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The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Read more
The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Our academic team are highly rated within the paper science sector, and are regarded as experts in their field.

The subject
The range of materials classed as paper is diverse, from bathroom tissue to cardboard; but, despite the physical differences, they have the same chemical composition, consisting primarily of natural cellulosic fibres. The difference in the type of paper arises from the choice of raw material and the influence of the manufacturing process.

Our research
Our research covers the influence of factors, such as recycling and process chemistry, on the physical properties of the sheet, and looks at ways to improve them. We also look at improving the efficiency of raw materials and energy in manufacturing processes.

Industry links
We have strong ties with industry, including collaboration with Aylesford Newsprint, Billerud, Abitibi Consolidated, and M-Real. Our research impacts directly on paper manufacturers, and their suppliers and customers, and we are consistently approached by industry to collaborate and give expert advice on research projects.

Research projects
Some of our recent research projects include:
• Analysis of factors affecting the pore size distribution of paper
• Measurement and modelling of paper shrinkage during manufacture
• The influence of sheet uniformity and starch on the strength of recycled board

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The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Read more
The Paper Science research degrees are part of a dynamic research area within the school. We have close links with industry and much of our research impacts directly on current industry practice. Our academic team are highly rated within the paper science sector, and are regarded as experts in their field.

The subject
The range of materials classed as paper is diverse, from bathroom tissue to cardboard; but, despite the physical differences, they have the same chemical composition, consisting primarily of natural cellulosic fibres. The difference in the type of paper arises from the choice of raw material and the influence of the manufacturing process.

Our research
Our research covers the influence of factors, such as recycling and process chemistry, on the physical properties of the sheet, and looks at ways to improve them. We also look at improving the efficiency of raw materials and energy in manufacturing processes.

Industry links
We have strong ties with industry, including collaboration with Aylesford Newsprint, Billerud, Abitibi Consolidated, and M-Real. Our research impacts directly on paper manufacturers, and their suppliers and customers, and we are consistently approached by industry to collaborate and give expert advice on research projects.

Research projects
Some of our recent research projects include:
• Analysis of factors affecting the pore size distribution of paper
• Measurement and modelling of paper shrinkage during manufacture
• The influence of sheet uniformity and starch on the strength of recycled board

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The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) Professional course will allow you to progress and have considerable influence in your chosen field. Read more
The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) Professional course will allow you to progress and have considerable influence in your chosen field. Whether you aim to work in commerce, financial services, consultancy, government, the public sector or manufacturing, this course is for you.

The CIMA Professional Qualification allows you to become a chartered management accountant. You will be a professional who can shape and control the future of organisations. CIMA members are more than just accountants. On our course, you acquire a set of world class finance skills, including strategic thinking and risk and performance management skills. This is your passport to career success in a range of business and finance roles.

The University of South Wales is a CIMA Global Learning Premium Partner, the highest possible accreditation under CIMA’s quality assurance scheme for training providers. We have a fully implemented CIMA syllabus and an assessment regime, and have worked closely with CIMA to align our course.

We also work closely with the local CIMA member branch for the benefit of our students, and have hosted a number of CPD events in recent years. Tutors from the university have delivered lectures on sustainability accounting, performance management, risk management and Islamic banking and finance. In addition, we have significant experience of providing bespoke CPD to large, local organisations.

Our CIMA course is studied part-time, allowing students to combine their studies with full-time employment where they can build experience to satisfy CIMA’s practical experience requirements. For more information on CIMA, visit http://www.cimaglobal.com.

Accountancy at City Campus

At City Campus, we offer tuition for the qualifications of three of the major UK accountancy bodies (CIMA, ACCA and ICAEW) and have been successfully teaching for over 40 years. We are an ACCA Platinum Approved Learning Partner, a CIMA Premium Learning Partner and an ICAEW Partner in Learning.

What you will study

CIMA Professional Qualification

Operational level:
Paper P1 Management Accounting
Paper E1 Organisational Management
Paper F1 Financial Reporting and Taxation
Operational Level Integrated Case Study

Management level:
Paper P2 Advanced Management Accounting
Paper E2 Project and Relationship Management
Paper F2 Advanced Financial Reporting
Management Level Integrated Case Study

Strategic level:
Paper P3 Risk Management
Paper E3 Strategic Management
Paper F3 Financial Strategy
Strategic Level Integrated Case Study

At each level all three papers must be passed before students can progress to the integrated case study. The integrated case study must be passed before progression to the next level.

