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Masters Degrees (Pacific)

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The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Read more
The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Awarded by the USF College of Arts and Sciences and the USF School of Management, the MAPS/MBA program provides a cost and time savings of up to 16 units.

• Separate admission to each school is required.
• Students may begin either program first or begin the programs concurrently.
• Indicate in your "Statement of Purpose" that you are applying to both of these programs for the dual degree.

Curriculum

• Asia Pacific Studies Core and Elective Courses — 20 credits
8 degree units are waived

• MBA Core courses — 34 credits

• MBA Elective courses — 14 credits
8 units of MBA electives are waived

MBA and MAPS courses are offered during the evening on a year-round basis. MBA courses are also offered during the day and in the summer. This schedule allows you the flexibility to pursue the concurrent degree while working or studying full-time.

Format

MAPS/ MBA students complete the MBA program in either a Full-Time MBA cohort or Part-Time MBA cohort. Eight MAPS units are applied to the MBA elective curriculum.

Duration

The MAPS/ MBA can be completed on a full-time or part-time basis. Students opting for the full time format can complete the program in as little as three years. If students opt to take the program on a part-time basis, then the duration will be extended.

Career and Networking Forum

Understanding the vital role of professional development, our program holds an annual Career and Networking Forum for students, alumni, and others in the USF community to engage with various organizations seeking interns and employees. At the most recent event, over 35 organizations — including businesses, non-profits, and recruiters with a connection to the Asia Pacific — attended and approximately 200 people participated. Representatives from The Asia Foundation, Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), Give2Asia, Pasona, and many others have enjoyed dynamic, productive interactions with students at the Forum.

Mentorship Program

The Mentor Program is a voluntary, non-credit option offered to students at any time during their two years of study. It presents students with a broad spectrum of possibilities as to how they might apply their degree to their chosen career field and connects students with professionals in their field of interest. The Mentor Program is coordinated by members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board.

Professional Development Program

The Professional Development Program (PDP) offers students opportunities to broaden their familiarity with potential career paths and to meet with successful professionals.
The PDP relies heavily on the expertise and voluntary services of working professionals. The majority of these professionals are members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board. The Board's Professional Development Committee advises the Center for Asia Pacific Studies on the administration and direction of the PDP.

Executive Networking Event

Periodically students in the program are invited to the Executive Networking Evening held on campus in collaboration with the Center for Asia Pacific Studies. Students have the opportunity to meet many of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies' Board members and other professionals in a range of fields.

Job Search Training

MAPS students may request training and advice on pursuing a job in an international field, including resume design, mock interviews, and other job training skills.

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All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. Read more
All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of the Asia Pacific Region, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Asia Pacific Region.

The objectives of the programme are:

- To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to the Asia Pacific Region
- To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists
- To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge
- To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research

Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of the Asia Pacific Region within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to the Asia Pacific Region will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year.

All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course (https://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html)

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/

Structure

The MSc Economics is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September.

The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 58kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/file39831.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation.

The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation.

The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Pre Entry Reading

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs.

Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html). The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to the Middle East from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the Middle East. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability.

Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to the Middle East have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

SOAS MSc graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (Asia Pacific) is a unique degree that is partially funded by the European Union. The University of Sydney is part of a network of universities across the world that offer it – the most advanced human rights education programs at postgraduate level. Read more
The Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (Asia Pacific) is a unique degree that is partially funded by the European Union. The University of Sydney is part of a network of universities across the world that offer it – the most advanced human rights education programs at postgraduate level.

The course is taught across five universities and provides students with the opportunity to deepen their knowledge and skills in this field.

It offers students from across the Asia Pacific region and the world the opportunity to study the legal, sociological, philosophical and political contexts that underpin and drive human rights and democratisation challenges globally. The program combines rigorous academic knowledge, skills training and on-the-ground insights into what it means to be a human rights advocate from government, NGO, and private sector perspectives. Coursework is supplemented by field trips and workshops on a variety of human rights-related topics.

