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Masters Degrees (Participatory)

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Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Read more

Course Overview

Create art that engages audiences directly. Gain work and contacts in the creative industries. Enhance your ability to gain funding for participatory projects. Develop both advanced theoretical knowledge and practices of working in participatory settings. Earn a highly relevant Masters qualification.

This course is led by staff who are experienced in working within innovative and prestigious projects in participatory settings themselves, such as The Arts Council funded - The Cultural Spring. Academics also have links to a range of organisations who manage and organise such events.

You’ll engage with practical projects through large and small arts organisations and directly with communities, schools and other groups. The programme also aims to encourage an holistic approach to arts practice and provide a learning structure which will facilitate dialogue, collaborative working and peer support.

Course Content

Modules on this course include:

Certificate stage
Introduction to Working in Participatory Settings (30 credits)
Participatory Arts in Practice (30 credits)

Diploma stage
At Diploma stage, you will explore research methods that are specifically relevant to participatory practice an will also undertake and evaluate a live project reflecting you area(s) of interest.
Research and Praxis (30 credits)
Participatory Arts Live Project (30 credits)

Masters stage
At Masters stage, you can choose a practical dissertation/live project or a written dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and assessment

You’ll experience a range of teaching methods including online learning, peer learning, student-led seminars, workshops, small group work, individual and collaborative project work, supervised independent learning and tutorials.

You’ll also be encouraged to develop your own theoretical and methodological perspectives to inform your future educational, professional and personal practices. The programme provides a learning and teaching framework within which the growth of subject-specific knowledge, analytic abilities, teamwork, time and organisational management, production, presentation and practice-oriented competencies can be developed and assessed.

Facilities & location

Teaching for this course is based at our state-of-the-art David Puttnam Media Centre. The award-winning facilities available include a 200 seater cinema, radio and TV studios, which also hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies. You will have access to the array of arts and media facilities across the institution.

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles.

Students are helped to develop their research skills working with lecturers and library staff to develop their awareness of art history as well as contemporary art and design and the wider contexts of the subjects.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:

- Art Full Text + Art Abstracts: A major resource for media and arts information
- Design and Applied Arts Index: Covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
- British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC): Provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media
- JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’): Provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
- Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive

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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This taught Master’s course, made up of four modules and a 12,000-word dissertation (split into two modules for PT students, with each module producing… Read more

This taught Master’s course, made up of four modules and a 12,000-word dissertation (split into two modules for PT students, with each module producing 6,000 words of work), responds to major transnational developments in contemporary media which have eroded the line between ‘producers’ and ‘consumers’, democratising media or leading to a lo-fi “cult of the amateur.” At the same time, social media platforms have become major economic players, raising questions over who benefits, and how, from the social activity they host. This MA focuses on the specialised, advanced study of current media developments: students will be able to analyse and critically reflect on the media world they inhabit, developing their expertise in participatory culture/social media and associated practices of fandom, activism, community-building, and creativity.

The course is targeted at those who wish to develop their understanding of specific kinds of digital media – involving people “formerly known as the audience” – and their social, economic and cultural contexts. It is designed to lead into PhD work for those wishing to progress to further Higher Education, as well as leading to a range of professional roles linked to participatory culture and social media.

For more information about our research areas of interest visit our Journalism and Media research pages - https://research.hud.ac.uk/research-subjects/journalism/



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Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this. Read more
Sustainable development, or development that balances economic, social, and environmental aspects, is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can be powerful tools in helping to achieve this.

The ICT for Development (ICT4D) specialism is a strand within the established and highly successful MSc Practising Sustainable Development. It is offered jointly by the Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) Group and the UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway, University of London.

This ICT4D Masters strand takes a global perspective on sustainable development and the role of ICTs; placed at the interface of research and practice, it is designed for those who want to launch or further their careers as development practitioners or scholars. It combines cutting-edge teaching on ICT4D with rigorous training in the broader field of sustainable development, to provide a well-rounded perspective on current and future development challenges. This degree extends knowledge, develops key skills and optimises career prospects.

The course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Master’s degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscpgdippsdict4d.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This is an intellectually exciting and inspiring course, drawing on both physical and social sciences, which attracts a diverse, international group of students.

- Our teaching staff are leading international experts and have wide experience in different developing regions and economies in transition, including Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia, East Asia and South-East Asia.

- You will benefit from small group learning and an intense but friendly atmosphere, and will receive individual mentoring and career advice from our staff (both from your personal tutor and a dissertation supervisor).

- You will receive an internationally renowned University of London degree, giving you a solid foundation for a career in the field of development and/or environment.

- The course will provide you with training in the skills needed to research and assess ICT for development. These include research design, project development, geographic information systems, remote sensing, participatory methods, project analysis and evaluation.

Department research and industry highlights

The UNESCO Chair/Centre in ICT4D at Royal Holloway is an interdisciplinary centre involving staff in Geography, Management, Computer Science and Earth Sciences. One of the world leaders in its field, with 17 affiliated staff and 18 PhD students, it is a vibrant research community embedded in both the College and the international ICT4D Collective of ICT4D practitioners. It has excellent links with NGOs, businesses and international organisations. Friendly and diverse, it is an exciting place to study and network with other ICT4D experts.

The Politics, Development and Sustainability (PDS) group consists of over 20 research-active staff, 35 PhD students and 50 Master’s students on four MSc programmes. We are committed to conducting collaborative research which seeks to understand and contribute to addressing problems of social inequality, environmental destruction and injustice. The breadth of its members’ research places it in an ideal position to contribute to theoretical and policy debates on key challenges facing Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean today.

