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Masters Degrees (Pacific)

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The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Read more

The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Awarded by the USF College of Arts and Sciences and the USF School of Management, the MAPS/MBA program provides a cost and time savings of up to 16 units.

• Separate admission to each school is required.

• Students may begin either program first or begin the programs concurrently.

• Indicate in your "Statement of Purpose" that you are applying to both of these programs for the dual degree.

You can request more information on our website.

Curriculum

• Asia Pacific Studies Core and Elective Courses — 20 credits

8 degree units are waived

• MBA Core courses — 34 credits

• MBA Elective courses — 14 credits

8 units of MBA electives are waived

MBA and MAPS courses are offered during the evening on a year-round basis. MBA courses are also offered during the day and in the summer. This schedule allows you the flexibility to pursue the concurrent degree while working or studying full-time.

Format

MAPS/ MBA students complete the MBA program in either a Full-Time MBA cohort or Part-Time MBA cohort. Eight MAPS units are applied to the MBA elective curriculum.

Duration

The MAPS/ MBA can be completed on a full-time or part-time basis. Students opting for the full time format can complete the program in as little as three years. If students opt to take the program on a part-time basis, then the duration will be extended.

Career and Networking Forum

Understanding the vital role of professional development, our program holds an annual Career and Networking Forum for students, alumni, and others in the USF community to engage with various organizations seeking interns and employees. At the most recent event, over 35 organizations — including businesses, non-profits, and recruiters with a connection to the Asia Pacific — attended and approximately 200 people participated. Representatives from The Asia Foundation, Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), Give2Asia, Pasona, and many others have enjoyed dynamic, productive interactions with students at the Forum.

Mentorship Program

The Mentor Program is a voluntary, non-credit option offered to students at any time during their two years of study. It presents students with a broad spectrum of possibilities as to how they might apply their degree to their chosen career field and connects students with professionals in their field of interest. The Mentor Program is coordinated by members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board.

Professional Development Program

The Professional Development Program (PDP) offers students opportunities to broaden their familiarity with potential career paths and to meet with successful professionals.

The PDP relies heavily on the expertise and voluntary services of working professionals. The majority of these professionals are members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board. The Board's Professional Development Committee advises the Center for Asia Pacific Studies on the administration and direction of the PDP.

Executive Networking Event

Periodically students in the program are invited to the Executive Networking Evening held on campus in collaboration with the Center for Asia Pacific Studies. Students have the opportunity to meet many of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies' Board members and other professionals in a range of fields.

Job Search Training

MAPS students may request training and advice on pursuing a job in an international field, including resume design, mock interviews, and other job training skills.



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Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions. Read more

Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions.

The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to give students the flexibility and independence to pursue their passions. Separate concentrations — humanities/social sciences and business — allow students to take courses that align with their professional or academic goals after graduation.

You can find more information on our website

Program Learning Outcomes

Students completing the MAPS Program will be able to demonstrate:

  • an ability to apply research tools and methods to analyze critically topics within class disciplines and contemporary interdisciplinary fields of Asia Pacific Studies.
  • an understanding of sociocultural histories and traditions, political and economic patterns of development, organizational practices and behaviors, and contemporary events as evidenced in the Asia Pacific region.
  • oral and written proficiency in an Asian language corresponding to the fourth semester of USF undergraduate courses, or the equivalent level in languages not taught at USF.
  • practical experience in Asia-Pacific related contexts via opportunities for academic and professional development such as internships, fieldwork, conferences, symposia, public programs, class excursions and other types of experiential learning.

Job Search Training

MAPS students may request training and advice on pursuing a job in an international field, including resume design, mock interviews, and other job training skills.

San Francisco Advantage

San Francisco is a nucleus for opportunities that connect the city with the Asia Pacific region. MAPS students take full advantage of San Francisco’s location and resources to gain career and research experience, immersing themselves in the city’s vibrant and diverse Asian Pacific communities through internship and networking opportunities.



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All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. Read more
All the courses offered by the Department of Economics approach the subject matter from a development perspective. Students on the MSc Economics with reference to the Asia Pacific Region will complete courses on macro, micro, quantitative methods and growth. In addition, students must complete two courses dedicated to the study of the economics of the Asia Pacific Region, as well as an optional module and a dissertation in applied economics with a focus on one or more countries of the Asia Pacific Region.

