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Summary. A Physician Associate is a healthcare professional trained in the medical model to work with the medical team in order to deliver medical care to patients. Read more

Summary

A Physician Associate is a healthcare professional trained in the medical model to work with the medical team in order to deliver medical care to patients. PAs work under the supervision of a doctor in a range of specialities across medicine in both primary and secondary care. PAs are trained to take medical histories, carry out physical examinations, formulate diagnosis, request and interpret tests and investigations, undertake procedures and develop treatment and management plans.

The PgDip/MSc Physician Associate Studies aims to ensure students receive the required education and training in line with requirements of the Competence and Curriculum Framework, enabling graduates to be successful in completion of the programme and the PA National Exam. It also aims to ensure that graduates are safe and competent clinicians, at the point of qualification.

This intensive programme is delivered over 2 years. Year 1 is mainly theoretical and University based (5 days per week) with 1 day per week in general practice. Year 2 is mainly spent on clinical attachment with one day every 3-4 weeks back in University. Students will develop a sound knowledge base in clinical medicine and develop comprehensive clinical examination skills which form the basis of their generalist medical education enabling them to enter work in any medical speciality. From that point, they develop the specialist knowledge required to progress their careers and care for patients

Students must pass all elements of the programme to be eligible to sit the National PA Exam for entry into professional practice.

About

The course is designed to ensure that graduates have the relevant clinical knowledge and skills in order to be successful in attaining their professional qualification and in their subsequent professional working life as a Physician Associate.

Please note this information is provisional and subject to change.

Year one specifically concentrates on the basic medical sciences that support the teaching and application of clinical medicine. In conjunction with this, a significant of time is spent on communication and clinical examination skills as these form the basis of the skills that the PA will use throughout their clinical working lives. In addition to this, the PA student will spend 1 day per week in clinical attachment (General Practice) to rehearse and fine tune their skills.

To exit with the PgDip in Physician Associate Studies, students will be required to pass assignments relating to the modules in Foundations of Clinical Medicine 1, Applied Pharmacology for Physician Associate Studies, Research Methods for Physician Associate Studies and Evidence-Informed Decision Making for Physician Associate Studies in Year 1. Students must also pass the assessments associated with the GP placement and an objective structured clinical examination for the Personal & Professional Development 1 module in order to progress to year 2. In year 2 students will be required to pass the Foundations of Clinical Medicine 2 and Personal & Professional Development 2 modules. The Clinical Competence in Physician Associate Skills module will assess the core competencies and core procedural skills in the Competence and Curriculum Framework for Physician Assistants and has been designated Pass/Fail, rather than having credit value. This competency assessment will be undertaken prior to taking the UK Physician Associate National Certification Examination at the end of Year 2. A pass in all taught modules of the programme and in the UK PA National Certification Examination will be required for the award of the PgDip in PA Studies.

This is a complex and very intensive programme and involves the establishment of a new suite of student placements and assessments, therefore, in the first instance, the course team do not intend to offer the masters programme and only intend to offer the PgDip. Once the programme has been established then the team will roll in the possibility to complete the masters by completion of the 60 credit Service Improvement Project module. This 60 credit module can either be taken alongside the second year of the full-time taught modules that comprise the PgDip or it can be taken part time over 3 semesters of a third year as a top-up.

Students who fail the assessment associated with the Personal & Professional Development 1 module but who have passed the module Foundations in Clinical Medicine 1 and passed other modules totalling at least 30 academic credits may exit with the lower award of Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Sciences (noting that students must pass all modules in year 1 to progress to year 2). A student who fails the Clinical Competency assessment/UK PA National Examination but who has passed all of the other elements of the programme can exit with a PgDip in Medical Sciences or if they have successfully completed the Service Improvement Project, an MSc in Medical Sciences.

Career options

Whilst the PA profession is established and growing rapidly in the UK with a variety of jobs across a range of primary and secondary care specialities, this is the first PA programme in Northern Ireland. As such it presents its own challenges in the form of employment opportunities. However there have already been jobs advertised in Northern Ireland for PAs and in preparation for the programme the University have been working with the local Trusts seeking clinical attachments and scoping the potential for employment of PAs. The evidence from early PA programmes in England indicates that all of their students secured employment as PAs with many offered jobs before qualification. This continues to be the trend in the UK and the University are confident that this will be the same in Northern Ireland.

Once qualified, PAs can work across a range of specialities throughout medicine. There are also opportunities to work in education and as potential future leaders of the PA profession.

The qualification is not recognised in the USA and currently graduates who train in the UK may only be able to work in the UK. This may change in time.



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Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Read more
Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science provides you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry.

Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends.

This course is aimed at recent graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise.

Why choose this course?

The design of our programmes is informed by state-of-the-art research being undertaken in the department.
- You will be given the opportunity to undertake an intensive course on compiler construction from one of Europe’s leading authorities in the field.
- Professional experts contribute to the range of subjects on offer.
- You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement
- You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community.
- The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT.