Learning and teaching methods

We offer flexible afternoon and evening tuition for the professional qualification. Entry is in September and March for computer based exams in February and May.

You will study each subject in a workshop format. Question practice, progress tests and revision sessions will prepare you for the exams. We offer an exceptional level of student support, including individual face-to-face feedback during the academic year.

Our team of eleven qualified accountants have significant industry and accounting practice experience, as well as experience of teaching professional accountancy qualifications. A number of the team mark professional body exams, contribute to professional journals and online professional student forums, engage in quality control work for professional bodies, and are external examiners for other universities.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

CIMA students can progress into management consultancy and business analyst roles, as well as more traditional management accounting. Further career progression may see you moving on to finance director or chief executive roles.

You could also decide to study additional management qualifications such as the EMBA, MBA or the Professional Fast-track MSc Accounting and Finance taught at the University of South Wales.

Assessment methods

The professional qualification is assessed by computer based exams.

Each level of the qualification (operational, management, strategic) has two assessment points – a 90 minute computer based exam for each subject within that level, plus an integrated case study exam.

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The MPhil in Social Anthropology is an 11 month taught Masters degree and can be taken as a freestanding qualification or as a route to the PhD. Read more
The MPhil in Social Anthropology is an 11 month taught Masters degree and can be taken as a freestanding qualification or as a route to the PhD. It is a demanding course that enables you to reach a high level of specialist knowledge in social anthropology within a short time and, subject to performance, equips you to undertake a research degree.

Problems in anthropological theory, interpretation, comparison and analysis are addressed in relation to particular ethnographies and substantive debates in the anthropological literature. Through critical reflection on a range of anthropological theories, and through practice in the application of those theories to bodies of ethnographic data, students acquire a thorough and intensive grounding in a range of styles of social anthropological analysis.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssampsap

Course detail

The principal fields of anthropological analysis are covered in two courses in General Anthropology; one optional course in specialised learning, and a non-assessed course in theory and methods:

1. Production and Reproduction (Paper 1)
2. Systems of Power and Knowledge (Paper 2)
3. Optional Papers (Paper 3)
4. Theory, Methods and Enquiry in Social Anthropology (non-assessed Paper).

Divided into two strands (1) interdisciplinary perspectives and (2) professional process, the optional papers reflect the current research interests of Social Anthropology staff, and they vary from year to year. By way of example only, in 2015-2016, the Division offers the following options:

Interdisciplinary Perspectives:

- Science and Society
- The Anthropology of Post-Socialist Societies
- Anthropology of Visual and Media Culture.

Professional Process:

- Social Anthropology and Museums (Paper 3e)
- Medical Anthropology (Paper 3f).

Format

Teaching for the MPhil is via introductory sessions, seminars, lectures and individual supervision. It is centred around four seminars (Kinship, Politics, Economics and Religion) that constitute the principal teaching of the General Anthropology. Those who are pursuing one of the professional options are expected to attend and take part in the above core seminars as well.

In addition to the seminars, the Division requires all MPhil students to attend the Part IIA lecturers for Papers SAN2, SAN3, and SAN4, plus one other Optional Paper to be chosen by the student during the first week of Michaelmas Term. Students are not expected to confine themselves exclusively to these lectures, but are encouraged to attend any lectures they find interesting. The Division also offers a separate research methodology course.

Each student will be supervised by a member of staff who can provide general guidance throughout the course. Students will meet their respective supervisors fortnightly and they will be expected to write essays. Supervisions provide an opportunity for them to discuss these essays and to raise wider questions on a one-to-one basis.

Placements

Students following the optional paper Social Anthropology and Museums are required to undertake four to six weeks practical work experience. Typically this requirement is fulfilled by the preparation of annual student exhibitions at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, although other museum work or an external placement may be arranged in consultation with the course coordinator and the student’s supervisor.

Assessment

Each student is expected to write a total of 6-8 essays for supervision in Michaelmas and Lent. The supervisor usually makes written comments on the essays and discusses them in supervision sessions.

