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Masters Degrees (Outreach)

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This course is designed for ordained clergy, church leaders and/or lay workers with a particular interest in the relationship between sport and spirituality, and whose occupational aspirations lie within the sports chaplaincy sector. Read more
This course is designed for ordained clergy, church leaders and/or lay workers with a particular interest in the relationship between sport and spirituality, and whose occupational aspirations lie within the sports chaplaincy sector.

The Sport and Christian Outreach (Sports Chaplaincy) programme offers students a unique opportunity to understand, critique and develop practice in the realm of sport and spiritual development within chaplaincy roles and settings. The course is based upon the University of Gloucestershire’s established track record in community sports development and sport and Christian outreach. Programme provision also draws upon the international reputation of Redcliffe College (Gloucester, UK) as a provider of excellent missionary training. Modules are tailored towards Christian community work in sport and theology.

Some modules are theoretical, some teach practical skills, some are generic with other sports management areas. Both the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma pathways include work-based, experiential modules that assess practical skills alongside knowledge, beliefs and values. The University provides support and assessment in finding and working in these placement situations.

Some of our modules
Sports Chaplaincy
Pastoral Care
Mission and Sport
Psychology of Sports Performance
Psychology of Physical Activity and Health
Sports development: Policy and Practice

Benefits
excellent links with the major Christian sports agencies
unique and challenging course content
rewarding placement opportunities
postgraduate certificate, postgraduate diploma and MA route available for this course

Career paths
sports chaplain with inter/national sport governing body;
sports chaplain with elite or semi/professional sports club;
youth worker with sports chaplaincy brief

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This MA at UCL Qatar equips students with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to assume a career as a leading museum professional within Qatar, the wider Gulf region or further afield. Read more

This MA at UCL Qatar equips students with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to assume a career as a leading museum professional within Qatar, the wider Gulf region or further afield. Through practical placements, students will gain a unique insight into the developing local and international museum sector.

About this degree

This programme introduces the theories and practices of museology, emphasising their significance and relevance in the Gulf region and beyond. Key areas of museum studies are taught, such as collections management, museum, gallery and site management, exhibition development, visual studies, education and emerging digital technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students take four core modules (75 credits), plus a combination of optional modules (either three modules at 15 credits each or one module at 15 credits plus one module at 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Exhibition Project
  • Museums Policies and Practices
  • Principles of Museum and Gallery Practice
  • Research Methods for Museum Studies
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Students choose from the following:

  • Materials vs. Culture
  • Museum Learning, Outreach and Public Engagement
  • Collections Care and Management
  • The Digital Museum
  • Placement I
  • Placement II

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical sessions, and structured reading. Students undertake a 20-day professional placement. Assessment is through essays, presentations, portfolios, reports, oral examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Museum and Gallery Practice MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme will gain an in-depth historical and theoretical background in museums and cultural heritage as well as experience in a range of relevant technical skills. They will be trained in all aspects of museums work, including collections management, education and community outreach, emerging digital technologies, exhibition design and interpretation. Graduates will be familiar with regional and global cultural heritage practices.

Employability

There is an increasing need for qualified professionals with expertise in museums in the Gulf. We expect graduates to go on to assume leading roles within museums and galleries in Qatar and elsewhere in the region and internationally, including in management, collection building, curation and outreach.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Museums are flourishing in Qatar and the region, and this programme provides unmatched opportunities to network with leading local museums and heritage professionals.

Education City, Doha, houses branch campuses of some of the world's most prestigious educational institutions. International students benefit from the unique cultural experience of studying in Qatar, where the diverse range of cultural backgrounds ensures that unique perspectives are brought to classroom discussions.

The programme suits students with a genuine interest and curiosity about museums and heritage in the Arab and Islamic world.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MSOE MBA in STEM Leadership is among the first of its kind in the world. It prepares STEM teacher-leaders to develop and support initiatives to improve student learning outcomes in STEM fields and generate greater community awareness for the importance of STEM education. Read more
The MSOE MBA in STEM Leadership is among the first of its kind in the world. It prepares STEM teacher-leaders to develop and support initiatives to improve student learning outcomes in STEM fields and generate greater community awareness for the importance of STEM education.