The objectives of the programme are:

- To enable students to apply the principles of economic analysis to the design of economic policy with reference to the Asia Pacific Region
- To teach postgraduates the technical and analytical skills to qualify them to practice as professional economists
- To enable practising professional economists to improve and update their skills and knowledge
- To impart the skills and knowledge that enable students to progress towards PhD research

Students will benefit from studying with experts on the economics of the Asia Pacific Region within the Department. More broadly, a large number of open lectures on topics relating to the Asia Pacific Region will be available in various departments of the School throughout the year.

All students are required to complete the compulsory preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics (including Computing) to begin studying on this programme. This course is taught over a three week period from the beginning of September covering mathematics, statistics and computing. For further information about this course including a timetable please see here: Preliminary maths and Statistics Course (https://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html)

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/

Structure

The MSc Economics is taught within a structured programme rather than being obtained mainly by research and dissertation. It consists of eight course modules delivered through lectures, classes, and tutorials and an 8,000-word dissertation. The degree is awarded on the basis of course work, examinations written in May/June, and a dissertation which is submitted in September.

The following is a complete list of courses in the programme, not all of which are offered in any single year. To see a list of courses being offered please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Please note that some courses may be taught in other departments of the School.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 58kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msceconpac/file39831.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The MSc includes eight taught modules plus a preliminary course in Mathematics and Statistics and an 8,000-word dissertation.

The courses are taught in seminar groups and lectures. The degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation.

The MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years. Four modules are studied each year, with the dissertation normally being completed in the second year.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

Students are required to complete an 8,000-word dissertation in applied economics.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Pre Entry Reading

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative courses are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative courses focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs.

Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary course in mathematics, statistics and computing (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html). The objective of the course is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This course is compulsory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Economics with reference to the Middle East from SOAS equips students with a range of important skills to continue in the field of research as well as a portfolio of widely transferable employability skills valued by a wide range of employers. These include numeracy, analytical thinking and general skills such as organisation and effective communication skills. Graduates will develop their regional expertise and understanding of the Middle East. In addition the study of Economics gives students particular problem solving skills including: abstraction, analysis, quantification, strategic thinking and adaptability.

Postgraduate students from the SOAS MSc in Economics with reference to the Middle East have followed successful careers in both academic work and also in international banking and financial analysis, in national governments in many parts of the world, in international development agencies and in a range of non-government organisations. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

SOAS MSc graduates have been very successful in gaining highly competitive Overseas Development Institute (ODI) fellowships which have allowed them to work in government agencies in countries ranging from Mozambique to Papua New Guinea.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Master of Māori and Pacific Development (MMPD) will take you through an advanced assessment of the underlying concepts and principles associated with social, cultural, political and economic development for indigenous peoples. Read more

The Master of Māori and Pacific Development (MMPD) will take you through an advanced assessment of the underlying concepts and principles associated with social, cultural, political and economic development for indigenous peoples.

You'll explore approaches to solving problems in the theory and practice of indigenous development, and more so in the realms of Māori and Pacific Development.

You can be assured that you are studying with the best. Our lecturers remain at the coalface of global development challenges and discourses including the refugee crisis, climate change, environmental issues, economic development challenges, labour migration, sustainable development, poverty and illiteracy.

You'll be learning with those who are recognised as development practitioners in NZ, Pacific and internationally through their projects, networks and collaborations. This includes projects for UNESCO, ASPBAE (Asia South Pacific Association for Adult and Basic Education) and other civil society groups. Our staff are also working towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) as agreed upon by the United Nations in 2015.

Course Structure

120 Point Masters

The Master of Māori and Pacific Development involves two semesters of full time study or its equivalent in part time study.

Students may choose from the following options:

  • a 120 point thesis, or
  • a 90 point thesis and 30 points from an approved 500 level paper, or
  • a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved 500 level papers.

At least 60 points must be gained from a single subject. Up to 30 points may be taken from outside the field of the degree.

Students should normally have qualified for the Postgraduate Diploma or its equivalent and have normally achieved a B+ or better.

180 Point Masters Requirements

To be admitted to the MMPD directly from a BMPD or BA, or equivalent, students will need to gain a high level of attainment in their relevant 300 level papers, normally an A-. This requirement, combined with the inclusion of an approved research methodology paper, will underpin successful completion of a significant research project of 60, 90, or 120 points.