A student is also expected to write one set essay and one dissertation over the year on which they will receive written feedback from the assessors. Students may use their supervision time to seek advice from their supervisors.

Supervisors submit online progress reports at the end of each term via Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System (CGSRS).

Continuing

Continuation to the MRes or PhD is subject to the following:

- acceptance of an application for continuation by the PhD Committee;
- a mark of at least 70% in the MPhil is normally required for continuation to the PhD.

Applicants intending to continue to the MRes/PhD programme should state so in their statement of purpose, however acceptance for the MPhil does not guarantee that you will be accepted for continuation.

Funding Opportunities

All applicants are eligible to apply for the Wyse Bursary for Social Anthropology. A separate application must be made for this via the following link:
http://www.socanth.cam.ac.uk/online-forms/

UK and EU nationals should note that applicants for the MPhil are not eligible for ESRC or Cambridge European Scholarship funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. Read more

Overview

Oxford is a wonderful place to study and it has unrivalled facilities. We have been running this part-time masters course successfully for thirteen years. The overwhelming response gained from our students is one of satisfaction, enjoyment and fulfilment. We have brought together a good balance of men and women, older and younger students, historic environment professionals and those with a personal or community interest in the subject. We have had some great field experiences and outstanding seminars. Although the coursework requires a solid commitment from you over two years, the course atmosphere is informal and friendly, and we aim to support every student with ideas, guidance and encouragement.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-applied-landscape-archaeology

What the course offers

The MSc in Applied Landscape Archaeology is a part-time modular course over two years, leading to an Oxford University Postgraduate Degree in Archaeology. Students become fully matriculated members of Oxford University during their period of registration, and therefore also become a member of a college. The course is designed for the needs of students who wish to study part-time and this includes those who are in full-time employment. Those with a personal or professional interest in landscape archaeology are welcome to apply.

Landscape Archaeology is an increasingly popular and widely-understood concept. Using a multi-period systematic approach, it is concerned with understanding past human impacts on the resources, topography and environment of the whole landscape, from uplands to coasts, and from farmed landscapes to urban/industrial areas.

Many methods of research are being developed in landscape archaeology, including geophysical survey, digital mapping and remote-sensing techniques such as LiDAR. These take their place alongside fieldwalking, historic landscape analysis, aerial photography and selective excavation to provide an effective armoury of techniques for the researcher. Skills such as survey and resource assessment are becoming essential for anyone involved in the management of the historic environment. Effecive communication and presentation of the value and potential of the historic landscape is vital in the world of planning, tourism, outreach and education.

The course involves a combination of academic study and field practice - survey and geophysics form a central theme, and we enjoy the support of Bartington Instruments Ltd for this.

This course is designed to appeal to those who already have experience of studying archaeology (or a closely-related subject) at undergraduate degree or diploma level and who wish to expand their academic, practical and professional skills in landscape archaeology. With a strong (but not exclusive) emphasis on the archaeology of Britain, it focuses on the applications of research methods in varying landscape situations. The course format is flexible and enables students to pursue their own research interests leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

College affiliation

All students studying for a degree (including the DPhil) must be a member of a college. A number of Oxford colleges accept applications from part-time postgraduates whereas others do not: please consult the graduate prospectus or enquire with individual colleges. The majority of part-time DPhil students in Archaeology have chosen to apply to Kellogg College and most of the tutors and lecturers are members of the College. Kellogg is dedicated to graduate part-time students and has developed a unique expertise in attending to the intellectual, social, IT and welfare needs of part-time, mature graduate students. If a college choice is not specified on your application, it will be automatically sent to Kellogg if places are still available there.

Course structure

The course is divided into two one-year modules, Year A and Year B, which are run in alternate academic years (from October to September):

Year B begins in October 2015
Year A begins in October 2016

All students attend both modules, but they may be done in any order depending on year of admission. Because the course is modular there is no advantage to one combination over the other. Students normally study two consecutive modules and this is regarded as the best way to experience the course. However, in exceptional cases, regulations permit a student to intermit between modules (by permission of the Board of Studies only).

Both one-year modules have one core paper and two advanced papers spread over three terms.