The MSOE MBA in STEM Leadership will provide PK-12 teachers and college instructors with the capabilities needed to drive higher levels of student achievement in STEM fields, engage colleagues and administrators in STEM initiatives, and foster community support for STEM in PK-12 schools. This innovative new program blends STEM education techniques, business knowledge, and leadership skills. The overall program objective is to support the transformation of STEM teachers into teacher-leaders to help grow STEM education at the elementary and secondary school levels, as well as within community colleges and universities.

MSOE is a leader in STEM teacher professional development. MSOE’s Project Lead The Way (PLTW) summer programs serve more teachers than any other PLTW location in the nation. In addition, MSOE is home to the Center for BioMolecular Modeling (CBM), which conducts grant-supported science outreach programs for teachers and post-secondary educators. Candidates for the MBA in STEM Leadership program will leverage their learning in the MSOE PLTW or CBM outreach program by completing guided field projects for graduate credit.

Program Features and Benefits

- Program graduates earn the MSOE MBA through completion of a 33 quarter-credit core; in addition graduates learn to effectively assimilate new teaching techniques into their schools and communities.
- The program is offered part-time and can easily integrate with a full-time work schedule, with classes delivered as either blended Internet or 100 percent online.
- Participation in PLTW and CBM science outreach programs is converted into graduate program credit through completion of guided field projects tailored to the unique needs of a student’s environment.
- Students complete a personal leadership inventory and receive one-to-one leadership development coaching throughout the program.
- Graduates are connected to a community of like-minded STEM teachers to share new ideas, disseminate effective practices, and provide support for change initiatives.

Program Objectives

1. Integrate understanding of all business functional areas to lead classroom and organizational initiatives to achieve a stated mission and strategic objectives.
2. Direct innovative initiatives and formulate policies using sound analytical skills and evidence-based practice.
3. Demonstrate the on-going integration of effective leadership traits and ethical principles into personal and professional personas.
4. Build and sustain relationships among diverse constituents, stakeholders, and policy makers that foster a culture conducive to strong student achievement and performance in STEM fields.
5. Build strong initiatives by identifying and motivating talented people, and helping guide their development.
6. Leverage existing and emerging technologies to enhance organizational efficiency and effectiveness.
7. Rise to significant leadership positions within the STEM education field.
8. Lead change efforts within courses and curriculum designed to enhance and support STEM education.
9. Lead efforts within school districts and regional communities to facilitate growth in STEM initiatives.
10. Apply evidence-based teaching practice to ensure STEM curriculum and pedagogy lead to high levels of student engagement and learning in the classroom.

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This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach. Read more
This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach.

You will receive a sound practical and theoretical grounding in scientific use of experiments in archaeological research. The programme will give you practical experience of experiments related to archaeological and taphonomic processes and the production of a range of material culture types including ceramics, stone tools, metals and a range of organic materials.

The role of experiments and ‘reconstructions’ in education and public outreach is investigated through classes, practical activities, and field visits. Links with professionals, such as museums and independent establishments, provide opportunities for practical work based on a sound appreciation of theory.

The University has established an outdoor centre on its Streatham Campus to provide a location for both short- and long-term experimental archaeology research. The programmes involve practical work and field trips.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Experimental Archaeology; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology and Funerary Osteoarchaeology.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

Learning and teaching

This programme involves a high degree of learning through practice and experiments. Most of the formal classes that you attend will be based on a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The precise mix will vary between modules.

All members of staff are actively engaged in research, both in Britain and abroad, and regularly attend conferences, symposia and workshops. It is through this active engagement in the discipline that we are able to supply top quality teaching by experts in their field and as a result we have a 24/24 grading for our teaching from the Quality Assurance Agency.

We have excellent facilities for experimental archaeology including:
• experimental archaeology lab - this flexible laboratory space is the epicentre of our students' experimental activity and is a hard- wearing practical space in which we can carry out the unusual projects that only experimental archaeologists can dream up!
• material stocks - including sinew, feathers, hides, bones, antlers, wood, different stone types and plant materials
• pottery and kiln room, where students can work with clay, equipped with a potter's wheel and a large programmable electric kiln that can reach 1300 degrees Celsius
• workshop equipped with all the tools necessary to prepare materials for experiments
• knapping area - an outdoor space reserved for flintknapping and other activities best done in the fresh air
• experimental land - a substantial area of land on campus for long-term outdoor experiments.

