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Masters Degrees (Paint)

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These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors. Read more
These programmes of study are designed for students who have a passion to pursue a conservation or heritage based research project defined by themselves, but with the support of an academic environment and supervisors.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training designed to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you will have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in a broad range of conservation and cultural heritage areas.

Strong links exist with the Colleges of Science and Arts, and an interdisciplinary research culture can facilitate collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Current doctoral research topics include:
-How can architectural paint research and analysis enhance the conservation-restoration and historiography of cultural built heritage in the UK?
-Regarding mediocrity: conservation, interpretation and presentation of the Doddington Hall tapestries.
-Biodeterioration of limestone: role of microbial biofilms and possible intervention strategies (in collaboration with Dr Ronald Dixon, School of Life Sciences).
-Nineteenth-Century Amateur Art in Places of Christian Worship.
-Tennyson and the Archive.
-David Brewster and the Development of the Kaleidoscope.
-The Life and Work of William Logsdail.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Archaeological conservation
-Architectural paint research
-Collections Management
-Conservation of a broad range of objects and material types
-Cultural heritage and climate change
-Material culture
-Paint and pigment analysis
-Preventive conservation

Previous areas of PhD study include:
-The Materials, Construction and Conservation of Eighteenth-Century Women’s Shoes.
-A Practical and Historical Examination of Jacob Christian Schaffer (1718-1790) and his Search for Non-rag Paper.
-An Analysis of the Success and Cultural Significance of Parian Ware Sculpture in Victorian England.
-'Curatorship and Conservation: A Theoretical Enquiry into the Scope of Each Realm, their Interaction and the Consequences for the Perception of Works of Art'.
-The History, Development and Conservation of Wrought Iron in Lincolnshire; the Significance of Minor Architectural Details.

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You are expected to work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at PhD level takes the form of an approximately 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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Please note this course is subject to validation. MA Painting at Wimbledon College of Arts offers the opportunity for students to explore a discipline that is constantly widening in scope. Read more

Introduction

Please note this course is subject to validation.

MA Painting at Wimbledon College of Arts offers the opportunity for students to explore a discipline that is constantly widening in scope.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To identify and debate key issues in contemporary painting

- To contribute to a collaborative public event and online archive on the subject of contemporary painting

- To extend your knowledge of paint as a material and process

- To examine the ways in which methods and materials shape the agenda in contemporary painting whilst creating a critical relationship to tradition

- To explore the range of models of practice for the contemporary painter

- To examine the notion of painting as research

- To develop your key questions and ideas from an initial period of review and experimentation

- To be part of a challenging learning and teaching environment that supports the development of your practical, professional and research skills

- To engage with the wider research culture at University of the Arts London

- To identify and debate key issues in contemporary painting

- To contribute to a collaborative public event and online archive on the subject of contemporary painting

- To extend your knowledge of paint as a material and process

- To examine the ways in which methods and materials shape the agenda in contemporary painting whilst creating a critical relationship to tradition

- To explore the range of models of practice for the contemporary painter

- To examine the notion of painting as research

- To develop your key questions and ideas from an initial period of review and experimentation

- To be part of a challenging learning and teaching environment that supports the development of your practical, professional and research skills

- To engage with the wider research culture at University of the Arts London

Structure

The course runs over a total of 45 weeks. Learning and teaching will take place through studio practice, written work, group seminars, critiques, exhibitions, peer-led workshops and reading groups. The course places great stock on the idea of a community of painters.

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Our Technology in the Marine Environment MRes provides research training, supervision and collaboration to international standards in the topics covered by the marine technology research groups. Read more
Our Technology in the Marine Environment MRes provides research training, supervision and collaboration to international standards in the topics covered by the marine technology research groups.

The MRes breaks down into approximately 40% taught modules and 60% research in collaboration with an industrial partner.

Your research project will normally be in one of the areas addressed by the marine technology research groups:
-Marine Hydrodynamics and Structures
-Marine Design, Production and Operations
-Sustainable Maritime Engineering
-New Energy Infrastructure

Depending on your previous academic training and the requirements of the project, you may receive formal instruction through taught modules in important areas.

