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This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Read more
This MSc focuses on the design, creation, and operation of democratic institutions. Students gain understanding of when a given set of institutes are appropriate for a society and what will make them function, and how scholars have thought about these matters, applying theory to examples of institution-building and design.

Degree information

Students are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for an in-depth understanding of democratic institutions and politics. They develop an understanding of the potential benefits and pitfalls of different institutional designs, reforms, and administrative practices, and are able to analyse problems raised by new and reforming democracies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four compulsory core modules (75 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Democracy and Constitutional Design (30)
-Democratic Political Institutions (15)
-Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
-Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules - choose one of the following 15-credit modules (the other two remain available as options):
-The European Union, Globalisation and the State (15)
-Parliaments, Political Parties and Policy Making (15)
-Governing Divided Societies (15)

Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available at: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/spp/teaching/masters

The following are suggestions:
-Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)
-Equality, Justice, and Difference (15)
-Making Policy Work (15)
-NGO, Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
-Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
-British Government and Politics (15)
-International Political Economy (15)
-Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
-Conflict Resolution and Post-War Development (15)
-Global Public Policy (15)

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

Alumni of this programme work in a variety of fields. Many take on roles within their home governments, and a substantial number find jobs with non-governmental organisations (NGOs), working in their home countries or abroad. Some work for a research institutes or provide research for business, and a small number have also gone on to PhD study.

First destinations of recent graduates include:
-The Labour Party: Secretary
-Head Office Agency: Campaign Co-ordinator
-Civil Service: Civil Servant
-National Centre for Social Research: Research Assistant
-National Autistic Society: Policy and Parliamentary Officer
-Liberal Democrats: Research Assistant

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Consultant, World Bank Group
-Trainee Campaign Organiser, The Labour Party
-Parliamentary Assistant, UK Parliament
-Research Intern, Access Info Europe
-PhD Political Science, Trinity College Dublin

Employability
Graduates of the programme are equipped with the theoretical tools and empirical evidence necessary for entry into the world of government policy, non-governmental organisations, or the private sector.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of democracy and comparative politics.

Students on the programme benefit from greater interaction with fellow students and academic staff due to small class sizes.

London features a wealth of seminars, conferences, and other events on democratic topics. These provide a means for students to expand their knowledge and to extend their professional networks prior to entering the job market.

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Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies. Read more
Since the first UN Conference in Stockholm in 1972 the environment has become an increasingly central issue for scholars of international studies.

The International Studies (Environment) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies. In particular it applies these to contemporary debates on global environmental issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-environment/

Why choose this course?

- A dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as global environmental governance, the rise of environmental social movements and whether we can achieve development whilst still maintaining the quality of our natural environment. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- You will have the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library, as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A high level of student support during your time with us. Each student is allocated an academic adviser and student support co-ordinators are also available to help you with any issues you might encounter.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in the fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
- Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

Professional advice

Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. Read more
One of the key themes in contemporary international studies is the impact of economic globalisation. The International Studies (Global Political Economy) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies, and in particular applies these to the globalisation of economic relations, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2016/international-studies--global-political-economy-/international-studies-global-political-economy/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers. .

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- Covers issues such as the globalisation of economic relations and the potential challenges it poses for states and the governance of the international system. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of this is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables you to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional Advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by n international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Read more
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations.

The International Studies (International Relations) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced International Studies, including the application of these to real world cases and issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-international-relations/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers the central foundations of the contemporary study of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip provides you with first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. Read more
The taught postgraduate masters programme in International Studies provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced international studies and international relations, including the application of these to real world issues. The MA and PGDip awards also provide training in social scientific methods.

The programme will appeal to you if you have a broad interest in international affairs, and if your future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal if you are wanting to progress to a research degree.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with ever stronger links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- A flexible and exciting range of postgraduate courses as well as interdisciplinary opportunities provided through collaboration with our colleagues in Business and Law.

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- A five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague provides first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed throughout the different pathways, including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

Each year students are required to go on a five-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip enables students to get a first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

Read less
The MSc in Real Estate Management is an interdisciplinary Master’s programme that fuses economic, social and environmental perspectives within a framework for identifying, assessing, designing, delivering and evaluating effective real estate interventions and responses. Read more
The MSc in Real Estate Management is an interdisciplinary Master’s programme that fuses economic, social and environmental perspectives within a framework for identifying, assessing, designing, delivering and evaluating effective real estate interventions and responses.

