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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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The Architecture MArch is a two-year full-time Master's degree which, in addition, leads to exemption from ARB/RIBA Part 2. The programme has an international reputation and is generally regarded as one of the leading Part 2 programmes in the UK. Read more
The Architecture MArch is a two-year full-time Master's degree which, in addition, leads to exemption from ARB/RIBA Part 2. The programme has an international reputation and is generally regarded as one of the leading Part 2 programmes in the UK.

Degree information

The MArch unit system of teaching ensures that an open, diverse and critical debate is sustained by the school on what constitutes architecture, and reinforces The Bartlett's ethos that architectural knowledge and expertise is synthesised throughout the student's own projects. Much of the current work by staff and students is at the forefront of developing new intellectual and formal concepts in global architecture discourse.

The programme consists of five core elements. The first year (known as Year Four) comprises three modules, followed by two modules in the final year (known as Year Five). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Year Four
-Advanced Architectural Design I
-Design Realisation (Technology and Professional Practice)
-Advanced Architectural Studies (History and Theory)
-Advanced Architectural Design 2*
-Advanced Architectural Thesis*
*Year Five modules

Dissertation/report
Not applicable.

Teaching and learning
The unit system of teaching is supported by lectures and seminars given by a diverse spectrum of leading practitioners and academics. Design work accounts for 65% of the programme, and assessment is through portfolio, essay, design realisation report, thesis and an interview with an external examiner in Year Five.

Fieldwork
There is one field trip (optional) annually as part of the programme. Maximum cost to student is £500.

Careers

Bartlett graduates are amongst the most sought-after employees by leading and emerging practices including Foster + Partners, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Make, Arup, Zaha Hadid Architects, HOK, and Heatherwick Studio. Other graduates have formed their own practices or forged successful careers in parallel practices such as time-based media, exhibitions and events, urban design, and furniture design and/or film-making.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Architect's Assistant, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
-Architectural Assistant, Foster + Partners
-Architectural Assistant, Haptic Architects
-Architectural Assistant, Níall McLaughlin Architects
-Designer, Heatherwick Studio

Employability
This combination of networks, knowledge and technical expertise makes our graduates some of the most highly valued in the world, with 95% securing employment within six months of graduation. Some choose to progress to further study and teaching, many go on to roles in design and the built environment and with some of the world's top architecture practices.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

The Bartlett has a substantial number of international students from all parts of the world, providing a dynamic global exchange of ideas, views and knowledge. Our research, partnerships, enterprise and knowledge-sharing activities similarly address all kinds of the built environment - from internal spaces, building systems and virtual environments to rural areas, from landscapes and towns to mega-cities. The school has repeatedly been voted "best architectural school in the UK" in The Architects' Journal, AJ100 poll. Over the past 20 years Bartlett nominees for the RIBA President's Medals have won more student awards than any other school.

Located in London, it is at the heart of the world's largest cluster of creative architects and engineering firms, next to the UK's seat of government and finance and has all the resources of a world city to hand.

Successful completion of the programme leads to UCL’s Architecture MArch and, in addition, exemption from Part 2 of the ARB/RIBA examinations.

Study at The Bartlett School of Architecture is enriched by the vibrant community of specialist consultants, partners and research associates who provide valuable contact with industry and academia. Many of our staff are themselves in practice. Our students benefit from the most advanced and broad suite of facilities available in any similar faculty in the EU.

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The MArch Architecture programme is for graduates of architecture with ARB/RIBA Part 1 who wish to gain exemption from ARB/RIBA Part 2. Read more
The MArch Architecture programme is for graduates of architecture with ARB/RIBA Part 1 who wish to gain exemption from ARB/RIBA Part 2. Our aim is to prepare students for the complexities of contemporary architectural practice by providing a rich mix of rigorous academic and professional teaching.

All students choose a design unit within which to undertake their project work, each unit has a different specialism across the themes of; digital surrealism, film and animation, bio-technology, art practice and contemporary culture. The units are led by a highly experienced team of internationally recognised design tutors.

The first year of the programme starts by developing advanced skills in urban design and digital representation that can be applied to a major building project in conjunction with a professionally mentored 'Design Realisation' technical report. Additionally students are exposed to current theoretical trends that form the basis for ambitious speculations on contemporary architecture.