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Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach. Read more
Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach.

This course is designed equally for those who are already information professionals in libraries and those who are looking to break into the sector for the first time. To suit those who have existing work commitments, the course is taught via a flexible distance learning mode and it has a slightly extended duration of 16 months. If you would prefer to study full-time on campus, please see MSc Information Science.

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This accreditation makes our courses stand out and enhances their credibility and currency among employers, and is also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) to assure students that programmes provide an excellent preparation for professional practice.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Information Science at Northumbria was established over 70 years ago and has developed in close collaboration with the profession. That dynamic working relationship has allowed us to not only reflect professional requirements, but also to be instrumental in understanding and shaping those requirements.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
Year One
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7025 - The library professional: management, leadership and outreach (Core, 20 Credits)

Year Two
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KC7027 - Information and digital literacy (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Research-Rich Learning

In fast-moving fields like information science it’s particularly important for teaching to take account of the latest research. Northumbria is helping to push out the frontier of knowledge in a range of areas including:
-Digital consumers, behaviours and literacy
-Digital socio-technical design
-Digital libraries, archives and records

As a student, you will be heavily engaged in analysing recent insights from the field of information science. You will undertake a major individual study that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. Your study will be tailored to your particular interests but the underlying theme will be the relationships between information, people and technology. Many of our students publish their own research and present at professional and academic conferences, before or soon after graduating.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals as well as the Archives and Records Association. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with the employers and close professional links. The accreditation vital if you want to move on to Chartership status once qualified.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop practical skills in leadership and strategy within the context of library management. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and delivering seamless services in libraries. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that will give your employers a valuable advantage.

Your Future

Libraries are being transformed due to the spreading of digital literacy and the changing needs and expectations of users. More than ever before, the delivery of high-quality services relies on library and information professionals who have a strong grasp of the principles and practices of modern library management.

On graduation, you will be well placed to play a role in this new world of libraries. Employers are looking for information professionals who can develop fresh insights through mastery of their subject and critical scholarship. With your Masters qualification, you will be equipped to make a difference, advance your practice and make well-balanced judgements. You could work for a wide range of employers in the public, private and third sector, or you could progress in a career that you have already started. Your Masters qualification can also form the basis for further postgraduate studies at a higher level.

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COURSE OVERVIEW. Combine and develop a range of interests across the heritage spectrum. Complete projects and placements in the UK and abroad. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Combine and develop a range of interests across the heritage spectrum
  • Complete projects and placements in the UK and abroad
  • Apply cultural theory and skills to real-world resources

Cultural Heritage and Resource Management considers the wider place of heritage management in contemporary society and offers you the chance to undertake your own projects on a range of different subjects. You investigate the theory and practice of cultural heritage and resource management from both a British and a global approach. Teaching comes from experts with specialisms in museums and galleries, cultural tourism, theme parks, national, local and global heritage organisations, archives, libraries, and archaeological units.

You have opportunities to participate in the department’s own research projects, which have included archaeological sites in Winchester, Cornwall, Georgia, Armenia, Corsica, Barbados, Ethiopia and Egypt, and are encouraged to use your skills in enhancing and developing existing cultural heritage strategies in these locations. The course offers a perspective which, although grounded in UK heritage practice, is also situated within a wider global context and offers industry placements and project work abroad.

Core modules include Cultural Heritage and Resource Management: An Introduction, Issues in Global Cultural Heritage, and Management in Heritage Organisations. Choose and optional module from a wide range including Mediterranean Landscape Studies, The Archaeology of Winchester, Religion, Magic and Esoteric Traditions in Post-Medieval Britain and Caribbean Peoples and Cultures. A placement module, based locally or abroad, allows you to gain practical training in the industry. Placements may involve work experience in a museum, gallery, historic property or archaeological unit/research project. There is also a dissertation, based on your original research, completed with full support and guidance from a tutor.

The course prepares you for a range of career choices. On completion, graduates often work in heritage, museums, galleries, education, outreach, libraries, archives, and archaeological units.