You will begin the course at the University of Sydney and spend the regional semester at one of four partner universities: Ateneo de Manila Law School (Philippines), Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia), Kathmandu School of Law (Nepal) and the University of Colombo (Sri Lanka). In the regional semester, you can choose to complete either a dissertation or an internship.

You will also have an opportunity to use our strong industry links in countries across the Asia Pacific for internship and job opportunities. Past internships have included organisations that work with migrants, children, women, refugees, sex workers, political prisoners, human rights defenders and legal aid advocates.

With a diverse student body that comes from all over the world, the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (Asia Pacific) has a truly international feel that is impossible to replicate. There are at least 20 scholarships offered to students from the Asia Pacific region.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Read more
The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Together, they make up one of the most diverse and important regions in the world.

SOAS has more expertise in this part of the world than any other institution in Western Europe; indeed there are very few places anywhere in the world that can boast the same range of expertise.

This degree is a way of bringing together the large number of modules on Pacific Asia currently on offer in SOAS Masters programmes for Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies, South East Asian Studies, and Korean Studies.

The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three taught units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As a Regional Studies programme students will be expected to select their modules from more than one discipline, The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Programme Specification

MA Pacific Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 33kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/file80829.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most modules there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Pacific Asia, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Pacific Asia.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions. Read more

Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions.

The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to give students the flexibility and independence to pursue their passions. Separate concentrations — humanities/social sciences and business — allow students to take courses that align with their professional or academic goals after graduation.

San Francisco Advantage

San Francisco is a nucleus for opportunities that connect the city with the Asia Pacific region. MAPS students take full advantage of San Francisco’s location and resources to gain career and research experience, immersing themselves in the city’s vibrant and diverse Asian Pacific communities through internship and networking opportunities.




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You can enter these programmes either with an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology, or with no previous anthropological experience but the desire to convert your academic focus into anthropology. Read more

MRes programmes

You can enter these programmes either with an undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology, or with no previous anthropological experience but the desire to convert your academic focus into anthropology. The MRes aims to provide a firm foundation in the methods and methodologies of social anthropology and the human sciences, to serve as a basis for knowledgeable and skilled research in Social Anthropology. You are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes throughout.

MRes in Social Anthropology with Pacific Studies

• Designed for students who have a special interest in the Pacific and Melanesia, either:
– to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD in the region.
– or to work there in some other capacity – e.g. in an NGO, in development projects, in multinational corporations with interests in the region.
• You study modules devoted to the history, languages, cultures and varieties of social organisation of Melanesia and the Pacific and their significance for the contemporary lives of its many peoples

Features

* Social Anthropology was established in 1979, and is now a constituent department in the University’s School of Philosophical, Anthropological & Film Studies with a staff of 14.
* Teaching at all levels is informed by the research interests and accomplishments of lecturing staff.

Postgraduate community

Many students are from abroad and are undertaking a varied range of taught courses and research programmes. Those returning from, or preparing to go into, the field form an active community with a wide range of diverse geographical and substantive interests.

You will participate in annual workshops organised by the Department, jointly with the Anthropology departments of the universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow under the Scottish Training in Anthropological Research (STAR) programme. These workshops provide opportunities for informal presentations of research proposals, discussions relevant to your fieldwork preparations (e.g. ethics, data collection, writing field notes). The exploration of creative ways of learning is held in a relaxed yet focused environment, together with members of staff and PhD students from each of the universities. The training workshops last for
four days and take place in a beautiful countryside location. They act as complementary elements of the postgraduate training programme, and are organised in consultation with postgraduate students themselves, according to their perceived needs and wishes. In addition, there are shorter workshops which take place throughout the year and are designed to develop theoretical perspectives in anthropological research.

Facilities

The Department of Social Anthropology occupies an extensive suite of offices on North Street and in St Salvator’s Quad. It is well situated in the centre of town and at the geographical heart of the University. The Centre for Amerindian Studies has its own set of rooms within the Department, including a reading room that holds a library for Latin American and Amerindian studies. Within Social Anthropology there is also a museum collection of ethnographic objects, and a common room that includes a general anthropological class library, providing a space that is shared by both staff and postgraduates. The Departmental libraries, along with the main library, which holds a fine anthropology collection, include materials from all ethnographic regions of the world.