The MSc in Software Engineering is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computer Science has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computer Science with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to update their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

You can also do a Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc)
-Formal Software Engineering (optional)
-Network Principles (optional)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Paradigms of Programming (optional)
-Compiler Construction (optional)
-Machine Learning (optional)
-Operating Systems Development (optional)
-Secure Programming (optional).
-Low Level Tools and Techniques (optional)
-Systems Administration (optional)
-IT Systems Management and Governance (optional)
-Multiservice Networks (optional)

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Teaching and learning

Lectures provide a theoretical basis, while the practical sessions are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. Coursework and projects form the basis for continuous assessment. These methods have been developed to provide the varied experience that our students require, including the opportunity to discuss your work directly with the lecturers.

Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. There are also visiting lecturers from research organisations and industry.

Assessment methods include examination and coursework, reflecting the development of academic content from the more practical aspects to the more conceptual.

Specialist facilities

Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables you to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances you understanding of theoretical concepts. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Our server and security laboratories provide a safe environment for you to experiment with range of complex systems and software.

Careers and professional development

Graduates of this course are employed across a whole range of careers from development roles in small software houses, to the activities of IT departments in large, multinational corporations, to more specialist roles for providers of IT and telecommunications services. These include technical roles, including software design and development, specialist product support, and infrastructure and security management roles.

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If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Read more
If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Our course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering.

The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself.

Why choose this course?

This programme is rooted in real-world and industry-relevant experiences. Lecturing staff have extensive experience in research and university teaching, as well as a wide range of previous industrial and commercial backgrounds. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement.

You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Computing is accredited as partially meeting the requirements for CITP and have been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computing has a modular course unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computing with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a Master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Computing Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Object-Oriented Programming (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Structured Data (compulsory for MSc)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Computer Systems and Networks (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc)
-Cyber security and the web (Compulsory for MSc)

As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here.

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Careers and professional development

Our MSc students come from all over the world and graduate to follow careers in technical, business-related and creative roles, for example as developers, engineers, IT managers or web developers. Whatever their interest, our graduates tell us that the relevance of our courses and the skills they've learnt enable them to achieve their goals and build their careers.

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The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research. Read more

The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research.

Combining core research skills with specialist criminology and criminal justice teaching from research-active staff, this course will encourage you to critically examine the theoretical foundations that underpin applied criminological research.

You will develop a critical understanding of research methods and their application as well as specialist knowledge of the issues within contemporary criminological and criminal justice debates.

The dissertation component of this course will enable you to study an area of your interest in-depth, under the supervision of one of interdisciplinary team of sociological, legal and psychological experts.

Aims

Aims of the course:

  • Meet national and regional demands for new research and policy oriented competencies in criminology or socio-legal studies.
  • Provide advanced, systematic and critical knowledge of research methods and theoretical arguments in criminology or socio-legal studies which are at the forefront of the subject area in the context of an vibrant research context.
  • Offer a course integrating a grounding in research methodology with understanding of the implications for policy.
  • Offer students the opportunity for developing their understanding of the key theoretical and epistemological debates within the subject area and to assist them to engage in theoretical debates at an advanced postgraduate level.
  • Provide a formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training for students in research methodology and transferable employment related skills.
  • Prepare students for PhD level research careers in academic life or as professionals in government and voluntary agencies.
  • Contribute to the national need for skilled social science researchers in criminological, socio-legal and related matters.
  • Train students to appreciate the relationship between research on the one hand and the implementation and operation of policy and practice in the implementation of justice.
  • Provide graduates with the tools for further research/study in criminology and/or socio-legal studies.

Special features

This acclaimed course has ESRC recognition as a Foundation Course for Research Training and is an essential step if you wish to progress onto doctoral studies or pursue a career in research in the public or voluntary sectors.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

To meet the requirements of the taught element of the course, all students must take course units totalling 120 credits. This is normally attained with eight 15-credit course units, as listed below, with 60 credits taken each semester. Students take 5 core units. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year). Information that is sent to students in the month of August preceding registration onto the course will clearly state the course units that are available in the academic year ahead.

In addition, students who pass the taught element of the course and who are permitted to progress to the research element of the course, must also submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words worth 60 credits.

Part-time  students take four out of the five compulsory course units in the first year, and then take the other one in year two. The remaining 60 credits of optional course units are selected and taken accordingly over the two years. 

 Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MRes can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The degree is designed to appeal to recent graduates looking to work for local/central government, the criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police; probation, voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks -such as The Howard League Reform Trust, as well as for a private sector.