The second year of study takes the aspirations of the students work to a higher level of professional and academic engagement with an integrated advanced architectural design project and a specialist theoretical and, or, technological thesis developed with respect to the students own interests and passions.

The part-time mode is intended for students working in a supportive architectural practice and requires attendance two days a week over three years.

The Department is based in a new state of the art building designed by the award winning architects Heneghan Peng; it is equipped with fourteen rooftop landscapes, cutting edge digital workshops, extensive design studios, a world-class library and two gallery spaces.

Our building is located in the heart of Greenwich, the newest addition to a suite of magnificent buildings that occupy the UNESCO World Heritage site and the location of the Greenwich Prime Meridian.

The aims of the programme are:

- To prepare the student to be an architect
- To enable the student to produce the highest level of architectural design
- To support students to combine the best of practice and academia in creating a design portfolio.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/arc/arcdip

Architecture and Landscape

We need tools to help us create a built environment that is responsive rather than obstructive to its users and to the world around it. At Greenwich we encourage both students and staff to embrace the interconnectedness of design, construction and building management, of landscape architecture and graphic design, and to constantly look at new ways of exploring these areas.

All architecture programmes focus on the urgent necessity to change our living habits in order to design and build a sustainable urban environment.

The construction management programmes are designed to provide students with a high level of understanding of the design, function, construction and statutory requirements for buildings of all classes, and to prepare them for more advanced employment within the construction industry.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Building Design Development (20 credits)
Design Realisation (40 credits)
Theories of Architectural Design (20 credits)
Future Representations (20 credits)
Urban Design Project (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Architectural Design 01 (Project Themes) (40 credits)
Advanced Architectural Design 02 (Major Project) (40 credits)
Architectural Thesis (40 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Building Design Development (20 credits)
Design Realisation (40 credits)
Urban Design Project (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Architectural Design 01 (Project Themes) (40 credits)
Theories of Architectural Design (20 credits)
Future Representations (20 credits)

- Year 3:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Architectural Design 02 (Major Project) (40 credits)
Architectural Thesis (40 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Students are assessed through design projects, course assessment and portfolio assessment.

Professional recognition

The programme has recognition and exemption from the Part 2 Examination in Professional Practice from both ARB (Architects Registration Board) and RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects).

Career options

The programme prepares students for future careers as national and international architects.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/645299/Architecture-ARB_RIBA-PArt-2-Exemption-Dip.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This ARB/RIBA Part 2-accredited course has been retitled from the previously named Graduate Diploma in Architecture to MArch in Architecture. Read more
This ARB/RIBA Part 2-accredited course has been retitled from the previously named Graduate Diploma in Architecture to MArch in Architecture. The course operates within the guidelines stipulated by professional accreditation, but has its own unique character. Being taught in an art-and-design-based faculty means that design is at the heart of our approach.

Key features
-You will gain a comprehensive knowledge of the areas of study required to enter and contribute to architectural practice and architectural discourse.
-You will acquire a critical understanding of architecture as a cultural, social and material practice, with consideration for the ways in which it impacts on human and physical environments.
-You will learn to create coherent, responsible and appropriate architectural designs capable of making a positive contribution to the environment.

What will you study?

During this course, you will develop as architectural designers and thinkers and move towards the ability to engage in architectural practice as independent and reflective practitioners. You will build on and further develop the knowledge, understanding and skill acquired during your first degree and a recommended initial period of work-based learning. The emphasis of this course is therefore to deepen and consolidate existing learning and skill, rather than to introduce a wide range of new subject material.

Assessment

Design projects, reports, seminars, presentations, essays, case studies, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that all modules listed below are compulsory for that level.
Core modules (Level 6)
-Reading Architecture
-Designing Architecture
-Representing Architecture
-Making Architecture

Core modules (Level 7)
-Dissertation
-Thesis

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The second part of our Master of Architecture (MArch) professional qualification is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), enabling MA students to graduate as registered architects. Read more
The second part of our Master of Architecture (MArch) professional qualification is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), enabling MA students to graduate as registered architects.

Our MArch course emphasises design as a research practice. It understands the architect as someone whose cross-disciplinary role enables them to draw upon knowledge from various related disciplines, to develop effective strategies and models for sustainable practice in industry space. This may be within the context of the production of buildings, the spaces between them or the urban contexts in which they occur.