Weekly research seminars are organised by both the Department and sometimes by the Centres, and include speakers from outside St Andrews and abroad, thus enriching the intellectual environment. Social anthropologists from other UK departments, and beyond, visit and contribute to our series of seminars, and to workshops and conferences arranged by staff members and by research students. We endeavour to create a warm and friendly atmosphere and this also contributes towards maintaining a high quality of teaching and intellectual exchange.

Teaching methods

Taught postgraduate programmes in Social Anthropology are small class format modules, in which formal lectures are combined with seminar style teaching and student-led group work. Every taught postgraduate student is assigned an individual supervisor from among the anthropology staff, who works with them closely to develop a topic and direction for the end of degree dissertation.

International conferences

An important element in fostering the Department’s reputation has been a series of international conferences, each of which has considered an important contemporary theoretical issue within the discipline. These have dealt with, for example, the Anthropology of Violence; Power and Knowledge; Localising Strategies; the Concept of the Market; the Problem of Context; Kingship; the Anthropology of Love and Anger; Ways of Knowing; an Epistemology of Anthropology. The Ladislav Holy Memorial Trust plays an important supportive role for many of these conferences. From time to time distinguished scholars are appointed to the St Andrews Visiting Professorship in Social Anthropology, and each year members of the international academic community join the Department to follow postdoctoral work and other research endeavours. Such visiting scholars greatly enhance the thriving research environment.

Careers

Social Anthropology graduates have characteristics many employers seek and a Social Anthropology degree provides openings to a wide range of careers.
• Private organisations: can use the skills of social anthropologists doing research for urban planning, working with health organisations, doing market research for advertising companies, training employees who will be working in international divisions, or working within human resource departments.

• Government agencies: can employ social anthropologists as policy researchers, research analysts, evaluators, managers, planners and policy makers.

• International organisations: can employ anthropologists in projects in various countries around the world as researchers and cultural brokers.

• Non-profit agencies: can employ social anthropologists as advocates, administrators, evaluators and researchers.

• Graduate employers: 70% of graduate jobs are for students from any discipline. Social anthropologists successfully move into teaching, law, finance, HR, marketing, PR etc.

Well known St Andrews Social Anthropology graduates:
• Saba Douglas-Hamilton – wildlife conservationist & BBC presenter
• Nicolas Argenti – anthropologist
• Alexander Schulenburg – historian, independent scholar and activist for the British overseas territory of St Helena
• Nicholas Barker – journalist: winner of The Independent Young Journalist of the Year.

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The M.A. in Asia Pacific Studies / MBA program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Read more
The M.A. in Asia Pacific Studies / MBA program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems.

Awarded by the USF College of Arts and Sciences and the USF School of Management, the MAPS/ MBA program provides a cost and time savings of up to 16 units.
- Separate admission to each school is required
- Students may begin either program first or begin the programs concurrently

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This course prepares students for careers in international and community development with government, non-government and international organisations, such as the UN or the World Bank, and charities. Read more
This course prepares students for careers in international and community development with government, non-government and international organisations, such as the UN or the World Bank, and charities.

Students will have access to the School’s own research institute – The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Science, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate and reflect critically on advanced and integrated knowledge of social theory, practice and professional ethics in a single discipline or interdisciplinary field of the social sciences
*Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and methods in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Analyse critically and evaluate social systems, institutions, structures and/or practices
*Generate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex perspectives, arguments and sources of qualitative and/or quantitative data pertinent to complex social, political, historical, economic, environmental and/or cultural issues, particularly those related to quality of life in the tropics worldwide
*Interpret and justify to a specialist and non-specialist audience theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions through advanced literacy and, where appropriate, numeracy skills
*Design and execute a substantial social science research-based project with a high level of autonomy and accountability
*Apply social theory to research, demonstrating advanced understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, including recent developments, in a single discipline or interdisciplinary fields of the social sciences
*Respectfully and responsibly apply expert knowledge of diversity and difference among people, especially vulnerable and Indigenous peoples, in scholarship and/or professional practice
*Adapt and apply knowledge and skills to identify complex problems and pose creative solutions to social and/or environmental challenges facing peoples and societies in diverse tropical contexts worldwide.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE (MSocSc)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia.