Course content and structure

The course is divided into three compulsory elements; theory, policy and practice; research training; and a dissertation. Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Sustainability, Development and Governance
This course will equip students with a detailed understanding of the development of sustainable development as a discourse. Students will explore key sustainability issues such as climate change, globalisation, and human responses with an emphasis on the emergence of environmental governance as a means to pursue sustainability.

Technology and Development
This course provides you with an introduction to the role of technology in development, focusing particularly on mobile phone and computer technologies. The course combines an understanding of key theoretical debates and how technologies have been applied in diverse sectors such as health and education. The course also includes training in the use of GIS (geographical information systems) within a development context.

ICT4D
This course gives you the opportunity to develop deeper understandings of cutting-edge applications of ICT4D research and practice. Topics covered include environmental change and Green ICT, open development and subversive forms of technology use, and logics of inclusion and exclusion in ICT programmes. You will also examine project planning, monitoring and evaluation in the field of ICT4D.

Participatory Research
This course combines detailed understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of participatory research and methods with practical experience of using different participatory research techniques. These include participatory diagramming, participatory video and participatory environmental monitoring.

Research Training
You will be provided with training in a range of methods to enable you to plan, carry out and complete a piece of research. There are three modules in this element:
- Social Research Methods Training - provides a range of social science methods for field research and analysis.
- Quantitative Methods for Graduates - provides basic statistical concepts and procedures used in empirical research.
- Development and Environment Research Training - provides guidance for planning, developing and undertaking research in a development and environment context.

Dissertation (MSc only)
The dissertation is of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, on a topic of your choice which has been approved by the supervisor. It requires both secondary and primary research, and the demonstration of originality in integrating theoretical and practical research methods in tackling a particular problem. You will be encouraged to carry out your dissertation in collaboration with an organisation in the field of development and environment.

Community Volunteer Project
You will undertake an independent volunteer project which will give you practical experience in gaining sustainability related work experience in a non-for profit organisation. The project will enhance your employability whilst and provide an opportunity to gain practical experience of third sector organisational objectives, cultures and practices.

Elective course units:
Sustainability, Development and Society
You will develop a detailed understanding of key social / environmental relationships incorporating contemporary issues in the geographies of sustainability. These will include 'risk society', sustainable cities, and the impacts of corporate sector activities on the environment. You will also understand the challenges to sustainable development at household and community levels, with a focus on community-based approaches to sustainable development.

Business Ethics and Enterprise
The aim of the course is to equip students with the moral frameworks and critical abilities necessary to understand the role of business in society from an ethical perspective. The course will cover different types of business including large publicly traded multinationals, small and medium sized enterprises, social enterprises and family firms. Students will be expected to understand the different issues in these organizational types and to articulate moral arguments from a range of different perspectives.

International Sustainability Management
This course provides participants with an understanding of how Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) informs sustainability management issues in large, transnational organisations. It will focus on issues such as consumption and sustainability as dichotomised between the apparently incompatible tensions of economic and environmental interests.

Other courses Geopolitics and Security / PIR / Management / Computer Science

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an understanding at an advanced level of the relationships between, and complexities of, social, economic, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development and ICT4D

- an understanding at an advanced level of how the key issues in sustainable development theory and ICT4D influence policy and impact on practice

- the ability to critically analyse complex or contradictory areas of knowledge in aspects of sustainable development.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Past students of the MSc Practising Sustainable Development are now employed by international development and/or environment agencies, national government in their countries, national programmes and implementing agencies, higher education institutions, consultancies, private sector businesses, social enterprises and NGOs; as environmental and development policy-makers, managers, workers, activists, teachers and researchers. Many of our alumni are also currently undertaking doctoral programmes in the UK and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing. Read more

Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing.

It provides an alternative to the standard model of psychological enquiry that foregrounds the individual at the expense of the collective, instead contextualising the difficulties faced by particular communities before seeking to develop solutions through participatory and action-oriented research.

The central focus of this course is to provide knowledge and training platforms that allow you to work towards addressing the institutional marginalisation and disempowerment that drives local and global community issues. It introduces critical, liberation and human rights perspectives, reflecting on traditional modes of scientific enquiry and what they mean for groups and individuals struggling with issues of marginalisation.

Our degree programme is among the few in the country that allow you to work directly with local communities to facilitate social change. With the help of our award-winning Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp), it gives you the opportunity to apply your skills as a psychologist and gain professional experience in the field.

This course will be of particular interest to those interested in developing a career in mental health.

Course structure

The course is primarily taught through intensive teaching sessions where modules run over blocks of two to three days, though some optional modules require weekly attendance.

Through lectures, workshops, seminars and the facilitation of community research partnerships, the course provides opportunities to explore the appropriateness and significance of how we work as community psychologists and to better understand the role of ideology inherent in the creation of an effective community psychology. It achieves this while retaining a degree of flexibility within the syllabus such that you are able to tailor your learning towards the kinds of areas most relevant to your work and interests.

The programme also offers an extended masters route for international students, allowing you to combine the degree itself with an English language course. Depending on your present language level, you will study English for between two and four months before starting your MA.

Areas of study

Community psychology is a culturally relative discipline and therefore takes different forms in different parts of the world. To help you maintain an open-minded approach to the subject, we introduce you to both local and international examples of community psychology in practice.

The syllabus is informed by contemporary research into such diverse areas as homelessness, older adults, disadvantaged young people, LGBT mental health, organisational wellbeing and mental health literacy in Cambodia, as well as by the experiences of our core teaching staff, Carl Walker, Katherine Johnson and Liz Cunningham.

