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Masters Degrees (Peace-Building)

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Institute for. Diplomacy and International Governance. The. Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance. offers unrivalled insight into the challenges and opportunities in the areas of modern diplomacy, international security, international business and trade, global communication and innovation management. Read more

Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance

The Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance offers unrivalled insight into the challenges and opportunities in the areas of modern diplomacy, international security, international business and trade, global communication and innovation management.

For more information, see our programme page for Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc

This programme

Our Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc explores the link between national and global security and the role of peace-building in developing multi-layered communities and nations.

You will utilise appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with these areas, while exploring the relationships between development and peace-building, civil-military relations, as well as the wider global security context in which politics, trade and conflict occur.

Your personal development

The Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance offers high-quality master’s programmes taught by outstanding teaching staff and professionals that are well connected within their field. You will benefit from the guidance and tuition of an academic team with an unrivalled track record in the teaching of Diplomacy and other related disciplines.

Enterprise Through the Curriculum is an intrinsic element of every master’s programme at Loughborough University London and has been carefully designed to give students the best possible chance of securing their dream role. From employability profiling to live group projects set by a business or organisation, and from site visits to organisation-based dissertation opportunities, Loughborough University London is the first of its kind to develop a suite of activities and support that is positioned as the underpinning of every student’s experience.

Future career prospects

Graduates of this programme will be ready to pursue a career in diplomacy, particularly in the areas of international security and peace-building.

Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MRes or PhD programme.

Speak to a programme specialist

If you'd like to know more about this programme, you can request an email or telephone call from an academic responsible for the teaching of this programme.

Complete the contact request form

Scholarships for 2018 entry

Our ambition is to inspire high achieving students from all backgrounds, to benefit from our outstanding teaching and cutting edge research facilities.

Inspiring Success Scholarship

The Inspiring Success Scholarship offers 100% off the full cost of tuition fees for selected unemployed and underemployed graduates, who obtained GCSE or A-level (or equivalent) qualifications from Hackney, Tower Hamlets, Newham or Waltham Forest.

East London Community Scholarship

The East London Community Scholarship offers 50% off the full cost of tuition fees for students who obtained GCSE or A-level (or equivalent) qualifications from Barking and Dagenham, Greenwich, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets or Waltham Forest.

Excellence scholarship

The Excellence scholarship automatically awards high-achieving students 20% off the full cost of our master’s tuition fees, regardless of their full-time programme or nationality. To be eligible for this scholarship, students must have an upper-second class degree or equivalent qualification recognised by Loughborough University.

Alumni Bursary

The Alumni Bursary automatically awards graduates of Loughborough University 10% off the full cost of our master's tuition fees, regardless of their full-time programme or nationality.

Further details about the full range of scholarships we offer are available on our website.



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This course analyses the complex relationships that lie at the heart of the development-security relationship in the global south. Read more
This course analyses the complex relationships that lie at the heart of the development-security relationship in the global south.

You will explore:
-How cycles of insecurity and violence affect development
-Difficulties faced by various organisations negotiating spirals of violence and insecurity (for example during armed intervention, aid provision, peace-building processes or postconflict reconstruction)
-Whether underdevelopment in the global south facilitates the international spread of terrorist and criminal networks

We have an interdisciplinary perspective on questions of peace, vulnerability and insecurity, giving you a distinctive grounding in concepts of conflict, security and development.

How will I study?

You take core modules and options, and learn through taught lectures, seminars and workshops. A dedicated module prepares you for further research and a professional career.

In the summer, you work on your supervised dissertation, which also has a placement option.

You will be assessed via term papers and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our MA is ideal for you if you wish to pursue a career in development, peace-building, international affairs, journalism or academic research. Or if you have a general interest in insecurity in the Global South.

