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This programme explores the link between national and global security and the role of peace-building in developing multi-layered communities and nations. Read more

ACADEMY OF DIPLOMACY AND INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE

This programme explores the link between national and global security and the role of peace-building in developing multi-layered communities and nations.
Our students will benefit from specialised, systematic and in-depth study focused on the relationship between diplomacy and international security and peace-building. They will utilise appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with this work, while exploring the relationships between development and peace-building, civil-military relation, cyber security, global identity and security.

See the website http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/institutes-programmes/in-international-security-and-peace-building/

Programme Aims

a) To provide specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of the study of and the relationship between diplomacy and international security and peace-building deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with the specific subject area

b) To enable students to acquire a critical awareness of the current issues involved in the study of the relations between diplomacy, international security and peace-building

c) To provide training in the concepts and applications of research appropriate for the study of diplomacy, international security and peace-building

d) To offer opportunities for independent study and research within the related fields of diplomacy, international security and peace-building

e) To equip students with the skills to pursue careers as trained specialists in diplomacy with particular reference to international security and peace-building

Programme Structure

To qualify for the award of the MSc degree in Security, Peace-Building and Diplomacy you must complete five compulsory modules, choose any two optional modules and choose one module from the second subject modules list, totalling 120 credits. Students must also complete a Dissertation worth 60 credits.

In the first semester, students will pick a subject from the list of nominated Second Subject modules offered by the other Loughborough University in London Institutes.

All students taking MSc Security, Peace-Building and Diplomacy will be given specific guidance on optional choices to help them make the correct choice for their chosen career development path. Graduates will also have the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MRes or PhD programme.

ASSESSMENT

Modules are assessed by a combination of essays, group exercises, presentations and time constrained assignments. Subject to your choices, there may also be exams.

CAREER PROSPECTS

The programme will equip you with the skills to pursue careers as trained specialists in diplomacy with particular reference to international security and peace-building.

COMPULSORY MODULES

- Dissertation
- Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 1
- Diplomacy: Policy, Practice and Procedures 2
- Peace-Building
- International Security
- International Protocol and Etiquette

OPTIONAL MODULES

Choose two modules only
- Economic Global Governance
- The Politics and Practice of the European Union
- Economic Diplomacy
- Diplomatic Discourse
- Cultural Projection and Perception

SECOND SUBJECT MODULES

Choose one module only
- Management Skills

Find more information on modules here http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/institutes-programmes/in-international-security-and-peace-building/

Scholarships

We are investing over half a million pounds (£0.5m) in our scholarship and bursary scheme to support your studies at Loughborough University London in 2017. This package of support celebrates and rewards excellence, innovation and community. Our ambition is to inspire students of the highest calibre and from all backgrounds and nationalities to study with us and benefit from the wider Loughborough University experience and network. Our range of scholarships, bursaries and support packages are available to UK, EU and international students.View the sections below to discover which scholarship options are right for you.

What's on offer for 2017?
Inspiring Success Programme
-For unemployed and underemployed* graduates living in the East London Growth Boroughs of Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets or Waltham Forest
-Award value: 100% off your tuition fees
-We are joining forces with The London Legacy Development Company to offer a two day programme of specialist support for graduates, including workshops, skills seminars and networking opportunities to increase students' employability and support those looking to enter into postgraduate education.
-Eligibility: At the end of the programme, eight students will be selected for a 100% scholarship to study a masters course of their choice at our London campus in September 2017.

Dean's Award for Enterprise
-For students looking for the skills and support to launch a new business
-Award value: 90% off fees to launch your business idea
-Eligibility: The award will be given at the discretion of the Dean and the Senior Leadership Team, based on a one-page submission of your business idea.

East London Community Scholarship
-For any students who obtained their GCSE’s or A-levels (or equivalent qualifications) from The Growth Boroughs – Barking and Dagenham, Greenwich, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest
-Award value: 50% off your tuition fees
-Eligibility: Competitive scholarship based on one-page submission showing your contribution to our community.