The substantial marine technology research community, including 50 research students, 140 MSc students, six-10 post-doctoral students, six technicians and 16 full-time academic staff, provides you with opportunities to progress your career, whether in industry or academia.

Our annual Postgraduate Research Conference provides you with an opportunity to share research experience and practise vital presentation skills.

We hold joint meetings of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST). You are invited to join these meetings as they offer vital insight into the workings of professional bodies.

Our research students have been very successful at finding employment across a wide range of sectors. Professional institutes hold Newcastle research degrees in high regard when assessing work applications.

Accreditation

Our course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA) and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST) on behalf of the Engineering Council. This means that you are automatically recognised as satisfying the educational requirements leading to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status.

The Royal Institution of Naval Architects is an internationally renowned professional institution whose members are involved at all levels in the design, construction, maintenance and operation of marine vessels and structures. Members of RINA are widely represented in industry, universities and colleges, and maritime organisations in over 90 countries.

IMarEST is the first Institute to bring together marine engineers, scientists and technologists into one international multi-disciplinary professional body.

Our accreditations give you an additional benchmark of quality to your degree, making you more attractive to graduate employers. It can also open the door to higher-level jobs, most of which require Chartered Engineer status.

Placements

Leading industrial organisations in the Marine and Renewables sector sponsor many research projects. Other projects involve collaboration between Newcastle and other institutions.

Recent partnerships and collaborations include International Paint, Lloyds Register and BAE Systems.

Facilities

You have access to a wealth of excellent facilities within the School of Marine Science and Technology, including extensive laboratories such as the:
-Hydrodynamics laboratory
-Emerson Cavitation Tunnel
-Princess Royal, a versatile twin-hulled locally designed and built vessel supported by a dedicated shore station at Blyth Harbour

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The MPhil programmes in Marine Sciences provide research training, supervision and collaboration to international standards. You can choose a wide range of topics within the marine science research groups of Marine Hydrodynamics and Structures (MHS) and Sustainable Shipping and Marine Engineering (SSME). Read more
The MPhil programmes in Marine Sciences provide research training, supervision and collaboration to international standards. You can choose a wide range of topics within the marine science research groups of Marine Hydrodynamics and Structures (MHS) and Sustainable Shipping and Marine Engineering (SSME).

Your research project will be in one of the areas addressed by the marine technology research groups:
-Marine Hydrodynamics and Structures (MHS)
-Sustainable Shipping and Marine Engineering (SSME)

Depending on your previous academic training and the requirements of the project, you may receive formal instruction through taught modules in important areas.

The substantial marine technology research community including 50 research students, 140 MSc students, six to 10 post-doctoral students, six technicians and 16 full-time academic staff provides you with opportunities to progress your career, whether in industry or academia.

Our annual Postgraduate Research Conference provides you with an opportunity to share research experience and practise vital presentation skills. We also instigated the UK Marine Technology Postgraduate Conference which involves research student presentations from leading UK universities involved in Marine Technology research. These universities take turns to host the conference which is sponsored by Lloyds Register, the Royal Institute of Naval Architects (RINA) and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology (IMarEST).

Delivery

This research degree operates through the Postgraduate Researcher Development Programme (PGRDP). This is part of the Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering (SAgE) Graduate School.

Your original research project is managed in the marine technology research groups. There is flexibility in how your research outputs are achieved. Supervisory inputs and collaborations with other Schools and Faculties are common.

Aside from the PGRDP, the programme of work suits you and your project requirements. You will achieve a certain number of credits through the PGRDP and School in your first two years. You will also:
-Write a thesis for viva voce examination
-Attend regional and international conferences in your chosen subject area
-Prepare papers for publication in academic journals

Work experience

Leading industrial organisations in the Marine and Renewables sector sponsor many research projects. Other projects involve collaboration between Newcastle and other institutions. The marine technology research groups form part of extensive national and international networks.

Recent partnerships and collaborations include:
-International Paint
-Lloyds Register
-BAE Systems

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Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more

Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition.

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation. 

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++. 

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles. 

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking. 

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Should I study the MFA or MA Computational Arts?

