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Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations. Read more
Our unique Creative Practices and Direction programme will develop your creative-practice and leadership skills through engagement with practice-oriented theory and new collaborations.

As a student of this programme, you will develop strong relationships with active professionals in your discipline and learn within a leading theatrical conservatoire that benefits from the intellectual stimulus of a major research-led university.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This unique programme is aimed at creative producers and directors and those who train and work with actors and performers to develop and direct their skills.

The programme offers five specialist pathways, including actor training, choreography and movement direction, directing, musical theatre creation, and practices of voice and singing, and you will also have the opportunity to develop a specialist practice within your chosen pathway.

The programme is primarily designed for graduates in drama, theatre and dance from universities and conservatoires, but will also appeal to those who have established themselves professionally and wish to refresh their skills and perspectives and take on leadership, coaching, creative or directing roles.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an Advanced Creative Practice module.

Students enter the MA Creative Practices and Direction to a specified pathway, personally supervised by their pathway leader, an expert in the subject area.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Facilitating Creativity
-Interdisciplinary Pedagogies
-Dramaturgy
-The Performing Body
-Body
-Research Methods for Practice
-Integrated Practice
-Specialist Techniques
-Personal Profile Development
-Technology
-Advanced Creative Practice

Pathways

Actor Training pathway
The specialist modules for this pathway are designed to produce a versatile and effective actor trainer with the strategies and skills required to enhance and facilitate an actor’s progress. Students will examine and contextualise a number of acting methodologies to develop their own comprehensive approach to professional practice.

Movement Direction and Choreography pathway
Students on this pathway follow and practically investigate a number of techniques and ideas dealing with onstage physicality. The focus is also on the development of movement language, through the investigation of the ideas and practices of seminal dance-based ideas (Laban, Bausch, Cunningham, Fosse, Graham, Horton, etc.) and methods for working with music and sound.

Practices of Voice and Singing pathway
This pathway brings together study and practice in both singing and voice, in order to create a new paradigm for teaching and coaching in these fields, enabling students to expand, develop and reflect on their coaching styles.

Directing pathway
This programme is a practice-led pathway incorporating methodologies and techniques that focus on approaches to theatre directing, dramaturgy, collaboration with other practitioners.

Musical Theatre Creation pathway
This pathway is designed for those who wish to study writing, and creative roles specifically in Musical Theatre. These might be as a director, choreographer, composer, librettist, musical director or creative producer.

Educational aims of the programme

-Provide advanced study and practice in creative leadership and direction in theatre-making and/or the training of theatre artists, specific to the pathway chosen
-Equip students for employment in the theatre industry and/or related performing arts industries as specialist practitioners in one of the following areas: Actor Training; Directing; Movement Direction and Choreography; Musical Theatre Creation; Practices of Voice and Singing
-Provide students with integrated practical and theoretical knowledge of specialist creative and/or pedagogic practices relevant to their chosen pathway; contemporary technical and scholarly contexts; and industry-specific contexts
-Enable students to develop intellectual and practical skills to inform and articulate self-reflection and critical awareness, through specialist study and practice, and work with other students in cognate fields
-Develop critical and independent practitioners imbued with a sense of learning as a lifetime pursuit via a commitment to professional and personal development

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Understand critical, contextual, conceptual and ethical dimensions of creative practices, leadership and facilitation in theatre and performance practices
-Articulate the practitioner’s relationship with key creative and production colleagues, performers, industry professionals and audiences
-Comprehend the implications and potential for theatre and wider performing arts practices presented by key developments in creative processes, training and producing regimes, and contexts for preparation and production
-Demonstrate an awareness of recent developments and specific techniques in the relevant specialist pathway
-Generate ideas, concepts, proposals, processes, solutions and/or perspectives independently and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as self-initiated activity
-Employ both convergent and divergent thinking in processes of observation, investigation, speculative enquiry, conceptualisation, facilitation and/or making
-Critically evaluate one’s knowledge and understanding of relevant performance/pedagogic practice
-Interact effectively with others through collaboration, collective endeavour and negotiation
-Demonstrate leadership skills, providing clarity and direction for others
-Demonstrate competence with specialist creative/facilitative theatre and performing arts practices (specific to the pathway followed)

Knowledge and understanding
-Understand critical, contextual, conceptual and ethical dimensions of creative practices, leadership and facilitation in theatre and performance practices
-Articulate the practitioner’s relationship with key creative and production colleagues, performers, industry professionals and audiences
-Comprehend the implications and potential for theatre and wider performing arts practices presented by key developments in creative processes, training and producing regimes, and contexts for preparation and production
-Demonstrate an awareness of recent developments and specific techniques in the relevant specialist pathway
Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Generate ideas, concepts, proposals, processes, solutions and/or perspectives independently and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as self-initiated activity
-Employ both convergent and divergent thinking in processes of observation, investigation, speculative enquiry, conceptualisation, facilitation and/or making
-Critically evaluate one’s knowledge and understanding of relevant performance/pedagogic practice
-Manage and make appropriate use of the interaction between context, brief, planning, process, outcome and critical reflection.
-Analyse information and experiences, formulate independent judgments, and articulate reasoned arguments through reflection, review and evaluation
-Source and research relevant material, assimilating and articulating relevant findings
-Formulate reasoned responses to the critical judgments of others
-Identify personal strengths and needs, and reflect on personal development, adapting plans accordingly

