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Explore how people participate in society in pursuit of social justice. Designed for experienced practitioners, this MA combines coursework with work-based learning and action research. Read more
Explore how people participate in society in pursuit of social justice. Designed for experienced practitioners, this MA combines coursework with work-based learning and action research.

You’ll gain:
-Knowledge of different conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to participation
-An understanding of how to apply these approaches to development and governance challenges
-Practical skills in participatory process and research
-Abilities of critical thinking, analysis and reflective practice
-Personal development of values and attitudes useful in pursuing participatory approaches

At IDS, our work is part of a global research collaboration. We work to identify and implement alternative approaches to social change. You’ll learn how to respond to local situations, and bridge operational practice with research and policy change.

Accreditation

This course is IAC/EADI accredited. Sussex is proud to be the first UK university to gain this accreditation.

The International Accreditation Council for Global Development Studies and Research wishes to influence proactively the process of quality assurance for global development studies and has developed a state-of-the-art accreditation system.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through core modules and options. You’ll be assessed through:
-Assignments
-A learning plan
-Module participation
-Progress reports
-Portfolio items
-Presentations
-A 15,000-word synthesis paper

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates work in:
-Conservation
-Agriculture
-Food
-Finance
-State ministries
-UN agencies such as UNESCO
-Government departments such as DFID
-NGOs including ActionAid

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MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at one of the world's leading arts organistions as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. Read more
MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at one of the world's leading arts organistions as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. The programme is jointly taught by the Learning and Participation department at Southbank Centre and the Department of Education and Professional Studies at King's.

Key benefits

- A unique collaboration between King's College London and the Southbank Centre.

- Innovative programme for current and aspiring educators in arts and culture.

- Unrivalled location, allows students access to the wealth of cultural resources and institutions on the South Bank.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/education-in-arts-and-cultural-settings-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings offers an exciting opportunity to study at a world-class centre for music, dance, visual arts and literature where learning and participation is central to its artistic programme as well as being taught by leading academics in education research and teaching at King's. The programme is jointly taught by staff at Southbank Centre and the Department of Education and Professional Studies at King's.

The programme is relevant to those who currently work, or those who aspire to work, within education, learning and participation in arts and cultural organisations and related sectors. Students will be encouraged to develop their academic research skills to become reflexive educators working in arts and cultural settings.

The MA offers teaching in methodologies used for designing, delivering and managing education programmes as well as for working at the interface between education and culture. Learning will be set against the background of current theoretical debates around cultural value, education, audience development, social inclusion, culture and identity, professional ethics within the cultural sector, and the economics and ‘social’ value of art and culture.

- Course purpose -

MA Education in Arts & Cultural Settings is an innovative new teaching collaboration between the Department of Education & Professional Studies at King's and the Learning and Participation team at Southbank Centre. The programme is relevant to those who currently work, or those who aspire to work, within education, learning and participation in arts and cultural organisations and related sectors.

- Course format and assessment -

Southbank Centre research project; compulsory workshops in core transferable research-related skills; specialist taught modules; written assignments; project work; presentations.

Please note that most of the taught sessions take place in the evening from 5.30pm.

Career prospects

Education/Learning-related roles within arts and cultural organisations; career enhancement in art education; further studies.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Read more

Summary

The Special Educational Needs (SEN) programme investigates issues involved in the education and development of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities and disadvantages. Our programme is founded upon a commitment to forms of education which enable the participation, learning and development of all.

Students studying on the programme engage with aspects of theory, policy and practice relevant to international and local contexts. With its international profile, this programme brings together teachers and other professionals working directly with children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages, as well as policy-makers and managers in areas of SEN and Inclusive Education.

On the MA Special Educational Needs, students choose between two distinct pathways, Inclusive Perspectives or Psychological Perspectives, which reflect different theoretical traditions and approaches to practice, provision and policy within the field of special educational needs, disability and inclusion. Both pathways are relevant to mainstream and special education contexts.

The Inclusive Perspectives pathway emphasises the application of inclusive and person-centred values and critical educational analysis. Concepts and theories such as person-centred education; participation and ‘voice’; the social model of disability and difference; and human rights and equalities are used to consider educational practice, provision, policy and systems relating to pupils experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

The Psychological Perspectives pathway emphasises the use and application of psychological theories. Concepts and theories of cognition, educational testing, and social and emotional development are central in developing psychologically informed understandings of children and young people experiencing difficulties in educational settings.

Students greatly benefit from engaging with the insights, experiences and perspectives of other course members, from a diverse range of contexts and backgrounds. The combination of their own experiences, insights gained from others on the course and the theoretical resources offered by learning within the modules, enables students to deepen their understanding of, and to be able to challenge, the barriers that hinder the learning, development and participation of children and young people with learning difficulties, disabilities or disadvantages.