Careers

Graduates often work in heritage, museums, galleries, education, outreach, libraries, archives, and archaeological units.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

Students are required to undertake placement work (to the equivalent of 200 hours) in one or more heritage environments chosen in collaboration with the Programme Leader. Recent placements have included work at the Arthurian Centre in North Cornwall; Portsmouth Historic Dockyard; the Royal Palaces; Nokalakevi; and Georgia and Barbados Museums.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Daytime

Modules are delivered through workshops and seminars with presentations (poster and oral), reflexive learning strategies (such as blogs and diaries) and more formal essays. A placement module, based locally or abroad, allows students to gain practical training in the industry. Placements may involve work experience in a museum, gallery, historic property or archaeological unit/research project. 

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester). 

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information 

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication. Read more

Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication.

You will develop the skills required to work in a range of sectors, including media, science policy, filmmaking, science outreach, public relations, museums and science centres, science festivals, and other public engagement fields.

Developed by the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the course features masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in a wide range of sectors, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

You will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?

You will consider these and other questions through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and link these to practical skills.

Special features

Real world learning

We bring practitioners into the classroom and enable you to participate in the various forms of science communication that take place in Manchester to complement your academic learning with real life experiences.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements for both individual students and groups.

You will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, professional literatures, and mass media products about science, technology and medicine.

You will also learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events.

We encourage participation and volunteering to help you further your own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Applicants may informally request examples of study materials to help you test your ability to engage effectively with the course from the Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

All units are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. You should expect both written and spoken assessments that use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

You may choose your own topic or medium for many of the assessments. Assessed work also includes a piece of original science communication research.

The final assessment is a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional (the mentored project).

Course unit details

The full-time version of the course runs for 12 months from September. There is also a part-time alternative, covering half the same classes each semester over two years. Part-time study involves a limited number of days' attendance per week and can be combined with part-time employment.

All students take three course units consisting of weekly lectures and discussion seminars:

  • Introduction to Science Communication (30 credits)
  • Communicating ideas in science, technology and medicine (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Contemporary Science and Medicine (15 credits)

All students also attend a series of intensive one-day schools on science communication practice and science policy, with sessions led by invited contributors including journalists, documentary filmmakers, museum professionals, policy analysts, outreach officers and other relevant experts. From these day schools, you will choose two of the following four areas to specialise in for assessed work (although you can sit in on all these units):

  • Science, media and journalism (15 credits)
  • Science museums, Science Centres and Public Events (15 credits)
  • Ideas and issues in science communication studies (15 credits) ¿ Science, government and policy (15 credits)

The course is completed by two more open-ended elements allowing you to specialise towards your preferred interests.

  • The science communication research project (30 credits) gives more scope for independent investigation and includes new research on a particular science communication topic.
  • The mentored project (60 credits), completed over the summer at the end of the course, involves working with support from a science communication professional on developing and analysing an activity close to professional practice.

Our course teaches the current trends in science communication, so details of our units may vary from year to year to stay up to date. This type of change is covered within the University's disclaimer , but if you are in doubt about a unit of interest, please contact us before accepting your offer of a place.

What our students say

Read about graduate Amie Peltzer's experience of the course on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of a dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Our classrooms extend beyond campus borders, into a city famous for its forward-thinking approach to public health advocacy and community outreach. Read more
Our classrooms extend beyond campus borders, into a city famous for its forward-thinking approach to public health advocacy and community outreach.

An interprofessional degree for tomorrow's public health leaders. Study public health in classrooms that extend well beyond campus borders, into a city famous for its forward-thinking approach to public health advocacy and community outreach.

• Authoritative – CEPH-Accredited Program
• Flexible – Entry in Fall for On-Campus; Entry in Fall or Spring for Online Format
• Interprofessional – Award-Winning Faculty from Nursing, Law, and Public Health

The Master of Public Health (MPH) Program is an interprofessional degree offered by the School of Nursing and Health Professions through its Department of Population Health Sciences.

Candidates complete coursework in a myriad of fields, including epidemiology, biostatistics, community and behavioral health, environmental health, and public health policy and management.

The program is particularly well suited for candidates eager to develop practice-oriented skills and competencies to promote population health.