Professional practical skills
-Select, evaluate, adapt and make appropriate use of techniques, materials, processes and partnerships
-Develop ideas through to outcomes
-Demonstrate skills in communication, expression and facilitation
-Utilise appropriate discipline-specific languages to investigate, analyse, articulate and apply ideas and information
-Demonstrate competence with specialist creative/facilitative theatre and performing arts practices (specific to the pathway followed)
-Present ideas and work to co-creators, performers, audiences and other stakeholders, as appropriate, in a range of situations
-Seek and respond to the views of others in the development or enhancement of their work
-Work in combination with others in relevant performing arts settings, demonstrating skills in teamwork, negotiation, organization, and decision-making

Key / transferable skills
-Interact effectively with others through collaboration, collective endeavor and negotiation
-Demonstrate leadership skills, providing clarity and direction for others
-Work effectively as part of a team and in pursuit of shared goals
-Study independently, set goals, manage own workloads and meet deadlines
-Anticipate and accommodate change, and work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty and unfamiliarity
-Source, navigate, select, retrieve, evaluate, manipulate and manage information from a variety of sources
-Select and employ communication and information technologies
-Demonstrate resourcefulness and entrepreneurship

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT

The School of Arts facilities include the 200-seat theatre in the Ivy Arts Centre, dark and light studios, digital creation stations and editing facilities, scenic, props and costume workshops, and interconnected sound recording and music facilities.

Teaching and workshop activity takes place largely in GSA’s dedicated rehearsal rooms, performance studios and design workshops. Lectures, presentations and seminars will occur in rooms across campus.

The University Library contains the majority of set texts, key journals, scripts, play texts and video materials necessary for the programme. Students have access to extensive facilities through the virtual learning environment, SurreyLearn, and IT Services.

Additional support is available in the Learning Resource Centre in the University Library.

Equipment is provided on a project-by-project basis according to the nature of the work in hand and the parameters of the project, which are negotiated with the tutor.

Facilities and equipment for production work will be booked by students according to specific project briefings and advertised resource parameters.

Academic support is provided by way of ongoing contact with the programme director and module leaders, group briefings and feedback, individual tutorials, and mentoring.

The programme makes use of a peer feedback system designed to provide a useful and supportive account of areas of strength and effectiveness, along with areas for improvement.

You are encouraged to identify personal learning and creative objectives that can be pursued in alignment with group project work.

RESEARCH

The School of Arts includes study in dance, digital arts, film, music, sound and theatre, with research activity in all areas, often with significant interdisciplinary connections.

With an integrated approach that comprises documentation, analysis and performance, Surrey’s agenda for research aims to engage critically with the past and present, while rigorously articulating new frameworks for understanding and practising the arts and culture in the twenty-first century.

Research infrastructure includes the Digital World Research Centre and the Laban Archive in the National Resource Centre for Dance (NRCD).

The School of Arts hosts and supports established research centres, research groupings and networks as well as individual research projects. Our research extends to partnerships with the artistic community, for instance, in support of public debates or in the dissemination of documentation for arts practice through the digital and print media.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/. Read more
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/

The 21st century is when everything about the moving image changes.

MA Film and Screen Studies will equip you with skills and knowledge to address current transformations of moving image media in a globalised world, from the media in your pocket to architectural screens.

It explores both the old and the new, philosophy and history, theory and practice, to help you understand the challenges of the 21st century's culture of moving images, changing artistic and political contexts as well as ever developing technologies.

Innovative approach

What distinguishes the MA in Film and Screen Studies is its innovative approach to learning and research. It takes you well beyond the borders of traditional film studies. It encourages you to think critically and imaginatively, across media forms, disciplinary boundaries as well as conceptual and creative work.

You'll have the option of two pathways:

-Moving Image Studies Pathway
-Media Arts Pathway

Students taking the Media Arts pathway will have the opportunity to submit some work in non-traditional forms.

Globally renowned academics

Teaching and supervision draw on the diverse research strengths of the globally renowned academics at one of the world's leading media and communications departments, which also has strong traditions in audiovisual practice.

You'll be taught by scholars of international standing who have expertise in the interface between film criticism and creation; new screen technologies; in early cinema and the media archaeology of modernity; in artist’s film; and in non-fiction film (eg documentary and avant-garde).

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rachel Moore.

Pathways

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway:
The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway:
The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
option modules to the value of 60 credits
a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Core modules

The core modules will give you a foundation to the subject. The shared core module in Archaeology of the Moving Image introduces current debates in film and screen studies through the key notion of media history.

Pathway-specific cores develop new ways of conceptualising the cinematic today, focusing respectively on the political aspects of media forms and styles in Politics of the Audiovisual (the Moving Image Studies pathway) and on artists' use of various screen media in Experimental Media (the Media Arts pathway).

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Media and Communications department.

Intercollegiate options

Students on the MA in Film and Screen Studies can also take one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other University of London colleges. Please consult the Screen Studies Group website for further details of other programmes and the Film and Screen Studies Convenor at Goldsmiths for more details on how to take part in options at other colleges. Options taken under this scheme are deemed to count for 30 credits at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

You will develop skills enabling you to analyse, contextualise, historicise and theorise current and future developments in screen-based media and to communicate your ideas in written and, on the Media Arts pathway, in audiovisual form.