As well as the MFA, we also offer an MA in Computational Arts. The MA is 1 year (full-time), the MFA 2 years (full-time).

The first year of the MFA is identical to the MA. You take the same classes and you learn the same things. The differences between the two courses is that in the MFA you get a 2nd year in which you take additional courses which help you develop your arts practice further. These courses mean that you get a space to work under a tutor's supervision.

Modules & structure

Year 1

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme: 

The follwing are core modules:

You may then pick modules of your own choice from the optional modules listed below: 

In year 2 you will study the following: 

Assessment  

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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BA (Hons) Fine Art. is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way. Read more

BA (Hons) Fine Art is a multidisciplinary course which allows you to work with paint, print, sculpture and hybrid, drawing, video, sound, performance, text, curation and installation practice in either a focused or pluralistic way.

You work from your own studio space where you can explore your practice and use the campus project spaces to exhibit your work, participate in group shows and hold meetings and events. You will have access to a broad range of workshops including 3D, print making, media suites and the drawing studio, all staffed with specialist technicians to support your practice.

Initiatives at galleries such as Wysing Arts Centre, Serpentine Galleries, Tate Modern and Camden Arts Centre provide opportunities to interact with the wider art world and you are challenged to consider wider realms of practice through lectures from practising artists such as 2013 Turner Prize winner Laure Prouvost, Cornelia Parker, Cécile B Evans, 2006 Turner Prize nominee Mark Titchner, Jack Strange and Jerwood Painting Fellows Susan Sluglett and Anthony Faroux. You will graduate with your final work shown in the NUA Degree Show, which attracts curators, collectors, critics and potential collaborators from across the UK.

 Join a community of artists and creative thinkers, experimenting, debating, developing ideas, learning new skills and acquiring further knowledge.

Facilities

3D Workshop

Sculpture workshop, foundry, mould-making, wood and plastics fabrication.

Print Making Workshop

For silkscreen, etching, lino-cut and relief printing, mono-printing and collographs.

Drawing Studio

Drawing and life drawing classes in a well-equipped naturally lit environment. Digital options include Wacom Intuos tablets and a digital microscope.

General Technical Sessions

Optional software inductions available to all students introduce you to a wide range of creative possibilities and output options.

The University Archive

House an extensive collection of exhibition materials and publications, including the NUA East Archive.

Media Resource Centre

For digital cameras, tripods, 35mm DSLRs, 35mm film cameras and lighting equipment.

NUA Library

The largest specialist are, design and media collection in the East of England including 32,000 books, 1,300 journal subscriptions and 3,000 DVDs.

Applications

The offer of entry onto a Masters Degree (MA) is based on an expectation that you have the potential to fulfil the aims of the course of study and achieve the standard required to successfully complete the award. Entrants should normally have achieved a BA (Hons)/BSc Degree of 2:1 or above (or its equivalent), in a subject related to your proposed course of study.

Applicants who hold a Degree from another discipline may also be considered for entry, subject to the submission of a satisfactory portfolio of art, design or media-related work in support of their application.

The majority of applicants to courses at NUA will be invited to attend an interview. This provides an invaluable chance to meet face-to-face and is the major factor in determining the success of your submission. The interview is an opportunity to assess your work and the suitability of your application and also provides you with a chance to assess NUA’s staff, campus and facilities and ask questions. The key focus of your application process is on your portfolio. Some courses may require additional entry requirements or passes in specific subjects.

  • Complete the application form, including a well-prepared and considered 500 word statement indicating your intentions for MA study. The form should be word-processed not hand-written.
  • Detach the Reference Form and forward to your chosen referee with a request to complete and return to NUA at the address indicated.
  • Email the completed form to: or post to Admissions, Norwich University of the Arts, Francis House, 3 – 7 Redwell St, Norwich, NR2 4SN
  • We will endeavour to contact you within two weeks of receiving your application and reference from your nominated referee. If your application is acceptable we will arrange a date for interview.

For further information on this course, please visit our website - MA Fine Art.



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Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more

Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing.

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation. 

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++. 

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles. 

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. These modules provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking. 

