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Masters Degrees (Parametric Design)

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This studio-based course will help you develop your own distinctive design practice. You’ll explore design processes and methodologies. Read more

About the course

This studio-based course will help you develop your own distinctive design practice. You’ll explore design processes and methodologies. There are opportunities to work on real-life projects with local and regional groups. You can take the course as a stand-alone MA or as preparation for a PhD via our PhD by Design programme.

Advance your career

Our graduates are architects, project managers, urban designers and client advisers.

Employers include the Olympic Park Legacy Company, Hawkins Brown, Renzo Piano Building Workshop and URBED (Urbanism, Environment and Design) Ltd. With a post-qualification degree, you could move on to a senior position or further academic research and teaching.

Learn from experts

You’ll be joining one of the largest and most diverse groups of full-time architecture academics in the country. Our staff come from the arts, physical and social sciences, and engineering. This connects our research to other disciplines and stimulates debate about the future of architecture.

Our international research projects shape policy and address public and professional needs. We integrate those projects with our teaching on courses that will develop your core skills. You’ll be encouraged to provide social and environmental solutions to the challenges of our time.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us fourth in the UK.

Explore your ideas

You’ll have access to a lot of specialist facilities. Our media unit has a range of audio-visual and environmental equipment including artificial sky for daylight simulation, a thermal imaging camera and a mixed reality imaging suite. We have our own photography studio, reprographics unit and 3D printers. There are design studios, research rooms and computer labs.

Our teaching is more than lectures and seminars. Our student-led design projects help you learn by doing. Working with real clients on real projects, you’ll discover the benefits of socially engaged design and collaborative working. The outcomes make
a difference to communities.

Code modules

Special Design 1 ‘Live Project’; Design Project 1 and 2; Reflections on Architectural Design; Thesis Design Project; Route A – Research by Design (Theory) Critical Spatial Theory; Route B – Research by Design (Practice) Theory and Research in Design, Environment and Technology in Design.

Examples of optional modules

Reflections on Architectural Education; Conservation and Regeneration Principles and Approaches; Conservation and Regeneration Traditional Materials and Techniques; Conservation and Regeneration Policy and Law; Participation in Urban Design and Architecture; History and Theory of Urban Design; Reflection on Urban Design Practice; Principles of Building Physics for Sustainable Design; Building Environmental Simulation and Analysis; Renewable Energy; Parametric Architectural Geometry; Critical Application of Building Information Modelling.

Teaching and assessment

Learning is through studio-based design work with individual and group tutorials, block seminars and workshops, traditional lecture modules, live projects involving real clients and real community projects. You’ll be assessed on course assignments and examinations, design thesis and a dissertation.

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Urban design professionals are in demand. We can help you develop design skills that will relate to a broader social, environmental and economic context, linking individual architectural projects and overall planning strategies. Read more

About the course

Urban design professionals are in demand. We can help you develop design skills that will relate to a broader social, environmental and economic context, linking individual architectural projects and overall planning strategies. The MA in Urban Design is a studio-based design programme with a strong emphasis on community participation. The aim is to address the challenges of uneven urban development, both locally and internationally.

Advance your career

Our graduates are architects, project managers, urban designers and client advisers.

Employers include the Olympic Park Legacy Company, Hawkins Brown, Renzo Piano Building Workshop and URBED (Urbanism, Environment and Design) Ltd. With a post-qualification degree, you could move on to a senior position or further academic research and teaching.

Learn from experts

You’ll be joining one of the largest and most diverse groups of full-time architecture academics in the country. Our staff come from the arts, physical and social sciences, and engineering. This connects our research to other disciplines and stimulates debate about the future of architecture.

Our international research projects shape policy and address public and professional needs. We integrate those projects with our teaching on courses that will develop your core skills. You’ll be encouraged to provide social and environmental solutions to the challenges of our time.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us fourth in the UK.

Explore your ideas

You’ll have access to a lot of specialist facilities. Our media unit has a range of audio-visual and environmental equipment including artificial sky for daylight simulation, a thermal imaging camera and a mixed reality imaging suite. We have our own photography studio, reprographics unit and 3D printers. There are design studios, research rooms and computer labs.

Our teaching is more than lectures and seminars. Our student-led design projects help you learn by doing. Working with real clients on real projects, you’ll discover the benefits of socially engaged design and collaborative working. The outcomes make
a difference to communities.

Core modules

Urban Design Project 1, 2 and 3; Urban Design Thesis Project; Participation in Architecture and Urban Design; History and Theory of Urban Design; Trajectories on Urban Design Practice; Urban Design Tools and Methods.

Examples of optional modules

Reflections of Architectural Education; Analysing Urban Context; Interactive Urban Visualisation Modelling; Building Environmental Simulation and Analysis; Parametric Architectural Geometry; Building Information Modelling, Management and Analysis.

Teaching and assessment

Studio-based design work with individual and group tutorials, block seminars, workshops and traditional lecture modules. You’ll be assessed on course assignments and examinations, design thesis and a dissertation.

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This is a hybrid programme that aims to integrate the principles of “DIGITAL DESIGN CREATIVITY” and “INTEGRATED/COLLABORATIVE DESIGN” under the same pedagogical framework. Read more
This is a hybrid programme that aims to integrate the principles of “DIGITAL DESIGN CREATIVITY” and “INTEGRATED/COLLABORATIVE DESIGN” under the same pedagogical framework. The course will investigate the integration of digital media in architectural and urban design at all three levels; creative (e.g. parametric, generative), operational and collaborative (e.g. BIM). Through collaborative design exercises, students will gain practical experience of working with diverse digital media and techniques to generate, evaluate and communicate design intelligence and information.