The teaching provided on modules is informed by active research and scholarship in the field of Inclusive Education and SEN practice and policy. All lecturers leading modules on the programme have high level specialist qualifications, teaching and leadership experience in the field of Education, SEN and Inclusive Education.

Content

All students complete a common module which takes a broad view of key perspectives and issues in SEN, it also introduces the psychological and inclusive perspectives. From here, students undertake specialist modules within the programme, depending on their chosen pathway.

Inclusive Perspectives Pathway content: Students critically explore the issues involved in children’s behaviour using sociological approaches. You will reflect on your own and society's beliefs about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ behaviour, which often relate to medical and psychological foundations of schools’ policies and practices. The social pedagogical approach is also explored as a basis for inclusive teaching and learning. A critical analysis of instrumentalist/functionalist approaches to teaching is developed with a view to enhancing holistic development and the participation of pupils as a means of addressing barriers to the inclusivity of the classroom.

Psychological Perspectives Pathway content: On this route students engage with the idea that socially and emotionally well-adjusted students perform better at school, whilst social and emotional aspects of learning have become marginalised in a highly competitive education system. The use of psychometric testing is covered, with an exploration of its appropriate uses (students can gain a Certificate of Competency in Educational Testing, accredited by the British Psychological Society, from successfully undertaking this module).

Optional modules are available to students on both pathways which focus on Dyslexia as a Specific Learning Difficulty and on Autism in Education. Students also have an option, instead of taking a taught optional module, to take a (non-taught) Independent Study module to learn about a specific issue relevant to their pathway and interests, which is not taught about in the programme.

The final module is an independent research-based enquiry (either a Dissertation or Practice-Based Research Project), which is founded upon the pathway perspective chosen, but is also subject to the student’s choice of topic.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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This course offers you the opportunity to study Politics at an advanced and specialised level, emphasising the interplay between the national, regional and global arenas. Read more
This course offers you the opportunity to study Politics at an advanced and specialised level, emphasising the interplay between the national, regional and global arenas. The underpinning theme of the MA Politics is participation; an issue that has, and looks likely to continue to be a key debate within political discourse.

Throughout the course you will have the unique opportunity to explore this theme through combining academic research skills with a period of work-based learning – either through existing links you might have with an organisation/institution, or through links established throughout the course.

We welcome applications from UK, EU and international students.

Why choose this course?

- Gain an advanced and critical understanding of the discipline, whilst enhancing your research and employability skills.
- Learn from research active staff who have a proven track record delivering a high quality student experience.
- Integrate yourself into NTU's research culture by attending the Politics and International Relations Divisional Research Seminars, and NTU's annual Alternative Futures conference.

Core modules

Core modules may include:

Citizens, Values and Political Participation;
Political Party Development;
Researching Political Issues;
Dissertation or work-based research project.

Plus one from the following optional modules:
Sustainability, Citizenship and Identity;
Global Governance and International Institutions.

For more information about the modules you may study please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/mapolitics

Assessment

Each module employs a range of assessment methods which, through their combination of both summative and formative forms, seeks to encourage a strongly developmental approach to learning. The majority of assessments will be written-based, ranging from article reviews, essays and portfolios. At least two modules will also involve individual presentations, involving both peer and tutor-led feedback.

Study and Support

Each module on the MA Politics adopts an explicitly national, regional and/or global perspective on a range of political, economic, social and environmental issues. Most of its modules are team-taught, which allows for a responsive and varied curriculum which reflects the individual and collective research interests of the team. All modules have been designed and selected specifically to adhere to the overarching theme of participation.

Support within the Division of Politics and International Relations is supplemented by effective School-based academic and pastoral support, which is widely publicised and used well by existing students. If you are an international student you will have the option of in-sessional English language support to help you with developing and sustaining your writing skills.

The MA Politics has regular Course Committees where a representative of your course can share your experiences and provide on-going feedback; feedback we value very highly and will encourage you – and the course team – to reflect on continually as the course progresses.

Skills development

You will acquire a range of transferable skills, such as the ability to critically analyse complex issues, apply advanced research methodologies, communicate effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences and work in a self-directed way. You will also develop your ability to find and manage information effectively. In the research methods training, you will enhance your numeracy skills and employ the major software political scientists use to interrogate research findings.

Career development opportunities

NTU has a justified reputation among the UK's universities for the high level of employability of its graduates. While the primary aims of a university course have traditionally been intellectual in nature and specific to the subject(s) under study, NTU realises the importance of the role of higher education in training graduates to move into the labour market. The MA Politics will provide you with a range of transferable skills which will be essential to employment in a range of occupations.