Our School of Architecture has been ranked in the Architecture top ten by the 2016 Guardian University Guide. This course carries full and unconditional prescription from the Architects Registration Board (ARB) as satisfying the Part 2 criteria.

Our MArch course emphasises design as a research practice. It understands the architect as someone whose cross-disciplinary role enables them to draw upon knowledge from various related disciplines, to develop effective strategies and models for sustainable practice. This may be within the context of the production of buildings, the spaces between them or the urban contexts in which they occur.

On this course you'll be able to consolidate your architectural experiences, both in education and in practice, whilst simultaneously questioning your preconceptions of the discipline.

By the end of the course, you'll be equipped to adopt a critical position within the profession and wider society. You'll also be able to initiate and deliver projects which are grounded in design-based research, and continue a process of learning through practice based experimentation and enquiry.

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Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture. Read more
Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture.

As part of the process of becoming a professionally-qualified Architect in the UK, graduates are required to complete a period of supervised ‘practical training', 12 months of which (commonly referred-to as the ‘Year Out') is normally undertaken before commencing full-time academic study at Master's level. This period of practical training constitutes Year 1 of the University of Huddersfield M.Arch course.

Therefore, students who have not previously completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 1. Students who have already completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 2.

Years 2 and Year 3 of the course are design-centred and intended to enable you to explore issues of critical regionalism and tectonic expression in relation to establishing your own theoretical position, through which you will be expected to develop a high degree of sensitivity to the context within which design work is undertaken in geographical, cultural, social and technical terms.

All design projects explore applications of sustainability and encourage a wide and plural outlook appropriate for both developed and developing countries. In this global worldview, understanding of progressive theories of design and the application of advanced construction methods co-exist with concern for the implementation of sustainable technologies, awareness of regional development issues and respect for craft-based building practices.

The rationale and definition of ‘International' both builds upon the studies undertaken as part of the Architecture (International) BA(Hons) degree awarded by the University of Huddersfield and acknowledges the reality of rapidly changing architectural practice in a fast moving, global context. Our course will aim to prepare you for new and emerging forms of practice through the development of your personal learning skills and a deep understanding of the need for flexibility, adaptability, innovation and enterprise in your career.

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Duration. 2 years (full time) or 3 years (part time). Simple timetable. Full-time. Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Part-time. Monday or Friday. Read more
Duration: 2 years (full time) or 3 years (part time)

Simple timetable
Full-time: Monday, Wednesday, Friday
Part-time: Monday or Friday

Entry requirements
All applicants must normally hold a degree in architecture providing exemption from RIBA part 1. Desirably, overseas students should demonstrate that their work has received exemption from RIBA part 1 by undertaking the Architects Registration Board Prescribed Examination, or by giving the department reassurance that this will be successfully completed in the first year of study. Applicants for the part-time course should normally be working in practice. All students are required to attend an interview with a portfolio of work or, if applying from overseas, to send a portfolio of work to the admissions tutor; this may be in a digital format.

Course units (total 240 credits)
Year 1
– Design
– Theory
– Digital Project
– Environmental Technology
– Dissertation
– Practice Management
Year 2
– Design
– Dissertation
– Design Economics
– Theory
– Technology
Part-time students study the same number of units over 3 years.

Course description
The programme provides students who have completed an undergraduate degree in architecture with the opportunity to define their own interests, speculating on a personal response to the design and making of architecture. Architecture is primarily a cultural activity, with significant connections to
theoretical, technological, and historical narratives. The discipline is exceptionally responsive to change, and actively engages with both the internal world of ideas and external realities around us; modernity in the broadest sense is a critical part of the world view of successful architects.

Our aim therefore is to educate reflective and resourceful architecture graduates for the 21st century.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture is a strongly design-based course, underpinned by a firm base in theory and technology. The department is committed to a studio system as being the best medium for the exchange of ideas. Students on the course choose from three design studios identified by subject and theme. Each studio has developed its specialised approach to architecture based on specific responses to contemporary issues in the city, and the developing landscapes around cities. Issues explored include the relationship between architecture and urban design, architecture and popular culture, and architecture, geometry, and structure.

