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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions to manage projects within this sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. Our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which is made up of practitioners in the field, exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. In addition, we use our alumni network to benefit from the views of professionals in prominent positions, who were also students at Oxford Brookes University.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time (FT) programme or as an distance-learning (DL) programme, which is normally taken over two years (minimum). Both FT and DL study modes include intensive study periods on-campus in Oxford, which are not compulsory. There is a compulsory European Field-trip. There are two entry points: September and January.

Why choose this course?

Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction, and professional institutions (the RICS and the CIOB), who can provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. Our alumni network spans the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, South Africa, Russia, Turkey, Hong Kong, India and USA. Professional Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) accreditation.

Problem-based learning (PBL) approach which ensures that the MSc is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. One intensive study period in each semester where full-time and distance learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops; and to share experiences. Extensive online learning material provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Teaching backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) we were 11th in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment (UoA 16). The School's membership of a select group of RICS accredited universities acting as RICS' ambassadors; and to be among the signatories to the RICS Initiative to Drive the Adoption of Sustainable Development Principles in Built Environment Higher Education in line with the Six Principles under UN PRME (Principles for Responsible Management Education).

Professional accreditation

RICS and/or CIOB members are well-sought after in the job market.

If you have no or very limited relevant experience in the industry, holding this RICS & CIOB accredited MSc reduces the duration of your structured training (or relevant experience post-qualification) to become a member from five years to 24 months.
Many of our open-learning students run their structured training along-side the course. Thus, they become members of these institutions shortly after the completion of the course.

In summary, the programme offers a relatively quick route to RICS & CIOB membership for people who have no or very limited experience in the industry, and hence increases their potential for employment.

This course in detail

There are two modes of delivery for the MSc PMBE: full-time on campus or distance learning, and there are two entry points - September and January. PGCert and PGDip are offered as 'exit' awards. Candidates who are wishing to graduate with one of these awards, should also apply for a MSc place in the first instance.

Extensive on-line learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site. Students have access to this site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The course is assessed by 100% coursework submitted via the VLE. Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, e-mail, telephone and Skype.

Intensive Study Periods - all students can attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections that extend into the industry. The open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff. The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are among the key features.

Distance learners must find their own accommodation and are asked to cover expenses for travel to Oxford, accommodation and food.

Field Trips and Site Visits - there are a number of field trips and site visits which take place mainly during the intensive study periods. There is one European field trip during the MSc programme and this normally takes place at the end of January each year - usually to the Netherlands. As well as bringing together full-time and open-learning students, the aim of this field trip is to integrate knowledge gained in the early part of the programme, to develop team skills and to build relationships. With the European field trip we also expose students to project management practices outside the UK and encourage them to observe and report on the different approaches to managing projects in the UK, their own countries and overseas.

The European Field Trip takes place at the end of January for the duration of five days and four nights. Heavily subsidised by the School, a coach is also provided to transport students and staff from Oxford Brookes to the field trip destination. Please read the details further down the page for information about additional costs for the field trip.

In order to attend site visits as part of the programme of study, we ask that students provide their own Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):
-Safety boots
-Hard hat
-High visibility vest
-Eye protection
-Gloves

Problem Based Learning - the programme will develop knowledge of current practice and issues in the built environment sector as well as building real-life skills including the exploration of interdisciplinary problems. We have responded to requests from industry to make our masters more practical by using an applied approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations. As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which encourages students to learn by applying theoretical principles in appropriate case studies. PBL leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study periods and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for open-learning study. Where necessary, open-learning students are supported by email, Skype, on-line lectures and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of the School of the Built Environment have an outstanding employment record. Usually, 100% of the graduates of MSc PMBE are in employment within six months after graduation.

Local, national and international construction companies, developers, project management consultancies, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department regularly to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within the construction sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. For example, prominent companies in the industry are represented in our Professional Liaison Group.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years. There are two entry points: September and January.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/project-management-in-the-built-environment/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a whole range of management skills and knowledge including project finance, technology, law and contract by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. They are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.
- There are four intensive study weeks during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Many have originally studied subjects outside the realm of the built environment such as law, psychology, architecture and geography, and others have been or still are (in the case of our open-learning students) employed in project management roles. As a result, there are great opportunities to share experiences, to gain a better understanding of the industry and the range of challenges that project managers face and also to benefit from the many different approaches to problem solving that is a feature of such a diverse group of students.

- Our graduates span the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, India and USA.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, approximately 80% of our research, with our colleagues in other Built Environment areas, was judged to be of ‘international’ quality, with approximately 40% rated as ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Communication with distance-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations.

Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture.

This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work.

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage/li>
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

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Clinical Academic Programme -. The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching. Read more

About the course

Clinical Academic Programme -

The academic programme is based on a ‘core competency’ model (BPS, 2007) and comprises four main areas of teaching: Professional Practice and Personal Development; Therapeutic Models and Interventions; Research Methods in Clinical Psychology; and Client Groups and Client Contexts.

Each of these four areas is further divided into a number of specific teaching modules that span the three years of training and correspond as much as possible with the structure and sequence of clinical placements. An awareness of the issues of ethical practice and equality for all is highlighted in all modules. Particular consideration is given to the many ways in which issues relating to diversity and inequality impact on the work of practising clinical psychologists within the lectures, and all lectures are formally evaluated on this by the trainees. Additionally, there are specific lectures considering a wide range of diversity issues within the Clients in Context module taught across the three years.