Careers

Possible careers include film and video distribution, film exhibition, museums, film and television criticism, new media criticism, new media art, and other jobs associated with screen culture, as well as further academic study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Please note. This course is a pathway within the MSc 'Advanced Practice Interventions for Mental Health' (APIMH). The information here relates to the Primary Mental Health Care pathway within the MSc APIMH, but is listed under the pathway specific title. Read more
Please note: This course is a pathway within the MSc 'Advanced Practice Interventions for Mental Health' (APIMH). The information here relates to the Primary Mental Health Care pathway within the MSc APIMH, but is listed under the pathway specific title. Other pathways are available in PSI for Psychosis (COPE) and Dementia Care.

The programme and pathways have been designed to respond and contribute to the modernisation of mental health care delivery and service design.

Postgraduate study in Primary Mental Health Care (PMHC) commenced at The University of Manchester in 2004, building on the well-established national and international reputation of the university for innovative research, service development and training in this field of practice. Common mental health problems, including anxiety and depression, account for one-third of all consultations in Primary Care in the UK and the impact of these on individuals, families, communities and health care resources is recognised at a global level.

A key strategy to address current and future challenges of this immense area of need is to equip those working in Primary Care, including those in both existing and new roles, with relevant knowledge and skills to enhance access to and effectiveness of services and care delivery through evidence-based, innovative approaches. The programme is directly relevant to clinical practice, using a bio-psychosocial framework to enable students to develop knowledge and skills in evidence-based interventions, including cognitive-behavioural approaches, collaborative case management and community engagement.

This part-time, multi-disciplinary, practice-focused educational programme aims to equip students with the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to offer high quality, evidence based interventions and contribute to service developments which promote socially inclusive mental health care for individuals, families and communities.

The first year of the pathway (PGCert) meets the national competencies for IAPT Psychological Well-being Practitioners (PWPs) and is a mandatory requirement, funded through an NHS contract, for newly appointed PWPs.

Aims

The aim of the programme and pathway is to enhance access to, and the effectiveness of, mental health and social care services that are evidence-based, multidisciplinary and focused on the needs of patients/service users and their carers.

The programme will equip students with advanced knowledge and skills necessary to enhance their own practice (PGCert), the practice of others and contribute to innovations and developments in mental health care and service delivery (PGDip/MSc).

Career opportunities

This course is for:
-Existing practitioners across the North-West region employed in the NHS as well as other statutory/voluntary services contributing to the work of the NHS
-Trainee Psychological Well-being Practitioners (as part of the 'Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) initiative) who are employed in the NHS in Greater Manchester as well as other statutory/voluntary services who have been commissioned to provide an IAPT Primary Mental Health Care Service
-The first year of the pathway (PGCert) is automatically undertaken as part of these roles

PWPs who have already completed the PGCert in Primary Mental Health Care since 2004 and have their employers' support, may enter the pathway at Year 2.

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The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics.

Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway.

Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway, there are currently 5 others.

Please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same generic degree, MA in Social Anthropology.

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students.

The Culture, Ethnography & Development pathway provides you with the opportunity to study the history, theory and practice of development in a broad variety of social and geographical contexts, encouraging you to think of development critically as a complex transformative process that has cultural as well as economic and political consequences. You may select from modules covering a broad range of topics, including:
-Relationships of dependence between the global North and the global South
-Social and cultural effects of international labour migration
-The Millennium Development Goals
-The political economy of foreign investment
-Inequality and urban planning in the cities of the global South
-The international agenda for the reduction of poverty
-The impact of local civil society and NGOs
-Social welfare policies
-The politics of biodiversity conservation

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.
About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important.

Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.

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The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. Read more
The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. There are 12 specialist pathways that you can choose from; each includes a range of core and optional taught modules and you will complete the course with a dissertation, recital or composition portfolio.

Pathways

Music MA: British Music Studies pathway
Music MA: Choral Conducting pathway
Music MA: Critical Musicology pathway
Music MA: Early Music pathway
Music MA: Electroacoustic composition/sonic art pathway
Music MA: Global Popular Musics pathway
Music MA: Instrumental/Vocal Composition pathway
Music MA: Mixed Composition pathway
Music MA: Open Pathway with Performance
Music MA: Open Pathway without Performance
Music MA: Performance pathway
Music MA: Performance Practice pathway)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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School Direct is a delivered in partnership with schools. The key feature of this course is that the majority of the year is spent on placement working alongside experienced colleagues in schools. Read more
School Direct is a delivered in partnership with schools. The key feature of this course is that the majority of the year is spent on placement working alongside experienced colleagues in schools.

The course aims to harness the knowledge and experience of school colleagues in the delivery of courses, working in partnership with the experience of accredited ITT providers such as universities. schools, and the mentors within them, provide the vast majority of the training.

Schools benefit by being more directly involved in student recruitment and the delivery of the course.

This is a cross phase course, you can study within the primary or secondary phase. The course takes one academic year to complete.

There are two School Direct courses, School Direct (Salaried) and School Direct (Training) (sometimes called non-salaried). It is important that you are clear which of these courses your school is offering as it will affect your funding for the course (see Fees and Finance below).

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/school-direct.aspx

Course detail

There are two possible awards from your School Direct course:

• Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) Pathway, all successful student teachers will achieve the recommendation for QTS.

• School Direct PGCE Pathway, successful student teachers who (in consultation with their school partner) decide to opt in to the School Direct PGCE (as described in “What will I study?”) will be awarded a PGCE.

Suitability

The course is for people who want to train to become teachers, spending the majority of their training time in school alongside qualified teachers.

Content

QTS Pathway – all students

The majority of your time on this course is spent in school. It is a requirement of all QTS courses that you get at least 60 days (or equivalent) training through the year. You will get at least 15 days taught sessions from the University and a course of professional development provided by the school. Your development in school will be supported by a mentor who will help you in your progress towards meeting the standards for QTS. You will be required to undertake a period of placement in a second school that provides a contrast to your base school.