In addition to developing team working skills, they will also be encouraged to identify and follow individually tailored career paths in line with their individual interests and aspirations. The course is specifically designed to accommodate and support learner-directed professional development in three main areas of digital and integrated design: creative design, digital modelling/simulation, design information management. We aim to cultivate an intellectual climate, providing close links with innovative design practices, embracing experiential learning supported with state-of-the-art facilities and resources.

The course aims to:

- provide the students with a comprehensive understanding of technology-mediated design theories, methods and techniques in Architecture and Urban design.
- provide the students with the knowledge and understanding of diverse and integrated models of “digital design collaboration” in a highly cross-disciplinary setting.
- assist students in developing the necessary knowledge, skills and competencies in a highly competitive, global and technology-mediated design practice.
- promote high quality research skills in Design Computation and Building Information Modelling (BIM).

Why School of Architecture?

Highly rated research

Liverpool was the UK’s first Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) accredited University School of Architecture. Research lies at the core of our activities and we have highly rated international research in the fields of History and Theory and Environment and Process.

The activities of the research groups within these two fields provide the knowledge and expertise required by the professional discipline that the School serves, but also reach out into related areas in the visual arts, urban design, conservation and innovative technologies.

Career prospects

Students who successfully complete a Higher Degree go on to interesting and rewarding careers in architecture, the wider construction industry, management, higher education, the arts and conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the arts, architecture and the built environment.

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Digital technologies are rapidly changing the way buildings and urban spaces are designed, constructed and inhabited. On this course you’ll learn the theoretical knowledge and technical skills required to produce innovative blueprints for architecture in the digital era. Read more
Digital technologies are rapidly changing the way buildings and urban spaces are designed, constructed and inhabited. On this course you’ll learn the theoretical knowledge and technical skills required to produce innovative blueprints for architecture in the digital era.

The past decade has shown rapidly growing expectations for built spaces with capacity to respond dynamically to changes such as shifts in demographics, new and emerging technology, climate change and ageing populations. These are global challenges and opportunities which demand architects and designers with the ability to creatively shape the way that buildings, landscapes and cities age and adapt over time.

Careers

Graduates go on to careers leading future practice in the digital creative industries, architecture and urban design, digital technology development and environmental design consultancy. The course also fully prepares graduates who are interested in pursuing doctoral studies towards a PhD.

Core modules

Parametric Architectural Geometry; Building Information Modelling Management and Analysis; Challenges of Digital Architecture; Studio Project; Elements of Computational Design 1 and 2; Dissertation Project.

Examples of Optional Modules

Advanced Computational Design; Interactive Urban Visualisation Modelling; Renewable Energy; Conservation and Regeneration Principles and Approaches; Building Information Modelling, Management and Analysis.

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Electronic engineering is a discipline at the forefront of advances for modern-day living and continues to push forward technological frontiers. Read more

Why take this course?

Electronic engineering is a discipline at the forefront of advances for modern-day living and continues to push forward technological frontiers.

This course provides relevant, up-to-date skills that will enhance your engineering competencies. You will broaden your knowledge of electronic engineering and strengthen your ability to apply new technologies in the design and implementation of modern systems.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Focus on the practical application and design aspects of electronic systems rather than intensive analytical detail
Experiment with our range of control applications including helicopter development kits and walking robots
Access a wide range of powerful and modern multimedia computational facilities, with the latest industry software installed

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course has been accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). It will provide you with some of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Professional electronics
Design
Research and development
Product manufacture
Project management

Module Details

You will study several key topics and complete a four-month individual project in which you apply your knowledge to a significant, in-depth piece of analysis or design. Projects are tailored to your individual interests and may take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry.

Here are the units you will study:

VHDL and Digital Systems Design: This unit covers the use of a hardware description language (VHDL) to capture and model the design requirement - whilst programmable logic devices enable an implementation to be explored and tested prior to moving into manufacture. The learning will have a practical bias such that experience as well as theory is gained in completing this unit.

Advanced DSP Techniques: This unit aims to introduce you to the fundamentals of statistical signal processing, with particular emphasis upon classical and modern estimation theory, parametric and nonparametric modelling, time series analysis, least squares methods, and basics of adaptive signal processing.

Mixed Signal Processors: This unit focuses on both control and signal processing hardware, how it works, how to interface to it, and software - how to design it and debug it.

Sensors and Measurement Systems: This unit proposes to introduce you to the technologies underpinning measurements including sensors both in terms of hardware and software. It also aims to provide you with an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in a practical setting and gain an appreciation of modern day requirements in terms of measurement.

Microwave and Wireless Technology: The unit combines team working via a project based learning activity relating to a significant circuit simulation and design problem with lectures aimed at analysing and applying the characteristics of a range of devices used in the microwave and wireless industries.

Communication System Analysis: This unit focuses on basic principles in the analysis and design of modern communication systems, the workhorses behind the information age. It puts emphasis on the treatment of analogue communications as the necessary background for understanding digital communications.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis and you will spend a significant amount of time in our electronic, communications and computer laboratories.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

This course is designed to respond to a growing skills shortage of people with core knowledge in advanced electronic engineering. It is an excellent preparation for a successful career in this ever expanding and dynamic field of modern electronics.

On successful completion of the course, you will have gained the skills and knowledge that will make you attractive to a wide variety of employers with interests ranging from overall system design to the more detailed development of subsystems.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Electronics engineer
Product design engineer
Aerospace engineer
Application engineer

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This is an MSc course in Embedded Systems with contributions from the fields of mechatronics and robotics. Embedded systems are microprocessor-based systems within a larger mechanical or electrical system that performs a dedicated function or task. Read more
This is an MSc course in Embedded Systems with contributions from the fields of mechatronics and robotics.

Embedded systems are microprocessor-based systems within a larger mechanical or electrical system that performs a dedicated function or task. They encompass a wide variety of products ranging from small mobile phones to large process automation installations. A practicing engineer in the field of embedded systems needs to have a specialised expertise in more than one of the engineering subjects of this multi-discipline subject.