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COURSE OVERVIEW. *Subject to Validation. ● Work in partnership with students from other performing arts disciplines. ● Build your confidence and technical and critical skills. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

*Subject to Validation

● Work in partnership with students from other performing arts disciplines

● Build your confidence and technical and critical skills

● Option to complete an internship relevant to your specialism

Dance at Winchester focuses on the academic study of dance, preparing you for a career in teaching, lecturing, research, choreography, dance dramaturgy or dance facilitation. It is also suitable if you are a professional interested in honing your analytical and critical skills, out of a passion for the subject or in order to change career direction. The programme provides you with a firm grounding in the critical theories and dramaturgical structures of musical theatre that are necessary for analysing, critiquing, choreographing or facilitating dance practice. You are encouraged to engage with academic literature, case studies and each other by reflecting on your own experiences.

The suite of Masters programmes in the Department of Performing Arts draws together students on courses in Theatre Studies, Musical Theatre and Dance. You work together on modules in Critical Theories and Dramaturgy (Analysis and Composition) and in the optional intensive practical module, benefiting from interdisciplinary interactions, debates and discussions. Over the duration of the course, you develop skills in independent and critical learning, building your confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis, with the support of staff.

You specialise through your choice of optional module and through supervision of Research Preparation and Dissertation modules. Optional modules include Theatre Stories, Cultural Entrepreneurship, Performance Now, and Dance Facilitation. The programme can be taken entirely by distance/blended learning, but Intensive Practice, Extending the Voice, and Physical Skills 3 are only available on campus and may be subject to audition.

Careers

The course prepares you for a range of careers, including research, teaching in schools or at further and higher education levels, the entertainment industry, the performance sector and production-related work, and outreach and facilitatory roles in community and social care settings.

Intended employment route for graduates include:

• Research or archival based careers

• Teaching in schools, and at FE and HE levels

• Entertainment industry – criticism, dance dramaturgy etc.

• Performance sector and production related – dance, production support

• Community and social care settings - outreach and facilitatory roles

*'Validation' is the process by which the University approves a new programme to ensure that it provides a distinct, high-quality academic experience for students, that enables them to acquire the necessary academic knowledge, understanding, general and subject-specific skills required to pursue a graduate level career. In the unlikely event that a programme is not validated then we will do our best to find you an alternative programme within the University.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Start Dates: September 

Teaching takes place: Daytime

Distance learning available

The University aims to shape 'confident learners' by enabling students to develop the skills to excel in their studies here and be transferable to further studies or the employment market. Staff and students form a community of learners who, together and independently, seek to generate and exchange knowledge. Over the duration of the course, students develop independent and critical learning, building confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis with the support of staff. Students take responsibility for their own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time (i.e. lectures, seminars etc), students are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, personal tutors and the wide range of services to students within the University.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, Winchester.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes.

Further details on assessment types can be found by attending an open evening or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures section.



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COURSE OVERVIEW. Work in partnership with students from other performing arts disciplines. Build your confidence and technical and critical skills. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Work in partnership with students from other performing arts disciplines
  • Build your confidence and technical and critical skills
  • Option to complete an internship relevant to your specialism

Musical Theatre at Winchester focuses on the academic study of musical theatre, preparing you for a career in teaching, lecturing, research, reviewing, writing or direction. It is also suitable if you are a professional interested in honing your analytical and critical skills, out of a passion for the subject or in order to change career direction. The programme provides you with a firm grounding in the critical theories and dramaturgical structures of musical theatre that are necessary for analysing, critiquing, directing and composing musical theatre texts. You are encouraged to engage with academic literature, case studies and each other by reflecting on your own experiences.

The suite of Masters programmes in the Department of Performing Arts draws together students on courses in Theatre Studies, Musical Theatre and Dance. You work together on modules in Critical Theories and Dramaturgies (Analysis and Composition) and in the optional intensive practical module, benefiting from interdisciplinary interactions, debates and discussions. Over the duration of the course, you develop skills in independent and critical learning, building your confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis with the support of staff.

You specialise through your choice of optional module and through supervision of Research Preparation and Dissertation modules. Optional modules include Theatre Stories, Cultural Entrepreneurship, Performance Now, and British Theatre 1945–2015. The programme can be taken entirely by distance/blended learning, but Intensive Practice, Extending the Voice, and Physical Skills 3 are only available on campus and may be subject to audition.