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

MA or MFA Computational Arts?

As well as the MA, we also offer an MFA in Computational Arts. The MA is 1 year (full-time), the MFA 2 years (full-time).

The first year of the MFA is identical to the MA. You take the same classes and you learn the same things. The differences between the two courses is that in the MFA you get a 2nd year in which you take additional courses which help you develop your arts practice further. These courses mean that you get a space to work under a tutor's supervision. 



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The Digital Visual Effects MSc equips you with advanced skills, knowledge and understanding of high definition digital effects to help you become a highly skilled technical director (TD) in the visual effects industry. Read more
The Digital Visual Effects MSc equips you with advanced skills, knowledge and understanding of high definition digital effects to help you become a highly skilled technical director (TD) in the visual effects industry.

This programme is entirely oriented towards current industrial needs, technology and practice and provides a direct route into the highly desirable creative industry. Our successful former students are working in London and for international companies in areas ranging from television graphics to architectural visualisation.

It covers 3D model building, texturing, lighting, rendering, procedural animation (cloth, hair, fur, dynamics), advanced compositing and high-definition digital effects. Although the thrust of the programme is towards high end film special effects and animation, the standards and techniques you learn will allow you to work in numerous other areas of digital effects.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/250/digital-visual-effects

About the School of Engineering and Digital Arts

The School successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting field of digital media. Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

We undertake high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Course structure

The course is designed to train digital effects artists to work in industry. Our successful former students are working in London and for international companies in areas ranging from television graphics to architectural visualisation. Although the thrust of the course is towards high end film special effects and animation, the standards and techniques you learn allow you to work in numerous other areas of digital effects.

The primary industry jobs the course is oriented towards include: technical directors in assistant, creature development, lighting effects, look development roles, compositors in compositing, digital paint and roto roles, modellers and trackers/matchmovers. For a smaller project or company roles would include that of a 3D generalist, 3D artist, effects artist or compositor. These are not easy to achieve, as global competition is fierce and success depends on much better than average concentration and constant practise to grasp the essence and modern techniques of digital visual effects.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EL831 - Digital Visual Art set-up (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL839 - Effects Animation (15 credits)
EL863 - Advanced 3D Modelling (15 credits)
EL864 - Pre-Visualisation (15 credits)
EL867 - Technical Direction (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop your knowledge and understanding within the field of digital visual effects, which will equip you to become a professional in the animation and visual effects Industry

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained technical directors who are highly skilled in using state of the art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide you with proper academic guidance and welfare support

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Careers

We have developed the programme with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students will be in a strong position to build long-term careers in this important discipline.

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/) has an excellent record of student employability (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/school/employability.aspx). We are committed to enhancing the employability of all our students, to equip you with the skills and knowledge to succeed in a competitive, fast-moving, knowledge-based economy.

Graduates who can show that they have developed transferable skills and valuable experience are better prepared to start their careers and are more attractive to potential employers. Within the School of Engineering and Digital Arts, you can develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek. These include problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Take your skills in chemistry further with a course that prepares you with the cutting-edge knowledge required for a career in the manufacturing or product development industries. Read more
Take your skills in chemistry further with a course that prepares you with the cutting-edge knowledge required for a career in the manufacturing or product development industries.

Formulation is a vital activity central to manufacturing in a wide range of industries. The course encompasses polymer and colloid science, building understanding of the physical and chemical interactions between multiple components in complex formulations, leading to a competitive advantage in product development and quality control.

You'll learn the trade secrets behind successful formulation,dealing with issues such as product stability, controlling flocculation, rheology and compatibility issues with multi-component systems. Whichever industry sector you're interested in working within, you'll develop the skills to deign formulations for a wealth of scenarios, for example food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and more.

Key Course Features

-You will develop skills to design formulations for a wealth of industrial scenarios - from food, cosmetics and personal care, pharmaceuticals, paper production, inks and coatings, oil drilling and mining to name just a few.
-In your research project you will interface with specialists from manufacturing industries and undertake a programme of experiments designed to develop the skills you want to learn.
-On this course you will learn the trade secrets behind successful formulation - dealing with issues such as product stability (stabilising emulsions and dispersions), controlling flocculation, rheology (flow properties, mouthfeel, gelation), and overcoming compatibility issues with multi component systems. You'll be introduced to modelling, new trends in processing and high throughput formulation.

