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Masters Degrees (Palaeoecology)

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This modular course has core units in Irish Archaeology in a Global Perspective (20 credits), Landscape Palaeoecology (20 credits), Topics in Archaeology and Environment and a Dissertation (60 credits, over the summer). Read more
This modular course has core units in Irish Archaeology in a Global Perspective (20 credits), Landscape Palaeoecology (20 credits), Topics in Archaeology and Environment and a Dissertation (60 credits, over the summer). The rest of the modules (20 credits each) are from the Dating and Chronology programme which include Chronology Methods and Application (dendrochronology, tephrochronology and radiocarbon dating and calibration including Bayesian analysis), Practical 14C dating and Chronology Analysis and Modeling . It thus allows genuinely specialist preparation for doctoral study or professional development, and makes full use of the excellent resources available.

The programme is available as 1-year full-time or 2-year part-time. All taught elements may also be taken in clusters of 60 CATS points as CPD units for a Postgraduate Certificate.

The programme may appeal to students with a general interest in theoretical, scientific-environmental or practical archaeology, landscape conservation, planning and environment and heritage. It is designed to provide a base for further research training and as a foundation for career development in specialised or general archaeology and environmental-palaeoecological work. Participants will be trained in a range of key technical, methodological, theoretical practical and transferable skills in the compulsory units and these will be extended in the electives. Students will develop advanced skills in their electives and Dissertation, which they will choose to meet their interests and career development.

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The aims of the programme are. 1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present. Read more

AIM

The aims of the programme are:

1. To support students in the development of their intellectual and practical skills through the study and interpretation of cultural heritage artefacts, their historic societal significance and relationship with the landscape and the wider environment in the past and the present.

2. To demonstrate how geo-spatial technologies and techniques (including GIS, scanning and digitisation) play a central role in the recording, analysis, interpretation and management of cultural heritage across a range of scales from excavated items, archaeological sites, and paper records to historic buildings, monuments and their landscapes.

WHY QUEEN'S?

In the new programme the internationally recognised expertise within GAP with regard to the development and application of digitisation and scanning technologies will be more fully used and integrated into the student learning experience.

The integration of these skills with wider academic expertise in Archaeology and the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork (CAF), and Geography and the Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis (CDDA) will create a unique 'heritage' focused programme in which students will experience heritage in its widest context and will have the opportunity to acquire and practice a wide range of geo-spatial skills and explore the conceptual issues associated with their application.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

MSc: successfully complete the five taught modules (120 CATS) and undertake independent research for the dissertation (60 CATS).

PgDip: successfully complete the same five taught modules but do not take the dissertation module.

PgCert: successfully complete the two Semester 1 modules.

Semester 1
GIS Technologies: Application and Practice (30 credits)
Introduction to Cultural Heritage and GIS (30 credits)

Semester 2
Heritage Structures (20 credits)
Heritage Landscapes (20 credits)
Professional Practice Placement (20 credits)

Semester 3
Dissertation (60 credits)

LEARNING AND TEACHING

One of the modules included in the Cultural Heritage and GIS programme includes a residential field course (between 5-10 days).

CAREER PROSPECTS

The market for those with a qualification in Cultural Heritage and GIS can be defined as:

professionals who are involved in providing scientific understanding in the support of heritage protection
professionals engaged in dealing with the digital documentation and portrayal of heritage structures and landscapes
professionals seeking a targeted training in the use of digital data handling, especially through the application of GIS
those wishing to develop a career in cultural heritage conservation and/or management;
those already employed in cultural heritage management who require the updating of qualifications, or the improvement of existing ones, in order to reflect new developments in technology and thinking.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

ASSESSMENT & FEEDBACK

Teaching is achieved through various combinations of lectures, seminars, practical classes and fieldwork and is supported by intensive self-guided independent learning. All assessment is coursework based and will be individually undertaken. The dissertation submission is an independent piece of research undertaken by each student under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Both formative and summative feedback will be given through, as appropriate, oral and written means. The pass mark for all assessments is 50 per cent. Students must obtain an overall 50 per cent pass mark for this taught programme (five modules) before progression from the PG Diploma to Masters.