Four models of psychological therapy are currently taught on the programme: cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), systemic and family psychotherapy, personal construct therapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The content of the introductory CBT module is mapped onto the IAPT curriculum to enable trainees to include this in their portfolio of competencies, should they wish to seek employment where this is a specific requirement. More advanced training is provided in the third year of training. A previous trainee recently gained accreditation with the BABCP based on their CBT training at the University of Hertfordshire.

The academic programme is located within the overall programme philosophy which places particular emphasis on incorporating constructivist and social constructionist approaches to conceptualising psychological difficulties and their management. In line with the programme philosophy, an important aim of the academic programme is to train clinical psychologists who can understand and apply a range of psychological theories and approaches to both clinical practice and research. We teach our trainees to draw on multiple theoretical and evidence bases to develop individually tailored assessments, formulations, interventions and evaluations of complex psychological problems. We emphasise the flexibility to adapt and combine different approaches as a key competence, and our curriculum therefore aims to develop a broad, thorough and sophisticated understanding of various psychological theories and therapeutic approaches.

Service User Participation:

The DClinpsych course encourages service user and carers' participation in the training and have established a committee of service users and carers who consult and participate in the training course.

Problem Based learning -

Problem-based learning (PBL) forms an important part of clinical training at the University of Hertfordshire. As part of the academic programme trainees complete a series of small-group based PBL exercises, which aim to promote reflective, collaborative and self-directed learning.

Throughout the three years, trainees also participate in a series of small group discussions to consider academic papers and clinical cases. These discussions provide an academic context for trainees to integrate theory and research, to highlight theory-practice links, and to enable peer review of formulation and intervention plans. More formal case presentations are undertaken in the third year.

A unique feature of our clinical psychology training at UH is the access that our teachers and trainees have to a purpose-built, advanced simulation training centre.

The trainees are regarded as mature students, and for this reason an adult learning model is adopted. In line with this model and the overall programme philosophy, it is recognised that not only do trainees learn in different ways, but also that they can pursue their own perceptions of the material being taught and interpret it for themselves.

In line with HPC requirements for all clinical training programmes, all trainees selected will be informed of the various activities that form part of the academic curriculum (e.g., role-plays, problem-based learning, simulation training, small group discussions, etc). Consent to participate in all aspects of the academic programme will be sought prior to the programme commencing.

How to apply

All applications for funded places to the Doctorate are made through the national Clearing House for Postgraduate Courses in Clinical Psychology (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp)

Our next intake of Trainees will be at the end of September 2016. Application packs are available from the Clearing House from September 2015, and the deadline for applications is early December 2015.

Each academic year starts at the end of September or beginning of October with a compulsory four-week, full-time introductory block of teaching. This is followed by teaching all day on Thursdays and Fridays during term-time.

We are now accepting self funding trainees from September 2015: See below on how to apply.

Up to two fee-paying places, on our doctoral programme for International, European and British applicants, are available for entry in Autumn 2015. Fee-paying students will follow the same programme of study as trainees with NHS funded places.

Applications for our fee-paying places need to be made directly to the programme, using our application form. The closing date for these applications is 1st March 2016.

Overseas applicants are strongly advised to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) from the British Psychological Society (BPS) before applying. For further details about how to go about this, please view the BPS website.

How to contact us

For further information, please contact the Course Administrators Ms Neeli Clarke () or Catriona Roy () or tel +44 (0)1707 286322 +44 (0)1707 286322

How to find us

We are based in the Health Research Building on the College Lane Campus. Where to find us - http://www.herts.ac.uk/contact-us/where-to-find-us/college-lane-maps-and-directions

Why choose this course?

The course has a particular remit to train clinical psychologists to take up NHS positions. Clinical psychologists working in the region support the course, and many are working in collaboration with the Programme Team to provide placement supervision, research supervision, teaching and skills workshops.
The DClinPsy Trainees attend the University for their lectures, seminars and tutor support, but also spend approximately three days per week on their clinical placements.

Careers

In line with the concept of the "scientist-practitioner", the programme of research aims to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills required to undertake high-quality research, appraise literature critically, and adopt an evidence-based approach to clinical practice, where possible. It also aims to foster in trainees an awareness of the need for, and motivation to undertake, research in clinical settings - both during their placements and after qualification - to contribute to the evidence base of the profession.

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The MSc in Educational Psychology aims to prepare Trainee Educational Psychologists to work as practitioners of applied educational psychology in local government (usually Education or Social Services), in voluntary agencies and elsewhere, in the U.K. Read more
The MSc in Educational Psychology aims to prepare Trainee Educational Psychologists to work as practitioners of applied educational psychology in local government (usually Education or Social Services), in voluntary agencies and elsewhere, in the U.K. and beyond.

Why study Educational Psychology at Dundee?

This two-year full-time professional training programme leads to qualification as an Educational Psychologist and eligibility for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as an Educational Psychologist, after a further year of supervised practice in a local authority psychological service and obtaining the Qualification in Educational Psychology (Scotland) (Stage 2).