Year A:

- Core Paper: Method and Theory in Landscape Archaeology
- Advanced Paper (Artefacts and Ecofacts in the Landscape)
- Advanced Paper (Archaeological Prospection)

Year B:
- Core Paper: Managing Historic Landscapes in the 21st Century
- Advanced Paper (Digital Landscapes)
- Advanced Paper (Reading the Historic Landscape)
- Field Training Week

Instead of one advanced paper, students may choose to opt for a ‘flexi-placement’ comprising at least 14 days spread over approximately one year to be spent working at an organisation which is involved in an aspect of landscape archaeology. The Course Director will supply details of these.

The dissertation (15,000 words) is the student’s own project which develops throughout the course and is submitted at the end of the second module. It can be based on a piece of fieldwork, or a methodological or artefactual study. Each student will be assigned a tutor who will supervise their dissertation. A dissertation workshop is held each year to help students work together on this essential course element.

In addition, once every two years (in late June - early July of Year B) a compulsory field survey training week will take place. Each student will also have a series of tutorials with the course director and tutors; these may take place in person or on-line.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-applied-landscape-archaeology/

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Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses. Read more
Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses.

Visit the website http://cce.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/civil-engineering/

Research Thesis Option (Plan I)

The thesis option is a research-focused program that includes conducting original research, writing a research thesis and defending the thesis to the student’s graduate supervisory committee. The research thesis option degree requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

21 credit hours of approved coursework, including
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A minimum of 15 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

6 hours of CE 599 Thesis Research
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Once taken, CE 599 must be taken every term until graduation

Paper/Report Option (Plan II)

The paper/report, or non-thesis, option requires a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent culminating experience, which is graded by the student’s graduate advisor. The paper/report option requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including:

27 credit hours of approved coursework:
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses

- A maximum of 3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum

- A minimum of 18 hours of CE-prefix courses

3 credit hours of CE 501 Masters Capstone Project – Plan II
- Taken with permission under the direction of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Requires completion a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent report with the topic, scope, and format pre-approved by the student’s advisor

- Must be taken the semester the student plans to graduate

Core Graduate Course Requirements

The faculty has defined core course requirements in four areas. Each student’s plan of study is required to include one of the following sets of core graduate courses:

- Construction Engineering and Management Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 567 Construction Accounting and Finance
CE 568 Construction Scheduling

- Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, MSEnvE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 575 Hydrology
CE 626 Physical and Chemical Processes

- Structural Engineering and Materials Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 534 Advanced Structural Mechanics
CE 531 Structural Dynamics

- Transportation Systems Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 559 Pavement Design and Rehabilitation
CE 655 Sustainable Transportation

Notes

- University Scholars (BS/MS) students are allowed 9 credit hours of coursework to double count between the BS and MS degrees.

- Students on graduate assistantships must register for a minimum of 1 credit hour of CE 593/693 each semester they are supported.

- Only 400-level courses without 500-level counterparts are allowed and must be approved prior to taking the class.

- Students are responsible for all forms and must route all forms through the Department prior to submission to UA’s Graduate School.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses. Read more
Students work closely with their graduate advisor and supervisory committee to define an appropriate plan of study that meets all degree requirements, including any prerequisite or preparatory work and a specified set of core courses.

Visit the website http://cce.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/engineering-environmental/

Research Thesis Option (Plan I)

The thesis option is a research-focused program, which includes conducting original research, writing a research thesis, and defending the thesis to the student’s graduate supervisory committee. The research thesis option degree requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including

21 credit hours of approved coursework, including
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework
(See later section for additional information regarding the graduate core)

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses
(Use Graduate School’s “Approval of 400-Level Cours for Master’s Credit” form)

- A minimum of 15 hours of CE-prefix courses
(See Appendix I for a schedule for all CE-prefix courses offered by the department)

3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor
(See later section for additional information regarding Practicum)

6 hours of CE 599 Thesis Research
- Taken with permission under the supervision of the student’s graduate advisor
- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty
- Once taken, CE 599 must be taken every term until graduation

Paper/Report Option (Plan II)

The paper/report, or non-thesis, option requires a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent culminating experience, which is graded by the student’s graduate advisor. The paper/report option requirements are as follows:

A minimum of 30 credit hours, including

27 credit hours of approved coursework
- 9 credit hours of core graduate coursework
(See later section for additional information regarding the graduate core.)