VISIT US

Visit Queen's to sense the atmosphere of our historic campus, tour our world-class facilities, and experience for yourself the exceptional learning environment we provide. Find out when our next Open Days are, or arrange a guided tour to suit you.

HOW TO APPLY

Applications for admission to the vast majority of postgraduate programmes are submitted online via the Postgraduate Direct Applications Portal. The online system also allows application for funding where appropriate.

If you have queries on course content please contact the school representative below.

Dr Paul Ell
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology
Tel: 9097 3186
Email:
WWW: http://www.qub.ac.uk/gap

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This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics. Read more
This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics.

You will receive training in research methods and take a taught course unit in a relevant subject area. The research topic for your project is agreed with a supervisor in advance and can be in any area of the expertise in the department research groups. The project outline will be developed in consultation with your supervisor and project work is carried out in parallel with the taught courses, becoming full-time during the third term.

This Master’s by Research will provide you with a suitable background to work as a research assistant or as the grounding for further study towards a PhD.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscearthsciencesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This course is ideal for graduates in geology and related sciences who wish to carry out independent research over a shorter time period than is possible in a doctorate (PhD) programme. It allows you study at Master's level an aspect of the geological sciences which may not be catered for by specialist MSc programmes.

- You will be involved at every step of the research project - from planning and sample collection, laboratory work, result analysis, to writing your dissertation.

- It is ideal preparation if you are interested in studying for a PhD, but would like to have further preparation and training.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department of Earth Science’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

- The Department has up-to-date computer interpretation facilities, a full range of modern geochemical laboratories including XRF, quadrupole and multicollector ICP Mass Spectrometry, atmospheric chemistry and a new excimer laser ablation facility, excellent structural modelling laboratories, palaeontology and sedimentology laboratories.

Course content and structure

The course consists of the following three components:

A Research Study Skills Course Unit
- Personal research skills (e.g. safety, time and project management, teamwork)
- IT skills (e.g. literature retrieval, web authoring, databases, modelling)
- Data analysis skills (e.g. statistical methods, GIS systems, sampling techniques)
- Communication skills (e.g. posters, oral presentation, writing papers, web pages)
- Subject-specific skills and techniques. These amount to 55% of the research skills assessment, and for example may include parts of specialist taught courses (see below), a training course on the theory and practice of chemical and isotopic analysis, or other training arranged by the project supervisor. This will include training for research in the general field of the research project, not solely what is needed to carry out the project.

A Specialist Taught Course Unit
You will choose an advanced taught course unit relevant to the subject area of your research project. The following taught units are currently offered:
- Applied Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
- Pollution Sources and Pathways
- Oceans and Atmospheres
- Risk and Environmental Management
- Geographical Information Systems
- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
- Contaminants in the Environment
- Advanced Igneous Petrogenesis
- Seismic Processing and Interpretation
- Geodynamics and Plate Tectonics
- Interpretation of Structural Settings
- Coal Geology
- Petroleum Geology and Evaluation
- Terrestrial Palaeoecology
- Palaeoclimates

Research Project
The project may be on any topic which is within the broad research themes of the Department. You will be linked to a potential supervisor at the application stage and, in consultation with the supervisor, you will develop a detailed project outline during the first half of the first term. Project work is then carried out in parallel with taught courses during terms one and two, becoming the full-time activity after Easter. A bound dissertation is submitted for examination in early September.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and understanding of a variety of analytical, technical, numerical, modelling and interpretive techniques applicable to the specific field of earth sciences

- the articulation of knowledge and the understanding of published work, concepts and theories in the chosen field of earth sciences at an advanced level

- the acquisition of knowledge from published work in the chosen area of earth sciences to a level appropriate for a MSc degree.