There is an emphasis on the observation and generation of alternative models for the city. This is developed through field trips to destinations such as Beijing, Berlin, Delhi, Dubai, Havana, Hong Kong, Istanbul, Jaipur, Las Vegas, Marrakech, Moscow, St Petersburg, and Tokyo.

Career opportunities
The course is well connected to key practices in London. Many LSBU graduates also work abroad in the Gulf States, China and the Far East, and Russia and the ex-USSR republics.

Students may also use their qualification as an introduction to careers in critical writing, journalism, project management, teaching, media and broadcasting, research, and website or software design.

Typical background of applicant
This course is usually intended for graduates of architecture courses where students have exemption from RIBA part 1. Applicants to this course will have a first degree in architecture (normally a 2:2 Hons or better); however, the university recognises that many individuals develop additional skills during their year out and will interview such applicants with a portfolio of both academic and practice work.

Professional recognition
The course is unconditionally validated by the RIBA, and offers the professional award of RIBA part 2 on successful completion of the course; the course is prescribed by the Architects Registration Board.

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This is an exciting and innovative programme of study. Based in one of the most beautiful and architecturally important cities in the world. Read more

Programme description

This is an exciting and innovative programme of study. Based in one of the most beautiful and architecturally important cities in the world.

The programme combines flexibility with rigour, allowing students to select from an exciting menu of studio courses and a choice of curricular pathways through the degree.

ARB/RIBA
The programme has Architects Registration Board (ARB) prescription and Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) validation. RIBA validation was achieved in 2011. The next RIBA visit is 2017.

For further information about ARB and the prescription of architectural qualifications, visit the ARB website:

Architects Registration Board

Programme structure

You will undertake a series of advanced-level research exercises and design projects, engaging with structural, environmental, cultural, theoretical and aesthetic questions. Non-studio courses encompass technology, Contemporary Architectural Theory and Management Practice and Law.

The programme emphasises studio-based investigation within a stimulating environment that enables creativity, experimentation and critical engagement with architectural design.

It offers the opportunity to select from:

-studios linked across the full two years
-a series of discrete thematic studios that vary from year to year

Many studios engage in collaborative working with other international institutions, research partners and particular user groups. There is a clear emphasis on the relationship between architecture and the city and the evolution of the student’s individual position in current theoretical debate.

During the course of the programme you will complete a comprehensive design project, accompanied by an illustrated report explaining its theoretical, environmental and technical dimensions. Projects are developed by way of drawings, models, digital representations and written reports. The trajectory of your work during the programme is documented in an academic portfolio at the end of the second year.

Career opportunities

The MArch degree forms the second stage in a process that will enable you to register and practise as a professional architect in the UK.

Fees and costs

Additional costs apply to this programme: £50 in year 1 and £150 in year 2; field trips costs of approximately £500-£600; additional computing and printing costs.

Additional programme costs (APCs) are used by programmes in Edinburgh College of Art to cover associated costs such as: basic consumables; equipment purchase, hire and maintenance; computing hardware and software; field trip and excursion expenses; and programme specific events. More detail will be available in programme handbooks.

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The study of architecture requires an enquiring and imaginative mind, to analyse and consider new possibilities for buildings that will improve people’s quality of life. Read more
The study of architecture requires an enquiring and imaginative mind, to analyse and consider new possibilities for buildings that will improve people’s quality of life.

It embodies many issues and challenges: the creation of better places to live, work, and relax; designing buildings and cities that recognise the cultural diversity of the population; proposing ideas that contribute socially and economically to the community; and using imagination and innovation to do all this more responsibly and efficiently for a world with finite resources.

Our MArch Architecture course, which is accredited by the RIBA and ARB, will provide you with the professional and creative skills required for a successful career in architecture. The taught course is complemented by a year's practical experience, allowing you to gain valuable experience of architectural practice. You will also have the fantastic opportunity to travel, whether on study trips to look at the very best of international design or on student exchanges in a partnership institution for 1 semester.

See the website http://www.rgu.ac.uk/architecture-construction-and-surveying/study-options/postgraduate-taught-full-time/architecture

Course detail

At Robert Gordon University Part 1 of professional accreditation is awarded after Year 3, more information can be found in Placements and Accreditations.