The course prepares you for a range of careers, including research, teaching in schools or at further and higher education levels, the entertainment industry, the performance sector and production-related work, and outreach and facilitatory roles in community and social care settings.

Careers

These courses provide a solid foundation for careers in the performance industry, such as choreography, direction and dramaturgy; the entertainment industry such as criticism, literary management, marketing and education roles; teaching; research or archival-based careers; and social care settings including community outreach and facilitator roles.

Subject to validation

*Subject to validation

'Validation' is the process by which the University approves a new programme to ensure that it provides a distinct, high-quality academic experience for students, that enables them to acquire the necessary academic knowledge, understanding, general and subject-specific skills required to pursue a graduate level career. In the unlikely event that a programme is not validated then we will do our best to find you an alternative programme within the University.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World



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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice. Read more

Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to make a difference in the world, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, our suite of International Development MSc courses is for you.

Engaged with current debates in policy and practice and grounded in interdisciplinary social sciences, you will develop the tools and confidence to work towards creative solutions that address practical problems in strategic ways.

Four distinct pathways provide a choice of flexibility and breadth, or the chance to pursue a particular interest in greater depth.

Innovative learning approaches promote in-depth investigation of particular cases and issues. These will draw out connections and contradictions between different actors and analytical perspectives, across global, regional, national and local scales.

The opportunity of a placement, leading to a work-based project, will provide hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and approaches used in international development and humanitarian action, and their strengths and limitations
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied in work for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South
  • the ability to analyse the complex interaction of social, economic, political and environmental factors in shaping problems and proposed solutions
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Course pathways

MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action

The MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action pathway enables you to gain an in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response. You will also form a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice. You will learn how to interpret and evaluate research information and evidence on topics related to humanitarianism, conflict and development.

MSc International Development with Economics

The MSc International Development with Economics pathway covers the key economic concepts, theories and tools required to understand development issues, policies and practices, including those of heterodox and social economics. You will learn how to apply them to analyse specific development problems, such as through appropriate combinations of quantitative and qualitative methods.

MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability

The MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability pathway enables you to gain an interdisciplinary understanding of theories and concepts of social and environmental justice, wellbeing and sustainability. You will develop in-depth knowledge of people’s practical struggles globally and locally for a better life, and the forms of policy and politics that can support or frustrate these. You will also explore how integrated perspectives can capture the complex interactions between social and ecological systems. Additionally, you will consider areas of complementarity and the trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

Graduate prospects

This course provides an excellent background for those wishing to pursue an international development career and improve people’s lives.

You will be qualified to work in a wide variety of roles, including social research, public policy, public information and campaigning.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while others have stayed in academia, to complete doctoral studies.

Join our webinar

Join our webinar on Wednesday 31 January 2018 at 12:00-13.00 GMT.

During the webinar you will be able to find about:

  • course structure and content
  • teaching and assessment
  • studying with the University of Bath

There will also be an opportunity to put your questions to our staff.

Register for the webinar.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Management of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Economics for development
  • Social and environmental justice
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Global political economy
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.



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This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. Read more

This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. With a strong focus on practical music making and supported by an outstanding programme of workshops and performances by professional musicians, it offers an invaluable opportunity for composers to hone their skills and develop their personal voice.

What makes us distinctive?

  • Links to ensembles as an integral part of the course.
  • Interaction with the music profession, including the BBC Philharmonic and Manchester Camerata.
  • Opportunities to develop professional skills, for example through collaborating, rehearsing and networking with professional musicians; learning to arrange/orchestrate; undertaking outreach opportunities; and collaborating in the creation of performances.
  • Flexibility to develop your own compositional and research interests.
  • Close ties with electroacoustic composers in NOVARS, and the flexibility to combine electroacoustic course units with those for instrumental and vocal composition.
  • Integration into the active research culture of the University of Manchester, through research seminars, performance workshops and concerts.

In addition to the submission of a final Portfolio of Compositions , all instrumental and vocal composition students take the core course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Compositional Etudes. Optional course units normally include Contemporary Music Studies , Advanced Orchestration , Fixed Media and Interactive Music , Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound , Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). For further information about the content of individual course units, see Course Unit Details below.