This pathway involves one full calendar year or one and a half academic calendar years or its equivalent in part-time study. It comprises 180 points of which at least 60 points at 500 level from one subject must be taken, including an approved research methods paper, and any compulsory papers prescribed in the relevant subject. Students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis, or a 60 point dissertation.

Career opportunities

  • Government Ministries and Agencies
  • Public Corporations
  • International Organisations
  • Public Service/Administration
  • Local Government
  • Small and Medium Business ownership
  • Business Planning
  • Appraisal and Evaluation
  • Negotiation and Facilitation
  • Health, Training and Welfare
  • Local and Tribal Authorities
  • Marae, Community  and Non-governmental Work
  • Research, Consultancy and Needs and Impacts Assessments


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The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Read more
The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Together, they make up one of the most diverse and important regions in the world.

SOAS has more expertise in this part of the world than any other institution in Western Europe; indeed there are very few places anywhere in the world that can boast the same range of expertise.

This degree is a way of bringing together the large number of modules on Pacific Asia currently on offer in SOAS Masters programmes for Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies, South East Asian Studies, and Korean Studies.

The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three taught units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As a Regional Studies programme students will be expected to select their modules from more than one discipline, The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Programme Specification

MA Pacific Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 33kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/file80829.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most modules there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Pacific Asia, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Pacific Asia.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law (LLM Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples') provides an opportunity to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights. Read more

Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law (LLM Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples') provides an opportunity to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights.

You'll examine how the United Nations and other international organisations influence the process of Indigenous rights development. You will learn what role the State plays in recognising environmental and economic rights of indigenous peoples.

What will post-settlement New Zealand legal landscape look like? You could be the driving force behind developing truly inclusive New Zealand Jurisprudence that would incorporate the best of the traditional Māori practices and Common Law.

The knowledge and skills developed through our specialist programme are relevant in roles in:

  • Academic teaching and research;
  • Treaty settlement
  • Maori governance
  • Crown Law
  • Local and central government
  • Education
  • Māori economy

The Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples’ Law programme is offered with the same study

options as those of Master of Laws (LLM). Please see the Master of Laws page for more information.

Cultural experience

The Faculty members come from a wide range of nations and cultural backgrounds, creating a truly multicultural environment. This helps foster in our students an increased awareness of global issues, exposes them to multiple historical and cultural perspectives as well as offer insight into legal systems outside the jurisdiction of the Common Law.

We have the most diverse and vibrant student body of all law schools in New Zealand. Up to 30 per cent of all our students identify themselves as Māori and nearly 16 per cent come from Pacific background. Nearly 40 per cent of our students are over the age of 25.

The Faculty's three dynamic law student associations: Pacific Law Student Association (PLSA)Te Whakahiapo (Māori Student Association) and Waikato University Law Student Association (WULSA) play an important role of fostering great collegial relationships between students and offer plenty of social and learning opportunities.

Our Mentoring Programme will provide extra support and guidance in your studies, help you to navigate through the transition period from school or previous employment to university study as well as advise you on other services and opportunities available to you on campus.



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This Postgraduate course embeds the learning and teaching in a graduate introduction to social science philosophies and methods in the study of the Asia Pacific while also giving students the opportunity to study one of the region’s main languages at a relevant level at the same time. Read more

This Postgraduate course embeds the learning and teaching in a graduate introduction to social science philosophies and methods in the study of the Asia Pacific while also giving students the opportunity to study one of the region’s main languages at a relevant level at the same time.

The course introduces students to a wide range of materials on the society, economy, politics and international relations of the region. It is founded in the development of critical analysis of these materials. This course is taught by staff from across UCLan’s Asia Pacific Studies team, including from the International Institute of Korean Studies, which works within a global network of influential academics, diplomats, journalists and public policy officials who work on countries around the Asia Pacific.

The course will provide students with a comparative advantage in journalism, diplomacy, international organisations, NGOs, and global business of gaining knowledge and expertise, in the international relations of East Asia. As a dominate force within the world economy, it also contains some of the world’s most pressing security issues. This course is designed so that on completion, the student will have studied relevant subjects and have the necessary skills for the preparation of doctoral research.

Students will study using the latest industry-standard equipment in our professional interpreting suites and will have access to our state-of-the-art Learning Centre, where interactive video, satellite TV, computers, and other self-study audio and video materials are available on an open access basis. Our students can study additional languages using the digital technologies including Rosetta Stone.