A key feature of the programme at Dundee is Problem Based Learning (PBL) which has been shown to be effective in promoting the development of active independent learning as well as collaborative learning. PBL provides an integrated model of teaching and learning as it crosses subject boundaries.

The programme incorporates a spiral curriculum whereby there is an iterative revisiting of topics, subjects or themes throughout the programme. Trainees build new knowledge on prior knowledge and achieve better understanding by exploring topics at deepening levels and in more complexity. Examples of this are the teaching and practical application of frameworks for practice; working with video to reflect on effective communication; and the development of critical reflection skills.

Aims of the course

The aims of the programme are to promote:
The acquisition and development of information, theories, evidence, strategies, skills, services and products, which are based on educational psychology, and relevant to:
- Enhancing effective learning
- Promoting positive social, emotional and behavioural development
- Promoting inclusion
- Co-operative problem-solving
With children, parents, teachers and a wide range of other carers and other professional agencies

Who should study this course?

The programme is aimed at applicants who wish to train as educational psychologists. Applicants have a wide variety of previous qualifications, experience and employment history.

How you will be taught

This course is taught by staff in the School of Education, Social Work and Community Education..
The course runs every two years, in even numbered years, i.e. 2012, 2014, etc. The start date is September and it lasts for 24 months.

Learning experiences in the university are closely linked with those from a series of practical placements in local authority psychological services.

Active and self-managed learning methods are emphasised.

The curriculum is delivered through a range of traditional teaching and learning sessions, practical tasks, role play, video analysis and feedback, peer tutoring and assessment, demonstration and other forms of experiential learning. The utilisation of problem based learning provides an integrated model of teaching and learning.

What you will study

Based on the assumption that educational psychology is primarily about effective learning in different contexts, the programme includes the following taught academic modules that reflect the different ages/stages as well as the various organisational contexts that EPs work to.

There are 5 compulsory academic modules:

Year 1:
Introduction to Educational Psychology Practice
Educational Psychology Practice in the Early Years
Educational Psychology Practice in the Primary Years

Year 2:
Educational Psychology Practice in Secondary and Post-School Years
Advanced Educational Psychology Practice

These modules are designed to facilitate exploration of the following curricular areas in a holistic and integrated manner: child and adolescent development - normal and exceptional; assessment and intervention - individual and systemic; contexts and systems in which children and young people develop and learn; research and evaluation methods; and transferable interpersonal and professional skills.

There are also 2 compulsory placement modules, undertaken in local authority Psychological Services, one in Year 1 and the other in Year 2.

How you will be assessed

There are no traditional written examinations. All assessment is continuous by written academic reports and assignments, oral presentations, a major research thesis, a placement file documenting planning, activities and reflection in both placements, observation and rating by supervisors of performance while on placement., and oral examination by the external examiner (for a sample of students).
There is also a strong emphasis on self-assessment. Trainees are required to keep a Personal Learning Plan, in which they identify and monitor individual targets related to particular skills or bodies of knowledge. These are reviewed in regular appraisal meetings with their university tutor. Grading's of work are on a pass/fail basis. Summative assessment incorporates a formative element and trainees are asked to identify action points to address in the next piece of assessed work.

Careers

Training to become an Educational Psychologist (EP) in Scotland is undertaken over 3 years and consists of 2 separate stages.

Stage 1 involves studying for a Master of Science in Educational Psychology, which is a 2 year full time course, combining study with research and supervised placements.

On completion of the MSc in Educational Psychology, graduates progress to Stage 2 of their training - the Qualification in Educational Psychology (Scotland)(Stage 2). The Qualification is conferred by the British Psychological Society (BPS) on successful completion of one full time (or equivalent) year of supervised practice in the employment of a local authority psychological service and meeting the requirements as specified (for more information on the Qualification please refer to the BPS website).

From 1 July 2009, anyone wishing to practise as an educational psychologist in the UK must be registered with the regulatory body, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The Qualification has been approved by the HCPC, and Qualification holders are therefore eligible for registration as practitioner psychologists.

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Please note that this course is only open to applications for September 2018 entry. Read more
Please note that this course is only open to applications for September 2018 entry.

This graduate entry programme is designed to enable students to develop the required competences, skills and standards of proficiency to be eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as an Occupational Therapist with either the PgDip Occupational Therapy or the MSc Occupational Therapy. The award received depends on the modules passed.

The accelerated format allows the full-time professional training to be condensed into two years, rather than the traditional three-year route. Key features are the use of problem-based (PBL) and inquiry-based learning approaches. These educational approaches involve students working together in small groups and sharing responsibility for meeting module learning outcomes. The course therefore requires students to draw on a range of self-management skills and this experience acts as good preparation for entering the evolving world of health and social care as a qualified member of the workforce.

Occupational Therapy at LSBU has a dedicated team of tutors who utilise their wealth of knowledge, skills and clinical experiences of working in health and social care to inform the teaching programme. The team has a strong commitment to engaging with clinicians and service users in the teaching programme.

To support the teaching programme, the School of Health and Social Care has a dedicated suite of clinical skills labs, including two well-equipped Activities of Daily Living (ADL) suites plus large rooms for art, splinting and group skills sessions.