School Direct PGCE Pathway – an option for all students

The School Direct PGCE pathway is a mixture of work based learning and academic assessments. All students on this pathway will study the aspects described above in the QTS pathway. In addition, Student Teachers who opt in to this pathway will be required to undertake academic study and write academic assignments. There are additional taught sessions and tutorial support to support students studying on this pathway.

Format

The majority of the learning on this course happens in schools. Student teachers will learn in a variety of ways in school, including from experienced mentors, through observing others and through experience.

There are 15 days taught in university at the Canterbury Campus. The teaching on these days will be a mixture of lecture and seminar and workshop activity.

There is a high level of individual support for learning offered in this course through the mentors in school and the university tutors.

Assessment

• QTS Pathway – all students
Throughout the course you will be assessed by your mentors and tutors who will grade you at key points to help you understand how well you are meeting the standards for QTS. At the end of the course you will have a final assessment. This will take the form of a review meeting to formally assess whether you have met the standards for QTS.

• School Direct PGCE Pathway
In addition to the above assessment process for the recommendation for QTS students who have opted for the School Direct PGCE Pathway will be required to submit three 4,000 word assignments, spread across the year, which will be assessed at Masters Level.

What can I do next?

Successful students on this course are able to become Qualified Teachers.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Our MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

The Management and Business Studies pathway

This pathway is suitable for two groups of people:

• Those people, especially business practitioners, who want to develop their understanding of and skills in applied research work.
• Those planning to undertake a PhD on a topic pertaining to management disciplines such as human resource management, organisational behaviour, strategic management, public sector management, marketing, accounting, finance, logistics and operations management.

Research training in Management and Business Studies builds on the internationally recognised research carried out by academic staff within Cardiff Business School. You will benefit from specialist expertise in management research as well as from the broad research profile of the School and links with wider Cardiff University research.

Sub-pathways within Management and Business Studies are:

• Banking, Accounting and Finance
• Logistics and Operations Management
• Human Resource Management
• Marketing and Strategy.

The course can be taken as a PGDip or MSc and is available for full-time study or part-time study.

Full-time PGDip

For the one-year full-time programme you will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. Dissertation topics are chosen by the students in agreement with their supervisors.

Core modules:

Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Developing Core Research Skills
Foundations of Social Science Research
Research Applications

Full-time MSc

For the one-year full-time programme you will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

Core modules:

All the core modules of PGDip PLUS a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. Dissertation topics are chosen by the students in agreement with their supervisors.

Part-time PGDip

Two year part time programme.

For the taught component, you will be required to complete six 20-credit modules (5 core research modules and 1 pathway module). In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

Please visit the website to see a full list of the modules available for this pathway

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-business-and-management-studies-pgdip-part-time

Part-time MSc

For the three-year part-time programme you will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. Dissertation topics are chosen by the students in agreement with their supervisors.

Please visit the website to see a full list of the modules available for this pathway:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-business-and-management-studies-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Support

All modules within the programme make use of our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment. You will be allocated a personal tutor.

Assessment

You will have to successfully complete the taught component which comprises of 120 credits.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words (MSc only)

Career prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.

It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/. Read more
This programme builds on London's position as one of the most important musical centres in the world, with a diverse range of concert halls, theatres, cultural institutions and arts events that reflect its cosmopolitan and multicultural society- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-arts-admin-cultural-policy-music-pathway/

Although professional management practice is a major element of the programme, the 'creative arts event' is the starting point for all teaching.

A music pathway has been added to the MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy, which is run by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship at Goldsmiths.

Instead of specialist theatre modules you take one 30 credit module from the MA Music or MMus programmes, and your dissertation/placement/business-plan will be directed towards musical organisations.

The MA introduces the key issues that concern the management of culture and in particular those within the performing arts.

Through both analysis of contemporary and recent practice, and practical work in a range of areas, you will develop a critical approach to the discipline.

The pathway provides an overview of the following areas:
arts funding structures in the UK (with reference to EU countries and the USA)
marketing for the arts
audience development
sponsorship
education programmes within the arts
programming
culture and tourism
cultural policy (including the role of the arts in national and cultural identity) and principles and structures of management
The aim of taught modules, projects and placements is to introduce you to new models of practice. These will be investigated and evaluated as a way of developing an understanding of management principles. Through this process, you will also be equipped with the necessary practical skills to enhance your potential as arts administrators.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Gerald Lidstone

Modules

Modules within ICCE

Cultural Policy and Practice- 30 credits
Introduction to Audience Development- n/a
Introduction to Fundraising- n/a
Seminar Series- n/a
The Management and Professional Practice 1: Internship- n/a
Management and Professional Practice 2: Business Planning for Arts Organisation- n/a
MA in Arts Administration & Cultural Policy Dissertation- 60 credits

Music Pathway option modules

The modules currently available include:

Contemporary Ethnomusicology- 30 credits
Critical Musicology and Popular Music- 30 credits
Material, Form and Structure- 30 credits
New Directions in Popular Music Research- 30 credits
Philosophies of Music-30 credits
Popular Music: Listening, Analysis and Interpretation-30 credits
Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis- 30 credits
Sound Agendas- 30 credits
Sources and Resources- 30 credits
Soviet and Post-Soviet Music and Politics- 30 credits
Strategies for Performance- 30 credits
Working with Original Musical Documents- 30 credits

Careers

This pathway allows you to pursue your interests in music, acting as a supplementary course to the main body of the Arts Administration programme.