Our MSc is tailored to provide you with advanced learning in microprocessor systems that are at the heart of embedded systems, with additional contributions from the fields of mechatronics and robotics. This approach reflects the needs of the industry and is well supported by the range in expertise we have in our Department.

The Department of Engineering and Design covers the full gamete of teaching in electronic, telecommunication and computer networks engineering as well as mechanical engineering and product design.

Our academics are a cohesive group of highly skilled lecturers, practitioners and researchers. You'll benefit from your choice of supervisors to support a wide range of modern and multi-discipline Masters-level projects. Our teaching is supported by well-equipped laboratory workshops, using mostly the latest hardware and software available in universities.

- Robot Detectives
LSBU holds an international reputation as a world leader in the use of robotics in non-destructive testing and developing intelligent robotic systems. Groundbreaking projects have ranged from building wall climbing robots to robots that work under water and oil.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/mechatronics-robotics-engineering-msc

Modules

- Embedded system design
This module shows you how to design and implement an Embedded System on a single IC. You will learn about the basics and the benefits of all programmable devices. The SOC (System on Chip) process flow is explained for FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) stressing the role played by the Hardware Description Languages (HDL). The accompanying workshops demonstrate the use of tools and methodologies as well as the programming, verifying and protecting your designs. We use the commercial software Quartus II and QSYS and the hardware development platform DE2 by Altera.

- Individual project
The individual project is a major element of the course. It involves a wider spectrum of multidisciplinary research in design, manufacturing systems, quality management and IT, with due regard to the efficient exploitation of the technology, materials and marketing resources of industrial firms. Students are encouraged to work on industrial-based projects.

- Pattern recognition and machine learning
This module introduces the fundamentals of both statistical learning theory and practical approaches for solving pattern recognition problems. Further, it consolidates lectures with experimental computer-based workshops to inculcate the principles of machine learning and classification. The module covers: Bayesian decision theory, parametric density estimation, linear discriminant functions, perceptrons, support vector machines, neural networks and clustering.

- Microprocessor-based control and robotics
This module will provide information allowing you to critically evaluate and make the right choice of the microprocessor that will be at the heart of your embedded system. To this effect we provide a thorough discussion and qualitative comparison of the various microprocessor architectures and the methods of the software development available to you. The workshop assignments involve interfacing 8 and 32 bit microcontrollers to a wide range of devices, including robotic manipulators and control/measurement instrumentation.

- Electromechanical systems and manufacturing technology
This module consists of two parts. The first part covers the design of electromechanical components of the embedded system. The material presented here derives from the fields of Mechatronics and Robotics. The second part provides information on modern developments in the field of materials and the manufacturing. Examples of topics covered include applications of nano-technology, use of polymers and composites. Manufacturing techniques are described together with process modelling and control that is essential to produce the material to the required specification.

- Technology evaluation and commercialisation
This module includes: research product idea generation; product definition and value proposition; market research and assessment; functional assessment of product concepts; and strategic assessment of commercial viability.

- Technical, research and professional skills
This module includes: an introduction to project management, project planning, research project characteristics, ethics, feasibility analysis of requirements and resources; research methods; stages in project management; modelling and optimisation tools (PERT and CPM); technical report writing.

- Robotics
This module introduces you to the basic elements and principles of modern robotics. You'll gain a thorough theoretical and practical understanding of the fundamental concepts of this important and fast developing field. Essential geometric concepts will be introduced and these will be applied to the analysis and control of several different types of machines. A key feature of the module will be the wide range of robotic devices studied, from industrial serial manipulators, through mobile robots to quadcopters. The workshop for this modules includes various topics such as Robot Programming, Path Planning, Mapping and Localisation.

- MSc project
The individual project is a major element of the course. We offer a supervision of projects from a wide spectrum of either specialized or multi-disciplinary topics. There are opportunities for individual-centered projects as well for the student being allocated specific tasks within a larger research effort. Students are encouraged to work on industrial-based projects under joint supervision with their employer.

Employability

The course has been designed to help to meet the needs of industry. How much your employability will increase, will depend on your background and the personal contribution you make to your development whilst studying on the course.

Benefits for new graduates

If you are a new graduate in electronic or computer engineering then you benefit from the further advanced topics presented. You'll get an opportunity to cut your teeth on a challenging MSc Project, which will demonstrate your abilities to the potential employers. Alternatively, you could also pursue PhD studies after completing the course.

Benefits of returning to University after time working in industry

If you are returning to University after a period of working in industry, then you'll be able to update yourself with the recent technological progress in the field. You'll gain confidence in your ability to perform at your best and stand a better chance to seek challenging work opportunities. If you are already working in the field, the MSc qualification will enhance your status which will may help with your promotion.

Employment links

We are continually developing links with employers who are interested to provide internship to our students . Examples of this can include small VHDL and DSP designs, ARM based designs, industrial design or correlation research. These projects can be performed as part of the curriculum or as part of a research project.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The School of Engineering at LSBU has a strong culture of research, extensive research links with industry through consultancy works and Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs), and teaching content is closely related to the latest research findings in the field.

History and expertise

A strong research tradition and our industrial links has helped shaped the course design, content selection, course delivery and project supervision.

The Department of Engineering and Design has a strong Mechatronics, Robotics and Non-destructive testing research group with a wide national and international profile. This is in addition to excellent research in many areas of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, product design, computer network and telecommunications engineering.

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Aerospace Propulsion provides a comprehensive background in the design and operation of different types of propulsion systems for aerospace applications. Read more

Course Description

Aerospace Propulsion provides a comprehensive background in the design and operation of different types of propulsion systems for aerospace applications. The course is designed for those seeking a career in the design, development, operation and maintenance of propulsion systems.  The course is suitable for graduates seeking a challenging and rewarding career in an established international industry. Graduates are provided with the skills that allow them to deliver immediate benefits in a very demanding and rewarding workplace and therefore are in great demand.

