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Masters Degrees (Participatory Arts)

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Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Read more

Course Overview

Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Develop both advanced theoretical knowledge and practices of working in participatory settings. Earn a highly relevant Masters qualification.

This course is led by staff who are experienced in working within innovative and prestigious projects in participatory settings themselves, such as The Arts Council funded - The Cultural Spring. Academics also have links to a range of organisations who manage and organise such events.

You’ll engage with practical projects through large and small arts organisations and directly with communities, schools and other groups. The programme also aims to encourage an holistic approach to arts practice and provide a learning structure which will facilitate dialogue, collaborative working and peer support.

Course Content

Modules on this course include:

Certificate stage
Introduction to Working in Participatory Settings (30 credits)
Participatory Arts in Practice (30 credits)

Diploma stage
At Diploma stage, you will explore research methods that are specifically relevant to participatory practice an will also undertake and evaluate a live project reflecting you area(s) of interest.
Research and Praxis (30 credits)
Participatory Arts Live Project (30 credits)

Masters stage
At Masters stage, you can choose a practical dissertation/live project or a written dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and assessment

You’ll experience a range of teaching methods including online learning, peer learning, student-led seminars, workshops, small group work, individual and collaborative project work, supervised independent learning and tutorials.

You’ll also be encouraged to develop your own theoretical and methodological perspectives to inform your future educational, professional and personal practices. The programme provides a learning and teaching framework within which the growth of subject-specific knowledge, analytic abilities, teamwork, time and organisational management, production, presentation and practice-oriented competencies can be developed and assessed.

Facilities & location

Teaching for this course is based at our state-of-the-art David Puttnam Media Centre. The award-winning facilities available include a 200 seater cinema, radio and TV studios, which also hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies. You will have access to the array of arts and media facilities across the institution.

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles.

Students are helped to develop their research skills working with lecturers and library staff to develop their awareness of art history as well as contemporary art and design and the wider contexts of the subjects.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:

- Art Full Text + Art Abstracts: A major resource for media and arts information
- Design and Applied Arts Index: Covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
- British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC): Provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
- JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’): Provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
- Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive

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Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. Read more

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, this MA offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. In short, it is at the heart of what Goldsmiths is all about.

This MA, launched in 2015, is the third of three related pathways. The first, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, was started in 1992 and is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification.

A second pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development, was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an NYA qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development.

This third pathway has been created in response to a growing number of applicants with an arts background and arts interests, and is aimed at students who wish to work in community arts. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development and community arts, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork are attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment. We also encourage you to audit courses run by the Art, Music and Cultural Studies departments, and in general to make the most of all the wonderful political and arts events organised by Goldsmiths staff and students every week.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, normally in community arts settings, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations.

The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork 1: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours)

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community arts. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community arts are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community arts practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in community arts practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 140 hours plus 20 hours observations) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community arts and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector. Read more
Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector.

It may be a suitable programme if your employer is looking to support relevant training and development opportunities for their staff.

The course aims to equip students with the necessary skills to initiate and manage truly inclusive arts projects with diverse and marginalised groups, for example those with learning difficulties or experiencing social exclusion due to economic or health reasons.

You can choose to study for either a full MA award or a PGCert. There are opportunities to work in diverse settings from schools, galleries, artist studios and design studios to day centres, photographic studios and FE colleges.

Past students have worked with a range of individuals and participant groups including people with learning disabilities, children, young people, elders, those experiencing homelessness, asylum seekers and youth offending teams. They have contributed both locally and to international projects in countries including Romania and Ukraine.

We value and encourage work across a range of art forms, including visual art, design, illustration, performance, film and photography.

Why study with us?

• Truly unique course that enables you to apply your passion for art in a positive community setting
• Focus on practical, vocational work that puts you in direct contact with marginalised groups, as you explore key issues in the inclusive arts debate
• Dedicated professional development module that gives you transferable skills in budget management, health and safety, partnership development and marketing
• Impressive employment rate, with graduates finding work as inclusive arts practitioners with various charities and trusts
• Support from specialist arts practitioners and professionals for collaborative working with diverse groups
• Guest speakers from the arts, health and voluntary sectors

Areas of study

Studies are based around a core of experiential work-related learning, integrated with theory. The course is designed to support participants' development and creativity as art practitioners within the contexts of inclusion, learning disability and marginalised community groups. Students work alongside diverse groups of people in a workshop setting, sharing experiences as partners in the process of learning.