Alongside providing such transferable skills, we believe that the optional pathway through the Dissertation module will strongly enhance your employability skills and, more generally, the course's engagement with contemporary global issues – particularly those of participation, sustainability and citizenship – will ensure that your knowledge and ‘openness' to the wider world is up-to-date and relevant.

Scholarships

The School of Social Sciences offers a number of competitive scholarships for our full-time Masters courses. For more information please visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3scholarships

Want to find out more? Come along to one of our postgraduate Open Evening. Visit http://www.ntu.ac.uk/s3events for further information

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This distance learning LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge of key areas of law relevant to international business. Read more
This distance learning LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge of key areas of law relevant to international business.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for those looking to develop a career in international business or law. Applicants to the course are likely to be recent graduates seeking to improve career prospects in international business and law or professionals working in international business, finance or international business law seeking to develop their expertise. As the emphasis of the programme is on the practical and problem solving aspects of the law, it will also help those who may not possess a legal background.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their advanced legal studies by enrolling on the PhD or MPhil programmes offered by The City Law School.

The nature of the LLM as a distance learning programme means there is no requirement to enter the UK, so you do not require a visa if you are an overseas student.

Objectives

The programme is designed with one aim in mind: flexibility. As the programme is delivered online, students have the freedom to study in their own working environment and at their individual pace. Technology-enhanced learning environments support the student experience and students also have access to City's extensive range of legal databases, including e-journals and e-books.

This flexible, part-time LLM is designed to provide you with specialist knowledge and help to broaden your existing knowledge of the legal rules which impact on international business. You will acquire legal and research skills to help enhance your career prospects as an international business professional or legal practitioner.

On successful completion of the LLM International Business Law by distance learning, you will have gained specialist knowledge in the key areas of law from an international business perspective and will have acquired transferable skills essential to understanding and succeeding in international business.

Academic facilities

The LLM International Business Law is delivered entirely online via distance learning via City's virtual learning environment Moodle. All resources used on the programme are available online via Moodle and the Library. You are welcome to connect with your module leaders via email or arrange appointments to speak on Skype or meet in person if you are in London.

As a distance learning student you have access to the facilities, including the libraries, dedicated law libraries and Student Centre at City. You are also welcome to attend public events/lectures and use the on-campus facilities if you are in London.

Scholarships

New students will be invited to apply for a scholarship which will be awarded at the start of the programme and applied to the cost of the first module. Decisions will be made on the basis of applicants' academic merit, financial need and 250-words statement.

Prizes

Progressing students (on progression from the first module, Foundations of Law in International Business, to the elective stage) will be eligible for excellence awards. Excellence awards will be applied to the cost of the second module. Decisions will be made on the basis of the students' top performance on the Foundations module.

Teaching and learning

The programme provides you with interactive learning opportunities, combining a range of learning technologies. Whilst it is in essence a self-directed study course, there is also an emphasis on interactive engagement, using learning activities such as discussion forums and chat rooms to help you extend your learning and work collaboratively with your colleagues.

Learning will be facilitated by:
-Virtual learning environment (VLE) as e-learning platform
-High quality module learning packs written by our experts and available online
-Online academic support and personal tutoring (e.g. via email or webchats)
-Interactive multimedia content
-Virtual classroom environment (e.g. via discussion boards or Adobe Connect)
-24-hour IT support
-Online access to our extensive library resource database.

Each module is facilitated by an e-tutor who will offer academic and technical support as required. To enrol on the programme, you are required to have easy access to a computer or laptop that has a minimum technical specification and good internet access. We will provide you with an email account and secure access to your virtual learning environment. You are expected to regularly submit work online and engage in online activities.

Assessment

On a weekly basis, you will receive feedback via the discussion board per each discussion thread. The Learning Packs will contain self-assessment questions, and tutors will provide formative feedback on your responses to these questions. Participation on taught modules is a pre-requisite for sitting the final assessment. Participation is mandatory and is therefore assessed as a pass/fail summative assessment. The activity requiring participation may vary from module to module, however, a standard will be maintained across all modules. For instance, if a module requires participation vis-à-vis posting messages/responses on a module discussion board and there are eight weekly opportunities to do so, you will be required to submit four posts (50%) for assessment. Each post must be sufficient in length (i.e. approximately 500 words). You are expected to participate in all online activities.

Summative assessment of the taught modules that comprise the degree will be by coursework only (3,500 words). It is considered that you will obtain the greatest academic benefit and satisfaction from researching a topic, reflecting on it and providing considered arguments in relation to it, as well as affording the opportunity to explore particular topics in greater depth. All coursework must be submitted via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Email submissions will not be accepted.