Alumni Bursary
-For all Loughborough University alumni
-Award value: 20% off your tuition fees
-Eligibility: International and UK/EU alumni holding a current offer for LoughboroughExcellence Scholarship
-For international and UK/EU high achieving students
-Eligibility: Any student holding a high 2:1 or first class undergraduate degree or equivalent from a recognised high quality institution will be considered.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.lborolondon.ac.uk/study/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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This course analyses the complex relationships that lie at the heart of the development-security relationship in the global south. Read more
This course analyses the complex relationships that lie at the heart of the development-security relationship in the global south.

You will explore:
-How cycles of insecurity and violence affect development
-Difficulties faced by various organisations negotiating spirals of violence and insecurity (for example during armed intervention, aid provision, peace-building processes or postconflict reconstruction)
-Whether underdevelopment in the global south facilitates the international spread of terrorist and criminal networks

We have an interdisciplinary perspective on questions of peace, vulnerability and insecurity, giving you a distinctive grounding in concepts of conflict, security and development.

How will I study?

You take core modules and options, and learn through taught lectures, seminars and workshops. A dedicated module prepares you for further research and a professional career.

In the summer, you work on your supervised dissertation, which also has a placement option.

You will be assessed via term papers and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our MA is ideal for you if you wish to pursue a career in development, peace-building, international affairs, journalism or academic research. Or if you have a general interest in insecurity in the Global South.

Our graduates have gone on to work in:
-Government foreign, defence or development ministries
-International organisations (for example the United Nations, NATO)
-NGOs (for example Oxfam, CAFOD, Amnesty International, the Red Cross)
-International development (for example the World Bank)
-International media or journalism
-Academia and research institutes

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmdispconfres/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration- 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAD104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian Case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Read more
The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Drawing upon national and international expertise in the field, this programme will position graduates for a wide range of career options in the public and private sectors as academic researchers and as practitioners and policy makers in fields such as conflict analysis and resolution, peace-building, and post-conflict transformation.

This programme (which replaces the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (PGDipArts) in Peace and Conflict Studies) combines theory and practice with a solid research component and is regionally focused on Asia and the Pacific.

Programme Requirements

PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict (30 Points)
PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory (30 Points)
PEAC 590 Research Dissertation OR PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report (60 Points)
and two further 500-level PEAC papers (30 points each) (60 Points)

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of two core papers and two elective papers, worth 120 points, together with a 60 point research dissertation, or 60 point practicum and research project:

PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict (30 Points)
PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory (30 Points)
PEAC 590 Research Dissertation (60 Points)
OR
PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report (60 Points)

And two of:
PEAC 503 Conflict Resolution Practice (30 Points)
PEAC 504 Development and Peace-building (30 Points)
PEAC 505 Peace Education (30 Points)
PEAC 506 Special Topic (30 Points)
PEAC 507 Critical Terrorism Studies (30 Points)
Total 180 points

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This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Read more

WHAT IS THE PROGRAMME?

This is a unique and innovative interdisciplinary programme taught through subject areas that include law, anthropology, english, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology and the creative arts. Module choice within the programme will permit you to build your own personalised portfolio of knowledge and learning within the area of conflict transformation and social justice. You will be taught by academics and practitioners whose expertise is both national and global and who offer research-led teaching in areas of conflict such as South/Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Southern Europe, South America and Northern Ireland.

HOW ARE WE DIFFERENT?

This MA provides the opportunity to undertake study across the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and beyond. You will be able to choose modules across ten disciplines and will benefit from an enriched, interdisciplinary learning environment. You will engage with core theories, concepts, issues and debates within conflict transformation and social justice, as well as with modes and forms of conflict and the legal and human rights aspects of conflict transformation and social justice.
Students will critically examine the key conceptual, moral, legal, political and cultural issues that define conflict and its relationship to transformation and social justice. Study will be framed by a core module that will draw together the various disciplinary approaches and methods. Those methods will also be taught via bespoke training modules within the Faculty’s postgraduate taught programme.

This interdisciplinary environment may provide a gateway to PhD research.

PROGRAMME DETAILS

Students are required to complete THREE compulsory taught modules:
Global Concepts and Practices of Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), Conducting Research in Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (20 CATS), and Making Knowledge Work (20 CATS), as well as the triple-weighted dissertation (60 CATS).