- A maximum of 6 hours of approved 400-level courses
(Use Graduate School’s “Approval of 400-Level Course for Master’s Credit” form.)

- A maximum of 3 hours of CE 593 or CE 693 Practicum
(See later section for additional information regarding Practicum.)

- A minimum of 18 hours of CE-prefix courses
(See Appendix I for a schedule for all CE-prefix courses offered by the department.)

3 credit hours of CE 501 Masters Capstone Project – Plan II
- Taken with permission under the direction of the student’s graduate advisor

- The graduate advisor must be a full member of the department’s graduate faculty

- Requires completion a research paper, a policy and practice paper, or equivalent report with the topic, scope, and format preapproved by the student’s advisor

- Must be taken the semester the student plans to graduate

EWR Core Course

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Core Coursework (MSCivE, MSEnvE, Ph.D.):

CE 573 Statistical Applications in Civil Engineering
CE 575 Hydrology
CE 626 Physical and Chemical Processes

Additional Course Requirements for Students Without an ABET/EAC-Accredited Degree

AEM 201, AEM 264, AEM 250, AEM 311

Notes

- University Scholars (BS/MS) students are allowed 9 credit hours of coursework to double count between the BS and MS degrees.

- Students on graduate assistantships must register for a minimum of 1 credit hour of CE 593 each semester they are supported.

- Only 400-level courses without 500-level counterparts are allowed and must be approved prior to taking the class.

- Students are responsible for all forms and must route all forms through the Department prior to submission to the Graduate School.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. Read more

About the course

Applications are being accepted to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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The Master of Health Sciences (MHealSc) degree allows study at a postgraduate level across a range of health disciplines, and research experience (thesis, dissertation or project) in the student's area of specialisation. Read more
The Master of Health Sciences (MHealSc) degree allows study at a postgraduate level across a range of health disciplines, and research experience (thesis, dissertation or project) in the student's area of specialisation.

Normally before embarking upon study within the Master of Health Sciences programme, students would first complete a Postgraduate Certificate in Health Sciences (PGCertHealSc) and/or a Postgraduate Diploma in Health Sciences (PGDipHealSc). Students are normally required to obtain a B average over their Postgraduate Diploma in order to be admitted to Masters study.

Information for new applicants

The Master of Health Sciences (MHealSc) comprises 120 points. This can be a thesis worth the entire 120 points, a 60 point dissertation and further papers to the value of 60 points, or 30 point research project and 90 points of further papers.

A 30 point research methods paper is a requirement for the Master of Health Sciences. It can be taken as a generic “unendorsed” option or as an "endorsed" option from those listed below.

Each “endorsed” option has different requirements so it is important to seek course advice before you apply. You can obtain information about each endorsement by clicking on the links below.

The Master of Health Sciences is taught from three campuses (Dunedin, Christchurch and Wellington). Contact details at each campus are listed below. Alternatively, contact for guidance.

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of either:
-Approved papers at 400-level or higher worth at least 120 points, and a thesis (120 points) embodying the results of one year of full-time or equivalent part-time supervised research.
OR
-Approved papers and other course components at 400-level or higher worth at least 240 points (at least 40 points of which will be at NZQF Level 9), including a research method paper or papers to the value of 30 points, and either a research project (30 points) or a dissertation (60 points). Where the programme includes a research project, the research methods paper must be one of the approved 800-level options.

The papers shall constitute a coherent and integrated programme, shall prepare the candidate for the research study, and shall normally include an approved research method paper or papers to the value of 30 points. With approval, papers worth up to a maximum total of 120 points which have been completed at a tertiary education institution other than the University of Otago may be credited to the programme and/or used as the basis for exemptions in terms of regulation 2(c) below.

Where the degree is to be awarded with an endorsed option in an area of specialisation the programme of study must conform to the requirements specified in the schedule for that option.

A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma or equivalent may be exempted from some of the required papers, provided that this previous study is directly relevant to the candidate's proposed and approved programme of study, to a maximum of 120 points.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree. The programme of study and the topic and supervisors of the thesis shall be approved by the Programme Academic Co-ordinator (or nominee).