You will be offered a range of assessment titles in each subject. Additional titles may be added to reflect any developments in the subject occurring during the teaching of the module, enabling you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues and to respond to the most up-to-date information available.

Modules

The distance learning LLM in International Business Law programme consists of taught modules of 150 credits (five modules at 30 credits each) and a compulsory Dissertation module of 30 credits.

In the first academic term, all students are required to take the Core module, Foundations of Law in International Business (30 credits). Upon successful completion of the Core module, you will select any further four taught modules from the range of available subjects. Students are free to take one or two modules each academic term.

All modules run over a period of 10 weeks (10 units). Each module requires approximately 300 hours of study and students will normally spend between 25 and 30 hours a week on each module, comprised mainly of self-directed and on-line hours. Typically, once all taught modules have been successfully completed, students proceed to the Dissertation (30 credits).

Elective modules - the elective modules will draw from a variety of sources of law, including laws from different systems of law (European Union Law, international law and the English common law) to make your learning experience more rewarding. The programme will take an internationalist and comparative legal approach wherever appropriate, an approach that is more enriching for professionals who work in a global environment. This distinguishes The City Law School distance learning LLM from most other LLMs offered by UK universities. The elective modules (30 credits each) currently offered on the LLM International Business Law include:
-Dispute resolution in international commerce
-E-commerce law
-International corporation law
-International investment law
-Law of international trade
-Legal aspects of international finance
-Privacy and data protection laws
-Regulation of information technology and intellectual property

Dissertation - the requirement to complete a 10,000-word Dissertation reflects the assumption, and the concerns of employers, that an LLM graduate should display a high standard of competence in research and a capacity for original thought. Dissertation supervision will be undertaken by internal members of staff and visiting lecturers ensuring that expert guidance is available to all. Where it is appropriate for a student to be supervised by a visiting lecturer, because of the subject area of the dissertation, the student should ensure that they have agreed in advance methods of communication including the mode and frequency of contact.

Career prospects

By the end of the programme, you will not only have gained specialist knowledge in key areas of law from an international business perspective but will have also acquired transferable skills essential to understanding, and succeeding in, the world of International Business Law. With this sound basis, you will be well placed for developing a career in international business or law.

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The aims of the MA in Global Justice are to. - Develop students' understanding of how to evaluate the justice of institutions and the rightness of individual conduct at the international and global levels;. Read more
The aims of the MA in Global Justice are to:

- Develop students' understanding of how to evaluate the justice of institutions and the rightness of individual conduct at the international and global levels;

- Encourage and assist students to make critical evaluations of political and ethical principles and the roles they should play in politics and ethics on a global scale;

- Foster students' awareness and critical interest in a wide range of contemporary global issues of political and ethical significance;

- Develop students' ability to analyse topics of global political and ethical controversy with philosophical rigour.

Key benefits

- World-famous teaching staff: Prospective students interested in global ethical issues will in many cases already have read books and other materials written by the academics giving the lectures on this course. These experts’ names are on UG reading lists worldwide (ex: Professor Thomas Pogge, Yale; Professor Allen Buchanan, Duke; Professor Dale Jamieson, NYU; and several leading King’s professors, such as Professors Jonathan Glover, Leif Wenar and Raymond Plant). As such students will be taught by the top leaders in the field, unrivalled by any competitors, at a reasonable cost.

- Dynamic and interactive online teaching: Teaching Fellows will offer students the opportunity to engage in live, interactive online seminars. Students will be encouraged to respond to lectures and readings by recording their views in preparation for seminars, and will be able to communicate with the Teaching Fellows outside of the seminar context through email or Skype. Online technology will encourage students to network with fellow students by asking and answering questions in student forums, visiting chat rooms, and collaborating on group projects.

- Career advantage: Graduates of the degree will gain knowledge and skills that will help them advance careers in government ministries, multinational organisations, the private sector and NGOs. The social networking element of the online provision will equip students with a worldwide cohort of contacts that they can call on as their careers progress.

- Accessible innovation and prestige: The teaching team aims to ensure that the online programme is accessible to students from all around the world who would otherwise not be able to attain a world-class King’s degree.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/global-justice-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides knowledge and understanding of the following:

Fundamental topics in moral philosophy, and their use in the analysis of global issues including:

1. Key theoretical perspectives on ethics and politics, e.g. utilitarianism. deontology, virtue ethics;
2. Areas of philosophical controversy. e.g. consequentialist vs. rights-based reasoning;
3. Epistemological issues regarding the objectivity of ethical principles and our understanding of them.