What Will You Study?

The course comprises 6 x 20 credit modules of taught content and a 60 credit Research Project. The taught element is delivered by a varied programme including lectures, seminars, and practical classes and may be studied on a full time or part time basis to suit you.

There is a strong emphasis on development of hands-on practical skills using a wide variety of advanced instrumentation.

TAUGHT MODULES
-Advanced Materials Science
-Chemistry & Technology of Water Soluble Polymers
-Formulation Science
-Research Methods
-Structure and Function of Industrial Biopolymers

The lectures and workshops are designed to train you in understanding interactions between polymer, solvent, and surfactant molecules with particles and surfaces. You will:
-Review the range of formulation types found in various industrial sectors, and their components.
-Master analytical techniques used to optimise product formulation, including measurement of molar mass distribution using gel permeation chromatography with multi angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS) and particle sizing techniques such as digital imaging and laser diffraction (to measure aggregates, flocs and emulsion droplets)
-Discover Green Chemistry and eco-formulation- exploring a whole range of biopolymers extracted from natural resources….including antimicrobial polymers from shellfish waste, gelling agents from seaweed, and oligosaccharides from locally grown grasses.
-Learn about man-made polymers and importantly, chemically modified biopolymers.
-Measure the viscosity and rheology of liquid formulations and see how this can be interpreted to yield structural information on thickened systems and gels, and particulate systems including fillers, additives and dispersants.

A module in Research Methods provides training in all aspects of undertaking research, from project management, through data analysis and statistics to communicating your results and writing your dissertation to ensure you are well quipped to undertake your project.

RESEARCH PROJECT
The course culminates in an industry-focused Research Project. For full-time students this may be partly or wholly undertaken within a local manufacturing company. For part-time students the project provider may be your current employer. The Research Project gives you the opportunity to undertake a piece of novel research, and will often be based around solving a formulation problem for the project provider. It allows you to put into practice the knowledge and skills gained in the taught elements of the course.

Because of the individual nature of the research projects, no two projects are the same. Below are some of the titles of previous research projects undertaken by previous masters students in our department:
-Aspects of Adhesive Bonding of Low Energy Polymers
-The Effects of Surfactants on the Rheological Properties of Hydrophobically Modified Cellulose
-Extensional Rheometry and Dynamic Light Scattering of Telechelic Associating Polymer Solutions
-Simple chemical syntheses of polymer/silver nanocomposites
-Phase Separation of Gum Arabic and Hyaluronan in Aqueous Solution
-Shear and extensional Rheology of Electron Beam (EB) Curable Paint

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessment of the taught modules is intended to allow the learner to demonstrate skills that cover the entire breadth of the programme aims – knowledge and understanding, key practical skills, intellectual skills in planning experiments/interpreting data and communication of information in writing and verbally.

The research project is examined by a final dissertation.

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This course trains graduates with a chemistry background specifically for a career as a polymer or biopolymer scientist. Read more
This course trains graduates with a chemistry background specifically for a career as a polymer or biopolymer scientist. The content reflects global interest in sustainably-derived polymers which are increasing in demand in a variety of applications including food and beverages, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, personal care, paints and inks.

Our specialist course will equip you with the knowledge to understand the behaviour of both naturally occurring and synthetic water soluble polymers at the molecular level, and how this influences their bulk behaviour. Lectures are reinforced and expanded by study of real-life polymer systems in the laboratory.

You'll learn about the vital roles played by polymers in a rage of products, gain knowledge of biopolymer modification, polymer synthesis and a range of specialist characterisation techniques. During your research project you'll work with specialists from manufacturing industries and perform a programme of experiments designed to help you develop your skills.