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Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. Read more

Overview

Combining theoretical reflection and practical application, our course will provide you with an opportunity to specialise in the latest developments in criminology and criminal justice. We welcome applications from recent graduates, mature students, and professionals in criminal justice or related fields. We tailor teaching content to your individual educational and professional background and interests. Our teaching format provides you with many opportunities to develop your own intellectual interests or professional experience. You will attend four, three-day long blocks of intensive teaching and discussion between September and May, plus an additional half day dissertation workshop. This format allows you to combine your studies with either part-time or full time employment should you wish to do so.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/criminologyandcriminaljustice/

Course Aims

- To introduce students to recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies

- To show students how recent and contemporary theorising in criminology and governance studies has attempted to describe, analyse and interpret contemporary developments in criminal justice, transnational justice, international justice, and governance more broadly

- To enable students to think through methodological problems and choose appropriate methods for the study of crime, criminal justice, and governance

- To enable students to critically assess research in a number of fields within criminology, criminal justice, and governance studies more broadly

- To enable students to design and complete a research project and understand the importance of the research process in the social sciences

Course Content

Our taught master’s programme comprises four 30 credit module blocks and one 60 credit dissertation. Each taught module is assessed by a 5,000 word written assignment. The pass mark is 50% and you must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words under the supervision of an individual member of the teaching team. Each module block comprises three days of intensive face to face contact between staff and students. Students are also supported by online content and access to staff throughout the academic year. The programme is taught by criminologists who all have considerable research and teaching expertise in criminology, criminal justice and related subjects. Each three-day long module block is divided into four thematically linked sessions:

Indicative Modules
• Contemporary Criminology: Theory and Practice
• Researching Crime and Criminal Justice
• Contemporary Challenges in Criminal Justice

You will study an elective module (subject to change) in:
• Advanced Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice

You will also be offered full advice and support to undertake your dissertation.

This programme is designed to fit around your work and personal commitments. The taught content is delivered in twelve days and the extensive online supporting materials allow you to complete your personal study at times that suit you.

Teaching & Assessment

Each of the taught modules is assessed by written, summative coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words (essay, case-study, research proposal, and empirical research report). The pass mark is 50% and students must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation, which involves researching and writing a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words. There are no exams.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-Library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post-graduate programme.

Careers

Graduates from our course have found employment in a variety of occupations including: the accelerated police and prison graduate training programmes; the probation service; in other criminal justice agencies; in the voluntary sector with organisations such as Victim Support and NACRO; and in a variety of other graduate level jobs. In addition, a number of graduates have gone on to take postgraduate courses at Keele and elsewhere.

As part of your Criminology degree you will have gained a set of Distinctive Graduate Attributes that put you in a unique position in an uncertain labour market that demands graduate employees to be skilled, yet flexible, workers.

For further help and advice about how to put yourself in the best position upon graduation explore the Careers and Employability web pages or drop in to see them. They can help with all aspects of the transition into employment, from drawing up a CV to preparing for job interviews.

TUITION BREAKS, GRANTS AND BURSARIES:
All students from North America (USA and Canada) are eligible for tuition breaks of 10%. Students from universities that are among Keele University's partner institutions are eligible for tuition breaks of up to 25% of the tuition fee.
Further information can be found at: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesfornastudents/

All students are eligible for an ERASMUS grant for the period spent at an EU partner institution. For further information on Erasmus grants and tuition breaks, please contact

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes. Read more

If you have an undergraduate degree in a subject other than Economics, the Conversion programme offers you a two-year route to our Economics MSc programmes.

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA). This brings you up to the standards required to continue with MSc study. Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above then proceed to one of our MSc programmes. Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

All of our MSc degrees equip you with a range of quantitative and analytical skills, and the ability to communicate complex economic concepts in a clear and concise style. Our programmes not only offer a stimulating education in economic theory, but also develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills to a range of national and international problems in the areas of finance, development, agriculture and the environment.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/196/economics-conversion-diploma-in-economic-analysis

Course structure

- Year 1

During the first year, you take the Diploma in Economic Analysis (DEA), which is a qualification in its own right, and brings you up to the standard required to continue with MSc study. The DEA consists of five compulsory modules.

- Year 2

Students who pass the DEA with 60% and above can then proceed to one of the following MSc programmes in year two:

- MSc Economics

- MSc Economics and Econometrics

- MSc Economics and Finance

- MSc Finance and Econometrics

- MSc International Finance and Economic Development

Students who pass but do not achieve 60% are awarded the DEA.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is through a wide variety of methods including seminar presentations, extended essays, short projects, in-class tests, examinations, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for students who already have a degree to proceed to study economics at Master’s level when they have not previously studied economics

- provide you with the knowledge, analytical and other skills from which you can proceed to further study in economics and develop a deeper understanding of economic theory, econometric and quantitative techniques and policy applications to specific areas

- provide a stimulating education in the principles of economics and their application, in which high-quality teaching motivates you to achieve your full potential

- provide options to enable you to study selected areas of economics in depth

- develop your ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in a range of theoretical, applied and policy problems

- develop your independent research skills and prepare you for work as a professional economist or in an area related to economics

- provide you with information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

Research areas

Labour and education economics

Staff research includes work in the areas of wage distributions, skills and job quality, education, migration and trade.