Fundamental topics in political philosophy and political theory, and their use in the analysis of global issues including:

4. Key theoretical perspectives, e.g. liberalism, libertarianism, egalitarianism;
5. Areas of theoretical controversy, e.g. over justice, equality, welfare, rights, liberty and its boundaries, the nature and limits of state action;
6. The translation of theoretical principles into recommendations for i) institutional reform and design ii) the regulation of corporations and other organisations and iii) individual action.

The political and ethical dimensions of specific areas of global concern, such as:

7. Climate Change;
8. International Justice;
9. Human Rights.

- Course purpose -

The programme will develop students':

- Ability to identify and isolate the underlying conceptual issues in political and ethical debates;

- Precision of thought and expression of complex concepts;

- Ability to engage critically with and evaluate challenging literature;

- Ability to identify, critically evaluate, and deploy arguments effectively in support of specific conclusions;

- Ability to use philosophical frameworks critically and effectively.

- Course format and assessment -

Summative assessments of learning outcomes 1-10 will consist of coursework in essay and dissertation form.

There will also be a 10% component of the final mark for quality of online participation:

(a) After each online seminar, you will be marked for the quality of your participation in the seminar.

(b) At the end of the term, the lecturer will review your contributions to the various online student fora.

The participation mark will be composed 50-50 of the seminar and forum participation marks.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This course has been developed for those who are currently working as special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs). You learn to lead, develop and evaluate inclusive cultures, systems and approaches to education. Read more
This course has been developed for those who are currently working as special educational needs coordinators (SENCOs).
You learn to lead, develop and evaluate inclusive cultures, systems and approaches to education. These new skills help you to make a difference in your school and to the wellbeing, participation and achievement of children and young people who have special educational needs and disabilities.

You reflect on, analyse and respond to current issues of practice through professional learning in the workplace and you are supported by experienced local special educational needs and disability (SEND) professionals. You develop:
-A critical understanding of the values, principles and dilemmas of inclusive practices and policies.
-A specialist knowledge base enabling you to obtain, evaluate and communicate current information regarding special educational needs and disabilities.
-An active community of practice with SENCOs and experienced SEN professionals supporting your leadership of change.
-The skills and practices of reflective practice to develop effective partnership working with pupils, families and colleagues.
-The skills and practices of professional enquiry to enable you to evaluate the impact of practice.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/pgcert-special-educational-needs-coordination

You have access to current SEND practitioners who share up-to-date practice. Your university tutors specialise in SEND and have complementary experience across age phases and special and mainstream schools. Their expertise supports your understanding of inclusive principles and practice, using research and theory to support your reflections, enquiries and study skills.

You complete a number of assessments that are focused on the development of effective practice in your school. Assessments consist of two practice-based portfolios:

Portfolio 1 – SENCO as manager
This consists of:
-An evaluation of school policy relating to special educational needs and disability in relation to current national policy and guidance. This involves engaging with parent voice.
-An evaluation of the school’s additional provision for children and young people with special educational needs. This includes an analysis of school data and lesson study to inform effective provision mapping.

Portfolio 2 – SENCO as leader
This consists of:
-Developing the role of SENCO as leader through evaluating and developing effective partnerships with other stakeholders.
-Designing professional guidance materials to support colleagues in making effective provision for children with particular SEN or disability.

Course structure

12 months part time. You attend up to ten teaching/tutorial/study days which are spread over the course duration. Starts September

Core modules
-SENCO as manager: evaluation and developing policy and provision
-SENCO as leader: people, principles and partnerships

Modules
Modules cover:
-Inclusive principles and values
-Social and medical modules of disability
-The role of the SENCO in analysing organisational needs and managing change
-The national policy context for SEN and disability including the SEN Code of Practice
-Equality and data protection requirements
-Formulating and reviewing policy
-Accessing and interpreting school data - tracking progression and participation
-Provision mapping
-Designing, evaluating and reporting on systems and provision
-Lesson study and action research methods
-Rights and duties under equality legislation
-Person centred planning and partnership working
-The local context for the implementation of Child Assessment Framework (CAF), school support and Education Health Care Plans (EHCPs)
-Leadership
-Role of the SENCO in leading professional learning
-Holistic assessment
-Researching and evaluatiing current knowledge and debates regarding high incidence special educational needs and disabilities
-Theories of learning and development
-Identifying needs and barriers to learning and participation
-Systematic evaluation in professional contexts

Assessment:
-Portfolio 1: evaluation and review of policy, and analysis of additional provision for children and young people with SEN.
-Portfolio 2: evaluation of partnership with stakeholders, and design of professional guidance materials.

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The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. Read more
The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. It explores the evolution of development theories and how successful national development needs to be founded on the integration of sound socio-economic analysis with an enabling legal environment. The contents are multi-disciplinary, ranging from exploration of key topics in development economics, to the rule-of-law and the foundation pillars for the creation and effective operation of development institutions. In addition, the Programme imparts a full spectrum of competencies needed for project cycle management (PCM).