Modules:

Working Together: Introducing Practical Collaboration
Participatory Practice and Creative Exchange: Inclusive Approaches to Collaboration
Research in Progress
Practice as Research
Looking Ahead: Continuing Professional Development
Option

Assessment takes place through presentations, seminar discussions, practical work and workbooks. The final research project is assessed through an exhibition rather than a dissertation.

Please visit the website to find out more about the syllabus:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/inclusive-arts-practice-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

On completion of the course, students are ideally placed to seek employment in a range of art, disability, community, health and education settings. Recent graduates have gone on to work for various organisations including Project Art Works, The Royal Academy and Kings College Hospital Trust as inclusive arts practitioners and workshop facilitators.

The course would also make a significant contribution to an artist's independent studio practice. Recent alumni have exhibited work at various locations including Phoenix Arts, Brighton Dome and Pallant House. Others have founded organisations such as Red Octopus Sensory Theatre and contributed to a wide range of projects and events .

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The PG Certificate in Dementia Studies (Arts and Activities) is a one year part-time distance learning programme that will explore potential for the creative arts, participatory approaches and novel forms of self-expression to enhance well-being and social participation for people with dementia. Read more
The PG Certificate in Dementia Studies (Arts and Activities) is a one year part-time distance learning programme that will explore potential for the creative arts, participatory approaches and novel forms of self-expression to enhance well-being and social participation for people with dementia.

This programme will enable you to develop your skills in designing, delivering and evaluating activities and will enhance your opportunities for gaining employment in this field or attracting funding for your projects. This course is intended for UK and international students who are:
-Arts practitioners, activity coordinators and others with an interest in developing and delivering creative activities with people who have dementia
-Volunteers who have contact with people with dementia

Why Bradford?

All teaching on the programme is research-informed and delivered by an academic team who are actively involved in relevant fields of dementia research. Members of the course team have completed research projects and studies using film, music, photography, narrative, conversation analysis and other participatory methods to enhance understanding of the experience of dementia.
Our distance-learning educational courses in Dementia are designed to be directly applicable to the workplace and to equip students with the skills to implement service delivery improvements.

Our focus is on developing person-centred dementia care in practice, to drive real world change. The programmes are designed for practitioners working in all areas and roles within health and social care, through offering choice in assignment topics meaning work can be tailored to each student's individual interests and role.

As our courses use distance and online learning methods, we enable practitioners and professionals to develop their knowledge in a flexible manner which supports study alongside work and family commitments.

We use the latest in e-learning technology to support students to be in regular contact with tutors and peers to facilitate communities of learning.

The University of Bradford has been providing accredited programmes in Dementia Studies since 2002, and has a long history of cutting-edge research related to person-centred dementia care and innovative methodologies for researching and developing practice in health and social care for people with dementia.

All teaching on the programme is research-informed and delivered by an academic team who are actively involved in relevant fields of dementia research. Members of the course team have completed research projects and studies using film, music, photography, narrative, conversation analysis and other participatory methods to enhance understanding of the experience of dementia.

For each module you are provided with a module study guide produced by the course team. It contains exercises, activities and links to audio and visual materials. To enhance the learning experience you are asked to contribute to on-line discussion groups and take part in real time tutorials.

Rankings

Ranked 6th in the UK for Nursing and Midwifery in the Guardian University League Tables 2017.

Modules

Arts and activities in Dementia Care
Understanding the Experiences of People with Dementia

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create. Read more

This MA addresses the historical, political, theoretical and ethical issues of applied theatre and develops your ability to contextualise, critique and create.

Our aim is to prepare students to be collaborative, responsive, imaginative, politically engaged and culturally aware artist practitioners. The course is aimed at newly-emerging practitioners with a background in theatre, education, activism or social change, as well as at more established practitioners who want to reflect, refresh and develop their skills. We actively encourage the sharing of skills and expertise among our multi-national group of students. We prioritise applicants with some experience in the arts, education, activism or social care, and it is rare that we take applicants directly from their first degree.

Together we explore the ways in which theatre and performance is created by diverse groups of people in a variety of community, social and educational settings: in schools or on the streets, in children’s homes and elderly care, in conflict zones, conferences, crèches and youth clubs, pupil referral units and prisons, women’s refuges and refugee centres, hospitals and hostels – anywhere groups of people meet and interact.

What is applied theatre?

Applied theatre is an umbrella term for a range of exciting worldwide performance forms concerned with personal and social change.

The term embracestheatre of the oppressed, community theatre, theatre-in-education, drama in education, theatre for development, prison theatre, intercultural arts, intergenerational arts, theatre in museums, archives and heritage sites, story-telling, reminiscence theatre, conflict resolution. The work often moves across art forms. This is not a definitive list, as it is a field that is dynamic and changing.