What's covered in the course?

Our programme reflects synergies with the Master’s courses in Planning Built Environments and Environmental Surveying in order to create a programme that works across the whole built environment profession and disciplines.

The programme focuses on the interaction between business and legal processes on property ownership and management. It integrates technological, financial, legal and management issues as they relate to property matters.

The theoretical underpinning of the course is rooted in real estate which stresses the need for interdisciplinary approaches and solutions.

This course will help you to connect the theory and practice of real estate to a range of real life case study challenges. It will give you a framework of knowledge, skills and tools to start understanding the complex world of property, whilst supporting you to become an independent learner and reflective practitioner.

Our programme builds on applied academic research and contemporary real estate practice. The course design and delivery utilises our expertise across real estate, sustainability and planning and also brings in external experts and practitioners to address key challenges and opportunities within practice.

Our courses are designed and developed with support from relevant professional bodies (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) and local professional individuals and practices. Owing to the need to meet these professionally-set learning outcomes, there is little choice in modules within these programmes, although it is possible to begin to specialise with dissertation and project topics.

Why Choose Us?

-This course aims to develop the real estate professional of the future who is equipped with the knowledge, tools and skills to operate efficiently, effectively and confidently within an ever-changing environment.
-The programme focuses on the interaction between business and legal processes on property ownership and management. The course integrates technological, financial, legal and management issues as they relate to property matters.
-The course design and delivery uses our expertise across the School to address key challenges and opportunities within practice.

Course in depth

Elements of the course are closely related to real-world scenarios. These build upon current practice issues identified through, for example, Parliamentary debates, revised planning documents and government guidance. We make significant use of professionals as Visiting Lecturers to ensure both continuing professional relevance and that you have direct access to people in current professional practice.

Every student on the programme is allocated a personal tutor and our students are invited to both group and individual meetings throughout the year. We provide set times (known as office hours) during the week where academic staff are available to see students, and staff also frequently arrange to see students by appointment outside these times if additional help or support is needed.

We invite you (normally by making individual appointments) to discuss assessment feedback/feedforward with the marking tutor to ensure that the detailed comments provided are supplemented verbally, and that they are understood, so that you can use comments to enhance future submissions. We collaborate closely with the Centre for Academic Success which offers workshops, individual advice sessions and small group tutorials to all University students on a variety of subjects including use of English, study skills, maths and other technical topics.

Modules
-Valuation 20 credits
-Commercial Inspection and Surveying 20 credits
-Development Project 20 credits
-Law 20 credits
-Property Management 20 credits
-Professional Practice 20 credits
-Dissertation 40 credits

Enhancing your employability skills

Staff from the professional bodies at local and regional levels visit on a regular basis to promote the professions, explain routes of access to full professional membership, and respond to your questions about employability.

Our long-standing links with the professions mean that we are informed about, and so able to advertise, details of relevant job opportunities, and ensure that you are well prepared for application and interview processes.

Key employment skills and career planning are embedded into modules through real life scenarios, local case studies, and a wide range of assessment methods that replicate typical workplace requirements, helping grow your skillset and confidence. The skills and attributes you develop throughout the course are highly transferable to the context of professional employment, helping you to set goals and to enhance your employability in a wide range of professional and business contexts.

The course also prepares you for professional membership APC (Assessment of Professional Competence) processes, which require individual reflection and personal development planning.

Birmingham City University programmes aim to provide graduates with a set of attributes which prepare them for their future careers. The BCU Graduate:
-Is professional and work ready
-Is a creative problem solver
-Is enterprising
-Has a global outlook

The University has introduced the Birmingham City University Graduate+ programme, which is an extra-curricular awards framework that is designed to augment the subject based skills that you develop through your programme with broader employability skills and techniques that will enhance your employment options when you leave university.

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This programme will explore the key debates in national and international education policy. You will engage with a critical analysis of the different concepts underlying the evolving landscape of educational policy globally, such as new forms of funding and delivery, privatisation, evaluation and inspection. Read more

Summary

This programme will explore the key debates in national and international education policy. You will engage with a critical analysis of the different concepts underlying the evolving landscape of educational policy globally, such as new forms of funding and delivery, privatisation, evaluation and inspection.