Increasing interests of international society in the Asia Pacific region will be an asset for our students to look for their career paths. The strong support from policy makers in the UK for Asia Pacific Studies at UCLan will also provide positive networking opportunities to our students that will, in turn, facilitate prospects of employability.

At the same time, our activities and programmes, which are currently under development, such as internships at research institutions or international organisations, and exchange studentship will contribute to job seeking exercises of our students.



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The MRes in Social Anthropology with Pacific Studies is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the Department of Social Anthropology within the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies. Read more

The MRes in Social Anthropology with Pacific Studies is a full-time taught postgraduate programme run by the Department of Social Anthropology within the School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies.

Highlights

  • The modules provide an understanding of the highly complex social, political and cultural experiences of the historic populations of the Pacific.
  • Small class sizes ranging from two to ten students encourages student-led seminars and discussion as well as more contact with supervisors.
  • Students are equipped to work with non-government organisations and multinational corporations with interests in the region.

Teaching format

Over two semesters, students take four compulsory modules. Teaching methods include formal lectures combined with seminar style teaching and student-led group work. Lecture class sizes range from five to ten students and tutorial sizes range from two to six students. Modules are assessed through coursework which includes essays, independent research-led assignments and group assessed oral presentations.

Over the course of the year, with particular focus during the summer months, you will devise a research project culminating in a 15,000-word dissertation. Every taught postgraduate student is assigned an individual supervisor from among the Anthropology staff who works with them closely to develop a topic and direction for the end of degree dissertation.

The Department of Social Anthropology provides postgraduates access to a museum collection of ethnographic objects and a common room that includes a general anthropological class library, providing a space that is shared by both staff and postgraduates. The departmental libraries, along with the main library which holds a fine anthropology collection, include materials from all ethnographic regions of the world.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.

Each module typically comprises:

  • 25 contact hours including lectures, seminars and practicals
  • 100% coursework assessment.

Students may substitute one optional module with an Honours-level undergraduate module, with the approval of the course coordinator.



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This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. Read more

This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. A prior knowledge of the region is not necessary. 

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MA content from a wide range of optional modules.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Course details

The Asia-Pacific is a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region in the world. Despite experiencing unrivalled economic growth, it must also face growing concerns over such issues as security, energy, the environment and internal cohesion. For the rest of the world, turning their back on the key players in the Asia Pacific, is not an option. This degree offers advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today.

Each year, a number of students from East Asia take the degree, in order to study their region from a different cultural and theoretical set of perspectives. Students who wish to work in or with East Asia take the degree and its modules, in order to gain an insight into the cultural, economic and political opportunities and challenges of the region.

Issues and topics examined include

  • China's emerging status as a world power
  • The regional institutions of East Asia
  • Security issues, including nuclear weapons and terrorism
  • Human rights, peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction
  • Environmental security and climate change

One of the real strengths of our masters programmes is the wide range of available modules, giving students the ability to tailor their course of study to their own academic interests.

Who is the programme for?

This programme is for students who want an advanced knowledge of the main issues, problems and actors in the diverse region of East Asia today, or who wish to expand their knowledge of a dynamic and rapidly changing key economic region of the world, or to pursue any area of professional life in, or linked to, East Asia. A prior knowledge of the region is not necessary.

More information on: International Relations MA (with specialist pathways)

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.

Employability

Graduates from the School have gone on to work in a range of careers, with recent graduates working with organisations such as the United Nations, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, local authorities in the UK and overseas and the Department for International Development.

The School takes employability very seriously and as well as linking students to the central careers services, also incorporates opportunities to enhance their employment prospects, including highlighting work experience opportunities, encouraging volunteering in extra-curricular projects (such as student seminars and events) and by inviting backgrounds for students to meet.

More information about careers and employability

Careers Network

The Careers Network provides a dedicated service to help you find work experience or internship opportunities outside of your studies, either part-time during term-time, or over the summer vacation. Right from the start of your degree you will have access to our interactive careers service, through which many regional, national and international employers advertise their vacancies, and your college internship officers will go out and about to find vacancies that will be a useful addition to your CV. 

Find out more about support for work experience and internships, bursaries, or mentoring.



