• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Teesside University Featured Masters Courses
"palaeoenvironmental"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Palaeoenvironmental)

We have 6 Masters Degrees (Palaeoenvironmental)

  • "palaeoenvironmental" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 6 of 6
Order by 
MSc Environmental Monitoring, Modelling and Reconstruction focuses on analysing past, present, and future dynamic environments, providing you with the skills for a career in environmental management or consultancy, and a firm grounding for research in the environmental sciences. . Read more

MSc Environmental Monitoring, Modelling and Reconstruction focuses on analysing past, present, and future dynamic environments, providing you with the skills for a career in environmental management or consultancy, and a firm grounding for research in the environmental sciences. 

Concerns over the human impact on the environment have stimulated demand from governments and industry for the monitoring, analysis and modelling of natural processes in environmental systems. This is essential if we are to improve understanding of the interrelation of environmental variables in order to predict and manage their responses to anthropogenic perturbations.

Studying this course, you will gain:

  • advanced theoretical knowledge and practical expertise in order to collect, interpret and analyse contemporary and past environmental data.
  • modelling skills, in order to investigate the interrelationships between environmental variables, and to predict their responses to changing internal and external conditions.
  • intellectual and practical skills, in order to design and undertake field and/or laboratory experiments in contemporary environmental process-monitoring, or palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, and to design and test appropriate environmental models with the data you collect.

We also use the proximity of Manchester to the upland areas of the Peak District; several past MSc students completed dissertation work in close collaboration with various organisations responsible for land management in the Peak District, giving their work direct policy relevance.

Aims

Teaching focuses on training in theory, concepts and research skills in the first semester, and practical applications and research experience in the second semester.

We teach course units in small-group interactive styles with a mix of lectures, tutorials, seminars, practicals and presentations. A range of physical geographers provide training in their specialised fields, covering both content and practical research methods.

In a typical week, expect to spend some time in the library, preparing for seminars; in the laboratory, completing practicals; in the dedicated postgraduate computer laboratory, or writing reports; and in the classroom.

The second semester in particular gives you increased opportunities to go out into the field, both for practicals and to gain research experience by doing field research with members of staff. We maintain an intensively monitored catchment on the moors near the Snake Pass in the Peak District and this is the focus of several practical exercises, as well as a source of data to support dissertation work.

Field and laboratory research are essential to your learning process in environmental monitoring, and these form integrated parts of both the taught units and dissertation work.

Teaching and learning

  • Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

Taught units comprise two-thirds of the course and are assessed by a wide range of project work, essays and presentations. There are no formal examinations. The remainder of your course consists of the dissertation. 

Course unit details

CORE COURSE UNITS

These typically cover:

  • Environmental Change and Reconstruction
  • Environmental Monitoring and Modelling Concepts
  • Environmental Monitoring and Modelling Practice
  • Dissertation Support.

OPTIONAL COURSE UNITS

Choose three from the following:

  • Applied Study Unit
  • Climate Change, Disasters and Urban Poverty
  • Digital Image Processing and Data Analysis
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Environmental Remote Sensing
  • GIS and Environmental Applications
  • Issues in Environmental Policy
  • Planning for Environmental Change.

Availability of course units may vary from year to year.

LEVEL 4 OPTIONS

Students are allowed to take up to 2 of the following level 4 options:

  • Hydrochemical Modelling
  • Ice Age Earth
  • Managing the Uplands
  • Climate Change and Carbon Cycling
  • Coastal Processes
  • Frozen Planet, Satellites & Climate Change.

Typical course units comprise a minimum of a one-hour lecture per week, or seminar supported by supervised laboratory time. The exact balance varies, depending on the requirements of particular units. Additional contact time is arranged on an ad hoc basis by students to discuss assignments and other matters. By the end of the course, you will have an advanced level of theoretical knowledge and practical experience in:

