from the Institute of Environmental Assessment and Management, regulatory bodies such as the Environment Agency and the Planning Inspectorate, and leading environmental consultancies such as ERM, URS, WSP and PBA.

These sessions serve to bring real-world experience to the programme, in addition to providing the opportunity for students to meet with potential employers.

A variety of materials and resources, including student experience, is used to provide a varied educational experience and a teaching and learning environment appropriate for graduate students.

The early parts of the programme focus on the background to EAM, particularly on establishing a solid grounding in planning, resource management, and principles of EAM.

Over time, increasing emphasis is placed on the skills required for environmental impact assessment and environmental management, culminating in the preparation of a major environmental impact statement (EIS) project.

Approximately two-thirds of the core-module element of the programme is devoted to environmental assessment, and one-third to environmental management. However, additional training in environmental management can be obtained by the selection of appropriate options.

Advice will be given at Induction on making appropriate choices in relation to students’ interests and intended career paths. The dissertation gives students the opportunity to explore a subject related to EAM in depth, and to integrate the various elements of the programme.

How this course helps you develop

The course develops the skills and knowledge that are in demand in practice and it has an impressive employment record. Potential employers are familiar with the programme content and delivery and regularly approach the course team in search of our graduates.

Careers

The course has been running for 25 years and has an extensive network of nearly 500 alumni, some of whom have achieved partner- and technical director-level appointments in leading consultancies such as ERM, EDP, WSP Environment & Energy, Hyder Consulting, and URS, while others have secured high-level environmental positions within organisations such as the European Commission and the World Bank.

Career destinations include:
- Environmental consultancy, including leading IEMA EIA Quality Mark companies such as ERM, AMEC, Environ UK, Nicholas Pearson Associates, Parsons Brinkerhoff, Pegasus Planning, AECOM, RPS Group, Savills, and Waterman, among many others.

- Environmental managers and EIA / SEA officers with regulatory bodies such as the Environment Agency and SEPA, local authorities, and government departments both in the UK and internationally.

- Officers with non-statutory bodies and non-governmental agencies in Europe and overseas.
A number of graduates have progressed to undertake research degrees (PhD).

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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