Overview

The key technological achievement underlying the development and growth of the aerospace industry has been the design and development of efficient and economical propulsion systems. This sector has experienced a consistent growth in the past and is expected to do so in the future. Major efforts are also now being dedicated to the development of new technologies relevant to the propfan and variable cycle engines.

The MSc in Aerospace Propulsion provides a comprehensive background in the design and operation of different types of propulsion systems for aerospace applications. The course is designed for those seeking a career in the design, development, operation and maintenance of propulsion systems.

The course is suitable for graduates seeking a challenging and rewarding career in an established international industry. Graduates are provided with the skills that allow them to deliver immediate benefits in a very demanding and rewarding workplace and therefore are in great demand.

Structure

The course consists of approximately ten to fifteen taught modules and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

- Provide the skills required for a rewarding career in the field of propulsion and power
- Meet employer requirements for graduates within power and propulsion industries
- Demonstrate a working knowledge and critical awareness of gas turbine performance, analysis techniques, component design and associated technologies
- Explain, differentiate and critically discuss the underpinning concepts and theories for a wide range of areas of gas turbine engineering and associated applications
- Be able to discern, select and apply appropriate analysis techniques in the assessment of particular aspects of gas turbine engineering.

Modules

The taught programme for the Aerospace Propulsion masters consists of eight compulsory modules and up to six optional modules. The modules are generally delivered from October to April.

Individual Project

Individual Project
You are required to submit a written thesis describing an individual research project carried out during the course. Many individual research projects have been carried out with industrial sponsorship, and have often resulted in publication in international journals and symposium papers. This thesis is examined orally in September in the presence of an external examiner.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:

- Design of an experimental test rig facility for an axial compressor
- Energy management in a hybrid turbo-electric, hydrogen fuelled, hale UAV
- Civil aircraft intake, nacelle and nozzle aerodynamics
- The computation of adiabatic isobaric combustion temperature
- Air filtration systems for helicopters
- Nacelle parametric design space exploration
- Distributed propellers assessment for turboelectric distributed propulsion
- Aerodynamic analysis of the flowfield distortion within a serpentine intake
- Green runway :impact of water ingestion on medium and small jet engine performance and emissions
- Distributed propulsion systems boundary layer ingestion for uav aircraft
- Preliminary design of a low emissions combustor for a helicopter engine
- Compressor design and performance simulation through the use of a through-flow method
- Estimation of weight and mechanical losses of a pts for a geared turbofan engine
- Optimisation of turbine disc for a small turbofan engine
- Modelling of tip leakage flows in axial flow high pressure gas turbine
- Aerodynamic modelling and adjoint-based shape optimisation of separate-jet exhaust systems
- Preliminary design & performance analysis of a combustor for UAV.

Assessment

The final assessment is based on two components of equal weight; the taught modules (50%) and the individual research project (50%). Assessment is by examinations, assignments, presentations and thesis.

Funding

A variety of funding, including industrial sponsorship, is available. Please contact us for details.

Career opportunities

- Gas turbine engine manufacturers
- Airframe manufacturers
- Airline operators
- Regulatory bodies
- Aerospace/Energy consultancies
- Power production industries
- Academia: doctoral studies.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Aerospace-Propulsion-Option-Thermal-Power

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Maintenance strategies are central to the smooth operation of complex industrial processes in a wide range of industries including automotive, pharmaceutical, nuclear, petrochemical, and aerospace industries. Read more
Maintenance strategies are central to the smooth operation of complex industrial processes in a wide range of industries including automotive, pharmaceutical, nuclear, petrochemical, and aerospace industries. The planning and implementation of professional maintenance strategies can reduce costly breakdowns which may interrupt production, contribute to sustainable engineering practice to the benefit of the environment, improve safety and drive down costs. This MSc course in Maintenance Engineering is suitable for engineers who have recently graduated as well as those with experience who are seeking to extend their knowledge, or update their qualifications with a view to promotion or other new position. The award covers both technical and management aspects of maintenance engineering and forms a suitable basis for a career in a range of roles associated with maintenance engineering on mechanical plants, such as: asset management, plant maintenance, preventative maintenance, etc."

The course will enable students to apply for positions such as Design of ‘products’ for ease of maintenance – in which case the bias will be towards the design processes, Maintenance Engineers – Technicians/Engineers who conduct maintenance of systems, plants, fleets etc, Support Engineers positions for example in an avionic environment referring to the people who look at supportability, maintainability, reliability, testability and the design of support systems and services.

On completion of the course students may be able to obtain one of the following degrees
- Master (MSc) in Maintenance Engineering
- Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Maintenance Engineering
- Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) in Maintenance Engineering

Course Content
The programme is divided into course credits which cover many management and technological characteristics in the field of maintenance Engineering. The aims of the modules are:
- to undertake a major piece of advanced level work having some significant elements of research and originality.
- to develop the individual skills necessary to conduct technical studies at an advanced level effectively.
- to synthesise bearing designs that minimise power loss, evaluate bearing material or coating selections that minimise friction and wear, employ ISO standards in the design of lubricant management systems, design condition-monitoring solutions of typical industrial machines based on an understanding of their performance and running characteristics, synthesise reliability and maintainability analyses of mechanical or electrical devices.

- to identify the relationships between structures and mechanical properties of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers and composites; understand types of material failure including, fast facture, fatigue, creep, and corrosion and oxidation, be familiar with design with materials, including modulus-limited design, yield-limited design, fatigue design and creep-limited design; to understand criteria for materials selection.

