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Law affects all of our lives and the knowledge of law increases our understanding of the society and the world in which we live. Read more
Law affects all of our lives and the knowledge of law increases our understanding of the society and the world in which we live. These Law (LLB) degree programmes provide a liberal education in Law, or in Law combined with another discipline, to promote such an awareness and to allow those who so wish to progress to careers in the legal professions.

This course is especially designed for people who have previously undertaken higher education and wish to study for a bachelor degree in Law. This may include:

Graduates who have successfully completed an honours degree in another subject at Bangor or another accredited institution
IELTS 6.5 (International Candidates)
Equivalent experience
As this is a qualifying law degree, on a successful completion of the 2 year programme, LLB graduates may progress onto a Legal Practice Course (LPC) to become a solicitor or onto BVC training to become a barrister.

In each academic year, students will undertake modules to the value of 120 credits in a combination of law courses addressing the issues of Public Law, Private Law and Property Law.

The first year involves the study of 6 compulsory double-modules (20 credits each) in law across Semesters 1 and 2. The second year will also consist of three compulsory double-modules and three optional modules from an approved list of modules according to students’ individual interests.


Modules
During the Law (LLB) degree you will study the seven foundation subjects to obtain a Qualifying Law Degree plus additional legal and/or non-legal subjects which allow for specialisation. You will be encouraged to study in areas which complement your chosen degree scheme.

The Foundations of Legal Knowledge are:

Public Law
Law of the European Union
Criminal Law
Obligations (including Contract, Restitution and Tort)
Property Law
Equity and the Law of Trusts
Legal Research
Year 1
Core modules:

Contract Law
Public Law
Equity and the Law of Trusts
Introduction to Law
Criminal Law
Legal Skills
2nd and Final Year
Core modules:

European Union Law
Land Law
Tort
International Law of Human Rights
2 x Optional modules in Law
Assessment
Each module is assessed separately by means of course work and end of module examination. In Year 1, course work will account for 25% and examinations for 75% of the final mark, whilst in Year 2 and 3, course work will normally account for 33% and examinations for 67% of the final mark. The pass mark in all assessment is 40%.

Second year and final year grades will both contribute to the final degree classification. At the end of Year 3, your final degree classification depends on your overall mark: a weighted average of your Year 2 average mark (one-third weighting) and your Year 3 average mark (two-thirds weighting).

Your final degree classification is determined by your overall mark.

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The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/). Read more
The Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics offers a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree via an on-campus program and an off-campus (distance learning - http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/) program through the College of Continuing Studies (http://continuingstudies.ua.edu/).

An MSAEM can be earned by coursework only or by a combination of coursework and an approved thesis. Most distance learning students elect to complete the coursework only degree option. On-campus students supported by assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis. Learn more about admission requirements (http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/admissions-and-financial-assistance/).

Visit the website http://aem.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MSAEM – THESIS (PLAN I) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a masters of science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan I option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework, including GES 554
- 12 hours of Elective coursework
- 6 hours of AEM 599 Thesis Research

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 24 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is 3 credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete at least 12 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by the student’s advisor.

- Thesis Requirement -

The student is required to submit a written thesis and defend in front of a thesis committee for approval by the committee and the graduate school.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to transfer. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours may be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 24 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan I degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

MSAEM – NON-THESIS (PLAN II) OPTION

Credit Hours
A total of 30 semester credit hours is required for a Master of Science in aerospace engineering and mechanics degree. For the MSAEM Plan II option, these credit hours consist of:

- 6 hours of Core coursework
- 6 hours of Mathematics coursework (including GES 554)
- 18 hours of Elective coursework

Elective coursework must be approved by the student’s advisor. Of the 30 coursework credit hours, at least 18 must have an AEM designation.

- Core Course Requirements -

All students must complete a minimum of one (1) class from the Aerospace Core listing of classes and one (1) class from the Mechanics Core listing of classes.

Aerospace Core:
AEM 567 Orbital Mechanics
AEM 582 Space Systems
AEM 614 Airfoil and Wing Theory
AEM 668 Advanced Dynamics of Flight*

Mechanics Core:
AEM 500 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
AEM 530 Continuum Mechanics
AEM 562 Intermediate Dynamics
AEM 637 Theory of Elasticity

* For those without a BSAE degree, this course has the pre-requisite of AEM 568.