The remaining 60 CATS points will be taken via module choice from the following Schools: English, Creative Arts, Law, Politics, International Studies and Philosophy, History and Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work. Students must pass all taught modules equating to 120 CATS points before being able to complete a dissertation.

The taught modules are delivered during two 12 week semesters

A student cannot take more than 40 credits in any School. Where a student wishes to take more than 40 credits in a particular School, it is recommended that they apply for the Masters programme in that School.
Within each stream students must take modules from at least two Schools.

STRUCTURE OF THE PROGRAMME

The optional modules are structured into three streams. You will be able to specialise in one stream that will permit you to explore different disciplinary approaches to and perspectives on related and overlapping subjects.

Stream 1: Conflict Transformation
In Stream 1, you will be able to focus on conflict via reading across definitions, forms, expressions and manifestations of conflict, conflict transformation and social justice. This could include, for example exploring notions such as terrorism, territoriality, behaviouralism, performance, scale, ethnicity, gender, environmental resource competition, youth and class.

Stream 2: Asserting Social Justice, Inclusion and Rights
Stream 2 will give you the opportunity to link skills development to the understanding of conflict transformation via a human rights and/or social justice frame. The Stream relates to rights of assembly, human rights abuse, social injustice, environmental conflicts, disempowerment and social, gendered, youth-centred and other exclusions.

Stream 3: Religion, Society, Peace-building and Conflict
In Stream 3 you will work on understanding religion/faith-based coexistence and inter/intra faith approaches to peace-building that relate to the concepts of ‘peace via religion’, ‘peace without religion’ and ‘peace with religion’. The practice of religious/faith based approaches will be taught around the importance of faith in conflict transformation, religion/faith-based NGO examples and approaches.

Full details on the course can be found in our course booklet: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/filestore/Filetoupload,470694,en.pdf

SPECIAL FEATURES

Only global MA programme on conflict transformation and social justice.
Only MA programme in the field to be interdisciplinary across all the humanities and social sciences in order to offer a fully rounded and multilevel analysis of the subject whilst offering optional modules for specialisation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

A list of FAQs are available to assist you by clicking here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/StudyWithUs/MastersinConflictTransformationandSocialJustice/FrequentlyAskedQuestions/

BE PART OF AN INTERDISCIPLINARY LEARNING EXPERIENCE

Learn more about the Institute here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/isctsj/AboutUs/

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry
-Research project
-Professional placement

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics.

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

• study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
• consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
• be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
receive close tutorial support.
• be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics:

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights:

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

PLUS

Research Methods
Dissertation

PLUS Two from:

Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
Global Environmental Politics
Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
Legacies of Warfare
Global Ethics
A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development. A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). Read more
Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development.

A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). The only MBA program in the Americas with community at its core; one that delivers advanced business knowledge and skills to make a difference in the local and global community.

Our one-of-a kind MBA in CED is designed for a new generation of leaders; for learners who aspire to be instruments of change in the public and corporate sectors and in not-for-profit organizations. Our MBA in CED offers a leading edge curriculum that includes all business subjects found in traditional MBA programs, with an emphasis on economic development, leadership, governance, and management of change. Specializing options include electives in Strategic Leadership, Peace Building, Public Administration, First Nations, Sustainability or International Business.

About Our MBA

Flexible delivery: Our MBA in CED fits with your busy life. We offer flexible delivery formats including short, on campus residencies in July and weekend classes in Toronto, Kingston, Saskatoon, Edmonton, or Whitehorse. Full time students can complete the program at our Sydney campus over a 12-month period.

Accessible: Cape Breton University’s MBA in CED is flexible. It is open to those starting their careers and to experienced managers. Our program works well for those who have completed an undergrad program, (not just business) and for those who have extensive business and community experience, but without formal academic credentials. For those who already have a degree in business or commerce, credits may be applied for as many as four foundation courses.

Nationally Recognized Faculty: Faculty members have strong backgrounds in teaching, business and community economic development, in addition to holding high academic credentials. Our faculty are award-winning teachers and includes honorees of the prestigious Order of Canada.

Research Focus: CBU’s MBA program includes a core Research Methodology course and the completion of an applied research project. Preparing this research component enables our students to compete for the coveted $17.5K SSHRC Canada Graduate Studies scholarships or continue their studies in a PhD program. A number of our full-time students have been successful in winning scholarships while others are now enrolled in a PhD program.