For the Social Research Practice module, you undertake an action-orientation project in a community psychology setting. Those who are working in a related profession can relate the project to their employer's needs; those who aren't have the opportunity to work with community and voluntary organisations including Mind, Age Concern and the Richmond Fellowship.

Modules

  • Community Psychology: Theory and Practice
  • Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Community and Clinical Approaches to Mental Distress
  • Social Research Practice
  • Dissertation

Dissertation

The dissertation forms a focal part of the MA and allows you to gain practical skills as a psychologist by doing fieldwork in the community. Previous students have used the opportunity to:

  • do a piece of participatory action research to explore the challenges faced by the growing population of Brazilian women in Brighton
  • use life-history narratives to investigate experiences of academic and social acculturation for international students
  • work with a local LGBT mental wellbeing service in order to reflect on the way that the development of a community has affected not only the wellbeing but the identities of its members.

Cupp

We strongly believe that it is our duty to use our knowledge and resources for social benefit, which is why we set up the Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp) back in 2003.

Cupp is an award-winning project that aims to tackle disadvantage and promote sustainable development through partnership with local organisations. Our combined efforts have made a tangible difference to the effectiveness of community sectors and the lives of local people.

As a Brighton student, you will have the opportunity to volunteer through Cupp and work in the community yourself, all the while developing your vocational skills and gaining valuable work experience.

Careers and employability

The course explores processes of social change and participatory engagement and equips graduates with theoretical knowledge, research skills and practical insights for working in the field of community psychology. It also serves as an ideal grounding for the further use and study of participatory modes of enquiry at doctoral level.



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This unique vocational programme is for anyone wanting to work as a dance practitioner in community settings. It supports your development as a dance artist with practical knowledge and skills, and an understanding of dance as a socially-relevant, inclusive practice. Read more
This unique vocational programme is for anyone wanting to work as a dance practitioner in community settings. It supports your development as a dance artist with practical knowledge and skills, and an understanding of dance as a socially-relevant, inclusive practice.

Visit the website: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/dance/postgraduate-programmes/postgraduate-diploma-community-dance

Course detail

Trinity Laban is the only institution where intensive, conservatoire-level art form training sits alongside applied study in community dance. The programme has four key strands:

• Artistic development. Progress your dance skills and artistic practice in a world-class conservatoire with first-class teachers and facilities

• Dance leadership and teaching. Develop knowledge and skills for working with different kinds of groups. Learn from some of the UK’s leading community dance practitioners and work with Trinity Laban’s renowned Learning and Participation programme.

• Understanding community dance. Context-specific study explores the values and principles of community dance, how it happens, and its impact on individuals and communities. Learn about planning and delivering projects, and the networks and agencies that support community dance provision.

• Professional practice. Encounters with practising artists and their work - supported by our partnerships with some of the UK’s leading professional organisations - facilitates your understanding of how the profession operates, as well as providing valuable contacts and work experience.

Purpose

The Postgraduate Diploma Community Dance attracts people from a diversity of backgrounds who have a common interest in dance as a creative, participatory artform and a desire to work beyond the traditional contexts of dance making and performance. We encourage applications from:

• Dance/performing arts graduates who have pursued teaching/education/community as a strand of study and want to continue this as a specialism at postgraduate level

• Graduates of non-arts subjects who have a dance background and interest/experience in participatory arts/ teaching/community work

• Individuals with traditional dance training wanting to extend their practice beyond performance and creation towards teaching and participatory practice

• Experienced professionals from dance/other sectors looking to broaden their skills and knowledge and enter new areas of professional practice

Career progression

The Programme prepares students for a breadth of possibilities and our graduates work in a variety of settings as dance artists, facilitators, teachers and artistic leaders, or go on to further study in related disciplines. The vocational focus of the Programme ensures that it continues to support graduate practitioners into the profession on an employed or independent basis.

FACILITIES

• Thirteen purpose built dance studios with the latest sprung flooring and large windows
• Laban Library and Archive
• Laban Theatre
• Bonnie Bird Theatre
• Cafe and Bar

THE FACULTY OF DANCE

Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is one of Europe's leading centres for the training of professional contemporary dance artists. Based in the RIBA-award winning Laban Building, in the heart of South East London's thriving arts community, Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is a creative and cosmopolitan community of performers, choreographers, teachers, designers and researchers, and is acknowledged internationally as a leader in the contemporary arts.

With one of the largest teams of specialist contemporary dance artist teachers in the world, our world class facilities include a 300 seat theatre, studio theatre and outdoor theatre, 13 purpose built dance studios and the largest dance library and archive in Europe.

We believe that contemporary dance has a vital part to play in everyone's lives. Our unique mix of energy and creativity advances the dance art form and fuels the dance world, connecting people to the exhilarating possibilities that dance offers. Our links with the professional dance world, local communities and other arts organisations ensure that an experience at Trinity Laban will be a rich and rewarding one.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/dance-applications

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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. Are you driven to make an impact on the world around you? Civic engagement, digital media, political discourse, data and democracy, social justice, youth participation—whatever your cause, Emerson’s . Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

Are you driven to make an impact on the world around you? Civic engagement, digital media, political discourse, data and democracy, social justice, youth participation—whatever your cause, Emerson’s Civic Media: Art and Practice (CMAP) Master of Arts program will prepare you for a life and career of improving the world through media, technology, and activism. This intensive one-year residential program, housed in Emerson’s Engagement Lab, will help you become a leader in the knowledge economy, ready to pursue a wide range of paths, including:

  • Civic engagement roles within non-profit, non-governmental, and governmental organizations
  • Community-building roles in news and media organizations
  • Leadership roles in innovation offices of municipal governments
  • Creative digital roles at foundations and corporations

From local neighborhoods to international contexts and even the developing world, no matter where you want to be, your degree will position you as an innovative leader in the burgeoning field of civic media.