  • Field/laboratory monitoring techniques for analysis of environmental processes
  • Advanced techniques for analysis of environmental materials field and laboratory techniques for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction based on stratigraphical studies of sediment cores, including microfossil and pollen analysis
  • GIS and remote sensing and advanced statistical methods
  • Designing, planning, funding and executing research projects in environmental monitoring, modelling or palaeoenvironmental reconstruction
  • Processing/analysing results logically, using objective statistical methods and/or mathematical modelling techniques objective, unbiased, and impartial reporting of analytical results and their interpretation, both oral and written, particularly scientific report writing. Normally taken full-time, the course is also well suited to part-time study over two years.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an onsite café and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
This course offers comprehensive and flexible postgraduate training in the established yet dynamic field of Quaternary science, with the academic emphasis being on the time-dependent processes affecting environmental change. Read more
This course offers comprehensive and flexible postgraduate training in the established yet dynamic field of Quaternary science, with the academic emphasis being on the time-dependent processes affecting environmental change.

By the end of the course you will have acquired and demonstrated specialist disciplinary knowledge and understanding of key issues pertaining to Quaternary science, in particular the core linking themes of high-resolution palaeoenvironmental records, high-precision dating, and multi-proxy approaches to the investigation of past environmental changes.

You will also be provided with advanced training in techniques used to assess the causes, scale and rapidity of past climate and environmental fluctuations; encompassing field, laboratory, statistical and computing methods used in the acquisition, interpretation and modelling of proxy climatic and environmental data.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/mscquaternaryscience.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The staff and facilities of the Centre for Quaternary Research (CQR) at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) provide a wide range of opportunities for postgraduate training and research including participation in internationally significant research programmes in Quaternary science and links with potential employers.

- This consortium of staff constitutes the strongest teaching team in the UK for the provision of Masters' teaching in the field of non-marine Quaternary earth science and environmental change.

- The Department is one of the leading centres for international geographical research in the UK. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework our research environment was recognized as overwhelmingly world class. The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) recognizes this course as "Excellent".

- You will be provided with the temporal perspective necessary for the understanding of many contemporary environmental issues, such as climate change, biological responses to environmental change and soil erosion.

- The distinctive aspects of the research at the CQR are the emphases on high-precision dating, multiproxy palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, quantitative palaeoclimate estimates, high resolution stratigraphy/sedimentology and the influence of Quaternary climate change on early human evolution and dispersal.

Department research and industry highlights

The CQR was established in 1990 and has grown to become one of the leading international research centres in Quaternary science.

Since its inception the CQR has attracted funding from an increasingly diverse range of sources (NERC, AHRC, ESRC, Leverhulme Trust, EC Framework Programs, British Academy). Major research partnerships and initiatives have been forged (e.g. with the Natural History Museum, Museum of London, British Geological Society, English Heritage and Oxford University), which are fostering important advances in understanding Quaternary landscape evolution, quantitative palaeoclimate reconstruction, geochronology, biostratigraphy and Palaeolithic and environmental archaeology. The CQR has also benefited from recent £1.5M SRIF investment in laboratory refurbishment that has enhanced the centre’s research capabilities in OSL dating, tephrochronology, analytical chemistry and soil micromorphology.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

acquired and demonstrated specialist disciplinary knowledge and understanding of key issues pertaining to Quaternary Science, in particular the core linking themes of:
- high-resolution palaeoenvironmental records
- high-precision dating
- multi-proxy approaches to the investigation of past environmental changes.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, practical exercises, field reports and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Destinations of our graduates include the British Geological Survey, Natural England, the Environment Agency, journal publishing houses, Research Councils, environmental archaeology and museums, as well as academic positions within universities. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies; around 70% of Quaternary Science graduates over the last decade have gone on to a PhD.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
Northern England has an extraordinary diversity of landscapes and geological features, and as the largest county, Yorkshire preserves a large proportion of them. Read more
Northern England has an extraordinary diversity of landscapes and geological features, and as the largest county, Yorkshire preserves a large proportion of them. From the rugged North York Moors and the limestone pavements of the Yorkshire Dales to the coalfields of South Yorkshire and the shifting coastlines of Holderness, it is in many respects a microcosm of the region.

In The Geology of Yorkshire and Northern England, students will obtain a regional geological understanding with which to interpret larger-scale Earth processes and structures. The programme will provide students with training in advanced palaeoenvironmental analysis and science communication skills. Students will also assess Yorkshire and Northern England's importance to current controversies in Earth sciences, from fracking to climate change, and acquire an understanding of the region's vital role in the history of geology.