The MA considers case studies from the UK and from across the globe. Central to this investigation are: questions of identity; representation; discrimination; health; equality; human rights; opportunity; access; social inclusion/exclusion; participation; ethics; evaluation and documentation; aesthetics and the role of the artist.

Placement and partnerships

The course is structured so that practice and theory constantly respond to one another, through practical classes and seminars. All students undertake a placement in a recognised host organisation where you'll work with experienced practitioners, and learn from the inside how participatory arts organisations function.

We have active partnerships with many companies, and the majority of the tutors, including the convenor, are active artists, with a variety of arts practices in performance, community and social settings.

Modules & structure

Practical workshops

In the autumn term we look at the roots of Applied Theatre in Education, in Social and Political Change, and in Community. Classes include work with Geese Theatre on their use of mask in Prisons, Drama and Theatre in Education techniques with Gail Babb of Talawa Theatre, intergenerational arts practices with Convenor Sue Mayo, and the use of Drama to explore Domestic Violence, with Tender. Throughout this term students are also engaged in skills-sharing sessions in order to pool their knowledge and expertise. 

In the Spring Term Tutor Raj Bhari, from Talk for Change, leads a module on creative approaches to Community Cohesion, Conflict Resolution, and the artist as activist. We have a short festival of art forms, with classes in song, puppetry and dance- and a residency shared with students of the MA in performance making, working across modules with artists of distinction from within the Goldsmith’s staff and beyond.

Throughout the practical sessions we work with students to develop their facilitation, devising,- project planning and management skills with attention to issues such as group dynamics; power and leadership; inclusion; accessibility; equality; conflict; intercultural practice; safe space and the ethics of touch.

In the summer term students design and lead a weekend of workshops for a public audience.

Histories, Theories and Contexts seminars

This contextual strand enables us consider the thinking behind our embodied knowledge. Through a series of seminars, we consider: the development of applied methods from political theatre; radical and celebratory arts; drama and theatre-in-education; community theatre; prison theatre; therapeutic creative practices and the legacy of Augusto Boal. We study the growing body of writing on applied theatre and its practitioners, and theatre theory. We consider local and international case studies; we read, discuss, watch videos and experience live performances.

Complementary Contextual lectures

Students also choose a lecture based Option module from one of the other exciting MA programmes. Previous modules have included, African Theatre, Performance Praxis, Radical Performance, and The Reflecxtive Practitioner. Our students can also take a specialist applied module led by Danny Braverman, on Disability Theatre, examining the scope and radical nature of disability theatre.

Placement

The Convenor, Sue Mayo, supports students to locate and develop a placement in a recognised host organisation. On the placement students further the skills they have practiced on the programme, whilst dealing with the challenges of a professional context. Placement hosts include London Bubble, Magic Me, Resonate. Greenwich & Lewisham Young People's Theatre, Talawa Theatre, Pan-arts, Crisis, Ovalhouse, Green Shoes Arts, The Young Vic, MIND, CEN8, Lewisham Youth Theatre and Spare Tyre.

Professional development

As part of our commitment to student’s employability, we offer up to five workshops covering various areas directly relevant to workplaces where drama may be applied; for example: planning and managing projects, child protection and working with vulnerable adults, ethics, evaluation, setting up a theatre company or working as an independent artist.

Assessment

The MA Applied Theatre has five points of assessment:

  • a 6,000-word essay based on material covered in Term 1
  • a 6,000-word reflective portfolio on the placement
  • a 12,000-word research project/dissertation

These assessments count towards 80% of the final mark.

The remaining 20% is derived from assessment of the two shared complementary/contextual modules, which include Disability Theatre, Performance Praxis, African Theatre, Musical Theatre and Cultural Theory.



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Get your music-related business off the ground with our ‘JAMES’ accredited Masters programme and make the most of our industry connections with major and independent record labels. Read more
Get your music-related business off the ground with our ‘JAMES’ accredited Masters programme and make the most of our industry connections with major and independent record labels.

About the programme

The rise of the ‘new artist model’ - placing emphasis on commercial autonomy by artists and practitioners within the music sector – has created the need for the development of a new music business skillset which this programme addresses. It develops business models within the music industry and uses music as a core asset in developing businesses across all the creative industries and beyond.

Taught at Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts, the programme covers the creative economy, entrepreneurship, and social media, and involves weekly contributions from a variety of expert practitioners.

You will have access to networks that will provide you with creative, intellectual and business connections. This culminates with the presentation of your business idea to potential investors, where previous funding has secured £2,000 – £30,000.