Modules

Year 1:

Introduction to occupational therapy and occupational science
Human function and occupational performance
Promoting health and wellbeing through occupation

Year 2:

Autonomy, accountability and development of professional identity
Person, environment and occupation
Contemporary Issues in occupational therapy

Students who successfully complete and pass 2 of the 3 first year modules at the first attempt have the option to transfer to the MSc pathway at the end of Year 1. One of these modules passed first time must be Module 3 - Promoting Health and Wellbeing Through Occupation.

School of Health and Social Care Dissertation (MSc pathway only)

All modules are assessed by a mix of written assignments, case studies, critical review, presentations, examinations, practice placements and a dissertation (MSc students only).

Timetable

Attendance is normally three to four days per week with the remaining time being used for self-directed study. There is often preparatory work for problem based learning groups as well as other teaching sessions. Whilst on placements students are full-time following the working hours of the setting.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, small group sessions, practical skills sessions, online and self-directed learning activities.

Placements

During the course you are required to successfully complete and pass over 1000 practice placement hours within a broad variety of health and social care settings; meeting the College of Occupational Therapists (2008), the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT, 2002) and the Health and Social Care Professions standards and requirements.

At LSBU, we work closely with a number of healthcare organisations to provide a wide range of suitable practice placements. You will therefore gain experience of working with:

• People of different ages, diverse backgrounds and life situations
• Acute and long standing health needs (including physical, mental health and learning disability)
• Services in a range of settings (hospital and community, urban and rural).

Structure of placement learning:

Practice placements are in four blocks and are developmental in nature as you progress through the course. Placements are full time following the working hours of the setting. Student work under the guidance and supervision of a state registered occupational therapist (practice educator).

Placement settings:

Placements will predominantly be within the Greater London area in the NHS, local authority, voluntary, social enterprise, charities and private sectors. Placements can be in established or emerging services. Applicants should be aware that they may need to cover travel costs and placements could require them to commute across London and beyond if necessary.

Professional links

We maintain very strong links with occupational therapists working in health and social care settings across the NHS London area. These expert clinicians contribute to the course design, delivery of teaching sessions and provision of practice placements.

The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council; the regulator of Health, Psychological and Social professionals.

The course is accredited by the College of Occupational Therapists; the professional association for occupational therapists.

The course is recognised by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists

Other professional links include the American Occupational Therapy Association, the Occupational Therapy Board of Australia, and the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy. You will be able to join the OT student society, which has won several LSBU awards.

Employability

Students who successfully complete the 6 core modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy.

Students who successfully complete the 6 core modules and the additional School of Health and Social Care Dissertation module will be awarded an MSc in Occupational Therapy.

Graduates with either award are eligible to register as an Occupational Therapist with the HCPC. Registration allows you to practice as an Occupational Therapist within the NHS, community services and local authorities, as well as social enterprise and the private sector. Other settings include prisons, residential and nursing homes, schools and Social Services.

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Approved by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), this programme is aimed at experienced neonatal nurses who expect their career to remain in neonatal professional practice, and who are working in neonatal intensive care units. Read more
Approved by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), this programme is aimed at experienced neonatal nurses who expect their career to remain in neonatal professional practice, and who are working in neonatal intensive care units.

The course has been designed to ensure you develop and demonstrate all of the competencies detailed in the RCN Guidance on Nurse Practitioners (2008) and the standards of the course meet those required by the RCN Accreditation Unit. The course consists of two types of modules: core modules units, which are not paediatric specific, and pathway modules that are neonatal specific to this course.

The programme content reflects the complexity of the clinical environment and acknowledges your experience. The main approach is problem-based. Problem-based learning (PBL) enables the development of analytical reasoning and synthesis skills. It also helps develop the group skills necessary to function in the clinical environment.

Modules

Year 1

Underpinning physiological principles for ANPs
Advanced assessment of the presenting neonate
Advanced clinical skills for the ANNP
Non-medical prescribing
Managing the complex presenting neonate

Step-off at Year 1 for the PgCert.

Year 2

Research methodology and strategy
Non-medical prescribing or
Innovations for excellence - leading service improvement

Step-off at Year 2 for the PgDip

Year 3

Research preparation
Systematic Review
Dissertation or practice development project

Complete the dissertation for the full MSc award.

Timetable

Attendance on the course is normally one or two days per week. The course when undertaken two days per week is designed to ensure you can function effectively as an advanced neonatal nurse practitioner at the end of Year one of the programme. Most neonatal units sending staff to the programme prefer this route.

The first academic year is organised into one, 15 week semester. The second semester is where the Non-Medical Prescribing course has been integrated into the programme and this is run over six months. The second academic year is organised into two, 15 week semesters where you would normally undertake just one module/unit per semester. An additional requirement, for the MSc award requires you to undertake a research preparation module/unit and a 12,000 word dissertation or practice development project which is completed in Year three.

Professional links

Approved by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN). The RCN represents nurses and nursing, promotes excellence in practice and shapes health policies.

Employability

The combination of clinical and leadership skills will lead to employment in a variety of roles such as nurse consultants/advanced neonatal nurse practitioners and shape the future of neonatal intensive care nursing.

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The master’s programme in Globalisation & Development Studies is a social science programme that focuses on how globalisation trends affect and interconnect different areas of the globe while marginalising others and how they produce diverse ‘local’ responses. Read more
The master’s programme in Globalisation & Development Studies is a social science programme that focuses on how globalisation trends affect and interconnect different areas of the globe while marginalising others and how they produce diverse ‘local’ responses. While acknowledging the roles of the state and the market, you will examine the processes of globalisation and development ‘from the ground up’. You will look at how they are experienced in the everyday lives of families, indigenous communities, migrant diasporas, grassroots organisations and NGOs.