Graduates typically go on to careers in the following areas:

Cultural policy: researching, developing, writing, analysing and evaluating policy for government agencies at national, regional and local level and for ‘think tanks’ concerned with culture and society
Management in building-based and touring theatre, dance, music and visual arts organisations
Arts education, arts regeneration and arts for social and community purposes
Audience development, fundraising, programming and planning
Independent producing in theatre, music or gallery-based organisations
Many students from this programme now have careers in major arts organisations worldwide or have progressed to MPhil/PhD degrees.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc HRM (with CIPD Pathway) has a stronger focus on HRM practice and skill development than the standard pathway. It is fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and provides access to membership of this professional body (www.cipd.co.uk). Read more
The MSc HRM (with CIPD Pathway) has a stronger focus on HRM practice and skill development than the standard pathway. It is fully accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and provides access to membership of this professional body (http://www.cipd.co.uk).

Membership of the CIPD is widely regarded as providing a distinct advantage to those who wish to pursue a career in the fields of HRM and Employment Relations and is increasingly seen as an essential requirement. The CIPD currently has 135,000 members and job advertisements for HRM posts frequently make reference to the need for CIPD membership. CIPD status is nationally recognised in the UK but is increasingly recognised on an international basis (see http://www.cipd.co.uk/global/).

This pathway meets the CIPD’s Advanced level criteria enabling those that have successfully completed and passed the pathway to apply for Associate and then Chartered level membership depending on their HR role/level and experience. The CIPD charges a student membership fee (currently £170). Associate and Chartered membership levels are granted by the CIPD. The modules included in the pathway are detailed below. There are no electives, as students need to complete and pass each module.

About the Birmingham Business School

At Birmingham Business School we deliver world-class research and teaching that provides the; insight, ambition and skills to shape advanced and sustainable business strategies. We put people at the heart of business and business at the heart of society.

Consistently found in global ranking tables and accredited by leading bodies, AMBA, EQUIS and AACSB. The triple-crown accreditation confirms our position within an elite group of global business schools.

Birmingham Business School is already globally renowned for the quality of our research and teaching. With students representing over 60 countries currently studying at our main campus, our courses being taught in a range of international business schools, and an international faculty and global alumni community of around 23,000 graduates, we have a global footprint that ensures worldwide impact.

Our dedication to providing our students with a rich educational experience within our Business School has led to increased investment in our career services and corporate relations programme. This will further enhance the already excellent career prospects of our graduates, with additional opportunities for project work and internships with leading global businesses.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Keele University School of Nursing & Midwifery offer this pathway as an NMC approved, full-time one-year Specialist Community Nursing programme. Read more

Overview

Keele University School of Nursing & Midwifery offer this pathway as an NMC approved, full-time one-year Specialist Community Nursing programme: District Nursing. Specialist Community Nurses provide up-to–date, specialist and highly technical care to patients in their own environments as well as supporting families and carers. As a district nurse today you need to be highly skilled and educated to manage the changing demographics of communities and populations you will work within; you will be expected to lead teams of both qualified and support staff in a community setting. Recent government policy outlines a call to action and model for district nursing services and this award, providing a qualification in Specialist Community Nursing (District Nursing Pathway), is timely to support this, leading to a recordable specialist qualification with the NMC.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/specialistcommunitynursing-districtnursingpathway/

Course Aims

The course has been designed to produce specialist community nursing practitioners who are safe, competent, and professional, to lead district nursing in a community nursing setting. This includes meeting Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) standards for Specialist Community Nursing, Education and Practice. You will develop your leadership skills whilst on the programme, so that you are able to plan and lead services and initiatives which promote health, support long-term conditions, and provide specialist nursing care, including community practitioner prescribing as applicable to your role. You will achieve the recordable qualification through the Postgraduate diploma; however, there is the opportunity to undertake a dissertation through a part-time route to convert this post-graduate diploma to a Master’s Degree.

A new vision developed for District Nursing (DH 2013) Care in local communities: a new vision and model for district nursing will underpin the content and delivery of the pathway with a focus on 'Compassion in Practice' underpinning the new model focussing on:
- Population and case load management
- Support and care for patients who are unwell, recevoering at home and at end of life
- Support and care for independence

The aim of this programme is to support the development and enhancement of essential knowledge and skills in the registered practitioner to equip them for a career in specialist community nursing. This will be actualised through building upon the theoretical and clinical basis of their specialised area of practice, through delivery of a cohertent programme of study.

The District Nursing pathway will have a contemporary focus and is designed to meet the requirements of the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) Standards for Specialist Education and Practice (UKCC 2001).

The programme will support students in applying their skills of critical reflection to enhance their professional, personal and academic development. It will encourage the development of sound District Nursing practice based on the critical application of research and evidence and will introduce students to theories and practice of leadership and partnership working.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Completing your Masters

The Postgraduate Diploma Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Health Visiting & School Nursing pathways) and the Specialist Community Nursing (District Nursing pathway) awards – registerable with the NMC – each comprise of six taught modules to meet individual or service requirements in year 1 as a full time student.

Successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma will lead to the NMC approved specialist and registerable qualification ‘Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Health Visiting)’, ‘Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (School Nursing)’ or the Specialist Community Nursing (District Nursing), depending upon the route that the student registers for.