Taught by leading researchers in our world-class facilities, you’ll learn to apply academic analysis to your experience of the region, or to convert past training in another academic discipline to apply it to the Asian context.

A wide range of optional modules will give you the chance to focus on topics such as business practices, the role of China or Japan in international development or the complex politics of the Asia Pacific among others.

Whether you’re entering a professional career and want to gain regional expertise, or you’re a professional seeking to build on your experience of living and working in an Asian context, you’ll gain an insight into a complex and fascinating part of the world.

East Asian Studies at Leeds is a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

If you’re interested in learning or developing your skills in an East Asian language, you might want to consider our East Asian Cultures and Societies (Language Pathway) MA.

Course content

This programme offers a wide range of choice. You’ll select the modules you want to study from a range of options, allowing you to shape the programme according to your own interests and career plans.

You could focus on Japanese business, China’s relationship with the developing world or international politics across the Asia Pacific among many other topics.

A core module will give you an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences, allowing you to develop your skills. This will culminate with your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Chinese Politics 15 credits
  • China's Development 15 credits
  • China and the Developing World 15 credits
  • Japan in the Discourse of International Development 15 credits
  • Japan: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Political Economy of the Pacific Rim 15 credits
  • International Politics of the Asia Pacific Region 15 credits
  • Chinese Business 15 credits
  • The Economics of China 15 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Cultures and Societies MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, project work and in-course assessment among others.

Career opportunities

This programme will suit you whether you’re just starting your professional career, or you’re a mid-career professional who has lived and worked in an Asian context. You’ll gain subject knowledge as well as transferable skills in topics such as analysis, research, communication, presentations and cultural awareness.

All of these are valuable in a wide range of professions across different sectors and industries, including business, public and third sectors. Graduates from our School have developed exciting careers in the UK and worldwide, as diplomats, educators, and policy-makers, to name just a few.

The programme will also prepare you for PhD study, providing a good stepping stone towards an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Are you looking for a course that offers a distinct business perspective on current legal issues and developments? The Master of Business Law is a specialist course designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge to address the wide range of legal issues that arise in contemporary business. Read more
Are you looking for a course that offers a distinct business perspective on current legal issues and developments? The Master of Business Law is a specialist course designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge to address the wide range of legal issues that arise in contemporary business.

You will develop an expert understanding of the legal environment and its impact on business practice in corporate governance, financial regulation, compliance and risk management.

The course positions you as a business specialist. It will advance your legal literacy and provide you with knowledge, skills and professional values to become an effective operator within compliance or business law environments.

Our curriculum allows you to study business law units from Monash Business School as well as commercial law units from the Faculty of Law. The flexible structure of the course enables you to tailor your studies to develop specialist legal knowledge in the areas most suited to your career.

Graduates work across a wide range of business roles such as contract negotiation, business management compliance, and regulation and risk management, and in fields including accounting, finance, human resources and taxation.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-law-b6013?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Advanced preparatory studies, Part B. Mastery knowledge and Part C. Application studies. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications you may receive credit for part A or part C or a combination of the two.

PART A. Advanced preparatory studies
These units provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge and skills across core business disciplines and a valuable contextual basis for further business law study.

PART B. Mastery knowledge
These units provide a comprehensive study of core business law disciplines and the impact they have on decision-making in organisations. They will develop your capacity to apply your knowledge to provide discipline-based solutions to legal problems and risks arising in contemporary business.

PART C. Application studies
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development and develop your advanced knowledge to master's level in business law.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

About us

We are proud of our national reputation as a leader in the field of business law. As one of Australia's largest and most versatile business law departments, we offer a comprehensive teaching and research program focusing on commercial law and regulation in the rapidly growing Asia-Pacific region.

Our Department has established a strong reputation for:

- publishing in leading international publications
- attracting the highest quality postgraduate students
- engaging in international collaboration
- securing external research funding.