Typical Masters unit themed content on the Scott Sutherland blog:
•Masters Unit 1 - Prof Gokay Deveci
•Masters Unit 2 - Prof Alan Dunlop
•Masters Unit 3 - Prof Neil Gillespie

Year 4
•Professional Experience Year (salaried employment)

Year 5
•History and Cultural Context
•Masters Studio 1
•Masters Studio 2
•Research Methods
•Dissertation OR an Erasmus exchange for 1 Semester

Year 6
•Masters Studio 3
•Advanced Building Technology
•Masters Studio 4
•Professional Practice and Management
•Elective

Placements and accreditation

- Study Abroad
You will have the opportunity to follow an exchange programme of study with a partner institution (for one semester in year 5 of the course).

- Professional Accreditation
The MArch Architecture course is accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects. Our RIBA accreditation is renewed on a 4 year cycle and this was unconditionally renewed in 2013.

The course is also accredited by the Architects Registration Board and the Association of Building Engineers.

Careers

This course enables you to progress to the final professional examination (RIBA Part 3) following a period in practical training. Successful completion of this allows you to become a Registered Architect. Exciting career opportunities exist in architectural practices across the world, in both the private and public sectors. Previous graduates have established their own architectural practices, while others hold senior positions in distinguished design firms and multidisciplinary organisations.

How to apply

All course applications for the MArch at Robert Gordon University must be made through UCAS at http://www.ucas.com/apply

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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The Master of Architecture (MArch) Programme at the Leicester School of Architecture (LSA) offers a professional level architectural education. Read more
The Master of Architecture (MArch) Programme at the Leicester School of Architecture (LSA) offers a professional level architectural education. Graduates are able to progress to professional registration examinations allowing access to the legal title of ‘architect’ and to markets, in the UK, EU or other legal jurisdictions. Graduates also progress in Higher Education to taught-courses offering specialized professional interests, or research.

The MArch course challenges emerging professionals to develop a personal stake in the globalised architectural world. Current issues in architectural thought, practices and processes are studied through foundations in historical and philosophical thought, contemporary states of urban inhabitation, challenges to a sustainable ecology, the ramifications of modern technology, legal and economic contexts, and the state of the profession.

Central to the course is a series of advanced design studios that are integrated with studies in the Humanities, Technology and
Environment, Digital Computation and Fabrication, and Professional Studies. In this environment you learn from a mix of leading practitioners, academic educators, visiting professors and your peers, who collectively offer a wide variety of architectural experience and engagement. A degree of flexibility is built into the programme to allow specialised interests to develop in ancillary studies, supported by published and research active academic staff in the Architecture Research Group with concentrations in History and Philosophy, Sustainability (Ethics and Technology), Digital Computation and Fabrication, Housing and a practice based research wing (LSA Atelier). Your academic and professional growth is further supported by the LSA’s extra curricular activities, such as visiting lecturers, symposia, multimedia exhibitions, interdisciplinary engagement in a Faculty that hosts Fashion, Product Design, the Arts and Humanities. International exchange and study abroad options are available in MArch Year 1.

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The MArch programme furthers your creative development through looking at ways of harnessing practice techniques and experience to find poetic readings and make a more architectural response. Read more
The MArch programme furthers your creative development through looking at ways of harnessing practice techniques and experience to find poetic readings and make a more architectural response. It is organised on the atelier system for design work, with options in supporting subjects. This allows for the full development of your skills, knowledge and creativity.

The integration of environmental design with architectural and urban design practice is of ever-increasing importance. Architects and designers able to address these issues are likely to strengthen their career prospects in both the private and public sectors.

Key Facts

Organised on the atelier system.
Engages with the professional practice of architecture.
Thesis is project based and aims to develop personal architectural interests.

Why Choose Us?

The MArch Architecture programme has a number of key benefits:

The purpose-built facilities at the Docklands campus were designed by one of our staff.
As well as its excellent studios there are extensive new workshops, photographic darkrooms and computer suites.
You also make visits to study sites and buildings, cities and landscapes in the UK and abroad.
At the end of year there is a comprehensive exhibition of student work.
You are allocated a personal tutor, whom you meet at least once a week.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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The University of Portsmouth was one of the first institutions to respond to the rapid changes within health and social care by offering a Professional Doctorate in Health and Social Care Disciplines programme. Read more

Why take this course?