Practical experience

You will receive credit for work-related learning during the Innovative Enterprise module.

Your learning

The programme has three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Global Music Industries: Creative Economy
• Innovation & Creativity
• Research Development: Methods & Practice

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Entrepreneurship
• Social Media: Manipulation & Impact

Options (students choose one module):
• Identity, Opportunity & Exploitation (SCQF 10)
• Music, Film & Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Professional Music Practice (SCQF 10)

- MA (180 credits):
Innovative Enterprise: Music Project (60 credits at SCQF 11) – this is a live business proposition within the current music business environment, supported by academic and industry mentors.

Our Careers Adviser says

This programme is endorsed by practitioners at the highest levels of the creative industries who recognise that it produces individuals with the skillset to make a successful living from the 21st century music industry. A business that was ‘incubated’ within the MA received start-up funding of £40,000, with others receiving smaller amounts of seed funding.

Professional accreditation

This programme is accredited by JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Support).

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. Read more
Delivered by expert practitioners and aimed at graduates from various disciplines and industry professionals wishing to broaden their skills across film, digital, media, photography, writing and performance. This programme equips you for a creative media career, offering network contacts, an impressive portfolio and essential practical skills.

About the programme

This unique programme will help you explore and consolidate your creative identity, working with others from diverse creative backgrounds to nurture your creative potential and create new opportunities to help sustain your career.

Informed by research excellence and expert professional practice, the programme will bring out your creative potential, while providing the critical focus essential to respond flexibly to new opportunities and sustain your career.

Practical experience

The Pg Diploma and Masters programmes offer work-related learning through the module Creative Skills 2, either as a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project.

Your learning

There are three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Creative Skills 1 – introducing new creative skill areas in short creative projects

• Critical Media Contexts – an essential overview of contemporary critical debate

• Creative Media Practice – intensive CPD workshops with reflective analysis

Students choose one option including:
• Motion Graphics (SCQF 10)
• Producing for Film & Television (SCQF 10)
• Producing Factual Formats (SCQF 10)
• Writing the One Act Play (SCQF 10)
• Music Film and Sound Aesthetics (SCQF 10)
• Podcasting and New Media (SCQF 10)

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
• Creative Skills 2 – a placement in the screen and broadcast industries and/or work on a professional project

• Collaborative Project – a previous venture won the 2013 BAFTA New Talent Award

• Research: Critical Development – introduction to research methods associated with creative practice and preparation of a creative research proposal

- MA (180 credits):
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. production of a feature screenplay, a documentary or digital media project. Previous successful Masters creative projects include an e-publishing project for fairy stories which was subsequently funded by Creative Scotland.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates have found roles such as independent producer; scriptwriter; TV development producer; documentary maker; and digital media producer/ developer. For graduates of design for the moving image, careers include artist filmmaker and motion graphics designer.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Learn from industry professionals on Scotland’s only songwriting Masters programme. Ideal for graduates from a range of music/ performance disciplines and professional writers/performers, there is a strong focus on live projects to develop your professional career alongside your studies. Read more
Learn from industry professionals on Scotland’s only songwriting Masters programme. Ideal for graduates from a range of music/ performance disciplines and professional writers/performers, there is a strong focus on live projects to develop your professional career alongside your studies.

About the programme

The programme provides an exciting, transformative creative environment for the development of songwriting skills. Explore your creative identity through a series of structured collaborative projects interwoven with individual music briefs, with feedback from renowned industry practitioners. The programme provides a broad range of demanding content, strongly reflective of the creative industries but with an academic focus, to offer opportunities to conduct research and analysis, undertake critical reflection, and develop a major creative project.

Our Ayr Campus features state-of-the-art recording/television studios and performance spaces suitable for the development and completion of course work.

Practical experience

The modules and assessments are built on professional models. The Songwriting Workshop includes a five day co-writing residency, and a short work placement to develop and run a small-scale project within the community. The Creative Skills 2 module requires the completion of a professional project (e.g. record release). The Collaborative Project is an interdisciplinary module culminating in a music performance.

Your learning

Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits)
Awarded on successful completion of:
• Songwriting Workshop (40 credits)
• Analysing Songwriting (20 credits)

Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits)
Core modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted) include:
• Songwriting Workshop (40 credits)
• Analysing Songwriting
• Collaborative Project
• Creative Skills 2 (NB you may opt for the Music Film and Sound Aesthetics module instead with the consent of the Programme Leader)
• Research: Critical Development

Masters Creative Project (60 credits)
A substantial practice-led research project, e.g. recording an album, the creation of a performance or series of performances with written contextualisation.