Macroeconomics, money and finance

Staff research in this area includes: macroeconometric theory; monetary policy; financial markets and macroeconomic performance growth theory and international macroeconomics; theoretical models of business cycles, labour market search and financial sources of economic fluctuations; DSGE models; growth theory and empirics.

Microeconomic theory, games and behaviour

Research interests cover public economics especially tax policy; gambling and uncertainty; international trade and government procurement; health economics; public goods; leadership in co-ordination games; industrial organisation; theoretic modelling; economic history.

Development economics

Research interests include work on growth; trade; the balance of payments; different aspects of migration and remittances on growth; applied studies focusing on particular developing countries.

Agri-environmental economics

Research interests cover non-market valuation, food safety, information economics applied to environmental problems, design and evaluation of agri-environmental policies, biodiversity, agricultural productivity, European agricultural policy, agricultural trade policy.

Transport and regional economics

Research strengths are the regional impact of transport investments; the economic evaluation of infrastructure; regulation and alternative funding models; the economics of public-private partnerships.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work as economists in international organisations, the financial sector, business, UK and overseas governments, and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at Kent, UK and overseas universities. Recent MSc graduates have gone on to work for companies in the UK such as BNP Paribas, AXA, FactSet and PwC.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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This course is designed to help nurses, social workers, teachers, counsellors and other health professionals develop their knowledge and increase the effectiveness of their work with families, couples and individuals. Read more
This course is designed to help nurses, social workers, teachers, counsellors and other health professionals develop their knowledge and increase the effectiveness of their work with families, couples and individuals.

It is built on the theoretical and practice frameworks established in the foundation year, and is both an intermediate year of training for systemic psychotherapy and end-stage training for the systemic practitioner.

This course is delivered in partnership with the Institute of Family Therapy in London.

Choose Intermediate Systemic Practice with Families and Couples PgCert and:

• Study professional contexts and the way in which they relate to work with clients, learn about ways of working which meet the needs of disadvantaged client groups, and investigate the legislative frameworks practitioners have to work with
• Explore issues of difference and the promotion and development of anti-oppressive practice which are central to the course’s philosophy and permeate all aspects of your learning
• Develop your familiarity with and confidence in employing approaches that are encompassed by systems theory
• Gain a wide range of critical skills through reading, discussion, student presentations and reviews of current research
• Benefit from a critical approach to theory and practice in the light of inequalities and your clients’ differences in relation to race, class and gender.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/intermediate-systemic-practice-with-families-and-couples

Course detail

This course equips participants with a systemic approach to working with individuals, couples and families at intermediate level. About one third of our students finish at this level and add the skills to their professional practice, as a systemic practitioner. About two thirds of our students continue to the MSc in Systemic Psychotherapy.

The inclusion of a wide range of systemic approaches has been considered an important characteristic of our courses across the two courses and the four years of the training. It is part of the philosophy of the course to encourage a critical approach to theory and practice in the light of inequalities and differences of race, class and gender, and to encourage an anti-oppressive approach to working with clients. Developing self-reflexivity, the awareness and utilisation of the person of the practitioner in action, is also a core aspect of the course.

Modules

• Intermediate Systemic Skills With Families And Couples (ASS049-6) Compulsory
• Intermediate Systemic Theory With Families And Couples (ASS048-6) Compulsory

Assessment

The course is composed of graded and pass/fail elements of assessment. The pass/fail assessments do not contribute towards your overall mark, but must be completed to a pass standard. There are two pass/fail elements: your log of 60 hours of systemic practice, and your reflective journal which charts your journey through the course.

Careers

On successful completion of the course you can use the title `Systemic Practitioner. This is a title recognised by the Association of Family Therapy and Systemic Practice and is highly regarded by employers in social care, education and the voluntary sector.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Why study this course. London Met’s Assessment Only (AO) route to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) provides you with a unique opportunity to gain a QTS qualification. Read more

Why study this course

London Met’s Assessment Only (AO) route to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) provides you with a unique opportunity to gain a QTS qualification. It's designed for those who are working in a school as an unqualified teacher. Successfully pass both assessment phases and you'll be recommended to the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) for QTS accreditation.

More about this course

The QTS assessment-only pathway is primarily for practitioners who are teaching in schools or children’s centres but who do not have Qualified Teacher Status. The pathway does not provide any training, so applicants must have several years’ experience in at least two schools and be employed in a school or children’s centre that is willing to support the process of assessment.

Assessment for the course is divided into two phases as follows:

Pre-assessment phase (A):

-Pass the NCTL Professional Skills tests in literacy and numeracy

-Prepare an audit of your teaching experience against the Teaching Standards (2012)

Assessment phase (B):

-Evidence portfolio demonstrating achieving the teaching standards across two key stages

Modular structure

As this is an assessment only route to QTS, there are no specific modules. Please refer to the Assessment section for information on how you will progress to your QTS accreditation.