Students will examine key education policies in the UK and other countries, with a particular focus on social justice, and consider the possibilities for more socially fair and democratic policy enactments. You will also explore a range of identities including, but not limited to, social class, gender and ‘race’/ethnicity, and how these aspects of identity shape the policy formation and enactment process in the UK and internationally.

This course has a particular focus on social justice within education, and allows participants to reflect on the varied and linked aspects of education in a contemporary domestic, and globalised, world. You will benefit from our relationships with international organisations and contacts such as UNESCO, which open up educational study and employment opportunities.

While providing an introduction to the key theories and concepts in the fields of education policy and social justice, this course will offer students an understanding of the established techniques of research and enquiry, and how these are used to create and interpret knowledge. With these skills, you will be well placed to be able to critically evaluate research and advanced scholarship, in order to understand the basis of educational policy nationally and internationally.

You will develop the confidence and knowledge to become a professional practitioner, researcher or developer in the field of education policy. With the necessary skills and understanding for reflecting on your own and others’ practice, you will be able contribute to improving educational processes and outcomes. As such, the course is well-suited to current teachers and school leaders, professionals working in policy related areas, and national and international recent graduates.

Content

Students will undertake a study of the recent history of Education policy, studying the key parliamentary acts from 1988 to the present time. Students will evaluate these policies in relation to social justice, looking critically at how inclusive or exclusive they have been, and from there consider the possibilities for more socially just policy enactment. Other modules will broaden this understanding, as students investigate global theoretical perspectives on education policy, and the different models and policy schemes in use, and the outcomes and implications of these policy choices in different contexts. Further, students will explore how discourses on teaching vary over time and across national contexts, and analyse the effects of education policies on the teaching profession, including looking at teachers’ contribution to social change.

Students can also explore the way in which policy is enacted and governance undertaken across the world. Particular modules will look at the new actors (philanthropists, social entrepreneurs, edu-businesses, community organisations, etc.) that have served as the driving force for recent political change, and study four conceptual principles underlying the concept of ‘network governance’.

Other modules will focus on developing your critical perspective on the political nature of education as well as offering chances to engage with new methods and tools to perform policy analysis. Especially, you will strengthen your ability to undertake and evaluate research, and you will be able to study a variety of theoretical concepts underlying social and educational research, carrying out a research project of your own.

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This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Read more
This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. The programme will introduce you to a variety of topics within this broad span of time, including religion and heresy, philosophy and political thought, gender, the expansion of urban communities, power and kingship, and the dynamics of historical change. You will develop your ability to critically assess and analyse historical evidence and we will look at the archaeological record, documentary evidence, including parliamentary petitions, guild records and manorial court rolls, and literary sources by authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland, among others. While the focus is on Britain, you will also study the British medieval experience comparatively alongside that of mainland Europe, in particular France and Italy.

After the core module, you can choose option modules that will further extend your exploration of the period and engage your passion for particular topics. The dissertation allows you to pursue independent research in an area of personal interest under the expert supervision of one of our research-active academics. If you are interested in how societies develop over time, this course will give you a stimulating and complex perspective on this fascinating period.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Dr Caroline Goodson

Staff involved in teaching the MA include:

Dr Rebecca Darley
Professor Vanessa Harding
Professor John Henderson
Professor Matthew Innes.

Other medievalists at Birkbeck include:

Dr Alison Finlay, a lecturer in English, specialising in Old Icelandic sagas and heroic poetry, and Old English.

Professor Anthony Bale, a Reader in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Isabel Davis, a lecturer in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Zoe Opacic, a lecturer in art history, who works on late medieval art and architecture.
Dr Robert Maniura, a lecturer in art history who works on late medieval art and architecture.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Birkbeck has research and teaching strengths in the medieval period and you will be taught by academics with expertise across history, English literature, cultural studies and interdisciplinary combinations.
This programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and writing a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures. Read more

Overview

Discover the richness and diversity of new writings in English with this distinctive degree, which focuses on literature from across the Commonwealth and the theoretical issues that emerge from colonial and postcolonial literatures.

You’ll develop your understanding of research in literary studies through a core module, but then choose from optional modules which look at the histories, contexts, structures and language that give postcolonial and colonial texts their uniqueness.