Our Careers Adviser says

UWS graduates enjoy recording and touring careers, writing and producing for other artists, developing and managing large-scale research/ knowledge exchange projects and teaching/supervising at school, undergraduate and MA level. Graduates are accomplished, reflective arts practitioners with a set of excellent creative tools and the ability to thrive autonomously in a range of professions.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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This unique vocational programme is for anyone wanting to work as a dance practitioner in community settings. It supports your development as a dance artist with practical knowledge and skills, and an understanding of dance as a socially-relevant, inclusive practice. Read more
This unique vocational programme is for anyone wanting to work as a dance practitioner in community settings. It supports your development as a dance artist with practical knowledge and skills, and an understanding of dance as a socially-relevant, inclusive practice.

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/dance/postgraduate-programmes/postgraduate-diploma-community-dance

Course detail

Trinity Laban is the only institution where intensive, conservatoire-level art form training sits alongside applied study in community dance. The programme has four key strands:

• Artistic development. Progress your dance skills and artistic practice in a world-class conservatoire with first-class teachers and facilities

• Dance leadership and teaching. Develop knowledge and skills for working with different kinds of groups. Learn from some of the UK’s leading community dance practitioners and work with Trinity Laban’s renowned Learning and Participation programme.

• Understanding community dance. Context-specific study explores the values and principles of community dance, how it happens, and its impact on individuals and communities. Learn about planning and delivering projects, and the networks and agencies that support community dance provision.

• Professional practice. Encounters with practising artists and their work - supported by our partnerships with some of the UK’s leading professional organisations - facilitates your understanding of how the profession operates, as well as providing valuable contacts and work experience.

Purpose

The Postgraduate Diploma Community Dance attracts people from a diversity of backgrounds who have a common interest in dance as a creative, participatory artform and a desire to work beyond the traditional contexts of dance making and performance. We encourage applications from:

• Dance/performing arts graduates who have pursued teaching/education/community as a strand of study and want to continue this as a specialism at postgraduate level

• Graduates of non-arts subjects who have a dance background and interest/experience in participatory arts/ teaching/community work

• Individuals with traditional dance training wanting to extend their practice beyond performance and creation towards teaching and participatory practice

• Experienced professionals from dance/other sectors looking to broaden their skills and knowledge and enter new areas of professional practice

Career progression

The Programme prepares students for a breadth of possibilities and our graduates work in a variety of settings as dance artists, facilitators, teachers and artistic leaders, or go on to further study in related disciplines. The vocational focus of the Programme ensures that it continues to support graduate practitioners into the profession on an employed or independent basis.

FACILITIES

• Thirteen purpose built dance studios with the latest sprung flooring and large windows
• Laban Library and Archive
• Laban Theatre
• Bonnie Bird Theatre
• Cafe and Bar

THE FACULTY OF DANCE

Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is one of Europe's leading centres for the training of professional contemporary dance artists. Based in the RIBA-award winning Laban Building, in the heart of South East London's thriving arts community, Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is a creative and cosmopolitan community of performers, choreographers, teachers, designers and researchers, and is acknowledged internationally as a leader in the contemporary arts.

With one of the largest teams of specialist contemporary dance artist teachers in the world, our world class facilities include a 300 seat theatre, studio theatre and outdoor theatre, 13 purpose built dance studios and the largest dance library and archive in Europe.

We believe that contemporary dance has a vital part to play in everyone's lives. Our unique mix of energy and creativity advances the dance art form and fuels the dance world, connecting people to the exhilarating possibilities that dance offers. Our links with the professional dance world, local communities and other arts organisations ensure that an experience at Trinity Laban will be a rich and rewarding one.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/dance-applications

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This practical, vocational programme is designed to produce graduates with the skills and knowledge employers would expect of professional journalists starting their careers. Read more
This practical, vocational programme is designed to produce graduates with the skills and knowledge employers would expect of professional journalists starting their careers.

About the programme

The programme has an outstanding employment record. Recent graduates have found work at the BBC and STV; a host of commercial radio stations such as Radio Clyde and Heart; and busy media offices and a range of high-quality journalism employers.

Your learning

Taught primarily in the University’s purpose-built television and radio studios in Ayr, students take six modules (20 credits each at SCQF 11):
• News Journalism – students compile and broadcast radio bulletins. Newswriting, interviewing, editing, and online content are taught. Professional voice coaching is also an important element of the module.

• Journalism Law and Regulation – the main legal and regulatory issues that confront working journalists are taught and analysed.

• Television Journalism – students make television packages, conduct live two-ways, write out of vision scripts, and present live television news bulletins.