Assessment

Research Study Skills: this is assessed by coursework and theory examination and will include short written assignments, a seminar, worksheets and practical tests. These assessments contribute 12.5% of the course marks.

Specialist Taught Course Units: these are mostly assessed by a written, theory examination and coursework. The unit assessment contributes 12.5% of the course marks.

Research Project: the project dissertation must be submitted in early September. It will be marked by both an internal and an external examiner, and will be defended at an oral examination with both examiners. The project assessment contributes 75% of the course marks.

Employability & career opportunities

Subject to agreement and suitable funding, MSc by Research students can transfer to the MPhil/PhD programme at Royal Holloway. They may use the research carried out for the MSc towards the PhD, and count the time spent towards MPhil/PhD registration requirements, provided that the MSc research forms a coherent part of the PhD, and that the transfer is approved prior to submission of the MSc research dissertation.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Interactions between plants, fungi and the environment from an evolutionary and historical perspective, with organisational levels ranging from genes to ecosystems, are explored in this programme. Read more

Environmental Biology

Interactions between plants, fungi and the environment from an evolutionary and historical perspective, with organisational levels ranging from genes to ecosystems, are explored in this programme.

You will study the fundamental life processes of plants and fungi at different organisational levels, from molecules and cells to entire plants and ecosystems. The goal of these studies is to understand how plants and fungi function in populations and ecosystems and adapt to continuously changing - often hostile - environments.

Tracks

Within the Environmental Biology Master, you can select a specialized track from the following:
-Plant Biology;
-Fungal Biology;
-Ecology and Natural Resource Management;
-Biomarine Sciences & Palaeoecology;
-Behavioral Ecology.

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This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. Read more
This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

Many of our former students have gone on to do PhDs, but the course also provides advanced training for those wishing to prepare for a career working in fields such as primate conservation or in museum or educational contexts.

The course is designed for those with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology, zoology or a related discipline.

Course content

This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

All students take the following modules, which provide an essential foundation in theory and methods for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Evolutionary Theory
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology.

Student will then choose 90 credits from a selection of the following:

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Primate Behaviour
-Cultural Evolution
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Palaeoanthropology and Palaeoecology
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Foreign language option.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/evolutionaryanthropology for further information.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 30 credits, and four optional modules, totalling 90 credits plus a 60-credit dissertation. Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics. Read more
This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics.

•Enrol on a truly innovative course, collaboratively developed with academic experts across a number of disciplines that include: Art and Design, Science, Education, Health and Community, Technology and Environment
•Enjoy access to a number of different established research centres across Liverpool John Moores University
•Develop real world skills on a programme unique to the UK and decide which areas of art and science you wish to follow as the programme progresses
•Explore art and science project briefs in unexpected forms

This practical, collaborative and vocational discipline can be applied to a rich variety of creative contexts and purposes within collaborative areas in art and science.

The MA is a studio based programme with collaborative practice and discovery at its core. The programme will offer a number of options for study and collaboration including; science and archaeological visualisation, museums, advertising, education, public health, biomedical communications, sports science and forensics.

You will focus on the practical application of art in a science context and be guided in understanding how this translates through a sequence of set and self-initiated projects.

You will define your existing practice and extend its scope and ambition within an art and science context, while studying themes related to public engagement, ethics, data protection and working with humans in research, and developing an understanding of current research happening in collaborative areas in art and science.

The programme will encourage you to work across other disciplines and, where appropriate, collaborate with other MA programmes within the Liverpool School of Art and Design, as well as other postgraduate taught courses across LJMU and external partners. It aims to help you to understand research happening in collaborative areas in art and science, and to develop research skills and relevant approaches to your practice and the critical techniques to support your final project.

Learning takes place predominantly through the creative and critical exploration of research focused Art in Science projects.