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER:

PART I -DISTANT LEARNING

A self-learning tutor-assisted period of 12 weeks’ duration designed to introduce the participants to the pre-requisite entry level knowledge in the disciplines of Part II, namely economics, institutional design, sociology, law and project management. The training materials will include selected chapters from key textbooks in addition to a number of articles from well-known journals. The learning content will be posted on the programme’s website while the participants will be provided with at least one prescribed textbook. Two weeks subsequent to arrival in Turin the participants will sit for two written examination covering the topics of Part I.

PART II - FACE-TO-FACE LEARNING

Module I: Introduction to developmentactors and institutions
• Introduction to development aid, international donor institutions – UN system, IMF and World Bank
• Project cycle management: logical framework approach, operational planning, budget, monitoring and evaluation

Module II: Economics of Development

• Economic development theories
• The global economic crisis
• Strategies of economic development: selected countries
• The role of FDI in development
• Environmental economics
• Inequality and poverty
• Cost and benefi t of migration in sending and destination countries

Module III: Legal concepts in development

• Enabling legal frameworks for effective and sustainable development
• The role and function of key actors in development, inter alia, multilateral and bilateral development agencies and NGOs.
• Human Rights based approach to development programming
• Labour Standards with emphasis on gender and prevention of child labour

Module IV: Institutional development and social analysis

• Factors infl uencing “institutional effi ciency “
• Political regimes and instruments of participation
• Development, politics and culture: perspectives from political science
• Family, gender and participation (special reference to problems of health and education)
• NGOs management

This face-to-face part is the core learning component of the Master. The participants will be asked to sit for three written exams in order to assess their learning achievement in the subject matter of Part II.

PART III - INDEPENDENT WORK- thesis preparation

This part is dedicated to individual or group formulation of a full-fledged project document in response to a perceived “development need” in a sector and country related to the participants’ work or field of interest.

Deadline for Application: 26 September 2015



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The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Read more
The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Practical experience is gained through individual and group professional practice assignments, a consulting project and an internship placement, both of which are conducted with host companies.

Applicants must have a good first degree in biological, medical or physical sciences or a financial or legal background and demonstrate a strong interest in pursuing a business career in the life science sector. MBE students are based at the Institute of Biotechnology and have a close affiliation to Judge Business School, a combination that provides an unparalleled educational experience and an opportunity to learn from leading scientists, entrepreneurs and academics at the University of Cambridge.

Learning is based on real business examples and lectures and case studies are frequently delivered by senior company executives. There are optional opportunities to gain a global perspective of the industry sector during a study tour to a international biotechnology business cluster, an event which may be planned and led by members of the class. Additional costs are incurred by students who elect to participate in these activities or incur other discretionary expenses associated with participation in the programme.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egcempbse

Course detail

The educational aims of the M.Phil. programme in Bioscience Enterprise are to:

- Enhance understanding of life sciences and related technological developments;
- Foster research and analytical skills and methodologies;
- Develop written and verbal communication skills;
- Provide knowledge of the ethical, legal and regulatory issues associated with bringing scientific advances to market;
- Develop applied business skills, including those that enable students to:
*identify potential business opportunities arising from research in life sciences and related areas;
*exploit entrepreneurial opportunities;
*undertake senior executive roles within biotechnology companies and other commercial entities.

Other aims of the programme are to:

- Provide a coherent and supportive learning environment, with students working closely with teachers drawn from both academic and biotechnology business executive backgrounds and whose teaching is informed by their own knowledge and business expertise;
- Develop new areas of teaching in response to advances of scholarship and the community;
- Continue to attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, nationality, background, gender or physical disability.

Learning Outcomes

Students gain an understanding of:

- Life sciences, including fundamental concepts of basic science and demonstration of how contemporary biological and medical research leads to exploitable science and commercial products;
- Business, including commercial and analytical skills required in biotechnology and healthcare related businesses;
- Management, including strategy, organisation, leadership, marketing and financing of technology companies;
- Technology transfer, from academia to industry and from industry to industry, including the concepts of licensing, partnering, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions;
- Law and intellectual property frameworks, relating to companies, individuals and shareholders in different jurisdictions;
- Social and ethical issues, including fundamental constraints when applying scientific research to the development of new bioscience products;
- Global biotechnology, including comparisons of the current industry status in the UK, Europe, USA and elsewhere.