We can only offer this route to achieve QTS in subjects where we already offer PGCE or PGCE by School Direct.

Assessment

Assessment for this course is divided into the pre-assessment phase and the formal assessment phase.

To complete the pre-assessment, you must pass the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) professional skills tests in literacy and numeracy, and prepare an audit of your teaching experience against the Teaching Standards (2012). You’ll then attend a tutorial to fully evaluate your experience and identify areas for development during the formal assessment phase. Please note that you’ll only proceed to the formal assessment phase if the tutor considers that you can achieve the standards for QTS within the available time frame.

The formal assessment phase will then take place over two consecutive half term periods, either from October to February or from February to June, depending on when you start the course. To pass the formal assessment phase, you must present portfolio evidence that demonstrates you've achieved the teaching standards across two key stages. Your University mentor will make three visits to your school placement during the assessment phase and will be responsible for training and ensuring that the Teaching Standards are being correctly assessed.

At the end of this phase, your mentor will complete a final assessment and you will present a portfolio of evidence that demonstrates that you have consistently met the teaching standards across two key stages. Your University tutor will then consider the evidence and, if you’re successful, recommend you to the NCTL for the award of QTS.

Professional accreditation

On successful completion of the assessment phase the university will recommend the applicant to the National College for Teaching and Leadership for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).



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Join us on this course and you will develop your systemic knowledge and skills, and increase the effectiveness of your direct work with children and families with children. Read more
Join us on this course and you will develop your systemic knowledge and skills, and increase the effectiveness of your direct work with children and families with children.

Designed as an intermediate year of training for systemic psychotherapy and end-stage training as a systemic practitioner, it is built on the theoretical and practice frameworks established in the foundation year.

It aims to deepen your confidence in employing different approaches encompassed by systems theory, and will encourage you to incorporate reflexive thinking in your work.

This course is delivered in partnership with the Institute of Family Therapy in London.

Choose Intermediate Child Focused Systemic Practice PgCert and:

• Study the application of systemic ideas and learn how they can help you understand the developmental stages of children
• Explore the five major models of systemic practice, including the philosophical underpinnings, main theorists, main theoretical principles, model of change and role of the practitioner with particular reference to work with families with minor aged children and their networks
• Develop your ability to apply systemic practice skills to a number of different client groups and across a range of practice contexts
• Gain the ability to work within the ethical and legal frameworks that are relevant to multiple practice contexts and the particular requirements of organisations
• Benefit from an enhanced ability to use relevant evidence-based research to make assessments, formulate interventions and review the effectiveness of your direct work.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/intermediate-child-focused-systemic-practice#about

Course detail

The course is designed to help professionals to develop and deepen systemic knowledge and skills in order to increase the effectiveness of direct work with individual children and families with minor children across a broad range of contexts. The course is both an intermediate year of training for systemic psychotherapy and end stage training as a systemic practitioner. It is built on the theoretical and practice frameworks established in the foundation year of training. It seeks to deepen students familiarity with and confidence in employing a number of approaches encompassed by systems theory.

The course is suitable for professionals who wish to increase their capacity to work directly with families with young children. This includes nurses, social workers, teachers, counsellors, other health professionals and those in front line services who wish to utilise a systemic approach with clients.

The course stresses the importance of understanding professional contexts and the way in which they relate to work with families with children. Particular emphasis is placed on thinking about ways of working which meet the needs of the most disadvantaged client groups and which take account of the legislative frameworks within which most practitioners will have to work. Attention to issues of difference and the promotion and development of anti-oppressive practice are central to the course philosophy and permeate all aspects of the teaching.

In addition the course focuses on the development of the therapeutic relationship and the use of self in direct work with individuals and families.

Modules

• Intermediate Systemic Child Focused Practice (ASS047-6) Compulsory

Assessment

The course is composed of graded and pass/fail elements of assessment. The pass/fail assessments do not contribute towards your overall mark, but must be completed to a pass standard. There are two pass/fail elements: your log of 60 hours of systemic practice, and your reflective journal which charts your journey through the course.

Careers

On completing the course students are likely to have access to posts that require therapeutic skills in working with families with minor children. One example is in the Health and Social Care fields following the Munro Report on Child Protection which promotes systemic ideas as essential skills for front line workers. This course provides Intermediate training in systemic ideas that are applicable to social care, health, education and other contexts. On successful completion of this course students may describe themselves as systemic practitioners, an end target in itself, and also an intermediate stage in the full systemic psychotherapist training.

Some students enter the course to enhance their current practice with families with minor children or their carers without changing their work context. One example are counsellors who have originally trained to work with individuals and who use this foundation training to move towards working with families in the voluntary sector or as a stepping stone to further training.

For those in the statutory sector, many use the course to expand their practice and to develop routes to promotion into social care, management or supervision.