- To examine the main methods for developing a modern maintenance programme for industrial plants. It provides a comprehensive understanding of theory and practice of reliability centred maintenance and total productive maintenance strategies to achieve high plant availability, optimise on product quality, and address safety and environmental issues.

- To examines the main methods for developing sustainable engineering programme for industrial plants. It provides a comprehensive understanding of theory and practice of sustainable systems engineering strategies to achieve high plant efficiency, optimise on product quality, and address safety and environmental issues.

- to enhance the student's ability to work independently, to provide an opportunity for the investigation of a topic of particular interest to the student, to enhance the student’s skills in report writing and critical evaluation, to enhance the ability to evaluate the results of an investigation.

- to provide students with Engineering knowledge of various renewable energy technologies; Scientific understanding of the contributions which the renewable sources can make, the technologies used to harness them and limitation associated with their uses; Practical skills in developing renewable energy projects.

- to introduce methods of computer interfacing of industrial or scientific instruments and data processing for monitoring and control of engineering processes, to provide students with a sound understanding of the use of advanced instrumentation and sensing methods, to apply signal processing methods and system design methods

- to Gain a deeper understanding of Computer Aided Design (CAD). Students will analyse the requirements for complex 3D CAD models and to build coherent solutions. This will include assemblies, complex surfaces, parametric design, etc...

Study mode
- Full time (2 days per week) or part-time (1 day per week) for compulsory and optional modules
- Modules are delivered on semester base
- Project (core module) is delivered during summer (September entry) or Spring (January entry)

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Subject to validation from January 2016 entry. Throughout this course, you will study the theory and practice of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as the emerging industry standard approach to the design, analysis and management of building life cycle. Read more

About this course

Subject to validation from January 2016 entry.

Throughout this course, you will study the theory and practice of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as the emerging industry standard approach to the design, analysis and management of building life cycle. This course incorporates an innovative blend of design management, sustainable design analysis and advanced modelling, customisation and visualisation, at the cutting edge of technology. You’ll research novel approaches and technologies for an efficient design integration and project collaboration, understanding BIM impact on the design process and workflow requirements.

In February 2015 the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills unveiled Digital Built Britain, the government’s strategic plan for Level 3 BIM. This new programme is of direct relevance to anyone guided by the vision of greater efficiency and profitability.

During your study you will be exposed to and get involved in cutting edge BIM enabled integrated design and construction via research projects and consultancy conducted by your lecturers, such as Dr Boris Ceranic’s projects, SmartPoD, Hierons
Wood and Retro-Tek. The University of Derby has been granted Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists CIAT Centre of Excellence status, one of only four in the country.

You’ll study modules such as:

Research Methods, Application and Evaluation
BIM and Integrated Project Collaboration
nD BIM – Costing, Project Planning and Design Management
BIM and Sustainable Design Analysis
Advanced Parametric Design and Specification
Project Planning, Value Engineering and Risk Management
Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution
Sustainable Architecture and Low Energy Design
Negotiated Module
Independent Scholarship (Technology)

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The degree is currently validated by the RIBA at Part 2 and prescribed by ARB. Your study will be mainly studio based, with design projects each year. Read more

About the course

The degree is currently validated by the RIBA at Part 2 and prescribed by ARB. Your study will be mainly studio based, with design projects each year. To qualify as an architect, you’ll produce at least one comprehensive design project and a dissertation.

Through our unique live projects you can work with local, regional and international groups on real-life challenges. You could be building, designing urban masterplans or designing in detail.

Advance your career

Our graduates are architects, project managers, urban designers and client advisers.

Employers include the Olympic Park Legacy Company, Hawkins Brown, Renzo Piano Building Workshop and URBED (Urbanism, Environment and Design) Ltd. With a post-qualification degree, you could move on to a senior position or further academic research and teaching.

Learn from experts

You’ll be joining one of the largest and most diverse groups of full-time architecture academics in the country. Our staff come from the arts, physical and social sciences, and engineering. This connects our research to other disciplines and stimulates debate about the future of architecture.

Our international research projects shape policy and address public and professional needs. We integrate those projects with our teaching on courses that will develop your core skills. You’ll be encouraged to provide social and environmental solutions to the challenges of our time.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us fourth in the UK.

Explore your ideas

You’ll have access to a lot of specialist facilities. Our media unit has a range of audio-visual and environmental equipment including artificial sky for daylight simulation, a thermal imaging camera and a mixed reality imaging suite. We have our own photography studio, reprographics unit and 3D printers. There are design studios, research rooms and computer labs.

Our teaching is more than lectures and seminars. Our student-led design projects help you learn by doing. Working with real clients on real projects, you’ll discover the benefits of socially engaged design and collaborative working. The outcomes make
a difference to communities.

Core modules

Design 1, 2, 3 and 4; Live Project 1 and 2; Theory and Research 1 and 2, Environment and Technology 1 and 2; Management, Practice and Law 1 and 2; Dissertation 1 and 2.

Examples of optional modules

Participation in Architecture and Urban Design; Interactive Urban Visualisation Modelling; Critical Spatial Theory; Parametric Architectural Geometry; Building Information Modelling, Management and Analysis.

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The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers. Read more
The MSc/PgDip programme in Food Safety and Control addresses the key issues of food control, from both the food producers and food law enforcement points of view, recognising the equally important needs of distributors, retailers and of course, consumers.

The course covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control, such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards.

The responsibility of assuring the safety of food lies primarily with government and the industry. In today's food industry, all aspects of the production, storage and distribution of food must be effectively controlled, not only to assure safety and wholesomeness, but also to ensure efficient and consistent manufacture at the lowest possible cost. Consumers are demanding a greater assurance of safety as well as more information on which to base their choices. Students are expected to take on demanding roles in a wide range of food control activities in both the private and public sectors upon graduation, while gaining an internationally recognized qualification.