We focus on literature, but the programme also introduces you to other forms of cultural production such as music and cinema – and you’ll think about the relationships between literary studies and disciplines such as geography, anthropology and history. Supported by our Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you’ll gain a cross-disciplinary insight into how writers from around the world have engaged with issues such as identity, place, independence, development and race among many others.

The University of Leeds was the first UK university to establish ‘Commonwealth Literature’ as an academic discipline at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We’re still leading the way in research and teaching, supported by the expertise of staff within and outside of the cross-disciplinary Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with access to extensive resources for your research and placing literature and culture in their historical and political context. Microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers, parliamentary papers relating to the British Empire, US government and presidential files, the Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and British documents on the end of empire, foreign affairs and policy overseas are just some of the resources at your fingertips. You’ll have plenty of opportunities to explore your interests and gain key skills.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

You’ll take one core module in your first semester, introducing you to the challenges, methods and approaches used in researching literature and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also choose one of our optional modules, before studying another two in your second semester.

You can choose all of your modules from within postcolonial literary and cultural studies, but you also have the option to expand your studies by choosing one from those available across the School of English, from the early medieval period to contemporary literature.

By the end of the programme, you’ll demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve developed when you submit your dissertation or research project on a postcolonial literary or cultural topic of your choice.

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The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film. Read more
The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film.

Degree information

Russian culture is explored from a variety of perspectives. Students specialise in literature and culture, social sciences or history, or combine modules into an interdisciplinary programme. They are encouraged to develop their research skills, and many choose to learn Russian, or improve their command of Russian, through a language course.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one of a choice of three core modules (30 credits), a choice of a Russian language module (30 credits) and/or optional modules (to a total of 90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - this is a multi-disciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three modules:
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Historical Methods and Approaches
-Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules - 90 credits from a range of options, which may include:
-Advanced Qualitative Methods
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
-The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
-The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
-Linguistic Methods
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Russian Foreign Policy
-Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
-Russian Language Module
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, film viewings, tutorials and specialist language courses. Assessment is carried out through unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Visa officer, Finnish Consulate General of Petrozavodsk, Russia
-Europe and CIS Armed Forces Analyst, IHS Jane's
-Parliamentary Assistant, The Labour Party
-Foreign Rights Assistant, The Blair Partnership
-Principal Examiner for GCE and GCSE, Pearson-Edexcel

Employability
Russia is one of the most exciting and important countries in the world, and SSEES is the ideal place in which to study it. Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think-tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SSEES is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia. Read more
The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge of central and south-eastern Europe from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on aspects of history, politics and culture. They develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline specific research skills, area specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of one of three compulsory modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 90 credits can then be selected from a range of options across SSEES.

Core modules - this is a multi-disciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three courses:
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Historical Methods and Approaches
-Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules - total of 90 credits from options below. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from another SSEES MA programme or from another MA programme within UCL (Anthropology, History, European Studies, Comparative Literature etc.).
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central & Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
-Little Hitlers? Right Radicalism in Central and Eastern Europe, 1900-1945
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Cities in Eastern Europe
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism and Post-Modernism
-The Crisis Zone: Central Europe 1900-1990
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-'Metropolis': History of Berlin, 1871-1990
-Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
-Baltic Politics and Society
-Making of the Modern Ukraine
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Module
-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Directed Reading Module

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Self-Employed Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Charity Manager, The Big Give
-Parliamentary Assistant, MP's Assistant
-Research Analysis Intern, TechnoServe
-Assistant Producer, Global Radio

Employability
Students who have successfully completed this programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the world's leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Read more
The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Students are introduced to philosophical, legal and policy issues and encouraged to engage with them in a critical way.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the central issues and problems in the formulation, defence, development, interpretation and application of human rights instruments, law, practice and policy. They gain knowledge of central disciplines and their contribution to human rights studies, and are equipped with key research skills in human rights.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-International Law and Human Rights (30)
-International Human Rights: Standards and Institutions (15)
-Theoretical Foundations of Human Rights (15)
-Normative Methods, Legal Analysis and Research Skills (15)

Optional modules - choose one of the following 15-credit modules:
-Introduction to Qualitative Methods (15)
-Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
-Introduction to Quantitative Methods (15)
-Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