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The M.A. in Asia Pacific Studies / MBA program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Read more
The M.A. in Asia Pacific Studies / MBA program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems.

Awarded by the USF College of Arts and Sciences and the USF School of Management, the MAPS/ MBA program provides a cost and time savings of up to 16 units.
- Separate admission to each school is required
- Students may begin either program first or begin the programs concurrently

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The Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato places a strong emphasis on the development of research skills. The classes are small and are typically offered in seminar style discussions. Read more

The Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato places a strong emphasis on the development of research skills. The classes are small and are typically offered in seminar style discussions. This approach to teaching at an advanced level creates opportunities for you to share perspectives and discuss issues related to the topic. It'll help you to improve your communication skills and gain expert knowledge. It creates opportunities for you to network with others and renew motivation and confidence. You'll also get a lot of one-on-one time with the lecturing or supervising academic staff.

We offer the largest selection of papers in Cyber Law in New Zealand, and therefore you can complete this Masters focusing on this area.

The Faculty hosts two research centres: Centre for Environmental, Resources and Energy Law (CEREL) and Māori and Indigenous Governance Centre (MIGC). You’ll benefit from the expert knowledge and national and international professional associations in these fields. For example, you’ll be eligible to apply for the International Bar Association scholarship. Waikato Faculty of Law is the only school in New Zealand that offers this opportunity.

Whether your interest lies in Cyber Law, Law of War and Conflicts, Transnational Criminal Law, Indigenous Issues or Environmental Law, you will benefit from nationally and internationally recognised academic staff.

Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law

Passionate about indigenous issues? This Masters programme will allow you to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights. You'll develop skills enabling you to participate actively in the development of Pacific jurisprudence and to enhance global understanding of Pacific legal systems.

Read more about Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law.

Double LLM: University of Waikato and University of Arizona

Interested in holding two LLMs from internationally highly regarded Faculties of Law in significantly less time and in two different countries?

If you’re a dedicated, engaged student and you’ve successfully completed 90 points of LLM at Waikato (or 75% of our LLM), you could receive 6-8 credits towards the LLM degree at the James E Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona.

There are two options on offer for LLM in Arizona: Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy LLM (composed of 24 credits) or International Trade and Business Law LLM (composed of 26 credits).

Cultural experience

The Faculty members come from a wide range of nations and cultural backgrounds, creating a truly multicultural environment. This helps foster in our students an increased awareness of global issues, exposes them to multiple historical and cultural perspectives as well as offer insight into legal systems outside the jurisdiction of the Common Law.

We have the most diverse and vibrant student body of all law schools in New Zealand. Up to 30 per cent of all our students identify themselves as Māori and nearly 16 per cent come from Pacific background. Nearly 40 per cent of our students are over the age of 25.

The Faculty's three dynamic law student associations: Pacific Law Student AssociationTe Whakahiapo (Māori Student Association) and Waikato University Law Student Associations play an important role of fostering great collegial relationships between students and offer plenty of social and learning opportunities.

Our Mentoring Programme will provide extra support and guidance in your studies, help you to navigate through the transition period from school or previous employment to university study as well as advise you on other services and opportunities available to you on campus.

Career opportunities

  • Government departments
  • Law teaching and research
  • Civil and public service and the judiciary
  • Banking, financial services and financial regulation
  • International development organisations
  • Non-governmental organisations such as human rights agencies
  • Private legal practice
  • Business


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With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand. Read more

With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand.

As a world-leader in marine conservation, New Zealand is a great place to develop your expertise in the field. Its unique and lengthy coastline is home to numerous marine organisms—from the tiny phytoplankton to the endangered New Zealand sea lion.

Study with Victoria's School of Biological Sciences, a leader in marine biology research. Examine marine conservation issues and practice using examples from New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific and wider Indo-Pacific region, which can be applied worldwide.

Marine Conservation can be studied through two qualifications. The Master of Marine Conservation (MMarCon) is a taught Master's with no thesis component and is the only taught Marine Conservation Master's degree in New Zealand.

Or you can choose to study the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation (PGCertMarCon), a shorter qualification for those who want to expand their expertise into a new area of interest.

Master of Marine Conservation

The 180-point Master of Marine Conservation consists of three core courses and three courses chosen from a range of marine biology, biodiversity, ecology, ecological restoration and conservation courses. You can also choose courses that specialise in environmental management and conservation issues relating to New Zealand Māori and Pacific Island communities.