Students are encouraged to apply all of the learning to their work context which will enhance their career management skills. The course develops a range of practice skills which the student transfers directly into the work place; these include direct work and consultation skills.

On successful completion of the course you can use the title `Systemic Practitioner. This is a title recognised by the Association of Family Therapy and Systemic Practice and is highly regarded by employers in social care, education and the voluntary sector.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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This MRes Criminology offers a specialism in social statistics with a focus on developing advanced quantitative data analysis skills. Read more

This MRes Criminology offers a specialism in social statistics with a focus on developing advanced quantitative data analysis skills. It will provide you with a thorough grounding in research methods, as well as the tools to collect and analyse advanced quantitative statistical data, with a focus on criminological research, theory, policy and practice.

Combining criminology and social statistics teaching from research-active staff in the School of Law and the School of Social Sciences, this course will encourage you to critically examine the theoretical foundations that underpin applied criminological and sociological research and give you an advanced understanding of social statistics.

You will develop a critical understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods and their application as well as specialist knowledge of the issues within contemporary criminological and criminal justice debates.

The dissertation component of this course will focus on in-depth quantitative data analyses in an area of your interest, under the interdisciplinary supervision of two academic experts, one from criminology and one from social statistics.

Aims

 Aims of the course:

  • Meet national and regional demands for new research and policy oriented competencies in criminology or socio-legal studies with focus on advanced quantitative data analysis.
  • Contribute to the national need for skilled social science researchers in criminological, socio-legal and related matters.
  • Ensure the necessary grounding both to understand and to contribute to future development of quantitative methods in these research areas.
  • Provide advanced, systematic and critical knowledge of research methods and theoretical arguments in criminology or socio-legal studies which are at the forefront of the subject area in the context of a vibrant research context.
  • Offer a course integrating a grounding in research methodology with understanding of the implications for policy.
  • Offer students the opportunity for developing their understanding of the key theoretical and epistemological debates within the subject area and to assist them to engage in theoretical debates at an advanced postgraduate level.
  • Provide a formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training for students in research methodology and transferable employment related skills.
  • Prepare students for PhD level research careers in academic life or as professionals in government and voluntary agencies.
  • Train students to appreciate the relationship between research on the one hand and the implementation and operation of policy and practice in the implementation of justice.
  • Provide graduates with the tools for further research/study in criminology and/or socio-legal studies.

Special features

This acclaimed course has ESRC recognition as a Foundation Course for Research Training and is an essential step if you wish to progress onto doctoral studies or pursue a career in research in the public or voluntary sectors.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Course unit details

To meet the requirements of the taught element of the course, all students must take course units totalling 120 credits. This is normally attained with eight 15-credit course units, as listed below, with 60 credits taken each semester. Students take 6 core units. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year). Information that is sent to students in the month of August preceding registration onto the course will clearly state the course units that are available in the academic year ahead.

In addition, students who pass the taught element of the course and who are permitted to progress to the research element of the course must also submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words worth 60 credits.

Part-time students take three out of the six compulsory course units in the first year, and then take the other three in year two. The remaining 60 credits of optional course units are selected and taken accordingly over the two years. 

Dissertation

  • Dissertation of 12-15,000 words during summer, supported by two area supervisors.
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra three months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MRes can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This degree is designed to ensure highly numerate, research-oriented and employable graduates, and will provide you with the skills necessary for roles within criminal justice, academia, government departments, research institutes and commercial research.



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This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector. Read more
This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector.

The course was developed by the University's School of Business School in collaboration with the London Housing Foundation (LHF), who are sponsoring the course. LHF may consider sponsoring applicants from relevant areas of the public sector as well as the third/voluntary sector.

The course is primarily designed for appropriately experience and qualified staff in the homelessness and allied sectors. The course also enables you to make a study visit to a similar sector in another country through the support of the London Housing Foundation.

The course will run throughout 2017 on a part-time basis. There'll be an initial residential from Tuesday 24 to Thursday 26 January followed by a combination of weekly attendance (9 weeks) each Thursday afternoon and three two-day blocks (Thursdays and Fridays) during each Semester.

Modules

• Leadership and Management (20 Credits)

This module covers different concepts of leadership and management focusing on what might be considered the more appropriate styles in the homelessness and housing context. There'll be opportunities to evaluate your own individual and organisational competences and for skill development using in-depth reflections.

Assessment
100% coursework but with two elements as follows:

Element 1 (40% weighting) – two examples of high level reflections of your leadership or managerial performance
Element 2 (60% weighting) – an individual written assignment applying relevant theoretical concepts to your organisation.

• Introduction to Accounting (10 credits)

This module provides you with a knowledge of basic concepts and practices in accounting, an understanding of accounting requirements in third sector organisations and an appreciation of good practice in financial reporting.

Assessment
100% coursework based on a case study.

• Third Sector Organisational Development (20 Credits)

This module explores theories, techniques and knowledge in the area of Organisational Behaviour and People Management relevant to homelessness and housing organisations.

