• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
"patristics"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Patristics)

  • "patristics" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 5 of 5
Order by 
Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. Read more

Course overview

Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. We have strong links with related disciplines such as history, archaeology and modern languages. We welcome postgraduates in any of our areas of research expertise.

Classics and Ancient History at Newcastle has a long and distinguished international reputation. We deliver quality research and teaching. We have taught Latin and Greek since 1874. We have taught Ancient History since 1910 and Classical Archaeology since 1931.

Our staff include scholars of outstanding international reputation. Our research covers all major aspects of the study of the ancient world, with research strengths in: rhetoric and historiography; ancient philosophy, science and medicine; reception and recreation of ancient texts; ancient concepts of divinity.

Our research specialities include: the ancient Near East; Greco-Roman culture and religion; early Christianity and patristics; Greek art and archaeology; Greek ethnography; history and archaeology of Roman Italy; Greek and Roman music; Greek language and literature, including Homer, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric; Latin language and literature, including historiography, rhetoric and Augustan poetry; reception of the classical tradition; ancient science and medicine; ancient Greek and Roman patristics and philosophy.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/classics-ancient-history-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/classics-ancient-history-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

Read less
This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology across a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology. Read more
This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology across a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology.

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Catholic Social Thought
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level. When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

Read less
Within the History of Christianity subject area there is particular research strength in. patristics and early Christian history. Read more

Research profile

Within the History of Christianity subject area there is particular research strength in:

patristics and early Christian history
the Reformation in Britain and on the continent puritanism
the history of British and European Christianity from the 18th century
the history of Christian missions, especially in Africa, from the 18th century.
There is a research seminar for staff and students to which visiting speakers are invited. Informal reading groups and Latin language classes are also offered.

The School of Divinity is home to a thriving research community. All of our academic staff are engaged in individual research and writing projects and many are also involved in collaborative projects with colleagues across the globe.

The School of Divinity has consistently scored exceptionally highly in the Research Assessment Exercise, the most recent assessment putting us among the best schools in theology, philosophical theology and religious studies in the UK.

Our researchers currently boast the highest percentage of 4* scores (world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour) of any Scottish university in theology and religious studies.

We have the largest number of divinity research-active staff in Scotland, and the third largest in the UK. Overall, the RAE ranked us third in the UK with 60 per cent of our research activity judged internationally excellent or world-leading.

Training and support

Our community comprises 450 students (undergraduate and postgraduate) and nearly 30 full-time academic staff, including internationally respected scholars in a wide range of specialisms.

We welcome students from around the world, from religious and non-religious backgrounds, taking pride in our status as a renowned research centre in a broad spectrum of subject areas.

We take a personal interest in our students and offer a welcoming and friendly setting in which to pursue the exciting and demanding study of theology and religious studies.

The large graduate school and the presence of visiting academics from around the world help ensure a diverse and stimulating research environment.

All research students are assigned a primary and secondary supervisor. You are offered a training course in research methods, and are given conscientious supervision from your first weeks through to submission of your thesis.

There are also special orientation events for international students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate researcher you can draw on the outstanding library resources of New College, the University of Edinburgh and the nearby National Library of Scotland.

New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection, including the papers of Thomas Chalmers, John Baillie, JH Oldham and James S Stewart.

The strengths of the Library collections contribute greatly to the teaching and research of members of the School as well as students elsewhere in the University.

These collections are complemented by the many resources available in the University and beyond. The total holdings in all the University libraries exceed 2.25 million volumes. In addition, the National Library of Scotland holds more than five million volumes.

The New College Library boasts a magnificent reading hall, originally built as the sanctuary of the Free High Kirk.

The School provides extensive and well-equipped computing facilities for coursework and research at all levels, including dissertations. We provide all students with access to PCs, scanners and printers, across four labs.

Research opportunities

We offer two types of research-based masters degree, as well as PhD programmes.

Masters by Research (MSc by Research/MTh by Research)

These one-year masters degrees by research are designed for students with an academic training in divinity or religious studies (or other relevant subject) who wish to focus on a particular topic.

The programme may be taken as either a Master of Theology by Research or a Master of Science by Research. The difference is one of nomenclature only.

Both involve research training and orientation courses, after which you may either research and submit a dissertation of about 30,000 words, which comprises the remaining assessment for the degree, or write three supervised research essays to provide appropriate background and preparatory study for the topic of your research, and then submit a dissertation of about 15,000 words.

Read less
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
Supervision in Theology can be offered in areas such as Biblical studies; Patristics; Church History; History and Interpretation of Christian doctrine; Systematics/Constructive Theology; Modern Theology and Philosophy, Theology and Sexuality; Theology and Theatre/Performance Studies, Political Theology and Black Theology. Read more
Supervision in Theology can be offered in areas such as Biblical studies; Patristics; Church History; History and Interpretation of Christian doctrine; Systematics/Constructive Theology; Modern Theology and Philosophy, Theology and Sexuality; Theology and Theatre/Performance Studies, Political Theology and Black Theology.

Supervision in Religious Studies can be offered in areas such as Comparative Religious Studies; Jewish Studies; Jewish-Christian dialogue; Hindu Studies; Buddhist Studies; Tibetan Studies; Religion and Visual Culture; Religion and Literature; Philosophy of Religion; Religion and Social Theory; Religion, Gender and Sexuality; Religion and Postmodernity.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/theology-and-religious-studies-by-research.aspx

Course detail

You should discuss your initial ideas for a MA by research topic with a suitable supervisor from the programme team in the area of your study. If you are unsure, please contact Dr Maria Diemling, the Subject Lead in Theology and Religion, Philosophy and Ethics, who will be able to advise you whom to contact.

Your research topic may develop from a recent undergraduate encounter with a particular aspect of Theology or Religion, Philosophy and Ethics or you may be returning to education looking for a structured environment in which to formally pursue an established passion.

Please note that while students can build up on their BA research dissertation, they will not be allowed to submit identical material again under the current QAA policies.

Suitability

Are you fascinated by religions and their role in shaping our diverse, globalised, and multicultural world? Are you drawn to thinking about God, or relish the prospect of understanding how people of faith have instilled life with religious meaning? Are you concerned about questions of ethics, society, and justice in modern life? Do you value open-minded, independent and critical thinking? If so, you will enjoy studying the Theology and Religious Studies MA by Research.

Format

The teaching team at Canterbury Christ Church provide an excellent student experience in Theology and Religious Studies. They are passionate about their subject, and encourage students to share their enthusiasm and excitement. Drawing on academic expertise in major areas of Judaism and Christian Theology, as well as Indian and Chinese Philosophies, the team can offer supervision in an exciting and broad range of topics, including studies in world religions, the history and interpretation of religious thought, and the study of critical challenges in the contemporary world.

Assessment

Students will write a research thesis on their chosen topic. For an MA by Research students will need to demonstrate critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at the forefront of their own academic discipline.

The length of the Masters by Research thesis excluding bibliography and appendices, but including footnotes, is 25,000-30,000 words.

The MA by research will be assessed by dissertation. The examination will be done by an internal and an external examiner and might include a viva voce examination.

What can I do next?

This programme is a significant qualification in its own right but could also fast-track you, if you're successful, to MPhil and ultimately to PhD qualifications.

The research and writing skills you'll gain, together with the specialist disciplinary knowledge developed during the course, will enhance your employability and can provide an invaluable grounding for careers in teaching, media and journalism, publishing and marketing.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X