Other admission requirements

Applicants for admission where non-standard research methods requirements apply (i.e. for the Bioethics endorsement, or where a NZQF Level 9 research methods paper is required in the Masters’ programme, or where an exemption from a research methods requirement has been granted, or in other approved exceptional circumstances) shall normally be required to satisfy all of the following:
-Be a graduate in a health-related field or possess an appropriate health professional qualification requiring at least three years of full-time tertiary study.
-Have completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Health Sciences or equivalent with grades averaging B+ or better.
-Provide evidence of ability for advanced level academic study.

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The programme is suitable for physiotherapists, osteopaths and doctors. This internationally renowned programme is open to doctors and physiotherapists. Read more
The programme is suitable for physiotherapists, osteopaths and doctors.

This internationally renowned programme is open to doctors and physiotherapists. As the longest-established Sports and Exercise Medicine MSc in the country, we have a prestigious history. The programme is based on the philosophy of total care for the athlete and the promotion of physical activity in the general population. Working in sport is a largely practical discipline and the programme's emphasis lies firmly on regular clinical experience. You will benefit from regular contact with members of the Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine as well as visiting clinicians and lecturers who are experienced sport medicine specialists.

The Centre is ideally situated on the same campus as the sports injury, physiotherapy, podiatry and the interdisciplinary combined sports clinics. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to attend recognised external clinics around London, as well as the chance to attend sporting events and visits to national centres of excellence where possible.

Successful alumni have gone on to hold pivotal positions in sports medicine across the UK and internationally, including the Chief Medical Officer to the British Olympic Association and London 2012 and the Medical Director to the English Institute of Sport.

The Centre is renowned in the UK for its academic strength and excellence. Lectures are delivered by national experts; from cutting edge scientists to physiotherapists, doctors, and other health professionals working with world-class athletes.

An insightful video for prospective students interested in the Sports and Exercise Medicine programmes.

This programme will:

-Offer you mastery of foundation concepts and skills in Sports and Exercise Medicine.
-Give you the knowledge and skills to assess sports injuries and to understand their treatment options, as well as understanding the physiological and psychological benefits of exercise and its use as a health tool.
-Allow you regular clinical contact with athletes and sportspeople.
-Introduce you to visiting lecturers, who are experts in the field of Sports Medicine.

Why study your MSc in Sport and Exercise Medicine at Queen Mary?
The Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine is based at the William Harvey Research Institute at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry is comprised of two world renowned teaching hospitals, St Bartholomew’s and The Royal London, which have made, and continue to make, an outstanding contribution to modern medicine. We were one of the top five in the UK for medicine in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

It is unique in the UK for the delivery of integrated academic and practical tuition. Lectures are delivered by national experts.
Core clinician-scientists on staff consult to elite athletes, we have an international research profile in Sports and Exercise Medicine.
Our staff will work closely with you to nurture your research interests and to develop your clinical ability in Sports and Exercise Medicine.

Many students also go on to publish in peer-reviewed journals, a reflection of the quality of our student research output.
Facilities

You will have access to Queen Mary’s comprehensive libraries, including the Postgraduate Reading Room, and The British Library can also be accessed as a research resource. We subscribe to many journals in sport and exercise medicine. You can access electronic journals online.

The Human Performance Laboratory (HPL) at QMUL combines the expertise of sports medicine clinicians, surgeons, engineers and sports scientists with state-of-the-art physiological testing and motion analysis equipment. This collaborative venture offers clinical, educational, research and athlete support service applications in the laboratory or field based settings.

The capabilities of the HPL can be broadly divided into two areas: musculoskeletal biomechanics and physiological testing.

Musculoskeletal biomechanics
The HPL carries 4 Codamotion Cx1 infra-red scanning units that are used extensively for 3-dimensional motion analysis. This system is fully integrated with 2 ground embedded Kistler force plates and a 16 channel wireless EMG system. The integration of these systems allows for full analysis of movement, forces associated with movement and measuring muscular effort during movement. In addition, the HPL also boasts a 64 channel EMG system for multichannel work and an isokinetic dynamometer, which can be used for both research and rehabilitation.