- Mathematics Requirement -

A total of six credit hours of mathematics is required. GES 554 Partial Differential Equations, which is three credit hours, is required and counts toward the six-credit hour mathematics requirement. The remaining three credit hours of mathematics coursework must be approved by the advisor.

- Elective Coursework Requirement -

A student must complete a least 18 hours of elective coursework. These courses are typically AEM courses, but other approved courses are acceptable. The specific courses must be approved by student’s advisor.

- Comprehensive Examination or Culminating Experience -

Students pursuing the MSAEM Plan II degree option have the choice of completing one of the following options to satisfy the requirement of a comprehensive examination or culminating experience:

- Pass one of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations that serves as the comprehensive examination or

- Complete a culminating experience and receive faculty advisor approval for the written report detailing the culminating experience. MSAEM Plan II students may, but are not required to, enroll in AEM 594 Special Projects, three credit hours, complete the culminating experience, and submit the written report detailing the culminating experience as part of the AEM 594 course requirements.

The student must have completed at least 18 hours of coursework prior to submitting the written report for the culminating experience. The approved written report for the culminating experience must be submitted no later than the thesis deadline date during the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The comprehensive examination option may only be attempted twice.

- Test Pilot School -

Students that seek credit for Test Pilot School completed through the United States Air Force may send official transcripts from the TPS to the UA Graduate School for transfer credit. The student must receive a grade of at least a B in TPS for the credit to be transferable. Additionally, the transfer of credit from TPS is subject to the restrictions placed on the transfer of credit by the Graduate School and the AEM Department. A maximum of six hours can be transferred. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

- Transfer Credit -

With approval of the UA Graduate School, a maximum of 12 hours of graduate credit for coursework completed at another institution may be applied toward the 30 credit hour coursework requirement for the MSAEM Plan II degree. The maximum of 12 hours of graduate transfer credit includes the six hours of credit transferred from TPS, if applicable.

All credit toward the MSAEM degree, including transfer credit, must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the MSAEM degree is to be awarded. Students who have earned post-baccalaureate course credit are encouraged to explore transfer credit opportunities. For additional information, view the transfer credit policy at the UA Graduate School website (http://graduate.ua.edu/admin/policy/transfercredit.html).

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The MSc Psychology (Conversion Degree) is an excellent fast-track route suitable for appropriately qualified individuals who do not have an undergraduate degree in psychology but who wish to study core areas of psychology and pursue a career in psychology. Read more
The MSc Psychology (Conversion Degree) is an excellent fast-track route suitable for appropriately qualified individuals who do not have an undergraduate degree in psychology but who wish to study core areas of psychology and pursue a career in psychology. The programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC). GBC is necessary if a student is interested in becoming a chartered psychologist. You can visit careers.bps.org.uk for further information about careers in psychology.

The programme is also suitable for those who have obtained a previous degree in psychology (home and overseas) that is not recognised by the BPS, and it may also be of particular interest to health and social care professionals with some background in psychology at degree level.

The programme provides a broad scientific education in psychology with a strong grounding in psychological theories and research methods, and explores how psychological research is conducted, analysed and reported. The programme is delivered through a series of guided learning exercises, culminating in an independent research project. Students receive carefully designed academic support throughout the programme.

Students develop a strong understanding of psychology as a discipline and acquire a range of skills, including critical thinking and analytical and research skills. On successful completion of the programme students will be able to evaluate, interpret and integrate arguments, evidence and empirical findings. These skills are appropriate to psychology as a discipline and suitable for a diverse range of employment opportunities.

If you would like any further information, please contact the programme team on .

The Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling is a trusted provider of excellent academic degrees and vocational training. Our teaching staff are research active and are experts in their respective field. The department is consistently rated highly in the National Student Survey. We pride ourselves on combining high-quality teaching with world-class research and a vibrant student experience. We have well-equipped facilities and laboratories to support our activities and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques.

The aims of the programme are:

- To teach students a scientific understanding of mind, brain, behaviour and experience, and the complex interactions between these

- To foster students' understanding of real-life applications of theory to the full range of experience and behaviour

- To help them develop a range of research skills and methods for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in an ability to conduct research independently

- To develop their knowledge, leading to an ability to analyse, discuss and critically evaluate theory, research findings and applications. If you would like any further information about this programme, please contact .