Program Details

Civic Media: Art and Practice (CMAP) is a one-year intensive applied research MA program housed in Emerson’s Engagement Lab. In contrast to traditional coursework, you’ll connect with potential community stakeholders from the outset and work with those organizations as you formulate your thesis project.

The CMAP program responds to the burgeoning landscape of media and technology with a program that is applied, embedded in communities, and represents a deviation from the traditional way a graduate higher education program works. The program is design-oriented and requires the building of technologies, games, public art installations, participatory storytelling platforms, and other processes and practices that support the ambitions of the cohort.

We understand the components of CMAP as follows:

  • Civic Media are the technologies, designs, and practices that support connecting a common purpose, ranging from systematic interventions to the creative and interpretative acts that rest in the realm of art. The program focuses on the challenges of implementation: each student is confronted with the complexity of moving theory into practice, together with organizational partners.
  • Art in our program is understood as the production of creative objects, platforms, and actions that go beyond the walls of galleries and museums and relate to questions of collective good rather than, or in addition to, personal self-expression.
  • Practice is understood here as the application of student experiences in the real world. This does not mean where students will go for jobs once they are finished, but rather the application of all curricular work towards community engagement, whether local, national, or global, and non-profit, governmental, or private.

Learning Outcomes

CMAP pulls all of the core concepts and ideas of civic media into an intensive one-year program, during which students will:

  • articulate a sophisticated understanding of contemporary issues in media, communication, and technology that impact civic life
  • use a variety of participatory design and research approaches and methodologies, including human-centered design and participatory action research
  • employ the appropriate strategies to effectively communicate and work with communities
  • address, in classes and projects, the major scholarly debates regarding the interplay of new technologies, art, and civic and political life
  • discuss, write about, and design projects around the global scope of civic media and be able to situate local problems within a global context

In Demand in Today's Market

There is an increasing number of jobs in civic media within the public, private, and non-profit sectors. Students in the program gain experience working with a variety of community-based organizations and will be prepared for jobs such as:

  • Community Manager
  • Director of Civic Engagement
  • Civic Technologist
  • Civic Artist
  • Digital Strategist
  • Innovation Director
  • Civic Designer
  • New Media Catalyst
  • Communications Director
  • Community Relations Specialist
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Manager

Past graduates of CMAP currently work in various industries and organizations where they apply the skills and knowledge gained from the program, including the Obama FoundationGlobal Family Research ProjectHarvard Kennedy School, and more.



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Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector. Read more

Our Inclusive Arts Practice MA is aimed at artists or individuals from related fields who are working in healthcare, education, the arts or the community sector.

It may be a suitable programme if your employer is looking to support relevant training and development opportunities for their staff.

The course aims to equip students with the necessary skills to initiate and manage truly inclusive arts projects with diverse and marginalised groups, for example those with learning difficulties or experiencing social exclusion due to economic or health reasons.

You can choose to study for either a full MA award or a PGCert. There are opportunities to work in diverse settings from schools, galleries, artist studios and design studios to day centres, photographic studios and FE colleges.

Past students have worked with a range of individuals and participant groups including people with learning disabilities, children, young people, elders, those experiencing homelessness, asylum seekers and youth offending teams. They have contributed both locally and to international projects in countries including Romania and Ukraine.

We value and encourage work across a range of art forms, including visual art, design, illustration, performance, film and photography.

Why study with us?

  • Truly unique course that enables you to apply your passion for art in a positive community setting
  • Focus on practical, vocational work that puts you in direct contact with marginalised groups, as you explore key issues in the inclusive arts debate
  • Dedicated professional development module that gives you transferable skills in budget management, health and safety, partnership development and marketing
  • Impressive employment rate, with graduates finding work as inclusive arts practitioners with various charities and trusts
  • Support from specialist arts practitioners and professionals for collaborative working with diverse groups
  • Guest speakers from the arts, health and voluntary sectors

Areas of study

Studies are based around a core of experiential work-related learning, integrated with theory. The course is designed to support participants' development and creativity as art practitioners within the contexts of inclusion, learning disability and marginalised community groups. Students work alongside diverse groups of people in a workshop setting, sharing experiences as partners in the process of learning.

Modules

  • Working Together: Introducing Practical Collaboration
  • Participatory Practice and Creative Exchange: Inclusive Approaches to Collaboration
  • Research in Progress
  • Practice as Research
  • Looking Ahead: Continuing Professional Development
  • Option 

Syllabus

The course is delivered through seven modules, including one related optional module. PGCert students study the Working Together and Issues and Debates modules only.

Assessment takes place through presentations, seminar discussions, practical work and workbooks. The final research project is assessed through an exhibition rather than a dissertation.

Working Together: Introducing Practical Collaboration

This module is a practical introduction to inclusive arts practice that explores processes of collaborative working and art facilitation skills. You undertake a series of supported arts workshops in local artists studios, working alongside the learning disabled Rocket Artist Group. You establish key philosophies and practices of inclusive practice suitable for transference to other community groups later in the course and your future practice. There are also opportunities for you to think about and develop your own work in the context of collaboration.