This is a part-time Postgraduate Diploma delivered wholly online in a fully supported learning environment. The programme starts in late September/early October each academic year, and places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate after successful completion of the first year if their circumstances change.

Overview

The programme will aim to:
-Introduce the key tenets and sub-disciplines of geology, focussing particularly on the geological evolution of northern England
-Provide students with a holistic understanding of the geological origins and history of Yorkshire and northern England
-Introduce students to field and laboratory geological analysis, and the skills and techniques required to interpret geological features accurately
-Describe the main geological units present in Yorkshire, their composition, distribution and formation
-Explore the geological history of Yorkshire and its global significance in the development of Earth Sciences
-Examine and interpret the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic geology of Yorkshire
-Explain the scientific importance of Yorkshire's rocks, and the role they have played in our understanding of the evolution of the Earth.
-Further develop students' palaeoecological and palaeoenvironmental interpretation skills
-Examine the Cenozoic and recent geological history of Yorkshire
-Provide students with an understanding of human interactions with, and exploitation of, the geological resources and landscapes of Yorkshire and northern England
-Further develop students’ knowledge of Yorkshire's role in the evolution of global geological hypotheses

Structure

This part-time two-year programme will comprise six 20-credit modules:
Year One
-Origins – the Development of Geology in Northern England
-Dales and Vales – the Palaeozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England
-Moors and Coast – the Mesozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England

Year Two
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Analysis
-Fire and Ice – the Cenozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England
-People and Landscape - The Human Geology of Yorkshire and Northern England

Students will be required to complete all these modules in the first instance, though additional modules may be added in the future to accommodate future programme growth and offer a broader learning experience.

It is anticipated that assessments will comprise a balance of short and long critical essays, laboratory-based projects and project work.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Two stages: Certificate and Diploma. Each stage typically takes 12 months
-Comprises six distinct modules
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

Read less
The MA Landscape Management and Environmental Archaeology programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'. Read more
The MA Landscape Management and Environmental Archaeology programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'.

Course Overview

The MA programme is taught within the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, and seeks to embed the student experience into a range of landscapes, both wild and managed, and environments within Wales where unique and particular landscapes are encountered. Many, but by no means all, employment opportunities are focused on the conservation, preservation, exploitation or manipulation of the natural resources.

Industries based on tourism, cultural heritage and sustainability, to name a few, are prime destinations within Wales (and beyond) for graduates from this programme of study. Integral to this is an understanding of what archaeological evidence survives, and what methods and techniques can be used to explore and explain both past and present human relationships to these landscapes and environments. As part of this scheme students undertake a minimum of four weeks voluntary experience with a host organisation as a work placement. This gives students direct experience of a relevant working environment and has proved beneficial to students, the host organisations and the School of Archaeology History and Anthropology. When in a work placement students make a contribution to the objectives of the host organisation.

Along with the emphasis on ‘employability’, students engage in a rigorous academic training grounded in the discipline that is Archaeology. Students are schooled in the concepts and practices required to undertake good academic research. Field and laboratory experiences underpinned with both legal and theoretical frameworks are core attributes of this scheme. Core staff teaching the scheme are actively engaged with a wide range of professional bodies, undertaking contract research, acting as advisors, or are recognised specialists in their field.

Such staff operate at the crossing point of archaeology as an academic discipline and industry and community. The programme benefits considerably from the experience and expertise of UWLAS (University of Wales, Lampeter Archaeological Services) which provides a professional consultancy service across a range of areas including dendrochronology, pollen analysis, archaeozoology, quaternary stratigraphy, soils and sediments analysis.

Modules

-British Landscape and Environmental Field Class
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Methods
-Work Placement
-Dissertation

Key Features

Draws upon a range of expertise in the School. Our lecturers are active within the consultancy world of environmental archaeology which gives the programme a strongly vocational tilt. Extremely good record of finding students who have completed the course employment opportunities many within the sector.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has a good record of matching students to the needs and requirement of the labour market.