And then a further 30 credits from other modules. The following are suggestions:
-Terrorism (15)
-War and International Law (15)
-Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
-The Ethics of Poverty (15)
-Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)
-Governing Divided Societies (15)
-Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: challenges to Democratisation (15)
-Global Ethics (15)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme has an integrated research and teaching approach, where key and cutting edge areas are brought into the seminar room for discussion, and students are encouraged to carry out original research into these areas. Assessment is through essays, unseen examination, seminar presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

The Human Rights MA is a challenging, formative experience that provides the foundations for a variety of future careers. Graduates of the programme are now working in an impressive number of international, national, governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations, including:
-United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
-Advocates for International Development
-Amnesty International
-British Institute for Human Rights
-Council of Europe
-European Parliament
-International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association
-Japanese Government
-Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies
-Royal Commonwealth Society
-Save the Children
-UK Foreign Office
-UN Development Programme
-Universal Rights Group

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Researcher, Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice and studying LLM International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, University of Essex
-Legal Intern, UNHCR (United Nations High Comissioner for Refugees)
-Politics Editor, Urban Times
-Legal Assistant, Christine Lee & Co.
-Research Assistant, Overseas Development Institute

Employability
Graduates of the programme have secured employment in an impressive number of international, national, governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations, including the UK Foreign Office, Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman UK, British Institute for Human Rights, the European Union, the Council of Europe, Amnesty International, ILGA, Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies. Some of our students are now human rights lawyers. Our students have also pursued PhDs and have become human rights academics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of human rights.

Students benefit from weekly seminars featuring distinguished external speakers, and regular high-profile events for policymakers and others. Each year the students have the opportunity to participate in a study trip to Geneva to visit the United Nations Human Rights Institutions and meet human rights practitioners.

The research preparation and tailor-made interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training students receive are of the highest standard available at one of the world's top universities, as reflected in UCL's performance in a range of rankings and tables.

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Come Study how communication shapes world politics within a high quality graduate program that focuses on elected leadership in the age of global communication. Read more
Come Study how communication shapes world politics within a high quality graduate program that focuses on elected leadership in the age of global communication. The program provides students with advanced knowledge, understanding and tools of analysis in a world characterized by growing fusion between politics and communication. Graduates are equipped to evaluate and respond to the challenges that arise from the interconnectedness between politics and communication and are prepared for careers as leading scholars, campaign managers, political analysts, diplomats, journalists or professionals in related fields.
The Political Science & Political Communication MA program extends far beyond the traditional classroom, field trips to various governmental, parliamentary and media institutions and discussion forums comprise an integral part of the program's curriculum.Students are encouraged to supplement their academic work with internships at organizations ranging from Israel's preeminent political and research institutes to communications teams to diplomatic missions.

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Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes. The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'. Read more

Why this course?

Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'.

Blending a rigorous understanding of fundamental theory with evidence about real world problems you’ll analyse recent innovations in theory, policy and practice.

Drawing on a range of disciplinary approaches, the course will enable you to develop a rational and just response to crime.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change is unique in both its approach and its flexibility.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/criminaljusticepenalchange/

Study mode and duration:
- LLM/MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 21 months part-time
- PgCert: 8 months part-time

Key features

- our focus is on pressing contemporary national and international issues of policy and practice
- you can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc
- study full-time or part-time
- learn from a world-class teaching team
- students are from a range of nationalities and disciplinary backgrounds
- you'll benefit from the work of the Centre for Law, Crime and Justice

Who is the course suitable for?

- practitioners working in a wide range of law, justice and welfare areas
- professionals developing justice policy
- members of the third /voluntary sector
- recent graduates in law, social sciences and humanities

Flexible study options

You can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc or complete the course early with a PGDip/Cert.
You'll have the option of studying full or part-time and attending classes in the early evening.

Centre for Law, Crime and Justice (CLCJ)

You’ll benefit from the work of the CLCJ, which brings together expertise in the study of law, crime, criminal justice as well as interdisciplinary areas between law, sociology, social work, psychology and computer and information science.

As well as providing distinctive postgraduate courses and research opportunities, it conducts internationally leading research and helps to shape public policy, discourse and practice.

Teaching staff

You'll be taught by some of the world’s foremost experts not only in academic research but also from the fields of policy and practice.
The course is run by Strathclyde Law School’s Centre for Law, Crime and Justice. It brings together world leading research expertise with some of the most accomplished practitioners and policy officials.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As well as seminars, you’ll be asked to take part in role play exercises, presentations and other forms of learning.
We've an active programme of public lectures from eminent visiting speakers on contemporary topics. There'll be a programme of visits to local justice agencies designed to stimulate your academic learning.