Diversity: Our MBA in CED attracts a large number of women, aboriginals and non-business graduates from Canada and around the world.

At the core of this unique program is community. Cape Breton Island is rooted in community-based efforts that overcome obstacles, face difficulties with creativity and use innovation to solve age-old problems. The island heritage includes community economic development giants like Father Jimmy Tompkins, founder of the co-operative and credit union movement in English Canada and is home to growing community ventures like New Dawn Enterprises – the oldest community economic development corporation in Canada.

It is a heritage Cape Breton University is proud to continue.

Options

Strategic Leadership Option
Leadership techniques for advancing organizations and communities; challenges in making changes in an existing organization and understanding the dynamics with various leadership theories and styles.
-MBAC6219 Social Dynamics of Leadership
-MBAC6233 Contemporary Issues: Change Management and Governance

First Nations Option
Delves into community economic development issues facing Indigenous communities across the country. For Aboriginal and non-aboriginal learners.
-MBAC6209 Land Claims, Self-Government and CED
-MBAC6211 The Dynamics of Community Economic Development in First Nations

International Business Option
Advanced content and strategies needed to grow the global organization; builds on modules in the core International Business course.
-MBAC6228 International Marketing
-MBAC6226 International Finance

Peace-Building, Reconstruction and Good-Governance Option
These courses are designed to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the role of CED in dealing with local and national emergencies and the role of CED in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict restoration activities.
-MBAC6215 Emergency Management
-MBAC6217 Conflict Resolution and Community Reconstruction

Public Policy
-MBAC 6221 Public Policy
-MBAC 6223 Government, Business and Third Sector Relations

Sustainability
-MBAC 6227 Environment, Energy, and the Economy: strategies for sustainable futures
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing

Marketing (2 courses)
-MBAC 6206 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6228 International Marketing
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing
-MBAC 6231 Marketing Strategy

Tourism
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6206 Tourism Management & Planning

What to Expect

As a career professional, you have developed an expertise in your field. You have a comprehensive understanding, study the trends and see opportunities that others with less experience, often miss.

An MBA in CED from the Shannon School of Business at Cape Breton University will highlight the interaction between community and business and expose you to development practices and advanced management concepts and skills in a whole new way.

Our graduates are prepared for senior leadership roles. Utilizing their previously acquired professional expertise blended with a new, broad, general management perspective, means decision-making skills are integrated across their entire organization. Courses demand critical analysis and include deliverables, such as marketing plans, business models and plans, development of community plans and organizational strategy.

Program depth-and-breadth characteristics:
-Program requires completion of 16 courses, including an individual research project, 48 credits in total
-Program curriculum focuses on the critical areas for performance of organizations: accounting, marketing, strategy, finance, organizational behavior, leadership, venture analysis
-Core curriculum includes subjects that provide insights in community economic development, such as comparative development, business and community development, economic geography
-Core program has an intense research component, typically found in social science graduate programs, requiring completion of a research methods course and an individual applied research project, accompanied by a mini-thesis of 70-90 pages.
-Curriculum allows for 2 elective courses that provide specialization in First Nations urban and rural economic development, peace-building and community reconstruction, strategic leadership or international business.
-Courses require application of theory and concepts into practical objectives such as marketing plans and business models.
-The classes are often a mixture of early career and mid-career managers. This provides for a unique experience of enriching exchanges of knowledge and ideas. In-class and after-class interaction among students and faculty creates an environment of critical reflection.

Read less
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. Read more
The MA in Dispute Resolution and Conflict allows students to study the full spectrum of legal methods of solving disputes and managing conflicts, taking a broad view of conflict and law, and examining both the local, regional and international areas, including international tribunals and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/madisconfres/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Dispute and Conflict Resolution specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Alternative Dispute Resolution - 15PLAC104 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals- 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
- Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. Read more
The MA in Human Rights Law allows students to study human rights law, its application and relevance to a broad range of areas and legal issues, including Islamic law, Chinese law, gender, international law, conflict and labour law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/mahumrightslaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Human Rights specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World – 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: The Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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