According to the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) Report (2012), the discipline of law received a rating of five-stars (well above world standard). Our staff have won numerous major teaching awards within the Monash Business School and at Monash University. Several of our staff are authors of leading textbooks used throughout Australia and around the world.

Research expertise

The Department's research activities in corporations law, taxation law, employment law, Asian law and international business law are carried out through three research groups. Each group regularly sponsors international symposia and work with partner groups at European, North American, Asian and Australasian universities. These research groups are:

- Asia-Pacific Business Regulation Group
- Workplace and Corporate Law Research Group
- Taxation Law and Policy Research Group.

Our expertise in these areas has resulted in the Department receiving a number of national and international competitive research grants. Our active and high quality doctoral program has been recognised as one of the world's best, attracting PhD students from four continents.

Teaching Excellence

The Department of Business Law and Taxation is responsible for business law and taxation teaching in the Monash Business School. The Department teaches units in the undergraduate and graduate programs offered by the Faculty. These units recognise that knowledge of law and taxation is essential for the informed business professional.

The Department of Business Law and Taxation provides Monash business students with a rare opportunity to learn from staff focused on business law, rather than the broader law program.

Engagement and collaboration

Business Law and Taxation staff carry out research activities in conjunction with:

- the business community
- the accounting and legal professions
- government agencies
- social welfare bodies
- international organisations.

Department academics have been seconded to assist government agencies including the Treasury and Australian Taxation Office.

We regularly work with international agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and Asian Development Bank to assist with the development of business and tax laws across the Asia-Pacific region.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-law-b6013?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Do you want to pursue a career in international business, diplomacy or politics? The Master of International Business gives you the opportunity to advance your business and management knowledge and give you the skills to operate from a global perspective. Read more
Do you want to pursue a career in international business, diplomacy or politics? The Master of International Business gives you the opportunity to advance your business and management knowledge and give you the skills to operate from a global perspective.

Specifically designed for recent graduates and those in the early stages of their career, this course will build on your undergraduate credentials and further strengthen your business skills.

The course develops expertise in communicating and negotiating across cultures, and will develop your capacity for advanced analysis of firm internationalisation, international trade, and corporate strategy.

As part of the course you can build your knowledge and extend your expertise in one of two areas:

- International Business
- Diplomacy and Trade

The International Business stream has a business-oriented focus, seeking to advance your knowledge of the international environment in which firms and their managers operate considering issues such as international trade the internationalisation of operations.

The Diplomacy and Trade stream, which is only offered at Caulfield, has a political economy focus, looking to advance your knowledge of the relationships between international politics, diplomacy, economics, international trade, international law and international development.

Graduates develop deep knowledge and analytical skills that can be applied in a variety of organisational settings including the corporate, governmental and non-profit sectors. Career opportunities are available in a range of private firms and multinational enterprises across the manufacturing and service, export and trade, travel and tourism, consulting and research sectors. Employment opportunities also arise in government departments and institutions, NGOs and international organisations.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-business-b6007?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Diplomacy and trade
Diplomacy and trade provides formal academic study across a range of disciplines relevant to the needs of organisations operating in the global environment. It provides high-level training in the fields of diplomacy, economics, law and contemporary politics. This specialisation is aimed at recent graduates who hope to work in the public and private sectors, or those who presently work in these sectors, and wish to increase their understanding of the international environment. It is designed to provide the knowledge needed to workin the government sector, implementing and providing policy advice on foreign affairs, trade, and business-related issues.

In the private domain, the course is designed for individuals who are operating, or looking to work, in an international capacity in both the corporate or not-for-profit sector.

International business
This specialisation investigates inter-disciplinary contemporary international business. Students will be engaged with international management, law, finance, economics, marketing, and strategy, enabling analytical skills that can be applied in a variety of organisational settings. International business develops strategic and operational international business knowledge and skills, particularly for the complexity of contemporary environments. The specialisation prepares graduates for international business roles across the corporate, governmental and non-profit sectors.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Advanced preparatory studies, Part B. Mastery knowledge and Part C. Application studies. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for part A or part C or a combination of the two.