The programme is delivered full time over one year and features a significant amount of independent study. You will exhibit your final work at the Masters degree show which involves all Liverpool School of Art and Design's taught postgraduate Masters students.

Facilities and Research Groups

The programme is based in the Liverpool School of Art and Design’s John Lennon Art and Design building, a purpose-built facility in Liverpool city centre which encourages interaction between different disciplines and sharing of ideas and expertise.

As a Masters student on this course you may become linked to our Exhibition Research Centre, Design Lab, Contemporary Art Lab and the Face Lab.

Throughout the programme you will have opportunities to visit and potentially collaborate with research centres across LJMU. This may include: The Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, Centre for Public Health, Astrophysics Research Institute, Centre in Evolutionary Anthropology and Palaeoecology and the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Level 7

-Studio practice (Art in Science)
-Research and Practice
-Collaborative practice
-Major project (Art in Science)

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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This master's programme focuses on the analysis of dynamic environments. past. present, and future. Concerns over human impacts on the environment have stimulated demand from governments and industry for the monitoring, analysis and modelling of natural processes in environmental systems. Read more
This master's programme focuses on the analysis of dynamic environments: past. present, and future. Concerns over human impacts on the environment have stimulated demand from governments and industry for the monitoring, analysis and modelling of natural processes in environmental systems. This is essential if we are to improve understanding of the interrelation of environmental variables in order to predict and manage their responses to anthropogenic perturbations.

You will gain:
-Advanced theoretical knowledge and practical expertise in order to collect, interpret and analyse contemporary and past environmental data.
-Modelling skills, in order to investigate the interrelationships between environmental variables, and to predict their responses to changing internal and external conditions.
-Intellectual and practical skills, in order to design and undertake field and/or laboratory experiments in contemporary environmental process-monitoring, or palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, and to design and test appropriate environmental models with the data you collect.

These skills are highly relevant if you wish to pursue a career in environmental management, or consultancy, and provide a firm grounding for research in the environmental sciences. Dr Jason Dortch directs the course, with input from other physical geographers working on a wide variety of aspects of environmental change. Current research includes:
-Measurements and predictions of climate change
-Glaciers and ice sheets (past and present)
-Biogeography
-Palaeoecology
-Environmental pollution
-Upland geomorphology (low relief, e.g. British uplands, and high relief, e.g. Himalayas)
-Remote sensing for environmental management
-Moorland erosion control
-Hydrology
-Water resource management
-Fire management
-Tectonic geomorphology

We also use the proximity of Manchester to the upland areas of the Peak District; several past MSc students completed dissertation work in close collaboration with various organisations responsible for land management in the Peak District, giving their work direct policy relevance.

Aims

Teaching focuses on training in theory, concepts and research skills in the first semester, and practical applications and research experience in the second semester.

We teach course units in small-group interactive styles with a mix of lectures, tutorials, seminars, practicals and presentations. A range of physical geographers provide training in their specialised fields, covering both content and practical research methods.
In a typical week, expect to spend some time in the library, preparing for seminars; in the laboratory, completing practicals; in the dedicated postgraduate computer laboratory, or writing reports; and in the classroom.

The second semester in particular gives you increased opportunities to go out into the field, both for practicals and to gain research experience by doing field research with members of staff. We maintain an intensively monitored catchment on the moors near the Snake Pass in the Peak District and this is the focus of several practical exercises, as well as a source of data to support dissertation work.

Field and laboratory research are essential to your learning process in environmental monitoring, and these form integrated parts of both the taught units and dissertation work.

Career opportunities

In the second semester, various speakers from environmental employers visit the department to give a flavour of their work and advice on employment.

The MSc in Environmental Monitoring, Modelling and Reconstruction has an excellent track record in providing a springboard for students to go on to careers in environmental industries, consultancies and government agencies, or to further research for higher degrees.