Careers

Students on the Strathclyde Masters (LLM or MSc) in Criminal Justice and Penal Change come from a range of backgrounds.
Some are recent graduates in law, humanities and the social sciences from around the world. Many are current practitioners, policy-makers in different fields of criminal justice. They find the course of invaluable assistance in gaining a step up the career ladder.

Where are they now?

Occupations which criminal justice students may (and do) take up include:
- Advocacy
- Central Government Criminal Justice Research Manager
- Council of Europe Analyst
- Criminal Barrister
- Defence law
- European Union Policy Analyst
- Forensic Services
- Judiciary
- Local Government Criminal Justice Policy Manager
- Lecturer in Criminal Justice
- Parliamentary Advisors on Criminal Justice
- Prosecution Service
- Prison Management
- Prison Psychologist
- Prison-based Social Work
- Victim Support

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. Read more
Both geopolitics and security are defining issues of our era. As a global community, we face unprecedented challenges relating to environmental catastrophe, resource shortages, economic meltdown, terrorism and infrastructural failure. We need to understand the conditions that make our daily lives vulnerable and to develop strategies to manage risk and mitigate the impact of crisis, whilst also fostering critical reflections on those very strategies and techniques which seek to keep us secure.

This course combines thematic elements which theorise geopolitics and security with specialist options, which allow you to follow your own interests, alongside a dissertation, which can be strongly connected to work-related/future career interests. Multiple methods of assessment and diverse research methods encourage skills development and employability. We will encourage students to network with relevant organizations and institutions, building on staff expertise and experience.

The course is designed for both ambitious young graduates and experienced professionals working in commercial or political organisations such as banking, energy, media, think tanks, NGOs and government, where risk (management), threat and insecurity are critical to strategic policy development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscgeopoliticsandsecurity.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Departments of Geography and Politics and International Relations are top-ranked research-led departments.

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research and experience outside the academy.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in geopolitics and security while allowing you to specialize in issues and themes of interest to you.

- There is a strong emphasis on skills development especially communication.

- Highly focused on employability – invited outside speakers will provide networking opportunities.

Department research and industry highlights

- Leading researchers and research groups (e.g. Politics, Development and Sustainability Group in Geography) with established track record in grant awards (e.g. from the ESRC, AHRC, Leverhulme Trust, EPSRC, British Academy, British Council, Falkland Island Government and the EU Marie-Curie fund).

- External networking and public engagement (e.g. working with UK government departments including MOD (British Antarctic Survey); Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Civil Contingencies Secretariat; the Parliamentary Office for Science and Technology and the Canada-UK Colloquium.

- Networking and Knowledge Transfer (e.g. collaborative postgraduate projects with major institutions such as the British Library, Science Museum and Royal Geographical Society). We have also worked closely with the BBC and its world service contributing to programme development and televised broadcasting.

- Ongoing collaboration with leading think-tanks such as Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) and Chatham House.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- A sophisticated knowledge and critical understanding of geopolitics and security including core debates, and case studies.

- A detailed appreciation of methods and sources used to investigate geopolitical and security related issues and themes

- High-level skills development especially in communication (including social media), report writing, briefing papers, political debate and critical thinking

- Opportunities to enhance employability through practical experience and exposure to relevant individuals and organizations in the geopolitical/security-related field

Assessment

Formal and informal assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, oral and group work presentations, policy, briefing and media reports, video and documentary production, and a dissertation. Field visits to important sites and organisations, including RUSI, will also be available, supporting collegial interaction between students and staff. Emphasis is placed on informal assessment (especially through group work) so that students have plenty of opportunities to receive formative support and guidance.

Employability & career opportunities

Geography and PIR graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many careers including working in government, media, non-governmental organizations and public organizations both in the UK and the wider world. This new course is intended for both experienced professionals seeking further academic training/reflection and also younger graduates eager to gain further skills development and relevant experience through study. Assessment and presentation opportunities as well as strategic field visits will help develop these skills, while a programme of external speakers will provide insight into the field. There will also be the potential for internships and work placements. The course will act as an ideal stepping-stone for PhD progression should this be chosen as a career pathway.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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