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/psy/psych

Psychology and Counselling

The Department of Psychology & Counselling at Greenwich has a strong record of delivering high quality programmes, research and consultancy. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. We welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Brain, Behaviour and Cognition (30 credits)
Individual Differences and Abnormal Psychology (30 credits)
Applied Psychology Project (60 credits)
Research Methods in Psychology (30 credits)
Advanced Developmental Psychology (15 credits)
Social Psychology: Current Social Issues (Level 7) (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Brain, Behaviour and Cognition (30 credits)
Individual Differences and Abnormal Psychology (30 credits)
Advanced Developmental Psychology (15 credits)
Social Psychology: Current Social Issues (Level 7) (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Applied Psychology Project (60 credits)
Research Methods in Psychology (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Assessments are varied and may include seen and unseen exams, essays, critical reflections, presentations, research poster and practical reports.

Professional recognition

This programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society as conferring eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the society, provided that the student has achieved an overall pass mark of 50% and has also passed the research project.

Career options

The programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC). GBC is necessary if you are interested in becoming a chartered psychologist. You can visit careers.bps.org.uk for further information about careers in psychology.

In addition to chartered psychologist professions, psychology graduates may find opportunities are available in business, commerce, counselling and education (with additional training), research, human resource management and the social sciences.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

View the list of subjects offered for the Master of Science (MSc) and the Master of Applied Science (MAppSc).

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned.

A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.

A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.

A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.



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If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Read more
If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Our course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering.

The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself.

Why choose this course?

This programme is rooted in real-world and industry-relevant experiences. Lecturing staff have extensive experience in research and university teaching, as well as a wide range of previous industrial and commercial backgrounds. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement.

You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Computing is accredited as partially meeting the requirements for CITP and have been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computing has a modular course unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computing with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a Master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Computing Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Object-Oriented Programming (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Structured Data (compulsory for MSc)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Computer Systems and Networks (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc)
-Cyber security and the web (Compulsory for MSc)

As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here.

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Careers and professional development

Our MSc students come from all over the world and graduate to follow careers in technical, business-related and creative roles, for example as developers, engineers, IT managers or web developers. Whatever their interest, our graduates tell us that the relevance of our courses and the skills they've learnt enable them to achieve their goals and build their careers.

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This is a fast-track undergraduate degree, which is only available to graduates of disciplines other than Law. The accelerated LL.B. Read more
This is a fast-track undergraduate degree, which is only available to graduates of disciplines other than Law.

The accelerated LL.B. allows graduates in other disciplines to obtain a degree which will qualify them for entry to the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice and the solicitor branch of the legal profession in two years. The two-year degree is available to all applicants holding a first degree.

◾The programme is fully accredited by the Law Society of Scotland for entry into the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice.
◾This flexible degree offers courses that put an emphasis on developing the key skills required by employers.
◾The programme provides you with a sound general foundation for a range of careers, such as the civil service, local government, journalism, industry and commerce, international institutions, administration, banking, insurance, social work and the police service.

Programme structure

The degree requires two years of full-time study and covers all courses required for the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice and the legal profession in Scotland.

Year 1
◾Obligations 1A
◾Obligations 1B
◾Introduction to legal study
◾Family law
◾Constitutional law
◾Criminal law and evidence

Year 2
◾Law and government
◾Jurisprudence
◾Legal profession and ethics
◾Property law
◾Commercial law
◾Business organisations
◾European Union law

There is a range of optional courses to choose from, covering topics such as
◾Roman law
◾International private law
◾Labour law
◾Forensic medicine
◾Public international law
◾Tax law.

Career prospects

If you intend to become a solicitor or advocate in Scotland you must, in addition to the LLB, complete a one-year postgraduate vocational qualification: the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice. There is then a period of full-time training for two years to become a solicitor, and up to two and a half years to become an advocate.

To qualify in England, in other member states of the EU or elsewhere, you must pass additional examinations in the appropriate legal system. Each year a number of our graduates decide to undertake the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and qualify in the English legal system.

The flexibility of the law degree at Glasgow means that the LLB degree provides a sound general foundation for a range of careers. These include the civil service, local government, journalism, industry and commerce, international institutions, administration, banking, insurance, social work and the police service.

ccreditation

This programme is fully accredited to allow entry to the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice and the legal profession.

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Read more
Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry.

Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends.

This course is aimed at recent graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise.