EU study opportunity

EU study opportunities exist with the University of deLorraine Nancy, France, and Universidad Politécnica deValencia (UPV), Valencia, Spain.

Excellent scholarship opportunity

Students who have accepted an offer for a place on this course are encouraged to apply for LSBU's Frank Brake scholarship. Find out more about the Frank Brake scholarship:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/scholarships/frank-brake-scholarship

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/food-safety-control-msc

Modules

Year 1:
All modules are assessed through a mix of formal examination and coursework. Each module represents 200 hours of learning time with up to 40 hours of class contact time.

- Food regulation and sustainability
Food legislation is an essential element for an effective food safety and control. The module deals with legislative control at various levels, embracing national and European Union legislation and also international approaches to harmonisation. It also provides an awareness of the different types of food standards, and their implications for manufacturers, retailers and consumers. It also addresses the policy issues in sustainable food production and management.

- Food composition and safety
This module comprises of selected topics that are directly relevant to food safety and control. It considers the complex chemical composition of foods, the chemical safety of foods, quality parameters, and develops the skills to interpret and use data. The common themes throughout the module are the choice of suitable, appropriate and cost effective analytical methodology, and the correct interpretation of analytical results.

- Food microbiology and hygiene
This module is designed to help you develop an understanding of food microbiology, to appreciate the principles of food microbiology and explore both microbial food spoilage and food borne microorganisms. You'll be able to critically analyse the means by which food can be processed safely from a microbiological standpoint, and the methodology that is applied to achieve this. Emphasis will be given to the development, application and use of microbiological criteria for foods and their limitations.

- Food quality management
This module introduces the principles behind all effective quality management systems (QMSs) employed in the modern food industry. Quality of product or service does not just happen; it has to be planned and managed. Systems used by small as well as large companies are covered.

- Food product development management
This module examines the management processes involved in the design and development of new safe food products. Students work together in small groups and adopt an allocated role within the group. The groups respond to a product development brief by designing and developing a new food product or an extension of an existing product. You'll prepare an individual portfolio describing your experience and contribution and make a group presentation of your product to a panel of external guests as a 'commercial pitch'.

- Food control operations
This module outlines the rationale, philosophy and concepts of modern food control, introducing the precautionary principle, the scope ranging from 'farm to fork', and the requirement of risk assessment. The principles of control based on prevention rather than detection and self-regulation are underlined throughout. Modern tools, techniques and procedures in food control are also introduced, illustrating the scope, applications and potential benefits of effective food control. You'll learn how to draw up specifications, identify safety hazards, conduct risk assessments, determine product shelf life, apply the commonly used statistical quality control techniques as well as use basic sensory evaluation methods. In the end, you'll have a broad and comprehensive grounding in modern food control operations.

- Research methods
This module aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills required for scientific research and systematic investigation. You'll learn how to ask the right questions, develop meaningful research proposals and evaluate objectively and independently research findings. Emphasis will be given to ethics, background information search, planning, experimental design, data collection and analysis. Principles of scientific methods, objective reasoning, idea formulation and model building will also be included. In data analysis, you'll be introduced to the most common statistical techniques covering both parametric and non-parametric tests.

- Project
The Project forms the climax of the MSc Food Safety and Control programme. It's the opportunity for you to demonstrate your grasp of food control in its widest sense, and produce documentary evidence of that grasp. The project provides the opportunity for you to apply your knowledge in an integrated fashion to a particular challenge in the management and control of food safety. We always try to help you match your project intention with your career aspirations and where possible use our networks to enable you to work on real commercial problems within an industrial placement.

The course has been developed to provide:
- A thorough understanding of the scientific principles on which both the safe handling of food and food control procedures are based

- An appreciation of the importance of the proper control of manufacture, storage and distribution, and the means by which it is achieved in the production and sale of safe food

- An understanding of the food industry's responsibilities to the interests and welfare of the consumer

- Opportunities to consider the social and economic contexts in which the industry operates

- An intellectually stimulating and coherent programme relevant to both your needs and those of the food industry

- A detailed understanding of the philosophy and methodology of research

- The best possible opportunity to develop personally and professionally

- The knowledge and skills necessary to enhance your career prospects.

Employability

The programme covers the knowledge and skills required for the successful introduction and implementation of systems of control such as those based on the accepted principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), and other international quality management standards. This opens up numerous and diverse opportunities in food safety and control.

You'll study all areas of food safety, ranging from microbiological, chemical and physical safety in the different modulesand throughout the programme.

The course will open up a wide range of career opportunities including roles in: product development; quality control; food safety and quality management; catering and retailing; technical auditing; and food law enforcement. Some of our graduates have gone on to PhD degrees.

Recent employers include Kerry Foods, Leathams, Bakkaver, Kraft Foods, Tesco, Asda, Marks and Spencer, Harrods and local authorities.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

You'll be encouraged to undertake a work-based project or dissertation.

Teaching and learning

You'll make extensive use of the Virtual Learning Environment, so materials are available whenever you need them. Personal tutoring support, extraclinics offering support outside lecture and tutorial sessions are available.There's a major focus on the practical applications of knowledge, supported byhands-on laboratory exercises. Various assessment methods are used in modules across the course.

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The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The MSc Forensic Psychology is the only BPS accredited programme in Wales, offering a unique opportunity for students to study Forensic Psychology in Wales. Working collaboratively with NOMS Cymru (National Offender Management Services, Wales), helps keep the programme up to date with strategy development and policy decisions. Regular contributions from practitioners within the Principality enable students to understand more about services within Wales and their impact on our society locally. We also have many national contributors who share their extensive knowledge and experience.​

Due to the popularity of this programme you should submit your application at the earliest opportunity, and at the very latest by 29th July. ​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology---MSc-.aspx

​Course Content​​

Forensic Psychology is the practice and application of psychological research relevant to crime, policing, the courts, the criminal and civil justice system, offenders, prison, secure settings, offender management, health and academic settings as well as private practice.