Recent graduates have found employment in agencies like the UK Atomic Energy Authority, The Environment Agency, Natural England and a range of environmental consultancies. Others have moved on to undertake full-time research for a PhD.

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This master's degree has three main areas. research into human palaeoecology and prehistory, palaeoanthropology, geology and palaeoontology of the Quaternary; archaeological intervention; and the management, conservation and socialisation of archaeological heritage. Read more
This master's degree has three main areas: research into human palaeoecology and prehistory, palaeoanthropology, geology and palaeoontology of the Quaternary; archaeological intervention; and the management, conservation and socialisation of archaeological heritage. It shares objectives and educational activities with the degrees in History and Anthropology and Human Evolution through introductory subjects to a specialisation in archaeology.

It offers a specialised, career-oriented degree designed to prepare students for research in the field of Quaternary archaeology without neglecting the important demands of society and the labour market. It aims to train students to evaluate and draw up reports on archaeological interventions so that they can work as specialists in the field of archaeology or in the management of archaeological heritage.

Student Profile

The master's degree is designed for graduates with bachelor's degrees or pre-EHEA degrees in history, art history, humanities, social and cultural anthropology, geography, studies in conservation and restoration of cultural property, chemistry, physics, biology and geology.

Career opportunities

Research in Quaternary archaeology and human evolution, with specialisations in the disciplinary branches, including field and rescue archaeology, dissemination and museumisation of human evolution and Quaternary archeology, and conservation and restoration of archaeological material from the Pleistocene.

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The "Heritage Science" MSc develops professional skills required in a variety of careers in heritage science, building conservation and landscape characterisation. Read more
The "Heritage Science" MSc develops professional skills required in a variety of careers in heritage science, building conservation and landscape characterisation. To enable heritage practitioners to record, analyse and report on historic buildings, monuments and landscapes, foundation modules offer an intensive training programme in digital data capture, including heritage applications of GIS, GPS, Lidar, and spatial analyses and 3D visualization techniques. All modules are 'hands-on' and elective modules cover practical and scientific skills in evaluating natural and cultural heritage environments. Students also undertake an internship in collaboration with a conservation/heritage organization, or professional, and prepare a major report or dissertation.

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This programme prepares graduate students for a professional career in field and practical archaeology through three compulsory modules and three optional modules, together with a dissertation. Read more
This programme prepares graduate students for a professional career in field and practical archaeology through three compulsory modules and three optional modules, together with a dissertation. The compulsory modules are (1) Archaeological Excavation, (2) Post-Excavation Strategies, and (3) Archaeological Practice, where students undertake a placement with the School's fieldwork unit (the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork) and a commercial-sector archaeological company. Optional modules include (1) Topographical and Digital Surveying, (2) the archaeology of buildings, and (3) cultural landscapes.

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The programme is located at the cutting-edge of inter-disciplinary social science and humanities research engaged with the role of space, place and power in shaping modern knowledge and societies. Read more
The programme is located at the cutting-edge of inter-disciplinary social science and humanities research engaged with the role of space, place and power in shaping modern knowledge and societies. Research training is provided in a range of qualitative methodologies relevant to research within and beyond the university sector. Modules running in 2016-17 include 'Popular geopolitics', 'Security and Securitization,' and 'Geographies of Markets'. A 12 week placement module is being planned and will provide an opportunity to engage with a public, charitable or other non-governmental organisation.

The programme develops specialised knowledge of the interaction between society and space and an understanding of how research underpins cultural analysis, interpretation and practice that gives graduates the opportunity to:

• Develop specialist knowledge and understanding of human geography and its approaches, philosophies and ontologies, and methods of analysis and interpretation;
• Develop critical, reflexive thinking;
• Develop research skills in human geography to prepare for doctoral research in human geography and cognate disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, or to undertake social and cultural research in the private, public and third sectors;
• Develop skills in qualitative, quantitative, textual and visual analysis
• Undertake a substantial piece of research in the field of Human Geography.

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