This programme builds on 20 years of globalisation and development teaching at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. It has a pronounced global and transnational orientation: from the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion, to emancipation and empowerment, hybrid identities, transnational social and political formations, and new possibilities for transforming society. You will develop a sound knowledge basis in the concepts, theories and issues relating to globalisation and development. Using Problem-Based Learning (PBL), which is very well suited for Globalisation and Development Studies, your learning is problem-driven and theory-driven and requires students to be active rather than passive.

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The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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he Rehabilitation Science (Physiotherapy) MSc allows you to apply for registration as a physiotherapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
he Rehabilitation Science (Physiotherapy) MSc allows you to apply for registration as a physiotherapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This course is also approved by the professional body, The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.
It is ideal for graduates with related first degrees who wish to gain both a professional and academic qualification and start a career in this challenging and highly rewarding field.

This accelerated course is taught with the innovative problem-based learning approach, with an emphasis on practical application of skills and knowledge. Through this balance of theory and practice experience you will graduate a capable and confident physiotherapist.

The values of the NHS constitution are embedded in our curriculum; where patients come first in everything the NHS does, and include respect and dignity, compassion and working together for patients.

Our high quality teaching and research are renowned, and have an applied focus. We have established strong links with specialist practice educators to ensure the provision of support and guidance both within the university and in practice.

Course structure

This intensive programme runs over 45 weeks per year, for two years. Your time on the course will be balanced between campus-based study and clinical practice.

The course begins in February and consists of six campus-based modules and five practice modules. Year 1 is mainly campus-based and year 2 predominantly involves practice placements alongside the campus-based Research Dissertation Studies.

The course is delivered in a variety of ways, typically via problem-based tutorials, subject specialist resource sessions, skills workshops, and simulation in our high-tech Human Movement Laboratory, and Clinical Skills and Simulation Rooms.

Completion of the Project Studies module and the submission of a dissertation lead to the masters award.

Syllabus

Your study will focus on real-life situations, integrating subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, therapeutic skills, behavioural sciences and research methods.

Year 1 modules:

Physiotherapy in Health
Physiotherapy in Rehabilitation
Practice Placement (six weeks)
Neurological Physiotherapy
NMS Physiotherapy
Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy

Year 2 modules:

Practice placements (five placements each lasting six weeks)
Research Dissertation

Facilities

Human Movement Laboratory:

The Human Movement Laboratory is used widely by our physiotherapy, occupational therapy and podiatry students, and is also used for commercial consultancy.

In the lab you will use the latest technology to measure and assess all aspects of human movement, joints, muscles, soft tissue structure and nerves. The laboratory has equipment for conducting cardio-pulmonary investigations including Cosmed metabolic system and spirometry.

Clinical Skills and Simulation Suite:

Our Clinical Skills and Simulation Suite is among the best equipped in the country, and is an invaluable tool for assessment and monitoring students' progress throughout the course.

You will benefit from practising nursing skills in an environment that simulates real-life professional experiences. Provided by the NHS’ South East Coast Ambulance Service, you may have access to our Simbulance, enabling you to work alongside paramedic students in an interprofessional learning environment. On board is a high fidelity mannikin with multiple uses, and a child-size mannikin for paediatric scenarios.

Learning by simulation means you will be confident in your ability to apply your knowledge and skills in your professional life.

Problem-based learning

Our educational philosophy mirrors the philosophy of occupational therapy. We believe that an individual's positive engagement in learning activity leads to advanced productivity, increased perception of self-worth, improved quality of life and enjoyment of the course.

Our occupational therapy courses use problem-based learning (PBL), a technique recommended by authorities around the world. All subjects covered are integrated around problem-solving within a real life situation. We find that learning in this way significantly increases our students’ engagement with the subjects.

Advantages of the problem-based learning approach are:

• Students report that they feel more motivated to learn theoretical knowledge as they can see where they can apply it to real-world situations
• Teamworking and improved communication skills are developed, as students share their expertise and rationale behind their potential solutions
• Students find they are more confidently able to search for information from a wider range of sources, such as journals, textbooks and the internet, and take more responsibility for learning independently
• It encourages deeper learning, as it focuses on activities and activating knowledge in practice contexts, rather than traditional rote memory recall in a predominantly classroom-based context.

Careers and Employability

This professional course prepares you to work as a chartered physiotherapist in the UK, with professional and portfolio development running from course start to finish.

Graduates are equipped for careers in the NHS and the private health sector, both in the UK and abroad.

Many graduates secure employment in the local area by developing networks through their placements.

After a period of work experience, you will also be given the opportunity to progress to PhD research programmes and contribute to the evidence base of the profession.

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This course (previously known as Health Through Occupation) gives you license to register and practice as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This course (previously known as Health Through Occupation) gives you license to register and practice as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

It is ideal for graduates of any subject who wish to gain both a professional and academic qualification and start a career in this challenging and highly rewarding field.

You will explore occupational health through our innovative problem-based learning approach, with an emphasis on practical application of skills and knowledge. Through this balance of theory and practice experience you will graduate a capable and confident occupational therapist.