It looks at the role of environmental, psychosocial, and socio-cultural factors that may contribute to crime or its prevention. The primary aim of Forensic Psychology as an academic discipline is to develop understanding of the processes underlying criminal behaviour and for this improved understanding to impact on the effective management and rehabilitation of different groups of offenders in all settings within the criminal justice system.

The first aim of the programme is to provide students with a thorough and critical academic grounding in the evidence relating to environmental, cultural, cognitive and biological factors that may contribute to a wide variety of forms of offending. The programme will encourage students to consider the role and limitations of causal explanations for offending in the development of offender treatments, services and policy.

The second aim of the programme is to introduce students to the basic professional competencies for working in the many settings where forensic psychology is practiced, including skills related to inter-disciplinary working, risk assessment, ethics, continuing professional development, report writing and differences in practice when working with offenders, victims, the courts and the police.

The programme aims to produce Masters degree graduates with the ability to understand the limitations of the conceptual underpinnings of interventions and assessments used in forensic psychology and who are able therefore to engage in critical evaluation of the evidence base upon which their own practice will eventually be based. The programme will specifically avoid providing any formal supervised practice. Its aim is to produce reflective scientist-practitioners who will be ready to engage with the next stage of training (i.e. BPS Stage 2 or HCPC route) towards registration as a Forensic Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Students will complete the following taught modules and will also be required to conduct a novel, supervised research dissertation with participants preferably drawn from a forensic setting:

Research Methods and Design (30 credits)
The aim of this module is to extend students knowledge and experience of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Topics covered include: randomised control trials, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, Power analysis, Regression, Non parametric methods, interviews, discourse analysis, grounded theory, reflective analysis and psychometric evaluation.

Forensic Mental Health (20 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical examination of the relationship between mental illness, personality disorder, learning disability and criminal behaviour. The module will encourage students to view the mental health needs of offenders in the broadest possible context and to appreciate the inter-disciplinary nature of services available to mentally disordered offenders, difficulties in accessing those services and problems for custodial adjustment presented by specific psychiatric diagnoses

Professional Practice and Offender Management (20 credits)
The focus of this module is the professional practice of forensic psychology. The module builds on the groundwork laid by earlier modules and covers professional skills and the types of interventions that a practicing forensic psychologist may engage in. The topics covered by this module include ethics, report writing, working with other agencies, and working with offenders and victims.

Psychological Assessments and Interventions (20 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the reduction of re-offending by convicted criminals. The central focus of the module is the 'what works' literature. A range of topics will be covered demonstrating the broad application of psychology to offender rehabilitation in the Criminal Justice System, and within Wales particularly. These topics include: (1) Offender assessment: risk, need and protective factors (2) factors affecting response to treatment; (3) ethical issues of compulsory treatment; and (4) interventions for a range of offending behaviours.

Theories of Criminal Behaviour (10 credits)
The module aims to examine the contribution made by biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives to our understanding of the aetiology of criminal behaviour. It will explore psychological theories of a variety of offending behaviours such as: violence, aggression, domestic abuse, sex offending, vehicle crime, fire setting as well as gangs and gangs membership.

Legal Psychology (10 credits)
This module covers psychology as it may be applied to the law, and the central focus of the module is evidence. A range of topics will be covered, demonstrating the broad application of psychology within the legal system. These topics include the interviewing of suspects and witnesses, vulnerable victims, offender profiling and the detection of deception.

Addiction and Psychological Vulnerabilities (10 credits)
This module informs students about different factors that may contribute to psychological vulnerability in offenders and victims. A variety of topics will be covered, including issues around the concept of addictive behaviours, vulnerability and the protection of vulnerable adults, including factors which may increase vulnerability to offending and victimisation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Teaching on the MSc Forensic Psychology Programme is predominantly conducted in small groups and adopts an interactive approach. The Research Methods and Design module and the Dissertation workshops are the only part of the programme which is taught in a larger group of around 40 to 50 students as opposed to between 10 and 20 students on the core modules. As a result teaching involves a range of discussions, activities, evaluations of papers, case studies and role play exercises. The focus within the programme is on both content and key skills to develop specialists in the field of forensic psychology with flexible generic skills. These experiences also help to foster student development and confidence as independent life-long learners.

Student learning is promoted through a variety of learning and teaching methods. These include: lectures, workshops, online learning through the virtual learning environment, Moodle, as well as self directed learning. Each student will have an allocated personal tutor to support them through their period of study.

As this programme is accredited by the BPS, there is a requirement for students to attend at least 80% of the taught sessions for the programme.

Assessment

The MSc is assessed by a range of different coursework assignments – e.g. presentations, reports, essays, reflective reports, academic posters, research proposal. There are no examinations.

Employability & Careers​

An MSc in Forensic Psychology is the first step (stage one) in gaining Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC). The MSc in Forensic Psychology will provide the knowledge base and applied research skills that will provide the foundation for stage two of the chartered process that requires a minimum of two years of full-time supervised practice with an appropriate client group.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Epidemiology and Statistics module will help you become familiar with various study designs that are used in epidemiology. The module will cover the rationale for using each study design as well as the types of results produced. Read more
The Epidemiology and Statistics module will help you become familiar with various study designs that are used in epidemiology. The module will cover the rationale for using each study design as well as the types of results produced.

You will explore key statistical principles and techniques such as hypothesis testing and estimation including how to use these techniques to analyse and interpret epidemiological studies.