Our graduates have gone on to work in:
-Government foreign, defence or development ministries
-International organisations (for example the United Nations, NATO)
-NGOs (for example Oxfam, CAFOD, Amnesty International, the Red Cross)
-International development (for example the World Bank)
-International media or journalism
-Academia and research institutes

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Read more

The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Drawing upon national and international expertise in the field, this programme will position graduates for a wide range of career options in the public and private sectors as academic researchers and as practitioners and policy makers in fields such as conflict analysis and resolution, peace-building, and post-conflict transformation.

This programme (which replaces the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (PGDipArts) in Peace and Conflict Studies) combines theory and practice with a solid research component and is regionally focused on Asia and the Pacific.

Programme Requirements

PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict

PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory

PEAC 590 Research Dissertation or PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report

and two of



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This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Read more

WHAT IS THE PROGRAMME?

This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Module choice within the programme will permit you to build your own personalised portfolio of knowledge and learning within the area of conflict transformation and social justice. You will be taught by academics and practitioners whose expertise is both national and global and who offer research-led teaching in areas of conflict such as South/Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Southern Europe, South America and Northern Ireland.

HOW ARE WE DIFFERENT?

This MA provides the opportunity to undertake study across the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and beyond. You will be able to choose modules across ten disciplines and will benefit from an enriched, interdisciplinary learning environment. You will engage with core theories, concepts, issues and debates within conflict transformation and social justice, as well as with modes and forms of conflict and the legal and human rights aspects of conflict transformation and social justice.
Students will critically examine the key conceptual, moral, legal, political and cultural issues that define conflict and its relationship to transformation and social justice. Study will be framed by a core module that will draw together the various disciplinary approaches and methods. Those methods will also be taught via bespoke training modules within the Faculty’s postgraduate taught programme.

This interdisciplinary environment may provide a gateway to PhD research.

PROGRAMME DETAILS

Students are required to complete THREE compulsory taught modules:
Global Concepts and Practices of Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), Conducting Research in Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), and Making Knowledge Work (20 CATS), as well as the triple-weighted dissertation (60 CATS).

The remaining 60 CATS points will be taken via module choice from the following Schools: English, Creative Arts, Law, Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, History and Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work. Students must pass all taught modules equating to 120 CATS points before being able to complete a dissertation.

The taught modules are delivered during two 12 week semesters

A student cannot take more than 40 credits in any School. Where a student wishes to take more than 40 credits in a particular School, it is recommended that they apply for the Masters programme in that School.
Within each stream students must take modules from at least two Schools.

STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAMME

The optional modules are structured into three streams. You will be able to specialise in one stream that will permit you to explore different disciplinary approaches to and perspectives on related and overlapping subjects.

Stream 1: Conflict Transformation
In Stream 1, you will be able to focus on conflict via reading across definitions, forms, expressions and manifestations of conflict, conflict transformation and social justice. This could include, for example exploring notions such as terrorism, territoriality, behaviouralism, performance, scale, ethnicity, gender, environmental resource competition, youth and class.

Stream 2: Asserting Social Justice, Inclusion and Rights
Stream 2 will give you the opportunity to link skills development to the understanding of conflict transformation via a human rights and/or social justice frame. The Stream relates to rights of assembly, human rights abuse, social injustice, environmental conflicts, disempowerment and social, gendered, youth-centred and other exclusions.

Stream 3: Religion, Society, Peace-building and Conflict
In Stream 3 you will work on understanding religion/faith-based coexistence and inter/intra faith approaches to peace-building that relate to the concepts of ‘peace via religion’, ‘peace without religion’ and ‘peace with religion’. The practice of religious/faith based approaches will be taught around the importance of faith in conflict transformation, religion/faith-based NGO examples and approaches.