Key Course Features

-You will learn about the vital roles played by polymers in a diverse range of high value products – e.g in mayonnaise, sun tan lotion, wound gels, liquid pharmaceuticals, paper, ink, water based paints and flotation aids in mining to name just a few.
-You’ll gain first-hand knowledge of biopolymer modification, polymer synthesis, and a wide range of specialist characterisation techniques.
-In your research project you will interface with specialists from manufacturing industries and undertake a programme of experiments designed to develop the skills you want to learn.
-Through case studies and your research project you will learn how to apply acquired knowledge in real world industrial scenarios, leading the way to success in subsequent employment.

What Will You Study?

The course comprises 6 x 20 credit modules of taught content and a 60 credit research project. The taught element is delivered by a varied programme including lectures, seminars, practical classes and may be studied on a full time or part time basis to suit you. There is a strong emphasis on development of hands-on practical skills using a wide variety of advanced instrumentation.

TAUGHT MODULES
-Advanced Materials Science
-Chemistry & Technology of Water Soluble Polymers
-Formulation Science
-Polymer Characterisation Case Study
-Structure and Function of Industrial Biopolymers

The lectures and workshops are designed to train you in understanding polymer molecules themselves, and the way they interact with each other, and with solvents, surfactants, particles and surfaces.

You will:
-Study the basic principles of polymer characterisation through a range of analytical techniques including FT-IR, UV-vis, NMR, ESR and fluorescence spectroscopy.
-Master the measurement of molar mass distribution using gel permeation chromatography with multi angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS), and gel electrophoresis.
-Use particle sizing techniques such as digital imaging and laser diffraction to measure aggregates, flocs and emulsion droplets.
-Discover Green Chemistry - exploring a whole range of biopolymers extracted from natural resources….including antimicrobial polymers from shellfish waste, gelling agents from seaweed, and oligosaccharides from locally grown grasses.
-Learn about man-made polymers and importantly, chemically modified biopolymers.
-Measure the viscosity and rheology of liquid formulations and see how this can be interpreted to yield structural information on thickened systems and gels.
-A module in research methods provides training in all aspects of undertaking research, from project management, through data analysis and statistics to communicating your results and writing your dissertation to ensure you are well equipped to undertake your project.

RESEARCH PROJECT
The course culminates in an industry-focussed Research Project. For full-time students this may be partly or wholly undertaken within a local manufacturing company. For part-time students the project provider may be your current employer. The Research Project gives you the opportunity to undertake a piece of novel research, and will often be based around solving a polymer application /characterisation problem for the project provider. It allows you to put into practice the knowledge and skills gained in the taught elements of the course.

Because of the individual nature of the research projects, no two projects are the same. Below are some of the titles of previous research projects undertaken by previous Masters students in our department:
-Aspects of Adhesive Bonding of Low Energy Polymers
-The effects of Surfactants on the Rheological Properties of Hydrophobically Modified Cellulose
-Extensional Rheometry and Dynamic Light Scattering of Telechelic Associating Polymer Solutions
-Simple chemical syntheses of polymer/silver nanocomposites
-Phase separation of Gum Arabic and Hyaluronan in Aqueous Solution
-Shear and extensional Rheology of Electron Beam (EB) Curable Paint

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessment of the taught modules is intended to allow the learner to demonstrate skills that cover the entire breadth of the programme aims – knowledge and understanding, key practical skills, intellectual skills in planning experiments/interpreting data and communication of information in writing and verbally.

The research project is examined by a final dissertation.

Career Prospects

The EU is the leading chemical production area in the world and the chemical industry is the UK's largest manufacturing export sector.

MSc Polymer and Biopolymer Science combines delivery of key theoretical knowledge with hands-on application in extraction, modification and testing of polymers / biopolymers.

You’ll learn how to develop experiments at bench scale through to processes at pilot and manufacturing scale. A Masters degree in Polymer & Biopolymer Science from Glyndwr University gives you the skills employers are looking for.

You'll be ready to step confidently into a world of manufacturing with a wealth of information and skills to offer. The course provides excellent career opportunities across a wide range of industrial sectors. Graduates can expect to obtain a research and development position in areas related to biomedical devices, pharmaceutical formulation, food and beverages, petroleum recovery, agrochemicals, functional polymers/speciality chemicals, inks, paints and coatings or cosmetics and personal care products.