Participatory Practice and Creative Exchange: Inclusive Approaches to Collaboration

This module introduces and interrogates the ideas and practices of inclusive arts practice through key readings, tutor-facilitated workshops and peer discussion. It includes issues and debates around the similarities and differences between disability arts, art therapy, occupational therapy and inclusive arts practice, and other approaches to collaboration and inclusion. Within this module students will have the opportunity to work in the newly developed Switch House Building at Tate Modern, as part of a short creative exchange project. 

Research in Progress

This module is designed to support students in the development, implementation and completion of their individual research projects. A series of work-in-progress seminars and workshops run alongside the delivery of students’ ongoing practical art projects.

Practice as Research

This runs in parallel with the Research in Progress module, giving you the chance to capture and present your research findings through a public exhibition or performance, and to demonstrate good practice and the impact of inclusive arts.

Looking Ahead: Continuing Professional Development

This module is designed to enhance the professional practice of arts practitioners and equip students with the skills and contacts to manage their future career paths. It covers areas such as working with museums and galleries, funding, public programming, health and safety, budget management, partnership development, and marketing.

Making sure that what you learn with us is relevant, up to date and what employers are looking for is our priority, so courses are reviewed and enhanced on an ongoing basis. When you have applied to us, you’ll be told about any new developments through our applicant portal.

Careers and employability

On completion of the course, students are ideally placed to seek employment in a range of art, disability, community, health and education settings. Recent graduates have gone on to work for various organisations including Project Art Works, The Royal Academy and Kings College Hospital Trust as inclusive arts practitioners and workshop facilitators.

The course would also make a significant contribution to an artist's independent studio practice. Recent alumni have exhibited work at various locations including Phoenix Arts, Brighton Dome and Pallant House. Others have founded organisations such as Red Octopus Sensory Theatre and contributed to a wide range of projects and events including:

Students and alumni have successfully secured funding for inclusive arts projects and research through the Springboard Grant scheme, the Santander/Beepurple Social Enterprise Award, Arts Council England and the Winston Churchill Award. Others have progressed to PhD research through scholarship funding.



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Explore how people participate in society in pursuit of social justice. Designed for experienced practitioners, this MA combines coursework with work-based learning and action research. Read more
Explore how people participate in society in pursuit of social justice. Designed for experienced practitioners, this MA combines coursework with work-based learning and action research.

You’ll gain:
-Knowledge of different conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to participation
-An understanding of how to apply these approaches to development and governance challenges
-Practical skills in participatory process and research
-Abilities of critical thinking, analysis and reflective practice
-Personal development of values and attitudes useful in pursuing participatory approaches

At IDS, our work is part of a global research collaboration. We work to identify and implement alternative approaches to social change. You’ll learn how to respond to local situations, and bridge operational practice with research and policy change.

Accreditation

This course is IAC/EADI accredited. Sussex is proud to be the first UK university to gain this accreditation.

The International Accreditation Council for Global Development Studies and Research wishes to influence proactively the process of quality assurance for global development studies and has developed a state-of-the-art accreditation system.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through core modules and options. You’ll be assessed through:
-Assignments
-A learning plan
-Module participation
-Progress reports
-Portfolio items
-Presentations
-A 15,000-word synthesis paper

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates work in:
-Conservation
-Agriculture
-Food
-Finance
-State ministries
-UN agencies such as UNESCO
-Government departments such as DFID
-NGOs including ActionAid

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This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more

This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

About this degree

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules

All three of the following:

  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
  • Social Development in Practice

Optional modules

One or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:

  • NGOs and Social Transformation
  • Communication, Technologies and Social Power
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Participatory Processes: Building for Development
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • Managing the City Economy
  • An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork

The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South.

The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Social Development Practice MSc

Funding

Candidates for the MSc in Social Development Practice may be eligible for the Swarovski Foundation scholarship. Details of this scholarship will be published on The Bartlett Development Planning Unit website in autumn 2017.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Institutional Capacity Building Programme Professional, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
  • Project Officer, Korea Development Bank
  • Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
  • Development Consultant, World Bank Group

Employability

Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.



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Sustainability is one of the key concepts of our times, although a contested one. As the product of concerns about environmental degradation, climate alteration, rising socioeconomic inequalities, increasing mobility, and accelerated change, the term has many different meanings and imperatives. Read more

Sustainability is one of the key concepts of our times, although a contested one. As the product of concerns about environmental degradation, climate alteration, rising socioeconomic inequalities, increasing mobility, and accelerated change, the term has many different meanings and imperatives: our lifeworlds must be environment-friendly, but also economically viable and socially equitable.

This Master’s programme in Cultural Anthropology: Sustainable Citizenship therefore departs from an integrated understanding. It focuses on the triangle of People, Planet, and Profit, pointing out that sustainability has not only an environmental meaning, yet also an economic and sociocultural one. As such, the programme seeks to understand how citizens worldwide are negotiating and restructuring their living environment to be safe and sustainable at the same time. It incorporates both local and global understandings of the concept of sustainability and, in doing so, scrutinizes various expressions of active citizenship in building sustainability around the world.

Innovative methodology

Anthropologists continually focus on cultural diversity and differences based on ethnicity, class, gender, age, and health. This Master’s programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to evaluate these facets of life and their interrelationships. During your studies, you will learn traditional anthropological methods and techniques (fieldwork, participatory observation, and qualitative interviews).

However, since anthropology is by definition engaged, you will move also toward engaged anthropology and explore collaborative ethnographic methods, such as participatory action research. In addition, you are introduced to related, innovative methodologies in, for example, the area of narrative and virtual ethnography, engaging in cutting-edge combinations of aesthetics, digital media, and ethnography. You will also discuss ethical dilemmas and your own social responsibility as an anthropologist.