SALC Placement offers students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. Placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in semester 2; they will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

Aims

This programme aims to:

  • Enable students to develop compositional techniques and professional skills appropriate to their creative needs.
  • Enable students to work with both student and professional performers toward the performance of recently composed prices.
  • Develop awareness of aesthetic, analytical and technical issues relating to contemporary Western art music.
  • Encourage students to discuss with clarity and conviction issues relating to contemporary music.
  • Enable students to compose several works worthy of public performance.
  • Equip students with skills appropriate to the development of further postgraduate study on MPhil and PhD programmes.

Special features

Our close links with in-house and Manchester-based ensembles allow us to guarantee that every student taking the MusM Composition programme will have their music performed and/or workshopped by professional ensembles, including the Quatuor Danel, Psappha, Trio Atem and the Manchester Camerata.

  • The Quatuor Danel enjoys a huge international reputation and their repertoire seemingly knows no limits. From early Haydn through Beethoven and Schubert, to neglected masterpieces from the Soviet Union, to white-knuckle rides through Ligeti, Xenakis and Lachenmann and premieres of new works by Manchester composers, our intrepid String Quartet-in-Residence regularly scales the summits of chamber music. Their visits to Manchester form a backbone of the university's concert series.
  • Psappha is one of this country's leading contemporary music ensembles, specialising in the performance of music by living composers and that of the 20th and 21st centuries . The ensemble has an extensive repertoire and a reputation for technical assurance and interpretive flair. Psappha has commissioned and premiered works by a wide range of composers, achieving particular notoriety for their performances of music by Peter Maxwell Davies.

In addition, MusM students frequently have their work performed by   the University of Manchester's new music ensemble.

Teaching and learning

The MusM degree consists of 180 credits in total, made up of four 30-credit taught course units and a 60-credit portfolio. Full-time students take two course units per semester; part-time students take one. Most course units are delivered via regular seminars and/or tutorials, supported where appropriate by practical workshops. The composition portfolio is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Each student meets regularly with their supervisor (for full-time students usually on a weekly basis during term-time, less frequently during vacations), allowing for in-depth exploration of ideas and intensive support for the various course units offered. Other members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultation during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units - all of which must be satisfactorily completed - are assessed by submission of compositions, coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The Composition Portfolio is created over the entire duration of study and is submitted at the end of the academic year (after the summer vacation). All work is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner.



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This MA course is for those interested in developing current practice of using theatre and drama in the community and education settings or of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system. Read more

ABOUT MA APPLIED THEATRE

This MA course is for those interested in developing current practice of using theatre and drama in the community and education settings or of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system.

The MA Applied Theatre encourages investigation into the possibilities and contradictions of drama and theatre practice as transformative and rehabilitative, and engages practically and critically with a range of theories and current practices.

Key features of the MA Applied Theatre are the exploration of theatre work in specific settings; key practices in applied theatre; project-based study examining specific professional work with a varied range of client groups; or specialising in working with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system.

This course develops knowledge of the ways in which drama and theatre are used to benefit a range of distinct groups that are key to today’s evolving cultural landscape. The course offers two specialist pathways: Drama in the Community and Drama Education or Drama and the Criminal Justice System. Each pathway is specifically designed to support current practice at work, or a particular field of interest in the developing landscape of applied theatre and drama in the UK. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own practice and
scholarship.

DRAMA IN THE COOMUNITY AND DRAMA EDUCATION PATHWAY

This pathway is for individuals wishing to develop current – or new – practice of using theatre and drama with people in a range of settings that may include schools, theatres, outreach departments, hospitals and prisons. Concerned with advanced enquiry into theatre for
change or education, this pathway enables students to situate their own emergent/developing practice within a wider understanding of the applied theatre field. Delivery of the course involves contributions and placement opportunities from prestigious key UK organisations.

DRAMA AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

This pathway is for individuals wishing to develop current – or new – practice of using theatre and drama with people whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system. Concerned with advanced enquiry into prison theatre, this pathway enables you to situate your
own emergent/developing practice within a wider understanding of the applied theatre field. Delivery of the course involves contributions and placement opportunities from prestigious key UK organisations.

ASSESSMENT

Each unit has a written and/or practical assessment. Submission of a dissertation addressing the student’s specialist area of interest.

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