The University of Portsmouth was one of the first institutions to respond to the rapid changes within health and social care by offering a Professional Doctorate in Health and Social Care Disciplines programme. This programme started in October 2000, and has been highly successful in its delivery to these professionals.

The Professional Doctorate is an alternative pathway to a doctorate qualification. It is a rigorous programme of advanced study and research, designed specifically to meet the needs of commerce, industry and professional groups and is the professionally oriented counterpart to the more theoretical PhD. It enables students to study a specific subject to the same depth as PhD students, but also allows them to apply learning to their professional practice.

What will I experience?

The Faculty of Science offers seven health and social care programmes at doctorate level:

Doctorate in Biomedical Science (DBMS)
Doctorate in Chiropractic (DChiro)
Doctorate in Health Science (DHealthSci)
Doctorate in Medical Imaging (DMedImg)
Doctorate in Nursing (DNursing)
Doctorate in Pharmacy (DPharm)
Doctorate in Social Work (DSW)

These routes are taught together and this enables students in each cohort to benefit from the experience of others and provides a unique inter-professional learning environment.

The Professional Doctorate is open to a wide range of health and social care professionals, who have an active interest in practice-based research and professional practice issues, wish to attain the highest level of professional and academic achievement and develop their career within the health and social care arena. Relevance and application of the research to the professional environment will be a pivotal feature of the programme and reflection on practice will be integral to the learning process.

This course is recognised internationally as a qualification granted to those who have reached the highest level of professional and academic achievement in their field of endeavour.

What opportunities might it lead to?

On a personal level, successful completion of the Professional Doctorate will offer personal fulfilment, professional development, career enhancement and encourage reflective practice.

The programme aims to enhance personal development planning for continuing professional development and encourage an advanced level of critical, analytical, debating and publishing skills, plus knowledge of the range of different research methods encountered in professional practice.

Within the National Health Service (NHS) a Professional Doctorate is now being seen as an essential academic qualification for attaining higher level posts within the NHS Agenda for Change career framework.

Module Details

This is a part-time course, which has been specifically designed so that it can be available to health and social care professionals from all over the country, to fit with the demands of fulltime employment. The course structure is only offered in a part-time mode and is divided into two parts.

Attendance for Part 1 will be in six study blocks of three days duration spread over two academic years. Typically, students will be required to attend the University for up to 18 days for the whole of Part 1. Attendance for Part 2 will only be required for tutorials, seminars and oral presentations.

Part 1

This is the 'taught' component of the programme, which will equip students with the skills that they will need in preparation for Part 2. Part 1 consists of four units, namely:

Professional Review and Development

Advanced Research Techniques

Publication and Dissemination

Proposal for Professional Research and Development

Part 2

This is the research and professional development component and comprises one or two pieces of practice-based research, linked with a commentary demonstrating the relevance of the research to both practice and the practitioner. The nature of this study may include pure basic research or applied research related, for example, to a management or educational setting. This should normally take between 24 and 48 months to complete.

Assessment will be by a thesis, an oral presentation and a viva voce examination.

The University offers Accreditation for Prior Learning (APL), for applicants with previous learning experience and other academic achievement which could be taken into account for some of the units of study. Claims will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Programme Assessment

Each student will be assigned one or more University supervisors, depending on the area of research and professional development. Access to specialist advisors in the workplace will be required for Part 2 of the programme and will vary according to the area of investigation. We have excellent support systems for our Professional Doctorate students. All students are assigned a Personal Tutor for Part 1 as well as two Supervisors for Part 2 of the course.

There are further opportunities to attend Research Seminars and Workshops organised by the University's Graduate School.

The Professional Doctorate consists of coursework and research and is credit based. The coursework component is designed to help build on professional expertise by exposing students to challenging and innovative ideas in their field.

Assessment is by coursework (including preparation of an article for publication and a research proposal) and oral presentations. This should normally take 24 months to complete.

Student Destinations

Those students completing the MRes Science course will have moved to the next level of qualifications with the advantages that this offers in terms of learning and employability. They will also be in an excellent position to apply for any related doctoral training programme, research assistant positions, graduate teaching positions, or general research related roles.

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