International context

The programme offers you a comprehensive learning environment with an international and comparative perspective. You will have the opportunity to go abroad for your field research and research internship, and you can attend seminars of the research group Sovereignty and Social Contestation, to which international researchers and lecturers are regularly invited. This Master’s programme is offered through the Department of Cultural Anthropology. Courses are taught by staff members with strong international reputations and standing like Dr Diederick RavenDr Annalisa Butticci and the Master's Programme Director Dr Yvon van der Pijl.

Intellectually stimulating programme

We offer an intellectually stimulating programme with a variety of work methods, in which you will be challenged to think critically about important and socially relevant themes, to formulate and to share your own arguments. You will formulate a research question that you will develop in a Master’s thesis using the theoretical knowledge acquired in the course modules and the empirical data that you gathered during fieldwork or a research internship. 

We expect an active contribution from students in the form of discussions, book reviews, papers and presentations. When preparing for the research, you will work on the research proposal in a tutorial group.

Research locations will be selected in consultation with the supervisor, with a large number of students conducting research in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa and Europe (including the Netherlands).

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

This Master’s degree programme will train you to work as an academic professional. Along with classic methods and skills, the programme allows you to acquire applied and practice-focused skills, enabling you to flexibly switch between or integrate scientific theory and anthropological professional practice. Take a look at the portraits of our graduates for a better idea of the career prospects.

Do you want to pursue a career as a scientific researcher? If so, the Master’s programme Cultural Anthropology: Sociocultural Transformation might be a better fit for your goals. This programme concentrates on the issue of power and (violent) conflict versus the state, while the Master’s programme in Cultural Anthropology: Sustainable Citizenship focuses on citizenship in relation to a sustainable living environment.



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Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we. But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we. Read more

Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we.

But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we.

Then join us in this innovative new postgraduate programme from Schumacher College in collaboration with the School of Architecture, Design and Environment at Plymouth University, the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, the Dartington Hall Trust and surrounding communities.

Ecological Design Thinking

Never has there been a more important time for a new approach for engaging with the challenging situations we face from the local to the global levels. In a rapidly changing dynamic situation, solutions rarely remain optimal for very long and continuous active participation is a necessary ingredient for success. Growing resilience in individuals and communities is the way to keep going despite the continuous change around us.

Our programme in Ecological Design Thinking embraces and explores this complex world of interactions with lively engagement and an optimistic approach. It offers powerful, practical and ecology-centred skills and knowledge to apply to a diverse range of practices from design, education and business to the more specific roles of leadership, management and consultancy.

The Ecological Design Thinking programme is trans-disciplinary, insightful and universal in its application; pragmatic and integrative in its operation. It brings together theoretical and practical discourses on ecologically inspired design, with methods of design thinking that are merged with the latest developments in anthropology, psychology and socio- political economics. It aims to create a novel ground for change makers at the forefront of our transition to sustainable societies.

Ecologically inspired design includes the study of ecological worldviews, systems dynamics and applied complexity theory alongside the philosophies and practices of permaculture and biomimetic design.

Design thinking is a well-established participatory technique grounded in the empathic understanding of the feelings, experiences and emotions of others. It engages people in lively conversations, visually stimulated interactions and playful prototyping. It frames problems as opportunities, forms insights and generates creative and collaborative solutions in complex situations.

The Ecological Design thinking programme aims to provide a nourishing environment for participants by incorporating short-courses led by internationally recognised thinkers, place-making projects in collaboration with the Dartington Hall Trust, the home of Schumacher College, and short placements offered by external partner organisations.

This programme is the fourth radical postgraduate programme developed at Schumacher College and contributes to and enhance the College’s ongoing collaborative inquiry into sustainable living – a live and networked inquiry of practice underway around the world by the College’s 20,000 alumni and others.

Who is this course for?

We would be delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to develop your understanding of a practice that is of great importance to all of our futures. We encourage applications from community practitioners and activists as well as planners, educators, architects, politicians and policy makers. You do not necessarily need a first degree in design to apply for this course. You only need to be enthusiastic, resilient and committed.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-design new approaches to the way we live that are socially just and ecologically sustainable. We are looking for those prepared to take risks and stand on the cutting-edge of new practices in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in a diverse mix of cultural experience and age that allows for rich peer- to- peer learning.

You Will Learn

  • The foundation of an ecological worldview through subjects such as ecology, deep ecology, systems thinking, complexity science and Gaia theory.
  • Living systems principles through the philosophy and practice of permaculture design, biophilia and biomimicry.
  • Creative and process-focused problem solving techniques by applying the methods and principles of design thinking
  • A multi-perspective appreciation of ethical issues and their implications for the future consequences of redesigning existing systems and creating new ones.
  • To apply ecological design thinking knowledge and skills to the design of social systems as a part of an emerging new economics
  • Personal and group enquiry practices to raise awareness of the interdependent relationship between the individual, society and nature and between theory and practice
  • Co-creative participatory practices and theoretical principles for new approaches to the ecological design process that include a range of stakeholders in the full lifecycle of projects, and you will apply these both in the studio, on the Dartington Hall Estate and in short placements on live projects

Special Features

An interdisciplinary programme integrating design methods with those of ecology and the social sciences.

An integrative design programme rooted in deep ecological understanding and practice and informed by cutting edge thinking in new economic approaches and social dynamics.

A balanced distribution of time and resources on skill-based and cognitive-based knowledge and between practice and theory.

Access to some of the world’s leading thinkers and practitioners in design, Gaia theory, complexity, climate science, systems thinking, new economics and social change.