Read less
This programme offers the opportunity to gain a qualification by following a structured route in scientific research. It is closely linked with parallel MPhil and PhD programmes of work. Read more
This programme offers the opportunity to gain a qualification by following a structured route in scientific research. It is closely linked with parallel MPhil and PhD programmes of work. Students can select from a wide range of theory courses appropriate to their individual research topic across the disciplines of chemical and life sciences. The programme comprises taught courses (60 credits) and a research project (120 credits) and is suitable for students who want to gain a postgraduate research qualification and strengthen their practical skills. The research project may be partially assessed by the publication of an original paper rather than a traditional thesis. The programme is designed to provide a comprehensive insight into the mechanics of research from both the literature and experimental perspectives. On successful completion of the programme, students are able to critically assess the primary research literature in depth, and appreciate the significance of the economic, environmental and social impact of research and development in a competitive industrial world. They can also design and carry out experiments to test hypotheses, and compose and present scientific information for publication purposes. The university has an extensive network of overseas contacts, with staff based in, or regularly visiting, some 40 to 50 countries. Overseas students are able to obtain an MSc by Research by attending classes for three to four months in the UK, with a project based and supervised in their own country, subject to approval by the Faculty of Engineering and Science.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide a critical understanding of the knowledge base required for a proposed research project

- To provide and build upon analytical, conceptual and research skills

- To achieve an understanding of the research methods appropriate to the chosen field

- To undertake a critical investigation of an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/science

What you'll study

Recent topics include:

Analytical informatics and chemometrics
Biomarker profiling
Biomaterials
Cell biology and intracellular gene delivery
Medicinal chemistry and drug-delivery systems
Nanotechnology
Mass Spectrometry
Pharmaceutical materials science
Biotechnology
GIS and remote sensing
Chemostratigraphy and inorganic forensic fingerprinting
Geography - sustainable development
Landscape ecology
Palaeoenvironmental analysis
Solar energy conversion and hydrogen production

Students must also take 60 credits of Master's level courses in order to obtain the award.

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through coursework and a dissertation or a published original research paper.

Career options

This programme offers opportunities in the public and private sectors.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

Read less
The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes Landscape and Environmental Archaeology is a programme that is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. The programme is targeted on skills areas that are linked to the needs of the regional labour market and relate to one of the six ministerial priority areas identified by Welsh Government, that of 'Environmental Management and Energy'.

Course Overview

The MRes programme is taught within the School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology, and seeks to embed the student experience into a range of landscapes, both wild and managed, and environments within Wales where unique and particular landscapes are encountered. Many, but by no means all, employment opportunities are focused on the conservation, preservation, exploitation or manipulation of the natural resources.

Industries based on tourism, cultural heritage and sustainability, to name a few, are prime destinations within Wales (and beyond) for graduates from this programme of study. Integral to this is an understanding of what archaeological evidence survives, and what methods and techniques can be used to explore and explain both past and present human relationships to these landscapes and environments.

Along with the emphasis on ‘employability’, students engage in a rigorous academic training grounded in the discipline that is Archaeology which comes to a head in the Dissertation of between 25,000 and 30,000 words. Students are schooled in the concepts and practices required to undertake good academic research. Field and laboratory experiences underpinned with both legal and theoretical frameworks are core attributes of this scheme.

Core staff teaching the scheme are actively engaged with a wide range of professional bodies, undertaking contract research, acting as advisors, or are recognised specialists in their field. Such staff operate at the crossing point of archaeology as an academic discipline and industry and community. The programme benefits considerably from the experience and expertise of UWLAS (University of Wales, Lampeter Archaeological Services) which provides a professional consultancy service across a range of areas including dendrochronology, pollen analysis, archaeozoology, quaternary stratigraphy, soils and sediments analysis.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-British Landscape and Environmental Field Class (40 credits)
-Research Methodologies (compulsory)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Methods
-Work Placement
-Dissertation

Key Features

Draws upon a range of expertise in the School. Our lecturers are active within the consultancy world of environmental archaeology which gives the programme a strongly vocational tilt. Extremely good record of finding students who have completed the course employment opportunities many within the sector.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has a good record of matching students to the needs and requirement of the labour market.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X