Our high quality teaching and research are renowned, and have an applied focus. We have established strong links with specialist practice educators to ensure the provision of support and guidance both within the university and in practice.

Successful completion of the professional elements of the programme leads to the award of a postgraduate diploma in Occupational Therapy.

Course structure

This intensive programme runs over 45 weeks per year, for two years. Your time on the course will be balanced between campus-based study and clinical practice.

Sessions are held in small groups, they are interactive, integrated, self-directed, and focus on problem-solving, to examine real-life situations. The use of problem-based learning is considered crucial to students' fast attainment of masters-level standards, and for critical evaluation.

Other learning experiences are arranged according to the need of the problem; these may be lectures, practical sessions, skills classes, debates or seminars. Most importantly, all subjects are integrated around the problems.

Our postgraduate programmes are taught by a wide variety of methods – small active learning groups, seminars, action learning sets, PBL, lectures, self-directed literature searches.

Understanding the relationship between occupation and human health and wellbeing is also explored through student participation in a variety of activities such as cooking, craft, horticulture, performing arts and pottery.

Assessments allow for individual feedback in essential professional skills including written critique, report writing, team working, presentation skills, and verbal/written presentation of intervention.

Areas of study

You will examine topics such as:

• theories of occupation and occupational science (causes of occupational problems)
• occupation related to population health
• clinical reasoning
• occupational therapy process (assessment, treatment, and evaluation)
• occupational therapy skills (creative, productive, leisure and daily living)
• research methods and professional issues.

Syllabus

Year 1 modules:

Human Occupation (including two-week beginner practitioner placement)
Assessing Occupational Capacities
Novice Practitioner (practice placement)
Maximising Occupational Capacities
Intermediate Practitioner (practice placement)
Evaluating Occupational Therapy

Year 2 modules:

Occupational Therapy: Teams
Diverse Practice (practice placement)
Occupational Therapy: Settings
Competent Student Practitioner (practice placement)
Occupational Therapy: Consumers
Achieving Best Practice
Research project

Facilities

There are a range of skills rooms which are equipped so that students can learn and practise practical skills with each other prior to working with patients and clients.

Human Movement Laboratory:

The high-tech Human Movement Laboratory is used widely in teaching and research for students in the school of health professions studying physiotherapy, occupational therapy and podiatry, and is also used for commercial consultancy.

In the lab you will use the latest technology to measure and assess all aspects of human movement, joints, muscles, soft tissue structure and nerves. The laboratory has state-of-the-art equipment for conducting cardio-pulmonary investigations including Cosmed metabolic system and spirometry.

Exchange

The student exchange programme is for occupational therapy students registered on the Occupational Therapy (Pre-Registration) MSc at the University of Brighton, Occupational Therapy MSc students at the University of Wisconsin La Crosse (UWC) and Occupational Therapy BSc students at the Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen (RGU).

There are two options:

• Host option (year one)
• Travel option (year two)

First year students host visiting students during their Maximising Occupational Capacities module which runs from February to April each year. During the second year students have the option of visiting either UWC or RGU during their spring break.

Please see the website for more information
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/occupational-therapy-pre-reg-msc-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Our philosophy

The pre-registration occupational therapy programmes incorporate the experience of doing and making, in order to engage analyse and develop skill in therapeutic media. We have creativity studios for cooking, ceramics, crafts, and performing arts, and we have developed gardens for the practice of horticulture.

Around the world, many academic courses in occupational therapy are losing this aspect of their education, to give over more time to ‘theory’, but here at Brighton we believe that it is vital to retain these embodied learning experiences – which utterly link theory and practice - as they are indeed central to the understanding of the true essence and potential of occupation.

Recent research has revealed the connection between skilled hand use and the development of thinking. As one student, who could not imagine a course without these sessions, said “how can we learn about doing without doing?” These classes are central to the philosophy of our occupational therapy education at Brighton and they have become one of its hallmarks.

Careers and Employability

After professional registration with the HCPC graduates are eligible to take up opportunities in health and social care, in the NHS, social services, and the private sector. There are now many new and exciting possibilities for occupational therapists nationally and worldwide.

Occupational therapists work in an ever-widening range of mental health and physical disability settings including acute hospitals, long-term rehabilitation, social care, local communities, schools, factories, residential homes, institutions for older or more profoundly disabled people, voluntary organisations and prisons.

Completion of the Occupational Health (Pre-Registration) MSc will also prepare you for further study at MPhil and PhD level if you wish to continue pursuing an academic path.

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Master of Chemistry in Environmental Forensics offers an exciting education using active learning and providing practical experience in close cooperation with the industry and environmental researchers. Read more
Master of Chemistry in Environmental Forensics offers an exciting education using active learning and providing practical experience in close cooperation with the industry and environmental researchers.