Why choose this course?

The design of our programmes is informed by state-of-the-art research being undertaken in the department.
- You will be given the opportunity to undertake an intensive course on compiler construction from one of Europe’s leading authorities in the field.
- Professional experts contribute to the range of subjects on offer.
- You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement
- You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community.
- The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

The MSc in Software Engineering is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computer Science has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computer Science with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to update their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

You can also do a Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc)
-Formal Software Engineering (optional)
-Network Principles (optional)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Paradigms of Programming (optional)
-Compiler Construction (optional)
-Machine Learning (optional)
-Operating Systems Development (optional)
-Secure Programming (optional).
-Low Level Tools and Techniques (optional)
-Systems Administration (optional)
-IT Systems Management and Governance (optional)
-Multiservice Networks (optional)

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Teaching and learning

Lectures provide a theoretical basis, while the practical sessions are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. Coursework and projects form the basis for continuous assessment. These methods have been developed to provide the varied experience that our students require, including the opportunity to discuss your work directly with the lecturers.

Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. There are also visiting lecturers from research organisations and industry.

Assessment methods include examination and coursework, reflecting the development of academic content from the more practical aspects to the more conceptual.

Specialist facilities

Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables you to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances you understanding of theoretical concepts. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Our server and security laboratories provide a safe environment for you to experiment with range of complex systems and software.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of this course are employed across a whole range of careers from development roles in small software houses, to the activities of IT departments in large, multinational corporations, to more specialist roles for providers of IT and telecommunications services. These include technical roles, including software design and development, specialist product support, and infrastructure and security management roles.

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Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the four main threats to the UK. Read more
Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the four main threats to the UK. There is an increasing demand from business and government for individuals skilled in computer science and cyber security who can design, build, and maintain secure software and systems that can protect people, business and data from malicious attack.

This programme builds on the knowledge gained in a first degree to equip you with advanced computer science and cyber security skills necessary to produce modern secure systems. The theory taught in the lectures is reinforced in the practicals where you have the opportunity to use industry standard tools and techniques in our dedicated security, server and networking laboratories which provide a safe space for you to practice both offensive and defensive security techniques.

Why choose this course?

Dedicated security, server and networking laboratories with enterprise equipment including Cisco switches, routers, firewalls and Dell servers. Small, dedicated private cloud that allows you to create more complex cyber security scenarios and to investigate cloud security issues. Access to a wide range of enterprise software to ensure realistic deployment environments.

An emphasis on live projects, alongside group work modelled on industry standard working patterns, giving you the opportunity to develop skills that are directly applicable to the workplace. Staff with a wide range of expertise in computer science and cyber security. An opportunity to apply to undertake a placement which enables you to practice and refine your skills within a company or organisation.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computer Science for Cyber Security has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree without placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). To qualify for a master's degree with placement you need to undertake a one-year placement in between the taught component and the dissertation.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

Semester 1 has the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc)
-Network Principles (compulsory for MSc)
-Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)

Semester 2 has the following modules:
-Operating Systems Development (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Secure Programming (compulsory for MSc)
-Low level Techniques and Tools (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)

If you are studying for an MSc you will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

MSc students have the option to apply to undertake a placement. Placement positions are not guaranteed, however the department will help and support students in finding a placement.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules offered may vary from the list here.

Teaching and learning

The taught modules include lectures, seminars, library and internet research, and practical design and experimentation.

Teaching staff include experienced academic staff and practitioners in the field of Computer Science and Cyber Security. Visiting speakers from business and industry help to maintain relevance to the evolution of the industry.

Laboratory facilities include dedicated security, server and networking laboratories.

Careers and professional development

This programme allows graduates to undertake a wide range of roles in IT and cyber security. Common careers in this area are IT security professionals, penetration testers, digital forensic investigators, software developers, systems engineers, technical analysts, IT managers, and consultants.

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Queen Margaret University awards one higher degree by research, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The PhD normally takes 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time. Read more
Queen Margaret University awards one higher degree by research, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The PhD normally takes 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time.

IGHD has a vibrant cohort of doctoral students working on health, health systems and social development in the context of globalisation, health sector reform and post conflict environments. Our PhD students come from many different countries including Indonesia, Nigeria, India, Pakistan, Thailand, USA, Spain, Japan, Malawi among others.