Physiological testing
Detailed analysis of pulmonary gas exchange can be made using an online gas analysis system, in addition to cardiac monitoring using a 12-lead ECG system, during exercise on a treadmill or the electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer. Measures can also be made out in the field, from simple tests of flexibility, strength, speed, power and cardiorespiratory fitness, to comprehensive measurement of expired air using the portable on-line gas analysis system.

Papers of interest

-In Vivo Biological Response to Extracorpereal Shockwave Therapy in Human Tendinopathy (paper is called ESWT)
-The role of interventions directed at the foot for managing patellofemoral pain (paper is called InTouch Article)
-The biomechanics of running in athletes with previous hamstring injury: A case-control study (Hamstrings paper)
-The ‘Best Practice Guide to Conservative Management of Patellofemoral Pain’: incorporating level 1 evidence with expert clinical reasoning (PFP paper)
-Eccentric and Concentric Exercise of the Triceps Surae: An In Vivo Study of Dynamic Muscle and Tendon Biomechanical Parameters (JAB EL CL paper)

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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The Cambridge MCL is a one-year taught masters programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. Read more
The Cambridge MCL is a one-year taught masters programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. It is designed for students wanting to pursue further legal studies after completing their first degree in law, both those intending to practise in the area of corporate law and those considering an academic career. The MCL has been structured so as to combine academic rigour with a diverse and flexible curriculum, enabling each student to tailor their MCL course selection to their own specific requirements.

MCL students take a combination of full-year and one-term modules during the course. All students take the compulsory full-year Deals course, which focuses on the legal and economic structuring of corporate transactions. They also choose one full-year LLM paper from a selection of corporate papers, including Corporate Finance and Corporate Governance. In conjunction with the full-year papers, students take four one- term modules, usually two in the Michaelmas Term and two in the Lent Term. The modules enable students to conduct a more detailed study of certain specialist areas of corporate law, such as shareholder litigation and international merger control.

See the website http://www.mcl.law.cam.ac.uk/

Course detail

MCL students are expected upon arrival to be familiar with corporate law and to be motivated to develop their expertise in this challenging area. Students who take the MCL should leave with a much enriched understanding of the topic. They will learn about areas of corporate law with which they were not previously familiar, will have an opportunity to reflect upon the theoretical and policy implications of the topic and will be challenged to think about the practical aspects of the subject in an academically rigorous manner.

Format

MCL students take the compulsory full-year Deals course and a full-year LLM paper from a selection of corporate papers. In addition they take four one-term MCL-specific modules from a selection of six on offer, usually two in the first term and two in the second term of the course.

Given that MCL enrolment is limited to 25 students, class sizes for the modules and the Deals course are small enough to mean seminar-style teaching occurs in classes formally organised as lectures.

MCL students receive one two-hour formal lecture per week for each of their four termly modules, for the full-year Deals course and for their full-year LLM course.

MCL students receive small group teaching for their full-year LLM paper alongside the LLM students taking the same paper if numbers are sufficiently large.

MCL students are entitled to submit up to three pieces of practice written work for the full-year LLM paper they take. This work might take the form of reflective essays or timed exam-practice essays. Course convenors and lecturers can advise on topics, but the aim is to produce a short piece of writing which provides a concise, rigorous argument or analysis of the issues in question. Students then benefit from specific and individual feedback, and can thereby hone their legal writing skills.

Assessment

- Students write three assignments during the MCL year as the formal assessment for the Deals course.

- A two-hour examination is required for each of their four termly modules, and a three-hour examination for their one full-year LLM course.

- All MCL students give a class presentation as part of a group within the Deals course. This forms part of the assessment for the Deals course, alongside students' individual written assignments.

Continuing

A number of students wish to remain in Cambridge after completing their Masters degree in order to pursue further advanced legal studies, either by undertaking research for the Diploma in International Law, the Diploma in Legal Studies, the MLitt degree or the PhD degree.

Students wishing to continue their studies at Cambridge by undertaking a research degree in law should apply for their chosen course through the Graduate Admissions Office by completing a GRADSAF application form and submitting it by the relevant deadline.

The Faculty of Law website contains information about the options available at:
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-research

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty of Law, in conjunction with Herbert Smith Freehills, offers an annual MCL African Bursary, which is either awarded to one student to cover their entire tuition fee, or jointly to two students to pay half of the tuition fee for each student.