Two of your core courses, BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice and BIOL 529 Tropical Marine Conservation Practice, are field courses. You'll visit several world-renowned marine conservation sites in New Zealand and overseas.

The field courses will have costs over and above the course fees.

You'll also examine marine conservation issues of cultural and socioeconomic significance to Māori and Pacific peoples, such as exploitation of coastal regions and ecotourism, seabed and foreshore rights, and community-led conservation strategies.

Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of three courses totalling 90 points chosen from any of the courses in the MMarCon programme; however, you must include at least one of the core courses.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The Master of Marine Conservation can be completed in 12 months of full-time study, or in 24 months part time.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation can be completed in six months of full-time study or in 12 months part time.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll gain skills and knowledge in a wide range of areas within the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems, in both temperate and tropical climates. You might find work at Crown Research Institutes, private research institutes or with national government agencies managing marine conservation and fisheries.

Other organisations you may work with include regional authorities such as city, regional and district councils, consultancy firms carrying out contract marine biology work or non-government agencies and not-for-profit organisations.



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This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia.

Taught by leading researchers in our world-class facilities, you’ll learn to apply academic analysis to your experience of the region, or to convert past training in another academic discipline to apply it to the Asian context.

A wide range of optional modules will give you the chance to focus on topics such as business practices, the role of China or Japan in international development or the complex politics of the Asia Pacific among others.

Whether you’re entering a professional career and want to gain regional expertise, or you’re a professional seeking to build on your experience of living and working in an Asian context, you’ll gain an insight into a complex and fascinating part of the world.

By choosing to study East Asian Studies at Leeds you will be joining a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

If you’re interested in learning or developing your skills in an East Asian language, you might want to consider our East Asian Cultures and Societies (Language Pathway) MA.

Course content

This programme offers a wide range of choice. You’ll select the modules you want to study from a range of options, allowing you to shape the programme according to your own interests and career plans.

You could focus on Japanese business, China’s relationship with the developing world or international politics across the Asia Pacific among many other topics.

A core module will give you an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences, allowing you to develop your skills. This will culminate with your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Chinese Politics 15 credits
  • China's Development 15 credits
  • China and the Developing World 15 credits
  • Japan in the Discourse of International Development 15 credits
  • Japan: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Political Economy of the Pacific Rim 15 credits
  • International Politics of the Asia Pacific Region 15 credits
  • Chinese Business 15 credits
  • The Economics of China 15 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Cultures and Societies MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, project work and in-course assessment among others.

Career opportunities

This programme will suit you whether you’re just starting your professional career, or you’re a mid-career professional who has lived and worked in an Asian context. You’ll gain subject knowledge as well as transferable skills in topics such as analysis, research, communication, presentations and cultural awareness.

All of these are valuable in a wide range of professions across different sectors and industries, including business, public and third sectors. Graduates from our School have developed exciting careers in the UK and worldwide, as diplomats, educators, and policy-makers, to name just a few.

The programme will also prepare you for PhD study, providing a good stepping stone towards an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme is for those students who wish to gain an advanced knowledge of the theory and practice of international relations, but who do not wish to restrict themselves in advance to a particular area. Read more

This programme is for those students who wish to gain an advanced knowledge of the theory and practice of international relations, but who do not wish to restrict themselves in advance to a particular area. It gives you the freedom to choose from a full range of options and to design your own course of study.

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MA content from a wide range of optional modules.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Course details

This degree offers a broad-based multidisciplinary approach to the study of international relations, with opportunities to specialise in one of several fields including international economic relations, security studies, European studies or Pacific Asian studies.

International Relations can be studied as a general masters programme, or you can choose a specialist pathway.

Issues examined may include

  • Historic and leading-edge theories of international relations
  • Critical approaches to international relations
  • Conflict and security, including terrorism and political violence
  • The operation and institutions of the global economy
  • Diplomacy and summit-level state interactions
  • Gender and international relations

Programme content

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MA content from a wide range of optional modules. View the Course Structure.

Specialist pathways

It gives you the freedom to choose from a full range of options and to design your own course of study. It offers a broad-based multidisciplinary approach to the study of international affairs, with opportunities to specialise, if required, in one of several fields including:

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.