Short courses led by internationally recognised thinkers and researchers.

Short practical placements with a range of partner organisations operating at the leading edge of social innovation.

An immersive, integrative and transformational teaching and learning approach rooted in the principles established by Schumacher College and Dartington Hall, and engaged in a living and working community on and around the Dartington Estate in Devon.

Where you will go?

Ecological Design Thinking can be applied to a wide range of contexts, from the personal to the societal. This programme aims to create a new generation of designers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, educators, researchers, consultants and activists. Graduates will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transformation of society.



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The MSc International Human Resource Management (IHRM) provides a broad understanding of the importance of people management in organisational development and business operations. Read more

Introduction

The MSc International Human Resource Management (IHRM) provides a broad understanding of the importance of people management in organisational development and business operations. The course builds on current trends in the internationalisation of work, occupations and management activities by offering a unique perspective on the challenges facing the HR profession and HRM practice in a global economy. It addresses both contemporary debates on HR management practices, and reflections on business organisation governance and strategy in an international context.
The course develops HR managers and leaders who are able to deliver responsible, participatory and sustainable service to their organisation, whether they work, in a private firm, a public agency or a not-for-profit organisation operating with an international workforce or across the world. It is especially designed for those who wish to work in organisations employing an international and diversified workforce, and to have responsibility for developing local and global HR systems that incorporate corporate social responsibility, innovation and participatory practices.

Accreditation

The Management School has associated PhDs including those funded by ESRC/Skills Development Scotland.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time
- Duration: MSc: one year; Diploma: 9 months
- Start date: September

Course objectives

This course provides a critical and academic assessment of the Human Resource Management (HRM) approach and its application by employers in international contexts. Particular attention is paid to understanding issues of responsibility and sustainability in HR management, as well as exploring the influence of various forms of business organisations on HR practices. Stirling Management School is committed to the principles of the PRIME* agenda, and the MSc International HRM reflects this engagement by integrating considerations of social responsibility and sustainability issues in the core curriculum.
The curriculum for the MSc International HRM builds on mainstream HRM scholarship to incorporate specialist topics which are regularly updated to ensure topicality and continued relevance. The course is taught from the Management, Work & Organisation Division, so students have access to specialists in a variety of fields.
The curriculum, and how it is delivered, is innovative and challenging for all students regardless of their academic background. The course uses a variety of assessment methods ranging from the more traditional examinations and essays, to formative assignments (short essays and group feedback).
The course seeks to provide recent graduates with a conceptual foundation for a career in the field of international human resource management or for further academic study in the subject, or to update the knowledge and qualifications of personnel/HR practitioners, managers and trade unionists. It will also provide you with a wider perspective on the principal issues and concerns affecting work and provide the basis for more effective decisions.

* PRiME stands for Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRiME). Its mission is to encourage responsible management education, research and thought-leadership globally. To this end, PRiME provides a voluntary engagement platform for business schools and management-related academic institutions.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

- Where are our graduates now?
MSc International HRM is a new course launching in September 2015. However, it builds upon the success of the MSc HRM which has produced graduates whose successful careers have seen them work, in various capacities (as HR specialists or in other management roles) for a range of public, private, for-profit or not-for-profit organisations operating in many industry sectors across the world, including:
- NHS
- Sun Microsystems
- Royal Bank of Scotland
- Nestle
- Ernst & Young
- United Nations
- Heineken
- Central and local government
- Universities around the world

Some of our more established alumni (MSc HRM) are currently leading and shaping the strategy of global organisations - here is an example of how a few former MSc HRM students have advanced in their careers:
- Human Resource Director, Detica (UK)
- Director, Workplace Solutions (India)
- HR Manager, PT. Bank Niaga Tbk (Indonesia)
- Head of Business Support, Royal Bank of Scotland
- Group Manager, CGU Plc (UK)
- HR Consultant, Aibel (Norway)

Graduating with an MSc in International HRM does not necessarily mean that you have to progress into a career in that field however. Indeed, it offers a solid foundation upon which to base a career in different areas related to business practice or to local or international socio-economic development policy-making and implementation.

Employability

Throughout the course of their studies, our students are introduced to a broad range of topical issues which enable them to better understand the challenges of work in various types and sizes of organisations operating both locally and globally.
Students on the MSc in International HRM learn significant transferable skills valued by employers, such as the ability to research relevant data and critically analyse these to inform contextual decisions, the ability to work in a team, to conduct projects and deliver effective presentations in time and to a high quality, and the ability to reflect upon contemporary management practice in an informed manner.
Their learning and development is further supported by encounters with guest-speakers with various industry expertise, as well as field trips (e.g. New Lanark) and the opportunity to take part in business-simulations with fellow students across the Management School (eg. the Strip Steel Business Challenge).

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Interaction design is a rapidly changing discipline, and we maintain the relevance of our education by working with real-world design cases and outside clients that include local industry partners, as well as cultural and civic organisations. Read more

Interaction design is a rapidly changing discipline, and we maintain the relevance of our education by working with real-world design cases and outside clients that include local industry partners, as well as cultural and civic organisations. Navigating a shifting design landscape also requires the critical mindset of a scholar, and we foster reflective design by teaching research skills and involving students in active research projects.


Interaction Design at Malmö University

We educate designers who can articulate and develop cutting-edge practices in key areas of interaction design: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development. Students approach these genres within a broad context that considers the social, political and ethical consequences of their designs. Our education is studio-based, bringing students into close contact with our design professors.

This is a one-year programme, which is also offered as the first year of a two-year programme providing a more well-rounded combination of design practice and academic research.