Format

Science and technology, business and transitionary modules are taught in each term, integrating commercial know-how with advances in research and demonstrating the many complex issues associated with bringing discovery and innovation from the laboratory to the market. The programme is highly participatory and includes practical elements in the form of interdisciplinary projects, workshops, case studies and business planning activities. Students have opportunities to undertake a consulting project and a technology company internship placement, and to gain an international perspective during a (self-funded, optional, student planned and led) study tour to a biotechnology business cluster in the EU or USA.

The MBE class is taught as a single entity. There are no elective components and all students follow the same syllabus. The class offers a professional practice experience and a high level of participation is expected. All lectures and course components are mandatory.

The department is renowned for its practical and successful approach to biotechnology entrepreneurship and the exploitation of bioscience inventions. Students benefit from a unique combination of teaching and mentoring from experienced business and academic contributors. The faculty pursue a variety of research interests and the application of the resulting technologies has led to the founding of many spin-out companies. Our innovative achievements and strong Master's teaching were recognised by the Queen's Anniversary Award (2007).

Placements

In April and May of each year, MBE students spend the majority of their time working in a company placement, carrying out research with a commercial or business dimension. Students are encouraged at this time to put into practice the lessons learnt from the academic aspects of the programme as well as to demonstrate originality of research and analysis. The MBE staff provides considerable support to students in regard to both identifying suitable projects and during the placement itself.

It is important that the project undertaken relates to the field of ‘bioscience enterprise’, addresses a defined research question and affords students the opportunity to collect quantitative and qualitative data. The subsequent analysis forms the basis of a substantial dissertation and the findings are also presented at a Symposium held at the end of the year, as well as in the form of conclusions and recommendations for the host company.

Assessment

A 10,000 word dissertation is an important aspect of course assessment. Passing this element of the course is crucial to attainment of the degree. The work is based on data collected during a research placement in a company, the analysis of which forms the basis of the work. The dissertation should show evidence of innovative thinking and must not be simply a review and subsequent extrapolation of previously published work.

Written submissions include in-depth science and technology in business papers, up to 10 essays of no more than 4000 words, a number of short reports and critical appraisals, a consulting project report and a dissertation of no more than 10,000 words based on research and analysis conducted during the internship placement. At the conclusion of the dissertation students make an assessed presentation. The Examiners may ask candidates to take an oral exam at the conclusion of the course.

Attainment is continuously assessed, with particular emphasis on practical activities, participation and learning through team-work in the research, preparation, and delivery of presentations. Where possible group work reflects the activities of a professional business environment.

Students are also encouraged to participate in extracurricular enterprise activities, including entrepreneurial competitions within the University and further afield, and submit a business development plan as one of the course assignments.

Continuing

Students completing this course usually continue their career in the life sciences commercial sector but a number also at the conclusion of the course apply for PhD research programmes in either science or management disciplines.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Students normally fund their studies through savings, loans, by a grant from their employer or by securing a scholarship from either a Cambridge Trust or other awarding body. The competition for scholarship awards is intense and candidates are advised that only a small percentage of the highest-achieving applicants are successful.

A limited number of bursaries are available to MBE students through the generosity of the Chris R. Lowe Carpe Diem Bursary programme and at times from other sources associated with the course. Candidates who meet the eligibility criteria set by the donors and are offered a place to study on the course will be automatically considered for these awards as part of their application process. Usually these awards are made to students on the basis of economic need, or those who live in or have studied in and intend to pursue their future careers in the UK.

Please note that the programme bursaries, whilst at times substantial, are not intended to cover all the costs associated with living and studying at Cambridge and therefore applicants must ensure they have access to sufficient funds to cover the balance of their tuition and College fees and maintenance needs.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests in community and youth work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-community-youth-work/. Read more
We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests in community and youth work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-community-youth-work/

Current research topics include:

-‘Community Participation in New Deal for Communities Programmes’
-‘Participation, Power, Authority and Empowerment: Case Studies from West London’
-‘Parental Participation and Local Budgeting: Comparing and Contrasting Experiences in the UK and in a Southern Context’

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for the student to continue their research to a PhD.

You will be assessed by thesis and viva voce.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Jennifer Mayo-Deman.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies has human relationships at its heart.

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

-understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
-become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
-change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

How detailed a research proposal are we looking for?

Obviously what you put on the form and exactly what you end up researching may be rather different, but in order to judge whether or not to offer you a place, the Department needs to know whether you have the broad outlines of a viable project. This means:

a project that is both worthwhile and interesting, but not over-ambitious
a project that can realistically be achieved within the confines of PhD on a full-time (4 years typically) or part-time (6 years maximum) basis
we need to be sure that you have thought about it carefully and are fully committed to the research
we need to be sure that you understand what is involved in doing a PhD
your research proposal should give us enough information to be able to interview you (if you are in the UK) or reach a decision as to whether to admit you if you are not based in the UK

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Read more
The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Our new MSc in Elections, Public Opinion and Parties provides students with a thorough grounding in the empirical theories and methods used for exploring and explaining models of party competition, public opinion and voting behaviour.