Environmental forensics is the systematic and scientific evaluation using various disciplines for the purpose of developing defensible scientific and legal conclusions regarding the source, age and history of chemical pollutants released into the environment. You, together with industry and leading researchers, have the opportunity to develop the knowledge needed for you to contribute to a future resilient society. The education offers insight in several disciplines including analytical and environmental analysis in order to characterize the source and amount of chemical pollutants in the environment as well as describing their history. In order to facilitate a broad understanding of the specialities involved in Environmental Forensics, the curriculum will include a wide-range of multidisciplinary expertise within natural sciences such as environmental science, isotope chemistry, environmental sampling, advanced statistics, and transportation modelling. To ensure that the students gain practical field experience, real-life cases are provided in collaboration with the industry. The education use problem-based learning (PBL) to encourage active learning and to develop problem solving abilities. These skills will be used to identify sources and history of environmental pollution. The program is a two-year programme but can be finished after one year resulting in a 60 credit Master of Science degree in Chemistry. Year one deals with distribution of environmental pollutions, environmental toxicology, forensic analytical methods and environmental agreements. Year two includes advanced statistical methods, research methodology and project management. Both alternatives ends with a project work in a research group and/or with industry.

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The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. Read more

Overview

The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. It is a one-year full-time programme designed for both home and international students, with a background in life sciences, who wish to study at postgraduate level for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science. The programme is open to science graduates who do not meet the academic criteria for a direct entry into the MSc. The MSc in Biomedical Blood Science is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). The IBMS is the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver the best possible service for patient care and safety.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalsciencegraduatediploma/

Course Aims

The overall aim is to provide the students with the academic background necessary for the masters programme and to enable them to develop and practise the subject specific academic skills required for the intensive pace of study at masters level. The course also aims to allow international students to benefit from English language support that will help them to develop their academic English language skills.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request; but, to summarise, the overarching course aims are as follows:

- To provide students with core knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to Biomedical Science

- To produce skilled and motivated graduates who are suitably prepared for the MSc in Biomedical Science and for further study.

- To cultivate interest in the biosciences, particularly at the cellular and molecular level, within a caring and intellectually stimulating environment.

- To get an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- To develop an understanding of the analytical, clinical and diagnostic aspects of Cellular Pathology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Immunology and Haematology pathology laboratories.

- To promote the development of a range of key skills, for use in all areas where numeracy and an objective, scientific approach to problem-solving are valued.

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment.

- To promote the development of critical thinking, autonomous learning, independent research and communication skills to help prepare the students for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science and for a lifetime of continued professional development.

Course Content

All the modules in this one year programme are compulsory. The programme consists of a total of 90 credits made up of one 30 credit module and four 15 credit modules. An additional English module (English for Academic Purposes) will be offered for non-native English speakers if required. This module will not form part of the overall award, but successful completion is required for progression to the Masters programme.

Modules:
- Biomedical Science and Pathology (30 credits):
The module provides the student with the knowledge and understanding of the pathobiology of human disease associated with Cellular Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Haematology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology and Clinical Virology. It also examines the analytical and clinical functions of three more of the major departments of a modern hospital pathology laboratory, including Haematology, Clinical Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Biochemistry and Medical Microbiology. In addition, the module will give an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists and how they assist clinicians in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- Biochemistry Research Project (non-experimental) (15 credits):
This module aims to introduce students to some of the key non-experimental research skills that are routinely used by biochemists and biomedical scientists, such as in depth literature searching, analysis of experimental data and the use of a computer as tool for both research (bioinformatics) and dissemination of information (web page construction). The student will research the literature on a specific topic, using library and web based resources and will produce a written review. In addition, the student will either process and interpret some raw experimental data provided to them.

- Advances in Medicine (15 credits):
This module will describe and promote the understanding of advances in medicine that have impacted on diagnosis, treatment, prevention of a range of diseases. It will highlight fast emerging areas of research which are striving to improve diagnosis including nanotechnology and new biochemical tests in the fields of heart disease, cancer and fertility investigations which will potentially improve patient care.

- Clinical Pathology (15 credits):
The majority of staff that contribute to the module are employees of the University Hospital of North Staffordshire (UHNS). Students will benefit from lectures and expertise in Clinical Diagnostic Pathology, Pharmacology, Biochemistry, Genetics and Inflammatory Diseases. Students will gain an insight into how patients are managed, from their very first presentation at the UHNS, from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment. The course will cover both standardised testing options and the development of new diagnostic procedures with a particular emphasis on genetic and epigenetic aspects of disease. Students will also gain an appreciation of the cost benefit of particular routes for diagnosis and treatment and the importance of identifying false positive and false negative results. Finally, the students will have the opportunity to perform their own extensive literature review of a disease-related topic that is not covered by the lectures on the course.

- Case Studies in Biomedical Science (15 credits):
This module aims to give you an understanding of the UK health trends and the factors that affect these trends. Through clinical case studies and small group tutorials, you will explore why the UK has some of the highest incidences of certain diseases and conditions in Europe and consider what factors contribute to making them some of the most common and/or rising health problems faced by this country. This will include understanding the relevant socioeconomic factors as well as understanding the bioscience of the disease process and its diagnosis and management. You will also focus on what is being done by Government and the NHS to tackle these major health problems.

- English for Academic Purposes (EAP ):
For non-native English speakers if required

Teaching & Assessment

In addition to the lecture courses and tutorials, problem based learning (PBL) using clinical scenarios is used for at least one module. Students will also be given the opportunity to undertake an independent non-experimental research project, supervised and supported by a member of staff. Web-based learning using the University’s virtual learning environment (KLE) is also used to give students easy access to a wide range of resources and research tools, and as a platform for online discussions and quizzes. Students will be given many opportunities to become familiar with word processing, spreadsheets and graphics software as well as computer-based routes to access scientific literature.