The course also provides a direct route to doctoral study, for those wishing to undertake further research training or pursue an academic career.

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

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The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science course. It'll allow you to qualify as a court-going forensic scientist, as well as preparing you for many alternative careers that require problem-solving and analysis. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science course. It'll allow you to qualify as a court-going forensic scientist, as well as preparing you for many alternative careers that require problem-solving and analysis.

You’ll graduate with relevant practical skills combined with analytical and investigative thinking.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/forensicscience/

You’ll study:

- crime investigation and legal processes
- criminalistics (eg shoe marks)
- forensic chemistry (fires, explosives, glass, paint)
- toxicology and drugs of abuse (cannabis, heroin cocaine etc)
- forensic biology (body fluid analysis, blood pattern interpretation)
- trace evidence and fibre examination
- questioned documents
- interpretation of evidence

You’ll become an effective analyst, develop strong written and verbal communication skills and develop knowledge of:
- common separation techniques (thin layer, HPLC and gas chromatography)
- modern spectroscopic methods (infra-red, ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence)
- DNA profiling
- crime scene investigation


MSc students will undertake a three-month project.

The eight-month Postgraduate Diploma course is similar to the MSc, but does not include the three-month project.

Facilities

Teaching takes place in the Centre for Forensic Science. It’s a modern purpose-built laboratory for practical forensic training, designed and equipped for ultra-clean working for the avoidance of cross contamination.

Teaching staff

Staff are experienced researchers in forensic science who are internationally recognised. The Centre for Forensic Science offers a unique learning experience, combining ‘case-based’ learning with research-led teaching.

- Practitioner Lecture Series
This course offers the unique experience of gaining first-hand accounts of forensics in action through our practitioner and forensic related professionals lecture series.

Well renowned practitioners and professionals providing these lectures include:
- Professor Peter Gill, Professor of Forensic Science, University of Oslo
- PD Dr rer nat Marielle Vennemann, Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Münster
- Dr Cerys Rees, Fellow, CB Analysis and Attribution, DSTL
- Dr John Jenner, Principal Toxicologist, DSTL
- Ciara Holland, Consultant Fire Investigator at BRE (Building Research Establishment Global Ltd)
- Jim Govan a retired Firearm Examiner at the Scottish Policing Authority and Terminal Ballistic Consultant to Deer Commission Scotland (now Scottish Natural Heritage)
- Alan Gall, Former Chief Superintendent and Divisional Commander, Strathclyde Police
- Graham Cairns, Former Chief Superintendent and Divisional Commander, Strathclyde Police

Accreditation

The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences is a professional body with members in over 60 countries and is one of the oldest and largest forensic associations in the world.

Its aim is to set high educational standards through the review and accreditation of courses that contain forensic science.

Additional MSc requirements

- IELTS 6.5 is required for all non-English speakers
- entry is competitive and students are selected on the basis of academic ability and previous experience
- final selection decisions are made by the academic selector and successful applicants will be notified
- in the course of forensic examinations, there is a potential for exposure to body fluids from hepatitis sufferers and prospective students should consider hepatitis immunisation (this takes from four to six months to be effective)

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Assessment

Assessment consists of written submission, practical work assessments and oral presentations. Practical work is continually assessed and counts towards the award of the degree.

The award of MSc is based upon 180 credits, while the award of PgDip is based upon 120 credits.

Careers

Most forensic scientists in the UK are employed by the police, government bodies such as Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and private companies who provide forensic science services to the police.

Most of the work is laboratory-based but experienced forensic scientists may have to attend crime scenes and give evidence in court.

How much will I earn?

Starting salaries are around £20,000 a year and can increase to £35,000 with experience. Senior forensic scientists can earn £45,000 or more*

*information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. Read more
This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. The skills and techniques acquired on this course are to the level necessary for theatre, television, film and animation industries..

During the year students acquire an understanding of professional practice and standards, and gain in-depth skills and experience in scenic art techniques and their application, combined with the practice of managing a scenic art department.