PART A. Advanced preparatory
These units provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge and skills across core business disciplines and a valuable contextual basis for further business study.

PART B. Mastery knowledge
These units will develop your capacity as a critical and creative professional who is able to apply your knowledge of international business, diplomacy and trade in international business and political contexts.

PART C. Application studies
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development in international business, diplomacy or politics.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

About us

We are proud of our national reputation as a leader in the field of business law. As one of Australia's largest and most versatile business law departments, we offer a comprehensive teaching and research program focusing on commercial law and regulation in the rapidly growing Asia-Pacific region.

Our Department has established a strong reputation for:

- publishing in leading international publications
- attracting the highest quality postgraduate students
- engaging in international collaboration
- securing external research funding.

According to the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) Report (2012), the discipline of law received a rating of five-stars (well above world standard). Our staff have won numerous major teaching awards within the Monash Business School and at Monash University. Several of our staff are authors of leading textbooks used throughout Australia and around the world.

Research expertise

The Department's research activities in corporations law, taxation law, employment law, Asian law and international business law are carried out through three research groups. Each group regularly sponsors international symposia and work with partner groups at European, North American, Asian and Australasian universities. These research groups are:

- Asia-Pacific Business Regulation Group
- Workplace and Corporate Law Research Group
- Taxation Law and Policy Research Group.

Our expertise in these areas has resulted in the Department receiving a number of national and international competitive research grants. Our active and high quality doctoral program has been recognised as one of the world's best, attracting PhD students from four continents.

Teaching Excellence

The Department of Business Law and Taxation is responsible for business law and taxation teaching in the Monash Business School. The Department teaches units in the undergraduate and graduate programs offered by the Faculty. These units recognise that knowledge of law and taxation is essential for the informed business professional.

The Department of Business Law and Taxation provides Monash business students with a rare opportunity to learn from staff focused on business law, rather than the broader law program.

Engagement and collaboration

Business Law and Taxation staff carry out research activities in conjunction with:

- the business community
- the accounting and legal professions
- government agencies
- social welfare bodies
- international organisations.

Department academics have been seconded to assist government agencies including the Treasury and Australian Taxation Office.

We regularly work with international agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and Asian Development Bank to assist with the development of business and tax laws across the Asia-Pacific region.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-business-b6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The full-time International Relations course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• Critical Security

• War, Identity and Society

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Civil Society and International Development

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• War, Technology and Culture

• State of Africa

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• Development Studies

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and

Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA



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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. Read more
The LLM in Environmental Law provides a unique specialisation in one of the most rapidly developing areas of law. Environmental law is one of the most challenging fields that has grown very rapidly over the past four decades and is now one of the key areas of both domestic and international law. At SOAS, we understand the environment in a broad sense which includes not only environmental issues strictly speaking but also all the links that they have with other areas such as natural resources, human rights, economic development trade or intellectual property rights.

The SOAS degree offers a distinct mix of modules that covers all the main areas of environmental law in their international and national dimensions. The international and global nature of many environmental issues makes the international law component a key part of the LLM in Environmental Law. We offer all the general topics that make up the core of international environmental law. Additionally, we focus specifically on the North-South dimension of international environmental issues given the key role this plays in most international environmental negotiations.

The LLM in Environmental Law specifically seeks to put international environmental law in its national context and examines the broad legal frameworks negotiated at the international level in the context of their implementation in selected countries of the South. It thus provides a much more grounded context to the study of environmental law.

Further, we also study the legal regimes of individual countries of the South to provide much more specific analysis of the discipline at the level of its implementation in specific contexts. The LLM in Environmental Law gives specific emphasis to different regions of the South, including South Asia, China and sub-Saharan Africa.

For further information about the general LLM at SOAS and a list of all the modules, please visit the General LLM description (http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llm/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmenvlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Environmental Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Water and Development: conflict and governance - 15PDSH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Water Law: justice and governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Global Energy and Climate Policy - 15PFFC017 (1 Unit)
- Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific - 15PFFH011 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change and Energy Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Law, Environment and Sustainable Development in a Global Context - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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