Full details on the course can be found in our course booklet: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/filestore/Filetoupload,470694,en.pdf

SPECIAL FEATURES

Only global MA programme on conflict transformation and social justice.
Only MA programme in the field to be interdisciplinary across all the humanities and social sciences in order to offer a fully rounded and multilevel analysis of the subject whilst offering optional modules for specialisation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

A list of FAQs are available to assist you by clicking here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/StudyWithUs/MastersinConflictTransformationandSocialJustice/FrequentlyAskedQuestions/

BE PART OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Learn more about the Institute here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/AboutUs/

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management 
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building 
  • Climate Change Disasters 
  • Technologies and Weaponry
  • Research project 
  • Professional placement 

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as: 

  • Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
  • Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
  • Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
  • Preparing for Floods 

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from.)

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics.

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

• study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
• consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
• be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
receive close tutorial support.
• be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics:

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights:

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

PLUS

Research Methods
Dissertation

PLUS Two from:

Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
Global Environmental Politics
Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
Legacies of Warfare
Global Ethics
A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management 
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building 
  • Climate Change Disasters 
  • Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as: 

  • Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
  • Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism) 
  • Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
  • Preparing for Floods 

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from.)

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers.

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more

The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

What will you study?

Planned Law modules include:

  • Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
  • Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
  • Disaster Management
  • Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
  • Public International Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict  
  • International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
  • Climate Change Disasters
  • Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

Practical training opportunities

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers.

What career can you have?

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.



Read less
International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. Read more
International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. The course combines perspectives from international relations, ethics and conflict resolution to reflect critically upon the wide range of social, political and economic issues associated with peace and political violence. A week-long Mediation Summer School provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in the area of conflict resolution and mediation. There is also the option to participate in various field trips in Ireland and abroad. Students are required to take the two core modules as well as four modules from the list of modules. A sufficient number of optional modules must be taken to fulfil credit requirements. A. Core Modules The Politics of Peace and Conflict Research Methods B. Students must take four modules from the following list of options: International Politics Ethics in International Affairs Conflict Resolution and Nonviolence Armed Conflict, Peace-building and Development The United Nations and Peacekeeping Human Rights in Theory and Practice Gender, War and Peace Northern Ireland: Conflict, Religion and the Politics of Peace The Politics of the Idea of Europe Race and Ethnicity, Theoretical Concepts Ethnic Conflict, Peace and the State NGOs in Theory and Practice: Internship Module Some changes to the structure and content of this course may be made during 2012-13. Prospective candidates should contact the Executive Officer for information on new developments. Teaching takes place in Dublin over two terms. A one term, non-degree course is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study. There is also the option of attending single modules. Modules from the M.Phil. in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies and the M.Phil. in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation are open to students on the M.Phil. in International Peace Studies. Students seeking to be assessed for their work on a module in either of the two other courses must first secure the permission of the relevant course coordinators. Dissertation: A research dissertation (15,000 – 20,000 words) to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff and to be submitted by 16 August.

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme focuses on the issues surrounding gender based violence and human rights and principles of human rights. This discipline and subject area has a wide international reach in terms of how society and central government tackle the different levels of crimes against women and men in different countries and regions of the world looking at the very basic rights of people, expectations and challenges in some societies to top level and bringing in a range of other disciplines to analyse issues.  There are a wide range of career options within this subject area which range from international development and diplomacy to security, peace-building, charitable work to improve conditions in communities, women's and men's rights, international justice, policy and law making and so on.

In this programme the focus will be on ways we think about, understand and respond to violence. How do we know what counts as violence or a violent act?Why does legislation against violence so often transpire as inadequate, perhaps especially in the case of gendered and sexual violence? As the links between sex, gender and violence appear intimate and often lethal, a central but not exclusive focus of the programme will be on theories and practices of sex/gender. You are taught by experts in the School of Sociology.  

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
  • Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

  • Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Optional

  • Dimensions of Globalisation
  • The Comparative Study of European Societies
  • Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned international experts from The Centre for Gender Studies and School of Sociology
  • University of Aberdeen provides an excellent range of interdisciplinary events which you can attend

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 



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The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. Read more
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/madisconfres/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals- 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
- Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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