All modules are assessed within the semester in which they are taught. Most contain elements of both ‘in-course’ assessment (in the form of laboratory reports, essays, posters) and formal examination, although some are examined by ‘in-course’ assessment alone.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The HYMS MSc in Physician Associate Studies is a two year intensive professional Master’s programme. Academic theory is blended with clinical placements, so that students get first-hand clinical experience from the outset. Read more
The HYMS MSc in Physician Associate Studies is a two year intensive professional Master’s programme. Academic theory is blended with clinical placements, so that students get first-hand clinical experience from the outset. It is medically led by HYMS but with multi-professional input delivered in partnership with the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of Hull and the NHS. This programme has been especially developed to meet the requirements of the National Competence and Curriculum Framework for Physician Associates.

Campus teaching will be delivered by staff from HYMS and the Faculty of Health and Social Care, at the University of Hull. Clinical placements will take place at our NHS partners in the Yorkshire and Humber region in GP practices and hospitals.

Why choose HYMS?
•Build your career on our intensive, two year professional Masters programme.
•Work alongside doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals in hospitals, GP surgeries and other settings.
•Thrive in our lively and interactive problem-based learning (PBL) environment.
•Experience a broad range of high quality learning opportunities made available by a strong partnership between HYMS, the Universities of Hull and York and the NHS.
•Develop your knowledge, clinical skills and research skills in a student centred and patient focused environment.

Course Structure

This programme combines six taught modules and a quality / service improvement research project which are delivered alongside clinical placements in hospitals and in the community.

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The MSc in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QSCM) programme is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. Read more
The MSc in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QSCM) programme is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. It employs an innovative teaching structure that is integrated with Brookes’ Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The result is the delivery of a flexible and exciting programme of study.

Starting in either January or September, the MSc programme may be studied either full time over one year, or as a distance learner over two years.

Why choose this course?

This course has accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), and is pending accreditation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). This demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme and as such our programme is your first step towards becoming a chartered Quantity Surveyor. Our staff sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence. Our longstanding links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction, and our strong links with local companies such as Beards, Kingerlee and Bidwells together ensure that the programme is directly tailored towards the employment skills needed by the construction Industry.

The coursework only programme uses an applied learning approach to study. This ensures that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective teaching, it is much more engaging than the traditional study and examination approach. Students develop a broad range of quantity surveying and management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real life problems as experienced by the construction industry. Our innovative programme structure which was commended at validation provides a flexible pattern of study that brings together both distance and full-time learners. Students can start either in September or January, easily switch between distance learning and full time modes of study and, if needed, extend their study up to 5 years.

Professional accreditation

This course has accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), and is pending accreditation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)

This course in detail

There are two modes of delivery for the MSc QSCM: full time on campus or distance learning, and there are two entry points - September or January. Course length is as follows:
Full time: MSc:12 months; PGDip: 9 months; PGCert: 4 months
Part time: Distance Learning: MSc: 24 months; PGDip: 21 months; PGCert: 9 months

Extensive online learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site to which students have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, e mail, telephone and Skype.

Intensive Study Periods - all students attend four intensive study periods during their programme each being around three days long. Students and staff enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections within the industry and the distance earning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff.

The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts.

European Field trip -To expose our students to the international nature of the construction industries, we also run a week long subsidised fieldtrip to Europe (usually Holland) every year in January. Feedback shows our students highly value this opportunity get to know how construction in other countries works to different management cultures.

Applied or Problem-Based Learning - We have responded to requests from industry to make our postgraduate education more practical and industry focused by using an ‘applied’ approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem-Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing you to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real-life situations. We use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise these problems and, as construction problems often cross discipline boundaries, they require research and collaboration to find their solutions. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree shaped by the use of the applied learning approach. This leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach.

Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, wherein students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern.

For the distance learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with distance learning students will be supplemented by email, Skype and telephone.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of our postgraduate construction programmes have an outstanding employment record. Our graduates are recognised as having excellent levels of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills. Consequently, our students go on to be employed across the broad spectrum of the construction industries both locally and internationally.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions whilst all of our distance learning students are employed full time by prominent companies in the sector.

As our programmes have accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), (and pending accreditation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)), our graduates are firmly on the path to become professionally chartered opening up excellent recognition for future career progression.

Graduates from the course will normally go on to become Quantity Surveyors within the construction industries, for which currently there are excellent job opportunities.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of built environment professionals.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme (15 months if starting in January), and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (27 Months if starting in January) and is extendable up to a maximum of 5 years.

Why choose this course?

Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme. Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers - and our graduates go on to further their careers locally, nationally and globally. Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

This course in detail

There are two modes of delivery for the MSc CPM: full time on campus or distance learning, and there are two entry points - September or January.

Extensive online learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site to which students have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, email, telephone and Skype.

Intensive Study Periods - all students attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections within the industry and the open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff.

The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are some of the major features.

Applied or Problem Based Learning - We have responded to requests from industry to make our postgraduate education more practical by using an ‘applied’ approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations.

As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach.

Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern.

For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Careers and professional development

All of our distance learning students are employed full time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many graduates are employed globally - including in India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, the Middle East and China.

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