Module content

The module consists of two complementary parts:
Epidemiology
-Populations and considering illness in populations.
-Use of routinely available data in epidemiology.
-Measures of disease.
-Direct and indirect standardisation, years of life lost, life expectancy and DALYS.
-Absolute and relative measures of risk.
-Causality, bias and confounding.
-Study design including cross-sectional, case control, cohort, clinical trials, ecological studies.

Statistics
-The different types of data.
-Measures of central tendency and dispersion.
-Probability theory and statistical distributions.
-Point estimation and confidence intervals.
-Principles of hypothesis testing and sample size calculation.
-Linear models.
-Non-parametric tests.

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The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

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Programme structure. The programme offers five "core" modules, taken by all candidates, along with a variety of elective modules from which students can pick and choose. Read more
Programme structure

The programme offers five "core" modules, taken by all candidates, along with a variety of elective modules from which students can pick and choose. There are lectures, examinations and coursework in eight modules altogether, including the five core modules. Additionally, all students complete an individual research project on a selected topic in financial mathematics, leading to the submission of a dissertation.

Core modules

Probability and stochastics. This course provides the basics of the probabilistic ideas and mathematical language needed to fully appreciate the modern mathematical theory of finance and its applications. Topics include: measurable spaces, sigma-algebras, filtrations, probability spaces, martingales, continuous-time stochastic processes, Poisson processes, Brownian motion, stochastic integration, Ito calculus, log-normal processes, stochastic differential equations, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.

Financial markets. This course is designed to cover basic ideas about financial markets, including market terminology and conventions. Topics include: theory of interest, present value, future value, fixed-income securities, term structure of interest rates, elements of probability theory, mean-variance portfolio theory, the Markowitz model, capital asset pricing model (CAPM), portfolio performance, risk and utility, portfolio choice theorem, risk-neutral pricing, derivatives pricing theory, Cox-Ross-Rubinstein formula for option pricing.

Option pricing theory. The key ideas leading to the valuation of options and other important derivatives will be introduced. Topics include: risk-free asset, risky assets, single-period binomial model, option pricing on binomial trees, dynamical equations for price processes in continuous time, Radon-Nikodym process, equivalent martingale measures, Girsanov's theorem, change of measure, martingale representation theorem, self-financing strategy, market completeness, hedge portfolios, replication strategy, option pricing, Black-Scholes formula.


Interest rate theory. An in-depth analysis of interest-rate modelling and derivative pricing will be presented. Topics include: interest rate markets, discount bonds, the short rate, forward rates, swap rates, yields, the Vasicek model, the Hull-White model, the Heath-Jarrow-Merton formalism, the market model, bond option pricing in the Vasicek model, the positive interest framework, option and swaption pricing in the Flesaker-Hughston model.

Financial computing I. The idea of this course is to enable students to learn how the theory of pricing and hedging can be implemented numerically. Topics include: (i) The Unix/Linux environment, C/C++ programming: types, decisions, loops, functions, arrays, pointers, strings, files, dynamic memory, preprocessor; (ii) data structures: lists and trees; (iii) introduction to parallel (multi-core, shared memory) computing: open MP constructs; applications to matrix arithmetic, finite difference methods, Monte Carlo option pricing.

Elective modules

Portfolio theory. The general theory of financial portfolio based on utility theory will be introduced in this module. Topics include: utility functions, risk aversion, the St Petersburg paradox, convex dual functions, dynamic asset pricing, expectation, forecast and valuation, portfolio optimisation under budget constraints, wealth consumption, growth versus income.

Information in finance with application to credit risk management. An innovative and intuitive approach to asset pricing, based on the modelling of the flow of information in financial markets, will be introduced in this module. Topics include: information-based asset pricing – a new paradigm for financial risk management; modelling frameworks for cash flows and market information; applications to credit risk modelling, defaultable discount bond dynamics, the pricing and hedging of credit-risky derivatives such as credit default swaps (CDS), asset dependencies and correlation modelling, and the origin of stochastic volatility.


Mathematical theory of dynamic asset pricing. Financial modelling and risk management involve not only the valuation and hedging of various assets and their positions, but also the problem of asset allocation. The traditional approach of risk-neutral valuation treats the problem of valuation and hedging, but is limited when it comes to understanding asset returns and the behaviour of asset prices in the real-world 'physical' probability measure. The pricing kernel approach, however, treats these different aspects of financial modelling in a unified and coherent manner. This module introduces in detail the techniques of pricing kernel methodologies, and its applications to interest-rete modelling, foreign exchange market, and inflation-linked products. Another application concerns the modelling of financial markets where prices admit jumps. In this case, the relation between risk, risk aversion, and return is obscured in traditional approaches, but is made clear in the pricing kernel method. The module also covers the introduction to the theory of Lévy processes for jumps and its applications to dynamic asset pricing in the modern setting.


Financial computing II: High performance computing. In this parallel-computing module students will learn how to harness the power of a multi-core computer and Open MP to speed up a task by running it in parallel. Topics include: shared and distributed memory concepts; Message Passing and introduction to MPI constructs; communications models, applications and pitfalls; open MP within MPI; introduction to Graphics Processors; GPU computing and the CUDA programming model; CUDA within MPI; applications to matrix arithmetic, finite difference methods, Monte Carlo option pricing.

Risk measures, preference and portfolio choice. The idea of this module is to enable students to learn a variety of statistical techniques that will be useful in various practical applications in investment banks and hedge funds. Topics include: probability and statistical models, models for return distributions, financial time series, stationary processes, estimation of AR processes, portfolio regression, least square estimation, value-at-risk, coherent risk measures, GARCH models, non-parametric regression and splines.

Research project

Towards the end of the Spring Term, students will choose a topic for an individual research project, which will lead to the preparation and submission of an MSc dissertation. The project supervisor will usually be a member of the Brunel financial mathematics group. In some cases the project may be overseen by an external supervisor based at a financial institution or another academic institution.

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