Employability

Graduates from the School have gone on to work in a range of careers, with recent graduates working with organisations such as the United Nations, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, local authorities in the UK and overseas and the Department for International Development.

The School takes employability very seriously and as well as linking students to the central careers services, also incorporates opportunities to enhance their employment prospects, including highlighting work experience opportunities, encouraging volunteering in extra-curricular projects (such as student seminars and events) and by inviting backgrounds for students to meet.

More information about careers and employability

Careers Network

The Careers Network provides a dedicated service to help you find work experience or internship opportunities outside of your studies, either part-time during term-time, or over the summer vacation. Right from the start of your degree you will have access to our interactive careers service, through which many regional, national and international employers advertise their vacancies, and your college internship officers will go out and about to find vacancies that will be a useful addition to your CV. 

Find out more about support for work experience and internships, bursaries, or mentoring.



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Are you looking for a course that offers a distinct business perspective on current legal issues and developments? The Master of Business Law is a specialist course designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge to address the wide range of legal issues that arise in contemporary business. Read more
Are you looking for a course that offers a distinct business perspective on current legal issues and developments? The Master of Business Law is a specialist course designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge to address the wide range of legal issues that arise in contemporary business.

You will develop an expert understanding of the legal environment and its impact on business practice in corporate governance, financial regulation, compliance and risk management.

The course positions you as a business specialist. It will advance your legal literacy and provide you with knowledge, skills and professional values to become an effective operator within compliance or business law environments.

Our curriculum allows you to study business law units from Monash Business School as well as commercial law units from the Faculty of Law. The flexible structure of the course enables you to tailor your studies to develop specialist legal knowledge in the areas most suited to your career.

Graduates work across a wide range of business roles such as contract negotiation, business management compliance, and regulation and risk management, and in fields including accounting, finance, human resources and taxation.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-law-b6013?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Advanced preparatory studies, Part B. Mastery knowledge and Part C. Application studies. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications you may receive credit for part A or part C or a combination of the two.

PART A. Advanced preparatory studies
These units provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge and skills across core business disciplines and a valuable contextual basis for further business law study.

PART B. Mastery knowledge
These units provide a comprehensive study of core business law disciplines and the impact they have on decision-making in organisations. They will develop your capacity to apply your knowledge to provide discipline-based solutions to legal problems and risks arising in contemporary business.

PART C. Application studies
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development and develop your advanced knowledge to master's level in business law.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

About us

We are proud of our national reputation as a leader in the field of business law. As one of Australia's largest and most versatile business law departments, we offer a comprehensive teaching and research program focusing on commercial law and regulation in the rapidly growing Asia-Pacific region.

Our Department has established a strong reputation for:

- publishing in leading international publications
- attracting the highest quality postgraduate students
- engaging in international collaboration
- securing external research funding.

According to the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) Report (2012), the discipline of law received a rating of five-stars (well above world standard). Our staff have won numerous major teaching awards within the Monash Business School and at Monash University. Several of our staff are authors of leading textbooks used throughout Australia and around the world.

Research expertise

The Department's research activities in corporations law, taxation law, employment law, Asian law and international business law are carried out through three research groups. Each group regularly sponsors international symposia and work with partner groups at European, North American, Asian and Australasian universities. These research groups are:

- Asia-Pacific Business Regulation Group
- Workplace and Corporate Law Research Group
- Taxation Law and Policy Research Group.

Our expertise in these areas has resulted in the Department receiving a number of national and international competitive research grants. Our active and high quality doctoral program has been recognised as one of the world's best, attracting PhD students from four continents.

Teaching Excellence

The Department of Business Law and Taxation is responsible for business law and taxation teaching in the Monash Business School. The Department teaches units in the undergraduate and graduate programs offered by the Faculty. These units recognise that knowledge of law and taxation is essential for the informed business professional.

The Department of Business Law and Taxation provides Monash business students with a rare opportunity to learn from staff focused on business law, rather than the broader law program.

Engagement and collaboration

Business Law and Taxation staff carry out research activities in conjunction with:

- the business community
- the accounting and legal professions
- government agencies
- social welfare bodies
- international organisations.

Department academics have been seconded to assist government agencies including the Treasury and Australian Taxation Office.

We regularly work with international agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and Asian Development Bank to assist with the development of business and tax laws across the Asia-Pacific region.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-law-b6013?domestic=true#making-the-application

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