Students who have met the requirements for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma will be eligible to proceed into year 2, onto the Masters’ award – subject to the rules of progression. The award of an MSc Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Health Visiting or School Nursing) requires successful completion of the Professional Practice dissertation (MSc route 1) or the Faculty dissertation module (MSc route 2), on a part-time basis.

The Specialist Community Nursing (District Nursing) programme will share modules with the P.G Dip/MSc Specialist Community Public Health Nursing Programme. This will enhance Inter-professional learning with other community specialist nurses working in primary care.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Contemporary India Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). Read more
Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Contemporary India Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab).

We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Contemporary India.

Students taking the Contemporary India Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Contemporary India. Development issues in Contemporary India are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the India. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the SOAS South Asia Institute, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Contemporary India.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-development-studies-contemporary-india-pathway/

Duration:

One calendar year (full-time) Two (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Development Studies programme. Students wishing to follow the Contemporary India Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development), one module specific to Contemporary India and a dissertation (which must be written on a Contemporary India-related topic). The dissertation will include the option of undertaking a 2-4 week internship during the summer months, either arranged by the student to be approved by the Convenor or, through the Careers Office who have a database of organisations offering internship positions in India.

If the following combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Development Studies with special reference to Contemporary India'.

- Non-Assessed Courses

All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics.

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations,
government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab). Read more
Applicants apply for the MSc Development Studies programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab).

We welcome applications from those who have worked in a broad field of development, but also from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in, and understanding of, development issues in Palestine.

Students taking the Palestine Pathway will develop a specialist understanding of Development Studies in the context of Palestine. Development issues in Palestine are a major focus of NGO and international organisations that work in the Middle East. SOAS' recognised strengths in this area, including the establishment of the Centre for Palestine Studies, makes this a unique and exciting opportunity for those interested in Palestine.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-development-studies-palestine-pathway/

Structure

Applicants apply for, and will be formally enrolled on, the MSc Development Studies programme. Students wishing to follow the Palestine Pathway will take two core modules in Development Studies (Political Economy of Development and Theory, Policy and Practice of Development), two modules specific to Palestine and a dissertation (which must be written on a Palestine-related topic).

If the following combination of modules has been successfully completed, students may request that the following specialism appears on their final degree transcript: 'MSc Development Studies with special reference to Palestine'.

- Non-Assessed Courses

All MSc students in Development Studies are eligible to attend the one-term , non-assessed module, Economics for Beginners,which introduces students to basic concepts in microeconomics, macroeconomics, development economics, and statistics and econometrics.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 90kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscdevstud/file101803.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations,
government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The central goal of the Division of Pathway Medicine (DPM) is to integrate post-genomic science with medicine in order to provide a better understanding of disease processes. Read more

Research profile

The central goal of the Division of Pathway Medicine (DPM) is to integrate post-genomic science with medicine in order to provide a better understanding of disease processes. This will provide the basis for the development of new medical innovations for the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. To do this the DPM promotes multidisciplinary interactions between science and medicine.

The DPM has two main research themes:

Pathway biology of infection and immunity. This involves the study of host-pathogen interaction in immune cells and the modelling of molecular pathways that control immune cell function in health and disease. Techniques and approaches utilised in this theme are also being applied to the study of other disease processes.

Biochip medicine in systemic response to disease. This programme involves the development of advanced biochip techniques and platforms for translating genomic and pathway research into clinical healthcare. This is a highly disciplinary approach involving the integration of biological and physical sciences with medicine, engineering and computational science.

Training and support

The DPM offers leading-edge multidisciplinary PhD training and research in the application of postgenomic technologies and analytical methodologies for the study of disease pathways and processes.

The DPM has regular seminar speakers and hosts a yearly international conference on pathway medicine. Students attend DPM seminars and the generic skills-training programme provided by the life-sciences graduate programme. Students are invited to the annual DPM scientific workshop held at the Firbush Centre in Perthshire.

Facilities

The DPM fosters an integrative and multidisciplinary approach to disease pathway analysis. Students have access to state-of-the-art facilities for high throughput genomic and proteomic studies and biochip applications, including dedicated laboratories for the study of virus-host interactions.

The Division also houses leading bioinformatics and IT infrastructure and expertise for the integrative analysis and modelling of high throughput genomic and proteomic data. Complementing this, the DPM is also leading the development of computational approaches for the construction and modelling of disease pathways.

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This exciting MSc reflects the broad-ranging and strong neuroscience research profile of our Department, equipping you with a rigorous grounding in the theory and applications of cognitive, clinical, and developmental neuroscience- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-cognitive-clinical-neuroscience/. Read more
This exciting MSc reflects the broad-ranging and strong neuroscience research profile of our Department, equipping you with a rigorous grounding in the theory and applications of cognitive, clinical, and developmental neuroscience- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-cognitive-clinical-neuroscience/

We offer two pathways on this Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience (CCN) MSc:

Cognitive Neuropsychology pathway

The Cognitive Neuropsychology pathway has been developed in partnership with the Blackheath Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre and Neurodisability Service. The emphasis of this pathway will be on research and clinical aspects of cognitive neuroscience.

You'll take six modules, including a research dissertation:

Clinical and Cognitive Neuropsychology
Developmental Cognitive Neuropsychology
Biological Aspects of Brain Functions
Methods and Techniques in Neuroscience
Statistics
Research Project

Methods and Techniques pathway

The emphasis of the Methods and Techniques pathway will be on practical hands-on training in methods and techniques used in cognitive neuroscience research.