• Advanced News Journalism – There is greater emphasis on presentation skills, online and social media content in this module, which requires students to file video, audio and written work for the web.

• Journalism and Public Affairs – students engage with the major debates surrounding the reporting of global issues, government and politics.

Plus one of either:
• Features and Packaging – you will be expected to produce and voice radio and video packages to a professional standard.

• Global Media Contexts – students are introduced to a range of critical and cultural debates and themes including environment, digital media, convergence, the past, and indigenous media.

By successfully completing these six modules you will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits). If you wish, you may continue to MA level (180 credits), which gives you the opportunity to produce a television or radio documentary.

Professional input is vital: lecturers have extensive experience of both BBC and commercial broadcasting. There is a course of guest lectures and talks from working broadcast journalists and editors as well as a series of industry visits.

Practical experience

Work placement is an integral part of the programme. Each student is sent on placement, often to commercial radio stations, which have actively recruited from the programme.

Our Careers Adviser says

We only accept students who we believe have a realistic chance of building a career as a broadcast journalist. This helps to sustain the excellent reputation of the University among employers, leading to the jobs record outlined above.

Professional recognition

The programme is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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Preparing arts professionals for the cultural sector of the future. The cultural world is in a state of rapid transformation due to technological innovation, urbanisation, economic globalisation, and an increasingly unpredictable sociopolitical landscape. Read more

Preparing arts professionals for the cultural sector of the future

The cultural world is in a state of rapid transformation due to technological innovation, urbanisation, economic globalisation, and an increasingly unpredictable sociopolitical landscape. All facets of the arts – practice, organisation, leadership, societal relevance, and internationalisation (in Europe and beyond) – are affected by this transformation. Utrecht’s Master of Arts and Society will prepare you to operate as a leading figure in the global arts, media, and cultural sectors of the future.

Our Master’s programme is designed to meet the urgent need for arts professionals who possess rigorous theoretical and research skills coupled with practical abilities and an acute awareness of the current state of the sector at the local and global levels. As a student in this programme you will explore, for example, the dynamics and dilemmas within existing mainstream culture and its relationship with a growing number of “alternative” cultural practices, new models of creative production and industry, and the ever-increasing role of the arts in social justice.

Our Master’s programme is unique in many ways:

  • You will benefit from interdisciplinary programme content that places a special emphasis on grassroots and participatory arts in social contexts.
  • The Department of Media and Culture Studies, our programme's home, is a community of world class scholars whose teaching and research complement Arts and Society.
  • ​You will be trained in highly innovative social research skills that combine methodological rigor, creative expression and critical engagement with the arts practices.
  • You will learn from faculty with international expertise and benefit from a curriculum with a global orientation.
  • Through our organisational partnerships in Europe, Africa, Asia-Pacific, North America, and Latin America, you will get a chance to meet and interact with arts professionals working in a wide variety of contexts.
  • You will have a broad range of opportunities for student exchange and joint research through our numerous academic partnerships across the globe.

After grduation

With a Master in Arts and Society you will:

  • Have an understanding of the latest developments in international discourse on arts and society, which is fed by a variety of scholars from both the humanities and the social sciences.
  • Be able to formulate independent opinions and contribute to this discourse clearly and convincingly.
  • Possess academic and practical skills that you can implement effectively and creatively in your future professional career. You will have acquired these abilities in class, in the library, on the Internet, in practical work, and in the field where you will have carried out research into mainstream and alternative practices.

Our Master’s programme prepares a new generation of creative critical thinkers and doers for the global cultural sector: cross-sector cultural partnerships (i.e. between arts and healthcare or arts and development), transitional processes of conventional cultural institutions looking for new audiences, research into the social and intrinsic value of art, and intercultural and international collaborations. 



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The UWS Creative Media Academy is one of the higher education partners of the Scotland Film Talent Net.Work. This new degree equips aspiring and emerging filmmakers with the skills to transform their dreams into cinematic realities. Read more
The UWS Creative Media Academy is one of the higher education partners of the Scotland Film Talent Net.Work. This new degree equips aspiring and emerging filmmakers with the skills to transform their dreams into cinematic realities.

About the programme

Designed for graduates and industry professionals, the course explores an advanced level of filmmaking. Delivered by award-winning fiction and documentary film-makers and academic practitioners, you will be nurtured to develop your distinctive voice and original cinematic visions. Collaborative opportunities exist with our MA Screenwriting students, student directors, producers, directors of photography, sound designers and editors. This enables you to work with your peers in fully-fledged production teams, ensuring everyone sees their creative visions through to completion.