Assessment
100% Coursework but with two elements:

Element 1: (80% weighting) assignment based in students’ own organisation
Element 2: (20% weighting) individual presentation on recommendations from element 1.

• Governance (10 Credits)

This module enables managers, of third sector and other civil society organisations, to reflect on and understand the role of governance in ensuring accountability within their organisations.

Assessment
100% coursework: individual presentation on a governance scenario using digital story book.

The weighted pass mark across the modules 50%. Where there are multiple assessments, a 40% minimum pass on each element is a necessary condition of an overall pass. It's necessary to pass all the modules to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

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Our CIM-accredited Marketing MSc develops your understanding of marketing from a strategic perspective, with specialisms available in Digital Marketing, Branding and Communications, Social Marketing and International Marketing. Read more

Our CIM-accredited Marketing MSc develops your understanding of marketing from a strategic perspective, with specialisms available in Digital Marketing, Branding and Communications, Social Marketing and International Marketing.

Using a mix of lectures, practical experience from live client projects and case studies our course will prepare you for a career in marketing. You will learn about both the theory and practice of marketing at an advanced level, and cover topics such as research methodologies, marketing planning and strategy. 

At the end of the first term, you will also have the option to specialise in one of four areas:

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM), the world’s leading professional marketing body, this course progresses you towards Chartered Marketer status through exemptions from examinations of the institute.  

Course structure

The course is organised into three-hour blocks of teaching and seminar activities, which are based on specialist reading, research and case studies. Modules are assessed through essays, reports, group work, presentations and examinations.

In the final phase of the course, you will complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a marketing topic of your choice, which will require you to make recommendations for real-life marketing practice. Throughout your dissertation, you will receive support from a supervisor who will help to guide you in your research.

Syllabus

All students will study six core modules including a masters transition module and a dissertation. Optional modules will allow you to specialise in the areas of marketing that interest you most.

Modules

  • Moving to Masters
  • Critical Developments in Marketing Theory and Practice
  • Marketing Planning and Strategy 
  • Marketing Research I: quantitative methods
  • Marketing Research II: qualitative methods
  • Dissertation

Two from:

  • International Marketing 
  • Branding and Communications 
  • Social Marketing 
  • Behavioural Economics 
  • Digital Marketing 
  • New Product Development

Chartered Institute of Marketing

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM), the world's largest organisation for professional marketers. The CIM have awarded the course Multiple Award Pathway status, which means that you will have a number of exemptions from CIM qualifications.

CIM qualifications are highly sought after by employers and – alongside our Marketing MSc – will ensure that you are equipped with the best education for a successful marketing career.

CIM membership 

You will be entitled to free CIM affiliate-level membership, giving you access to a range of benefits and services. CIM membership is a clear demonstration of your commitment to ongoing professional development.

Membership benefits include:

  • The Marketer – the members' magazine
  • Studying Member e-news
  • Learning Zone website – study resources
  • Marketing library and online archive resources

You will also be able to take modules from your course that will help you gain the following CIM qualifications:

CIM Certificate in Professional Marketing

To obtain this certificate you will need to pass the CIM’s Integrated Communications module and one option module. You will be exempt from the CIM’s Marketing module.

CIM Diploma in Professional Marketing

To obtain the diploma you will need to pass the CIM’s Marketing Metrics module and one option module. *

CAM Diploma in Digital Marketing

To obtain the diploma you will need to take the Branding and Marketing Communications module and pass the CIM’s Digital Marketing Essentials module and one option module. You will be exempt from the Marketing and Consumer Behaviour module.

Teaching excellence

Most of our tutors worked in industry before joining the university and continue to consult for corporate firms, which allows them to integrate the latest commercial developments into our courses. They are also active researchers at the forefront of marketing theory.

Industry representatives advise on the content and development of our courses and contribute to teaching as guest lecturers. Their talks help to bring classroom theory to life by sharing real-world case studies, results and pitfalls.

You will learn transferable skills in research, presentations, group work and conflict resolution, all of which are highly sought after in today's highly competitive job market.

Class sizes are small enough for there to be a personal and friendly atmosphere where staff know students by name and can closely monitor their progress.

Careers and employability

A Marketing MSc from Brighton Business School will help you to specialise and stand out in today's competitive job market. It will equip you with both the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for a successful career.

The course has been designed for people wanting a successful and rewarding career in sectors including advertising, branding, communications, digital marketing, direct marketing, event management, public relations and sales.

The course is also ideal preparation for continuing your study at MPhil or PhD level or working as a professional researcher in marketing.

Previous graduates have started successful careers with the following companies:

  • Product Manager for Astra Zeneca, Milan
  • Brand manager for Campari, Switzerland
  • Account Executive for Blaze Communications, UK
  • Marketing Manager for Mitchells and Butlers, UK
  • Marketing Manager for Cartier, Taiwan
  • Brand Manager for L'Oreal, Greece.