The degree’s substantive component gives you insights into the reality of political representation and accountability, as well as how political leaders and the media shape and respond to public preferences. The methodological component provides you with valuable analytical and research skills that will prepare you for careers in government, political consultancy, NGOs and research organisations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscelections,publicopinionandparties.aspx

Why choose this course?

the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

offers an advanced grounding in public opinion and political behavior at both a theoretical and empirical level

you will acquire valuable research methods skills that will equip you to carry out independent research and appraise both qualitative and quantitative research

you will acquire genuinely transferable skills that are highly prized in the job market

our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU- funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: intuitions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave 2012) and James Sloam 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and Political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The New Political Communication Unit's research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O'Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick's The Hybrid Media System, Politics and Power (Oxford University Press 2013), Cristian Vaccari's Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (John Hopkins University Press) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O'Loughlin and Laura Roselle's Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford studies in Digital Politics and Ben O'Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- Elections and Voting Behaviour You will be introduced to the main theories of voting behaviour. We will examine why people vote for different political parties and how their behaviour is shaped by the different mobilisation strategies of political parties and other institutional arrangements. We will consider how social divisions are translated in to political divisions, and how the mechanisms of accountability and representation operate in different political and economic contexts. To what extent do people vote along policy lines? To what extent do they vote along social lines? How have these changed over time?

- Public Opinion and political participation In this unit we will examine the various ways in which people try to influence the political process by participating in different types of political activity. We will examine formal types of participation, such as turnout as well as more direct forms of political action, such as participation in protests and social movements. In doing so we will look at how political behaviour has changed over time and consider the implications for representative democracy.

- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS. No prior expertise in maths or statistics is required.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of political behaviour in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- British Political Parties This unit explains what British political parties stand for and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the 'nuts and bolts'of the parties in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- Public Policy This unit examines the policy making process in comparative context. You will gain knowledge about the actors involved in the policy making process: how policy is made and what impact it has on different policy domains in different institutional contexts.

- Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications.You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to elections, public opinion, public policy and parties

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of inquiry

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Systematic Reviews for Public Policy and Practice MSc equips students to work with the increasing number of national and international organisations committed to evidence-informed policy and practice. Read more
The Systematic Reviews for Public Policy and Practice MSc equips students to work with the increasing number of national and international organisations committed to evidence-informed policy and practice. Students learn alongside early career and experienced researchers, policymakers and practitioners from a diverse set of policy sectors and disciplines.

Degree information

The programme will enable you to plan and appraise a systematic review of research in any policy area, to develop a critical appreciation of the full diversity of review approaches and types of research use, and equip you with understanding and skills to help ensure perspectives from the public, practitioners, policymakers and researchers are all considered in research and policy development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Systematic Reviews: Diversity, Design and Debate
-Research Engagement, Participation and Impact
-Social Theory

Optional modules - students choose an optional module from across the UCL Institute of Education's Master's-level offering, including the following:
-Systematic reviews: meta-analysis, qualitative synthesis, and mixed methods synthesis
-Impact Evaluation Methods
-Understanding Research
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation
-Social Policy: Theory, Practice and Research
-Exploring Educational Policy
-Education and Development in Asia
-Planning for Education and Development
-Gender, Education and Development
-Education and International Development: concepts, theories and issues
-Principles, Frameworks and Context of Educational Evaluation and Inspection
-Evaluation and Inspection for Educational Improvement

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 20,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered via online learning or mixed mode (with face-to-face seminars or workshops with online learning). It is assessed by coursework assignments and a 20,000-word dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas, for example one is a project director in mobile technology for learning, while another is a social research manager advising national government. Another graduate works as a senior editor of systematic research reviews.

Employability
Students completing the programme are equipped with enhanced critical thinking skills and, in particular, skills for research design and appraisal, spanning a full range of research purposes and problems.

Why study this degree at UCL?

You will learn from research-active tutors based at the IOE’s EPPI-Centre, which is recognised worldwide for its development of methods for diverse kinds of systematic review, for the production of policy-relevant research, and for research into perspectives and participation. The programme is unique in the way that students study systematic reviews of both qualitative and quantitative data, and a full range of review designs.

The programme can be taken entirely at a distance, or with some face-to-face learning, and so attracts students from across the globe, many of whom are already working for research-focused or policy-making organisations.

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Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.
-Regional policy of data-intensive economics.
-The political ecology and management of natural resources and land use.
-Globalisation.

In geoinformatics:
-Spatial data analysis, new information sources.
-Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications.
-Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research.

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