Practical experience

Directing students will produce at least two individually authored short films, and students in other specialisations will gain at least four production credits. Workshops and hands-on masterclasses with filmmakers and technicians are also offered.

Your learning

You will develop advanced skills and knowledge in various creative disciplines dedicated to the art and practice of filmmaking, creating your portfolio, and gaining production credits and an invaluable network of creative and professional contacts.

The programme has three stages:

- Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits):
Core modules include (20 credits each at SCQF 11 unless otherwise noted):
• Filmmaking in Context (20 credits) – film screenings, industry panels, and masterclasses by internationally acclaimed directors

• Screen Production 1 (40 credits) – practical workshops with UWS lecturers and invited filmmakers

- Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits):
Core module: Screen Production 2 (40 credits). Students work in teams to produce a short film, supported by masterclasses and mentoring from School and industry specialists.
You will choose one option module from a range including:
• Advanced Film Studies (20 credits)
• Screen Collaborations (20 credits)
• Working with Sound (20 credits)

- MA (180 credits):
Filmmaking Final Project (60 credits) – production of a substantial practice-led filmmaking project, e.g. a short fiction film or documentary, or digital media project with written contextualisation.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates are equipped to pursue careers in national and international film and television production, including fiction and documentary film director, creative producer and content producer. Alternatively you may wish to take advantage of the talent development schemes within the UK or abroad, or pursue a PhD by practice.

Great facilities

Accreditation by Creative Skillset, the Sector Skills Council for Creative Media, has led to the creation of the UWS Creative Media Academy. Operating across our campuses and through the UWS Glasgow Creative Enterprise Cluster, the Academy offers:
• A wide range of practice-led programmes

• First-rate facilities including an £81million investment in our new campus at Ayr

• Teaching in skills which are in demand by the creative industries

Research excellence

Our vibrant research culture spans a wide range of areas, including:
• providing advice on the cultural and educational aspects of the Olympic and Commonwealth Games

• student and industry collaboration on the creation of transmedia projects that offer real research and development potential and generate new online experiences for mobile and tablet users

• practice-led research in popular music, theatre, broadcasting and the visual arts

• new media art, ethics and emerging media technologies

• collaboration with leading arts festivals and venues including CCA Glasgow and Film City Glasgow

• creative writing for fiction, film, theatre and TV, working with leading broadcasters and arts companies

• cultural policy, cultural practice and cultural economy in Scotland and Europe, from small island communities to large urban areas

• participatory arts and media practice, community regeneration and public art

• journalism, politics and media representation

• the future of journalism and social media

• independent film and new media

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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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Interaction Design at Malmö University. We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design. Read more

Interaction Design at Malmö University

We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development. Students approach these genres within a broad context that considers the social, political and ethical consequences of their designs. Our education is studio-based, bringing students into close contact with our design professors.

This is a one-year programme, which is also offered as the first year of a two-year programme providing a more well-rounded combination of design practice and academic research.

Interaction Design: one-year programme

Interaction Design: two-year programme

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Practical Design Skills and Academic Research

Interaction design is a rapidly changing discipline, and we maintain the relevance of our education by working with real-world design cases and outside clients that include local industry partners, as well as cultural and civic organisations. Navigating a shifting design landscape also requires the critical mindset of a scholar, and we foster reflective design by teaching research skills and involving students in active research projects.

Internationally Recognised

Our programme was founded in 1998, making it one of the more established programmes of its kind. We focus on areas where our design and research excellence is internationally recognised: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development.

Who are you?

Interaction design requires the fusion of multiple skill sets. We recruit students with different backgrounds – design, media, engineering, the arts, and social sciences – and focus our teaching on creating disciplinary synergy in the concrete design work.

Content

The programme comprises full-time study for one academic year, divided into four courses starting with a studio-based introduction to multidisciplinary collaboration and mainstream interaction design. The next two courses address embodied interaction and collaborative media, two of our signature topics. The final course is a Master’s level graduation project.

Upon graduation, you are eligible for the second year of the two-year Master’s programme to learn more about interaction design research and theory. Read more about the two-year Master’s programme

Teaching Methods

The programme is based on a learning-by-doing pedagogy. This means that we encourage an iterative practice of experimentation and reflection. As teachers, we view ourselves as coaches guiding you in this process.

Studio-based

The programme is studio-based. You will also have access to computer labs, a materials workshop and a prototyping lab for electronics, sensor and microprocessor programming.

Group work in multidisciplinary teams

The primary method of learning is through group work in multidisciplinary teams with classmates and other stakeholders. Abilities to work in teams and with others – including user communities – are important parts of our curriculum, and several projects are organised to practice doing this.