Interaction Design: one-year programme

Interaction Design: two-year programme

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.


Practical Design Skills and Academic Research

Internationally Recognised

Our programme was founded in 1998, making it one of the more established programmes of its kind. We focus on areas where our design and research excellence is internationally recognised: tangible and sensor-based interaction, wearable and embodied interaction, game design, participatory design practices, critical design, social innovation and collaborative media development.

Who are you?

Interaction design requires the fusion of multiple skill sets. We recruit students with different backgrounds – design, media, engineering, the arts, and social sciences – and focus our teaching on creating disciplinary synergy in the concrete design work.

Content

The programme comprises full-time study for one academic year, divided into four courses starting with a studio-based introduction to multidisciplinary collaboration and mainstream interaction design. The next two courses address embodied interaction and collaborative media, two of our signature topics. The final course is a Master’s level graduation project.

Upon graduation, you are eligible for the second year of the two-year Master’s programme to learn more about interaction design research and theory. Read more about the two-year Master’s programme

Teaching Methods

The programme is based on a learning-by-doing pedagogy. This means that we encourage an iterative practice of experimentation and reflection. As teachers, we view ourselves as coaches guiding you in this process.

Studio-based

The programme is studio-based. You will also have access to computer labs, a materials workshop and a prototyping lab for electronics, sensor and microprocessor programming.

Group work in multidisciplinary teams

The primary method of learning is through group work in multidisciplinary teams with classmates and other stakeholders. Abilities to work in teams and with others – including user communities – are important parts of our curriculum, and several projects are organised to practice doing this.

Humanistic approach

With our humanistic approach, you will be practicing qualitative research approaches to support your design of tangible artefacts as well as digital and interactive services, systems and artefacts. We emphasize an understanding of people in their use situations.

Reflective and experimental design thinking and practical doing

Prototyping in the studio and real-world contexts is an integral part of becoming an interaction designer.

To practice reflective and experimental design activity, projects and courses integrate seminars and hands-on workshops introducing students to, among other things, ethnographic fieldwork, visualisation, low- and high-fidelity prototyping, microprocessor programming and video sketching, as well as evaluation of use qualities. All these practices are backed up by literature references and examples.

The thesis project

Your thesis project will be a combination of a design project and reflective writing that will involve communicating and discussing your design work. This is one result of a student's work in Thesis Project I.

Working environments

Students have access to studio space, and we encourage a healthy studio culture. This is where we conduct group-work, seminars, workshops, presentations and discussions. Close by there is a well-equipped materials workshop and a physical prototyping lab for electronics and sensor work. Additionally, we often use the facilities at the MEDEA research centre for final presentations, exhibitions, seminars and programme-meetings.

Career opportunities

Students enter the programme with different kinds of expertise, from art and design to engineering and social sciences. Upon graduation, you will have built a strong understanding of how your particular skills play a role in interaction design and how they combine with other specialities of fellow designers.

Potential positions

Most alumni move on to positions as interaction designers, user experience specialists or usability architects in the ICT, telecom and media industries. For some, this involves fine-tuning the interfaces and interactions of current products to users' needs; other interaction designers work on concept development for future products and services. Yet other alumni find their calling in strategic positions where the role of interaction design is considered in relation to market and business development.

Some interaction designers are also found in the role of change agents in public organisations and NGOs.


Degree

Master's Degree (60 credits).

Degree of Master of Science (60 Credits) with a Major in Interaction Design.

*OR (if you choose two years programme)

Master's Degree (120 credits).

Degree of Master of Science (120 Credits) with a Major in Interaction Design.




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Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Read more
Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people.

A range of modules are available to enhance your knowledge, develop skills and further your CPD. Credits can be gained on a standalone modular basis or used to achieve one of the School of Social Work, Care and Community’s CPD target awards.

COURSE OUTLINE

The module adopts an experiential learning approach which gives students the opportunity to participate in shared reflective activities through a variety of methods such as group problem-solving tasks.

Using theories and concepts of social pedagogy this module aims to introduce relationship based approaches to participatory practice; as a way of working with people. Students will be supported to consider how a focus on the social relations between and among staff and service users; and how the use of dialogue and critical reflection can help us understand events and interactions in practice. The module will also enable students to explore the value of practical and creative approaches to engage with service users.

The module covers topics including:
-Relationships
-Social learning
-Social justice
-Practical and creative approaches
-Developing risk competence
-Reflection
-The history of social pedagogy

LEARNING OUTCOME & AIMS

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
-Critically appraise concepts of social pedagogy and how they are relevant to social care and social work
-Consider critically the benefits of adopting a social pedagogical approach to working with people
-Demonstrate an ability to apply social pedagogy’s core values and skills in their work
-Critically explain how the theoretical approaches taught can be applied to the understanding of individuals
-Critically consider how ideas about, and understanding of social pedagogy can be used to inform practice with different service user groups.

INDUSTRY LINKS & PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

We have great links with employers including household names such as Sony, BAE Systems and Apple. We also have links with the smaller companies in the region and offer help and assistance to more than 1,000 of these – with many of our graduates staying in the region it is important we develop these relationships.

WORK EXPERIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

At UCLan we work with a range of businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme. Your course tutor will advise on opportunities available within your course and the UCLan Careers Team can provide help, advice and guidance on how to apply for them and how to make the most of these opportunities.

GRADUATE CAREERS

The UCLan Careers Team offer ongoing supportive careers advice and guidance throughout your course and after graduation, along with a range of modules, work experience opportunities and events to help you acquire the skills to make you stand out to potential employers in today’s competitive market.

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