The Course has 3 very intensive terms during which students paint the sets for the School’s six main house public productions, offering them the opportunity to see their finished work used on stage in a wide range of public performances and venues. Teaching is led by the School’s Head of Scenic Art in collaboration with visiting industry professionals who provide master-classes in a range of skills and techniques that include; life drawing, portraiture, perspective, marbling, wood-graining, polystyrene carving and painting for animation. The scenic art students work collaboratively with the School’s other production departments, and most especially with design students. Furthering their introduction to the industry, work placements with principal companies are arranged during the course; particular attention is placed on students developing their own professional portfolio. Upon graduation students will showcase their work in a public exhibition and be interviewed by some of the UK’s leading industry practitioners. In a freelance industry most of our graduates begin working as assistants for scenic artists, scenic workshops and large theatre companies, eventually becoming supervising scenic artists themselves.

Recent graduate employment; The Royal Opera House, The Royal Shakespeare Company, Cardiff Theatrical Services, The Royal National Theatre, Northern Ballet, TR2 Plymouth, Richard Nutbourne - Cool Flight Ltd, Cameron Macintosh's National Tour of ‘Mary Poppins’, Disney's ‘Aladdin’, ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ for Warner Brothers. Film work includes; Wes Anderson's ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ and ‘Isle of Dogs’ (still in production) Tim Burton's ‘Frankenweenie’, Aardman Animations' ‘Shaun the Sheep’, ‘Pirates’ and ‘Early Man’ (still in production). TV work includes 'Will' for TNT and ‘Crazy Face’ for Netflix.

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Why choose this course?. You are special, and we know you have thought hard about this decision. We have created a course we are proud to offer graduates like yourself who feel they need more time to develop their specialist portfolio, or to direct ‘that’ film. Read more

Why choose this course?

You are special, and we know you have thought hard about this decision. We have created a course we are proud to offer graduates like yourself who feel they need more time to develop their specialist portfolio, or to direct ‘that’ film. But most of all, we know that when you graduated from your BA you felt like it was the beginning… not the end.

When designing our animation courses we spent a lot of time in the development stages discussing our ideas with industry creatives, graduates and students. As a result, the Animation team has developed a unique and ground-breaking philosophy that affects everything we do: ‘CREATIVE EMPLOYABLE THINKERS’: The idea is simple, everything you do on this course will be aimed at you becoming a Creative Employable Thinker. Every module you study, every grade you receive, all the feedback you get will be based around the central aim of you becoming a Creative Employable Thinker.

What happens on the course?

This MA in Animation will help you advance the skills you already have and develop the skills you aspire to gain.

There are many careers within the Animation industries, so we have designed a curriculum that allows you to mould your experience to suit your needs. We will encourage you to explore and develop in the creative areas you are most passionate about, allowing you to specialise in single production area such as (but not limited to): storyboarding, directing, concept art, character design, script writing etc.

We believe that no two creative people are the same, so we encourage you to follow your instincts and identify your personal creative potential.

Modules and Assessment

You will take part in both formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments provide feedback on work in progress; this is done during in weekly sessions, as well as in writing throughout the course.

You will use blogging to document your research, progress, learning, reflections and thinking. The blogs are a useful tool within the formative and summative assessment processes and will help you develop your professional voice.

Summative assessment is given as the final grade which a rigorous procedure often involving two or more members of staff, students work is examined in accordance to the Module Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria which is stipulated on the Assessment Brief (given at the beginning of each Semester).

Why Wolverhampton?

The resources and equipment in Animation fully support the aspiration for high end productions to be created. You are encouraged to work to industry standard and aspire to award winning animations.

Facilities include:

  • A dedicated studio developed to replicate a professional configuration that is equipped with 25 workstations
  • All work stations have a Cintiq
  • 2 screen setups for both production and post production runs to occur
  • Production cycle software applications -- CGI software the complete Adobe and Autodesk studio packages, and TV Paint.
  • A multifunctional capture area where line testing/ and stopmotion animation spaces can be used for testing, experiments an high quality final productions
  • Dedicated blue and green screens and portable motion capture rig
  • A stop motion space that can be used to facilitate puppet and model animation production
  • Fully equipped drawing and life studios


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