You'll take six modules, including a research dissertation:

Advanced Methods and Techniques
Clinical and Cognitive Neuropsychology
Biological Aspects of Brain Functions
Methods and Techniques in Neuroscience
Statistics
Research Project

"It has been great to see so many of my fellow peers get onto doctoral training – I think this really highlights the strength and quality of the Goldsmiths CCN course. I am very honoured to have been offered the opportunity to complete it."
Romena, former student

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Val West.

Structure

Cognitive Neuropsychology pathway

This programme is intended primarily for graduates in Psychology, or closely related disciplines, who want to pursue further academic research (MPhil/PhD) in experimental psychology or neuroscience; to teach in higher education; or to develop further knowledge for clinical careers involving work with brain-damaged patients or people suffering from developmental cognitive disorders.

During the course of the MSc, there are opportunities for some students to gain highly relevant clinical experience through case demonstrations and voluntary/paid work at the Blackheath Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre and Neurodisability Service or in one of the several clinical sites we collaborate with. In some cases, there may also be the possibility of carrying out research for your dissertation in these clinical settings.

Assessment:
The programme is assessed by written examinations, coursework, an oral presentation, journal club and a research dissertation.

Methods and Techniques pathway

This programme is intended primarily for graduates in Psychology, or closely related disciplines, who want to pursue further academic research (MPhil/PhD) in neuroscience and to teach in higher education. During the MSc, students will receive highly relevant hands-on training in essential methods and techniques used in contemporary cognitive neuroscience research.

Research Project (60 credits)
The project requires you to carry out an empirically or theoretically based psychological project, which can be in any area of Cognitive Neuropsychology, Development Cognitive Neuropsychology, Brain stimulation or Neuroimaging (EEG). You will give an oral presentation of your project in addition to providing a full written report.

Assessment:
The programme is assessed by written examinations, coursework, an oral presentation, journal club and a research dissertation.

Skills

The programme will provide you with knowledge of theory and practical issues relevant to neuroscience and clinical psychology in the UK health services and research centres. The two pathways allow students to shape their study plan according to their interests and career objectives. You will have the opportunity to develop your own research project under the supervision of a member of staff and relevant external clinical/research sector staff.

Careers

This programme is intended primarily for graduates in Psychology, or closely related disciplines.

The Cognitive Neuropsychology pathway is aimed at students who want to develop further knowledge in clinical cognitive disordersto apply to UK clinical doctorate programs or to students who want to pursue further academic research (MPhil/PhD) in experimental psychology or neuroscience.

The Methods and Techniques pathway is mainly addressed to students who want to apply for a research doctorate (MPhil/PhD) in cognitive neuroscience and related disciplines.

During the course of the MSc there are opportunities for some students (Cognitive Neuropsychology pathway) to gain highly relevant clinical experience through case demonstrations and undertaking clinical activity at the Blackheath Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre and Neurodisability Service or in one of the several clinical sites we collaborate with. In some cases, there may also be the possibility of carrying out research for your dissertation in these clinical settings. Students on the Methods and Techniques pathway will be able to acquire valuable “hands-on” experience and build a research portfolio by means of ad-hoc tutorials, research projects and workshops on some of the most recent cognitive neuroscience techniques (mainly TMS, tDCS, EEG).

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme. - Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice. Read more

Overview

We offer three pathways in the Advanced Professional Practice Programme:
- Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice for pharmacists to develop the skills required for working in General Practice.

- Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy) incorporating the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Advanced Pharmacy Framework

- Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn) allows health professionals to choose from our range of modules to create their own pathway

Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice:
NHS England has recently announced their intention to invest £15 million pounds to pilot patient facing roles for clinical pharmacists in GP practices. This is a clear sign of that pharmacists are recognised as health professionals who are able to support patients in the management of long term conditions e.g. by optimising medicines. These roles offer exciting opportunities for pharmacists to develop in this area of practice. . If you wish to work in general practice, it is likely that you will need to be working towards or hold a postgraduate pharmacy qualification that includes Independent Prescribing.
Our new postgraduate pathway 'Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice' allows you to combine your choice of modules from across our Community Pharmacy, Advanced Professional Practice and Prescribing Studies programmes (including the Independent Prescribing course) to meet your own personal learning needs whilst working towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters award.

Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
The Pharmacy pathway is compatible with the emerging agenda for Advanced and Specialist Practice within the Pharmacy profession and supports the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s Faculty Professional Recognition Scheme. Pharmacists who follow this pathway will incorporate the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) within their Advanced Professional Practice award and be able to demonstrate competency in all six competency clusters of the framework, ie:
- Expert Professional Practice
- Collaborative Working Relationships
- Leadership
- Management
- Education, Training and Development
- Research and Evaluation

Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn):
Increasing numbers of pharmacists and other health professionals have a career portfolio that crosses the traditional boundaries of community practice, primary care and secondary care and need a programme of continuing professional development that can meet their specific personal professional development needs.
The Open learn pathway of the APP programme is designed to allow pharmacists and other health professionals, particularly medical and non-medical prescribers working in primary care, choice and flexibility in their progression to Certificate, Diploma and Masters awards to meet their specific professional development needs and advance their professional practice. Pharmacists can choose modules from across the Department of Medicines Management/School of Pharmacy postgraduate programmes’ portfolio, including Community Pharmacy and Clinical (Hospital) Pharmacy.
Pharmacists, medical and nonmedical prescribers can choose modules from the Prescribing Studies programme, including the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists, and also modules provided by other Schools within the Faculty of Health, and other Faculties within the University, subject to meeting the specific entry criteria required for individual modules.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/advancedprofessionalpracticepharmacy/

Course Aims

Keele's Pg Advanced Professional Practice Programme aims to:
- Equip you with the clinical and professional knowledge base and skills that you have identified as necessary to fulfil and advance your professional practice

- Provide you with a learning programme that meets your personal professional development needs and that will help you apply your knowledge and skills in daily practice

- Encourage you to develop the self-discipline of private study, self-directed learning and reflective practice that will be continued beyond Keele's Programme in your Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

In addition, you will develop valuable practical skills including written and oral communication, and the ability to design a project, collect, analyse and interpret data.