Humanistic approach

With our humanistic approach, you will be practicing qualitative research approaches to support your design of tangible artefacts as well as digital and interactive services, systems and artefacts. We emphasize an understanding of people in their use situations.

Reflective and experimental design thinking and practical doing

Prototyping in the studio and real-world contexts is an integral part of becoming an interaction designer.

To practice reflective and experimental design activity, projects and courses integrate seminars and hands-on workshops introducing students to, among other things, ethnographic fieldwork, visualisation, low- and high-fidelity prototyping, microprocessor programming and video sketching, as well as evaluation of use qualities. All these practices are backed up by literature references and examples.

The thesis project

Your thesis project will be a combination of a design project and reflective writing that will involve communicating and discussing your design work. This is one result of a student's work in Thesis Project I.

Working environments

Students have access to studio space, and we encourage a healthy studio culture. This is where we conduct group-work, seminars, workshops, presentations and discussions. Close by there is a well-equipped materials workshop and a physical prototyping lab for electronics and sensor work. Additionally, we often use the facilities at the MEDEA research centre for final presentations, exhibitions, seminars and programme-meetings.

Career opportunities

Students enter the programme with different kinds of expertise, from art and design to engineering and social sciences. Upon graduation, you will have built a strong understanding of how your particular skills play a role in interaction design and how they combine with other specialities of fellow designers.

Potential positions

Most alumni move on to positions as interaction designers, user experience specialists or usability architects in the ICT, telecom and media industries. For some, this involves fine-tuning the interfaces and interactions of current products to users' needs; other interaction designers work on concept development for future products and services. Yet other alumni find their calling in strategic positions where the role of interaction design is considered in relation to market and business development.

Some interaction designers are also found in the role of change agents in public organisations and NGOs.



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Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK).
  • Benefit from our established network of psychotherapists and gain work experience within a supervised clinical placement in a range of settings. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The only institution in Europe to offer training in all of the arts and play therapies, including dramatherapy, art and dance movement psychotherapy, music and play therapy.

Course summary

This course is designed for people who have prior dance experience and professional or volunteering experience with people in need, and would like to practise as a dance movement psychotherapist.

Dance movement psychotherapy is a relational process in which a client and therapist engage in an empathetic creative process using body movement and dance to assist the integration of emotional, cognitive, physical, social and spiritual aspects of self. We believe that focusing on the creative potential of individuals in a relationship creates a sound ethical basis for psychotherapeutic work.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as a dance movement psychotherapist. All graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK). Graduates often create their own positions; facilitating dance movement psychotherapy sessions within settings including: social services; special needs; schools; psychiatry; probationary and rehabilitation units; forensic psychiatry.

The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on development of your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies exhibition.

The MA in DMP benefits from cutting edge research conducted through the Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) and this feeds directly into teaching. The programme ethos emphasises a critical consideration of different descriptions and explanations of bodies, human systems and therapeutic practices in different places and times. In the context of an individual student's experiences, beliefs, values and different 'cultures', our teaching actively promotes a participatory ethic, self-reflexive practices and the ability for critical reflection on: creative processes, intersubjectivity and the construction of social and power differentials, in learning and in psychotherapy.

Content

The uniquely interdisciplinary MA course in Dance Movement Psychotherapy integrates theoretical, experiential and clinical learning, preparing students to practice as dance movement psychotherapists. Cutting edge research cascades into teaching emphasising the social, biological and psychological construction of the moving body and meaning-making. Students are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes.

Key areas of study include Contemporary DMP and psychotherapeutic theories, Feminist embodied reflexivity, clinical placement and supervision (for one-two days a week), dance movement improvisation skills and interventions, embodied performance practice, experiential anatomy for clinical practice, human development, movement and growth, Laban Movement Analysis and video observation.

Embodied practice and working with attention to the art of dance is placed at the centre of the programme. Drawing from Feminist, Psychoanalytical, Phenomenological and Systemic frameworks, the training emphasises the creative role of curiosity and a 'not knowing' position, a respect for difference, and appreciation of the effects that mutual influences have in all relationships.

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Creative Processes: Reflexive Movement Improvisation
  • Theoretical Approaches in Dance Movement Psychotherapy
  • Psychopathology: Alternative World Views

Career options

Graduates can enter a variety of roles including: NHS clinical practice within in and out patient services, community services, prison services, special needs schools, performing arts contexts, drug rehabilitation, in social services with immigrants and asylum seekers, in shelters with women who have suffered domestic abuse, dementia services, learning disabilities services, child and adolescent mental health services.

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