PhD programmes are normally followed for a period of three years full time (or six years part time), with a significant period of study generally spent overseas. Successful applicants are supported by a supervisory team, comprising a Director of Studies and one or more additional Supervisors. Full time students are provided with shared office accommodation and dedicated computing facilities. All students are required to attend an institution-wide Research Training Programme - and pass required coursework - before formally progressing to the status of a PhD student.

Candidates are generally responsible for meeting all costs of tuition and study themselves, either by self funding or by securing external funding. Funded bursary awards and other scholarships are publicly advertised when these become available.

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The Department of Anthropology and Sociology teaches the discipline of Social Anthropology with special reference to the societies and cultures of Asia and Africa, both past and present. Read more
The Department of Anthropology and Sociology teaches the discipline of Social Anthropology with special reference to the societies and cultures of Asia and Africa, both past and present. The emphasis given to particular regions and approaches varies with current trends in the discipline and contemporary global developments.

Course detail

You will examine behaviour in social groups, for instance the social organisation of a particular person: customs, economic and political organisation, law and conflict resolution, patterns of consumption and exchange, kinship and family structure, gender relations, childrearing and socialisation and religion.

Additionally you will gain skills that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying social anthropology at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective, where you will benefit from the exceptional global expertise of SOAS anthropologists while gaining a broad education in the subject, and an irrepressible curiosity about the world.

Expert at where the world is changing

Scholars in Anthropology have an impact on the world outside of academia—on law and government, in the arts and on public media and we are amongst the most respected in the field of social and cultural anthropology in the UK.

At SOAS, Anthropology is at the heart of the university, one of its largest and most important subjects. It is central to the shared objective of widening horizons, fostering cross-cultural perspectives, challenging taken-for-granted assumptions, and critical engagement with urgent issues.

Suitability

The MA degree programme in Social Anthropology is designed on a modular basis offering different pathways to suit, broadly, three categories of student:

• Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics and/or more regional and language-based study;

• Students with little or no previous knowledge of social anthropology wishing to acquire a broad knowledge of the discipline;

• Students with little or no previous knowledge of social anthropology wishing to take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree in anthropology, who are required to pass all the examinations with appropriately high marks.

Format and assessment

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
• Comparative Studies of Society and Culture
• Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology
• Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

The remaining unit(s) of your programme may then be selected from the Option Courses listed on our website.

Careers

A Masters in Social Anthropology at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will leave the graduate with an advanced understanding of behaviour in social groups, for instance the social organization of a particular person: customs, economic and political organization, law and conflict resolution, patterns of consumption and exchange, kinship and family structure, gender relations, childrearing and socialization and religion.

Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MFA in Fine Art is a studio-based, research-centred programme with a critical studies component, supported by studio-led seminars arising from the creative and critical interests of students and staff. Read more

The MFA in Fine Art is a studio-based, research-centred programme with a critical studies component, supported by studio-led seminars arising from the creative and critical interests of students and staff. Students are admitted into one of three subject areas: Painting, Sculpture or Fine Art Media, which includes electronic media, photography, print, film and video.

About this degree

The MFA programme provides an intellectual and creative environment in which talented fine art graduates may develop their individual potential as professional artists and researchers in their chosen studio area; whilst developing a critical awareness of the broadening intellectual and cultural contexts of fine art.

The Fine Art MFA is an integrated degree programme and does not have a modular structure.

The programme consists of studio work (100%) in the student's chosen subject area, and critical studies which are assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Exhibition

Assessment is by submission of the critical study and final examination of studio work in the form of an exhibition.

Teaching and learning

A studio-based programme, students develop their work with tutorial/technical assistance according to individual need. The taught component is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops, but primarily demands individual investigation. Year two prioritises supervised individual research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Fine Art MFA

Careers

The programme aims to develop students' individual potential, and provide an excellent foundation for further doctoral research. The Graduate Degree Shows are attended by artists, gallerists, curators, critics and collectors providing a high-profile entrance to the professional art world. Recent graduates have established international careers as professional artists, receiving important commissions, gaining gallery representation, winning major prizes and residencies, as well as developing new artist-led initiatives. Others have taken on roles in related careers including curation, museum and gallery management and teaching worldwide. News and achievements of alumni including recent graduates are detailed on the news section of the Slade Schoolwebsite.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Freelance Artist, Self-Employed Artist
  • Photo Editor, Getty Images
  • Art Tutor, JW3 Community Centre
  • Research Degree: Slade School of Fine Art, UCL
  • Art Technician, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts

Employability

Professional development opportunities are actively encouraged with graduate students recently working as research assistants on UCL CHIRP's Pigment Timeline project and the Colour & Emotion project, part of the Human Wellbeing focus of UCL's Grand Challenges.