Information about other, non MCL-specific funding is available from the University's Graduate Admissions Office website at:

http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Choosing the University of South Wales to study the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) Certificate will allow you to progress far and have considerable influence in your chosen field. Read more
Choosing the University of South Wales to study the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) Certificate will allow you to progress far and have considerable influence in your chosen field. Whether that be commerce, financial services, consultancy, government, the public sector or manufacturing.

The CIMA Certificate allows entry to the CIMA Professional Qualification. On completing all examinations of the professional qualification and gaining a minimum of three years relevant practical experience, you will become a chartered management accountant. You will be a professional who can shape and control the future of organisations.

CIMA members are more than just accountants. You acquire a set of world class finance skills, including strategic thinking and risk and performance management skills. These will be your passport to career success in a range of business and finance roles.

The University of South Wales is a CIMA Global Learning Premium Partner, the highest possible accreditation under CIMA’s quality assurance scheme for training providers. The course is studied part-time allowing students to study whilst in employment.

Accountancy at City Campus

At City Campus, we offer tuition for the qualifications of three of the major UK accountancy bodies (CIMA, ACCA and ICAEW) and have been successfully teaching for over 40 years. We are an ACCA Platinum Approved Learning Partner, a CIMA Premium Learning Partner and an ICAEW Partner in Learning.

What you will study

CIMA Certificate in Business Accounting:
- Paper C01 – Fundamentals of Management Accounting
- Paper C02 – Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
- Paper C03 – Fundamentals of Business Mathematics
- Paper C04 – Fundamentals of Business Economics
- Paper C05 – Fundamentals of Ethics, Corporate Governance and Business Law

All Certificate papers must be passed before students can progress to the professional qualification.

Learning and teaching methods

Students will attend workshops which will contain lecture, tutorial and question practice elements.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

CIMA students can progress into management consultancy and business analyst roles, as well as more traditional management accounting. You could also choose to undertake additional management qualifications, such as the EMBA, MBA or the Professional Fast-track MSc Accounting and Finance taught at the University of South Wales.

Assessment methods

The certificate papers are assessed via a computer based assessment.

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The Advanced Diploma is a nine-month postgraduate qualification especially designed for those who already have a degree, but in a subject other than Theology and Religious Studies. Read more
The Advanced Diploma is a nine-month postgraduate qualification especially designed for those who already have a degree, but in a subject other than Theology and Religious Studies. Taking this course may be a first step to doing an M.Phil. or Ph.D. in Theology and/or Religious Studies in this or another university, but does not count towards such a degree.

Please note this course will be renamed to Advanced Diploma in Theology, Religion and Philosophy of Religion with effect from 1 October 2017.

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words and offer three or four papers selected from Papers A1, B1-B16, C1-C12 and D1-D2 of the Theology and Religious Studies Tripos (the Faculty's undergraduate degree). Candidates shall offer at least one paper from the set consisting of Papers C1-12 and D1-D2 (third year papers). Only one may be from Papers A1, B1 or C1 (language papers). No candidate shall offer more than one paper examined by an alternative form of assessment (ie by essay).

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvadtrs

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the Advanced Diploma students should have:

- made the transition from another discipline, usually in the humanities, and acquired a grounding in the key concepts and methods in the subject;
- acquired advanced understanding in up to four sub-disciplines of the subject;
- acquired detailed knowledge of a specific topic, either in a chosen sub-discipline, or of an interdisciplinary character, and of basic principles of scholarly research, through the writing of a dissertation;
- had the opportunity to acquire a basic or advanced proficiency in a scriptural language of a major religious tradition and in the interpretation of scriptural texts.

Format

Students attend the lectures and classes given for the Undergraduate students. Supervisions will be given for the papers and the dissertation.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. The examiners may at their discretion request an oral examination in any aspect of the work submitted by the candidate.

Candidates may choose one of the papers assessed under alternative means. Depending on the paper, such means may be either two essays of no more than 5,000 words each; or a portfolio of supervision essays.

Candidates must offer two papers assessed by three-hour written examination, as well as a third paper assessed either by three-hour examination or by alternative means (see above). In addition, candidates may offer a fourth supplementary paper assessed by three-hour examination.

Continuing

Must achieve at least 67% in the examinations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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