By the time you graduate, you will be equipped with the skills to think and act independently, and to arrive at considered judgements and decisions in co-operation with others. You will be able to interpret information, data and ideas to produce creative solutions to problems and identify market opportunities.



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The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is designed to prepare students for leadership in scientific and management roles in Public Health. Read more
The Master of Public Health (MPH) programme is designed to prepare students for leadership in scientific and management roles in Public Health. It attracts students from clinical and health related disciplines from all over the world.

Why study Public Health at Dundee?

This course provides high quality training in the application of epidemiological, statistical and behavioural techniques used in public health practice and research.

You will have the opportunity to improve generic and transferable skills and will be ideally placed to pursue a career in research or public health practice. The MPH also provides an ideal springboard for further postgraduate study at PhD level.

What's so good about studying Public Health at Dundee?

"My experience with the MPH course was positive in every respect. From the quality of the teaching to the academic support by members of the department, it was a highly rewarding experience. I would strongly recommend the MPH course at the University of Dundee"
Dr Thaofiq Olatunde Ijaiya (MPH, 2007)

"The MPH provides an invaluable experience of being taught by inspiring academics with excellent research experience in the field"
Tony Barr, Programme Manager - Nursing (MPH, 1996)

"The design and execution of the MPH programme was very good. However, I was most fulfilled during the research dissertation stage. It was a wonderful experience and I am prepared for the future research challenges."
Dr Ekwem Divine (MPH, 2010)

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught predominantly by staff from the School of Medicine and guest lecturers from further afield.

The full time MPH course lasts for one year. The taught component takes nine months and is followed by research leading to a dissertation. All students initially enrol on a diploma programme (DipPubH) which includes the taught component only. To progress to the Masters programme and undertake the Masters dissertation students must obtain an overall pass of 60% in the taught component. Both programmes may be undertaken on a part-time basis.

This course has one start date - September

How you will be taught

The course is focussed on the academic needs of its students but also provides emotional and pastoral care as required. The inclusion of optional modules creates flexibility, which allows students to tailor the MPH to their specific requirements.

A variety of teaching and assessment methods are used to give students the best possible learning opportunity
Students are given formative assessment on all assignments

Students have a spacious teaching room with networked computers at their disposal

Lecturers operate an open door policy and students are encouraged to seek advice/help at any time

Students are given the opportunity to choose a dissertation topic which reflects their interest, then advised on the most appropriate supervisor

The rich research environment within the Division gives students the opportunity to work on a range of topics

The Division has weekly research seminars during term time, to which students are invited to attend
What you will study

The programme consists of the following modules

Core:
Public Health
Epidemiology
Introduction to Clinical Statistics
Research Methods
Behavioural & Social Science
Applied Epidemiology
Statistics for Clinical Trials
Applied Statistics with Routine Health Datasets
Introduction to Systematic Reviews
Data Visualization
Spatial Epidemiology

Optional:
Students studying for a Master of Public Health then undertake research and write a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The student's performance is monitored by continuous assessment throughout the programme. Written and oral examinations are held in December, March and May. Examinations are graded passes (A to D) or fail.

Students must obtain grade D or above in all written and oral examinations in order to be awarded the Diploma.

To be eligible to progress from the Diploma onto the Masters, students must pass the examination of each subject and achieve a minimum overall pass at B or above (60%).

Careers

The MPH prepares students for research and management careers in public health and also a variety of medical and health related disciplines.

Previous students graduating with the MPH from Dundee have taken up management positions in public health practice, nursing, professions allied to medicine, education, government, WHO and NGOs; and research positions within academic public health, general practice, acute medicine, nursing, professions allied to medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry and environmental health.

The MPH also provides an ideal springboard for further postgraduate study at PhD and MD level.

"I had a wonderful time during my stay at Dundee. Scotland as a whole and Dundee in particular have very friendly and hospitable people. This course is a well-balanced general MPH course. It will provide the prospective students with a good foundation and skill set to advance their career in research, management or academics.
Syed Asif Shah, MD. MPH. MBA. FACC. FACP, Assistant professor of Cardiology (MPH 1990)

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The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation. Read more

The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation.

This innovative, interdisciplinary course is taught by experts from sociological, legal and psychological backgrounds with real-world experience. You will benefit from research-led teaching as well as strong links to wider criminal justice professions and industry.

Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

Aims of the course:

  • Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
  • Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
  • Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
  • Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
  • Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.
  • Develop criminological knowledge and research skills for the writing of a Masters-level dissertation.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:

  • demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control;
  • demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas;
  • developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy;
  • recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies;
  • understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies;
  • demonstrated a critical awareness of research issues and methodologies related to the fields of criminology and/or criminal justice, combined with a knowledge of corresponding skills in undertaking a piece of research commensurate with Masters'-level study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of a dissertation.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year).

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you must write a 12,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. Your dissertation must be within the area of one of the units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MA can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.



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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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