Partnerships outside of UCL include one with Camden Arts Centre whilst the Slade is a founder member of the Junction: North London Cultural Consortium; all of which offers students the opportunity to experience working with galleries and other professional art bodies. In addition, there are several studio residency awards to help launch completing graduate students including the annual Red Mansion Art Prize of a residency in China and an annual competition for residencies at the Academy of Visual Arts, Hong Kong Baptist University, China

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Slade School of Fine Art at UCL is one of the UK's leading university departments for research in Fine Art, approaching the study and practice of art in an enquiring, investigative, experimental and research-minded way.

All academic staff are practising artists, actively involved in research as well as teaching, and have a broad and diverse range of interests and expertise. Students benefit from excellent studio space and technical facilities, including a large research centre in Woburn Square.

The UCL Slade School's central London location enables easy access to unparalleled learning resources including major galleries, museums, libraries, cultural institutions and theatres.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Slade School of Fine Art

79% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MPhil in Economics is a one-year master’s degree that runs from mid-September to late July. Read more
The MPhil in Economics is a one-year master’s degree that runs from mid-September to late July. This degree is specifically aimed at candidates who are interested in undertaking a master’s degree that will give them the technical training required to undertake a career as a professional economist working for, say, the UK Government Economic Service or an economics consultancy.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ececmpmec

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil degree students should have:

1. acquired an advanced technical training in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics;
2. acquired, through optional papers, some knowledge of work at the frontiers of the subject in particular areas;
3. begun to acquire independent research skills and experience of putting them into practice;
4. acquired experience and guidance in formulating a realistic research topic and prepared written work to a strict timetable;
5. acquired sufficient knowledge and understanding of advanced economics to proceed to a career as a professional economist in business or government, or to a research degree.

Format

Each student will take eight modules plus a dissertation. One module is equivalent to eighteen hours of lectures.

Requirements:

- to attend the preparatory course in mathematics and statistics
- one compulsory module in each of the three core areas [3]
- Three more modules which can be taken from any of the core areas [3]
- two additional modules, either from the core areas or from the list of additional options [2]
- a dissertation of up to 10,000 words.

There is an internal examination on the material covered in the preparatory course which is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Classes in problem sets take place for core compulsory modules - one problem set for each of the compulsory modules is formally assessed. Mid-course examinations in microeconomics I, macroeconomics I and econometric methods take place in January; marks are recorded but do not count towards the final degree result. Each student receives 2 hours of supervision for the dissertation component of the MPhil in Economics.

Assessment

Students submit a 10,000 word dissertation at the end of July worth 20% of the final overall mark.

Students are examined on 8 coursework modules in May/June worth 80% of the final overall mark.

Continuing

Although the MPhil in Economics is designed for students who wish to obtain a one-year master’s qualification before leaving academic economics, it will be possible for students to continue from the MPhil in Economics onto the PhD programme. To do this, students will be expected to perform at a standard similar to that required for continuation from the MPhil in Economic Research; this means that as well as achieving continuation marks, students would need to have taken the advanced modules that are compulsory for MPhil in Economic Research students. Continuation is also conditional on the appointment of a supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research. Read more
The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research.

The MCom can be pursued by a combination of papers and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a good Bachelor's degree (or equivalent qualification) will complete the MCom by papers and thesis (at least two years' full-time study). The first year consists of a selection of papers worth 144 points, leading to a Postgraduate Diploma in Commerce (PGDipCom). Students who have a good Honours degree or a PGDipCom (or equivalent qualification) can complete an MCom by thesis only (minimum one year).

Further information about completing a Master's degree is available at: otago.ac.nz/study/masters/index.html

Subject areas

-Accounting
-Economics
-Finance
-Information Science
-International Business
-Management
-Marketing Management
-Tourism

Structure of the Programme

-The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Commerce) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.
-The programme of study shall consist of the preparation and submission of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. In some cases, a candidate may also be required to take and pass approved papers, normally at 400-level, in addition to completing a thesis.
-The candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.

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