Course Content

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice):
For the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ pathway you may combine modules from our Prescribing Studies programme, Community Pharmacy programme and Advanced Professional Practice programme to meet your learning needs. A total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Pharmacy):
This pathway links to all the clusters of the Advanced Pharmacy Framework (APF) (http://www.rpharms.com/faculty-resources/advanced-pharmacy-framework.asp) You will study modules to allow you to develop in all six clusters of the APF: Expert Professional Practice; Collaborative Working Relationships; Leadership; Management; Education, Training and Development; and Research and Evaluation.

The modules you will study are as follows (more detail about individual modules can be found in the Postgraduate Modules pages):

Year 1 (Certificate Year)
- Advanced Practice Development (30) 30 credits (Continuous module during Years 1 and 2)
- Competency Frameworks for the Advanced Practitioner 15 credits
- Building Working Relationships for the Advanced Practitioner (30) 30 credits

Year 2 (Diploma Year)
- Researching and Evaluating Your Practice 15 credits
- Education Theory and Practice for Health Professionals 15 credits
- Business and Financial Management 15 credits

Year 3 (Master’s year)
- Advanced Practice Development 15 credits
- Independent Learning Project 45 credits

MSc in Advanced Professional Practice (Open Learn)
For the ‘Open Learn’ pathway, a total of 60 credits is required to achieve the Certificate award, 120 credits for the Diploma and 180 credits for the MSc. The 15 credit Advanced Practice Development module is compulsory, after that you may chose modules from across our programmes to meet your individual learning needs. A maximum of 30 credits per level of award is permitted from any one programme source for Certificate and Diploma awards. The Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course for Pharmacists module (60 credits) from the Prescribing Studies programme may only be used towards a Diploma award.

Our Postgraduate Modules pages will provide you with more information about the modules you can choose from.

Achievement of the Master’s award requires you to complete the Professional MSc year. The professional MSc year consists of three compulsory modules: Advanced Practice Development (15 credits), Researching and Evaluating your Practice (15 credits) and the Independent Learning Project (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is designed principally for distance-learning. We provide mainly online distance-learning materials so that you can study where and when it is most convenient for you. Our methods of delivery allow us to revise and update the course quickly to meet your changing needs as a pharmacist.

Students on the 'Pharmacy' Pathway will be required to attend Keele for occasional face to face study days. Students on the 'Open Learn' pathway maybe required to attend Keele, depending on their module choices.

The Advanced Professional Practice Programme is fully supported by a team of experienced, friendly, and approachable academic, administrative and technical staff based at Keele. You’re not on your own! And, don’t forget the network of other pharmacists on the course whom you can contact.

You will require the equivalent of 1-2 days (approximately 10-15 hours) each week to complete your course. Remember that the online nature of our course materials, and the fact that a good proportion of the assessed work focuses on your daily practice, means that you can integrate study and work.

Assessment is entirely by coursework for the Certificate, Diploma and MSc courses. A variety of assessment methods are used such as Practice-Based Assignments that will assess your knowledge, problem-solving skills, and data interpretation skills in relation to application of knowledge to practice, patient care and medicines management. Case Presentations assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. An Audit Project, Practice-Based Assignments, Project Protocol Development and the Independent Study Project Report assess ‘thinking’ and practical skills, and your ability to plan, conduct and report on an investigation. They also assess your ability to critically appraise the literature and relate published theory to everyday practice. Your Reflective Portfolio also assesses your ability to relate theory to practice, and self evaluation of, and reflection on, your own performance and CPD needs.

The nature of the assessments develops your written and oral communication skills. Practical skills and key life/transferable skills are assessed within the methods described above. Each method of assessment is supported by clear criteria for marking; these are explained in the relevant Course Handbooks. The minimum pass mark is 50%.

The summative assessment is supported by a variety of formative assessment activities that include online discussions, formative feedback on elements of the reflective portfolio, contributions to study days and feedback on draft proposals.

Additional Costs

For all programmes you will need regular access to a computer, email and the internet. However apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for our postgraduate programmes, with the exception of those listed below.

Some modules may require that you attend a Webinar. You may find it beneficial to purchase a headset to participate in webinars, however this is not essential if your computer has a built in microphone and speakers.

Some modules may require that you travel to Keele for a study day. There will be additional travel and accommodation costs (if required) to attend any face to face study days.

Study Days

Students on the Pharmacy Pathway will be required to attend Keele for some face to face study days. For further information please contact Bev Oakden.

Students who incorporate the Independent Prescribing Preparatory Course into the ‘Clinical Pharmacy for General Practice’ award will be required to attend Keele for some study days. For further information please refer to the ‘Independent Prescribing’ section of our website.

Whilst the majority of our modules are delivered at a distance, a small number may require attendance at Keele. Please contact Bev Oakden or Amanda Salt to discuss your choice of modules and any attendance requirements.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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