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Masters Degrees (Organised Crime)

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This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism. Read more

This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of how science, engineering and a variety of professional disciplines can contribute to tackling organised crime and terrorism. By the end of the programme, they will be able to apply appropriate scientific principles and methods to security problems, think strategically to develop and implement countermeasures, and appreciate the complexity involved in the design and implementation of organised crime and terrorism threat-reduction technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students are required to complete five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising five core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), and which may lead to the MSc, is offered.

Core modules

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Qualitative Methods
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Cybercrime
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Risk and Contingency Planning
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity
  • Prevention and Disruption
  • Terrorism (UCL Political Science, not available for distance learning students)

NB: places for optional modules are awarded on a first-come first-served basis.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects and laboratory classes. Student performance is assessed through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the research project and dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism MSc

Careers

This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Police Officer, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Threat Assessor, Imperial Protective Service
  • Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Avon and Somerset Constabulary
  • Field Intelligence Officer, West Mercia Police
  • Intelligence Analyst, Cambridgeshire Constabulary

Employability

This programme equips students with the knowledge to develop operational strategies to counter organised crime and terrorism. This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This MSc programme is delivered by experienced practitioners and researchers working in counter-terrorism, intelligence, law enforcement, risk assessment and security technology. It boasts a unique multidisciplinary platform, being the only postgraduate programme of its kind in the world taught in a faculty of engineering sciences, integrating the cutting-edge of the social and engineering sciences in the security domain.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. Read more
In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. We draw on state-of-the-art research to address key critical issues surrounding organised criminality and terrorism in contemporary society.

We involve multi-level analyses of organised crime as a concept, alongside the impacts of urbanisation, migration and globalisation upon both the practice of crime and the ways in which we understand them. You address cutting-edge critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues relating to organised crime and terrorism. You explore topics including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of terrorism
-Globalisation and organised crime
-Security and the state
-The hacker ethic
-Human rights

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Employment opportunities for graduates of this course include careers in security, policing, research, intelligence and justice professions.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. It's one of few programmes worldwide to offer you the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them.

The degree is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The programme combines vocational and theoretical components. You'll study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

You'll also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. The degree also offers te chance to examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme is part of a wider commitment to addressing modern slavery and human trafficking through the work of the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, policy makers, police, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs. Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organised Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

An inaugural conference, which took place in February 2017, was the first of an annual event, organised by the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery. With the aim of using research to fill the knowledge and evidence gaps experienced by policymakers and practitioners, the conference provides a space to promote debate and encourage collaboration on addressing the subject of human trafficking and modern slavery, with contributions from UK and international experts. Discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers will identify evidence gaps and tailor research to these needs. All MA students will be encouraged to engage with and contribute to future conferences and may choose to evaluate the experience and learning as part of their assessed work.

Course Content

All modules are listed on the St Mary's website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/human-trafficking

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development.

It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Read more
This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology.

Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

What is so good about this course?

This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules. Choose from:

Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Language Learning

If you need to acquire or improve your foreign language skills to enhance your postgraduate studies, (e.g. to read texts in a native language), you can enrol on a Languages for All course free of charge.

Degree Combinations

International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime MLitt
International Security: European Union MLitt
International Security: Human Rights MLitt
International Security: International Relations MLitt
International Security: Middle East MLitt
International Security: Russia MLitt
International Security: South Asia MLitt
International Security: Terrorism MLitt

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in Janary or September.

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

- How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

- MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

- MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

- MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

- MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

- MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

- MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

- MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

- MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

- MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

Employability

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject. Read more

We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject.

Covering exciting contemporary issues within the criminal process, such as homicide investigation, the threat of global organised crime and fraud investigation the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in this competitive field.

The research methodology and dissertation modules aim to ensure that you receive training in a range of research skills; invaluable in both the professional and academic worlds.

Course detail

During the course, you will gain an understanding of key issues in criminal justice policy and the administration of justice.

You will study topics which will give you a specialised understanding of organised crime, the complex relationship between policing and public perception, the investigation of homicidein the UK and internationally, and you will develop a working knowledge of the techniques used in investigating fraud and money laundering.

Modules

• Contemporary Criminal Justice Issues

• Counter Terrorism Policing

• Investigating Financial Crime

• Homicide Investigation

• Organised Crime

• Research Methodology

• Dissertation.

Format

We use a wide range of teaching and learning methods to meet different learning styles and objectives. Our teaching strategy places you at the centre of the teaching and learning process in order to stimulate your interest so that you learn through involvement. We aim to encourage you to learn by your participation in well-structured learning activities.

During your MA studies, you can expect to benefit from small group lectures and workshops, class discussions with your peers and academics, and frequent formal and informal feedback on your ideas and your progress. Although postgraduate level study requires a significant amount of individual study outside of scheduled classes, you will be supported by staff, who will direct you to relevant resources and help guide your learning.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary between modules, but will comprise of a combination of coursework and examinations.

Career and study progression

A Criminology postgraduate degree can open the door to many exciting and rewarding careers. Some of the most popular careers include:

• police

• probation and prison officers

• private companies in the security industry

• in the court system

• administration of justice.

The skills you acquire on this postgraduate level course are also transferable and valued across many other sectors, such as:

• finance

• the charity sector

• the civil service

• the public sector

• the public services.

Research study enables you to specialise in the field you are passionate about.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. Read more
This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. It will engage with both the war on terror, but also the response to terrorism, militarily, as well as in the intelligence world.

Why study International Security at Dundee?

This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

[What's so good about International Security at Dundee?]]
This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules.

Choose from:
Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Teaching & Assessment

The teaching team are based in Politics at Dundee, in the School of Humanities. Politics is big enough to have a real international presence, but is still small and intimate enough to offer a friendly and responsive home for students from all backgrounds. This is more than a mere claim - independent surveys consistently rate Politics at Dundee as among the best-received programmes in the country.

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in January or September. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more

This MSc provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to better apply science to understand crime problems, develop strategies for preventing them, and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Preventing Crimes
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose four of the following:

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Cybercrime
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of datasets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through lab and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Crime Science MSc

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, police and Ministry of Defence, or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Intern, OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe
  • Detective Constable, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Forensic Associate, Deloitte
  • Research Assistant, Universiti Brunei Darussalam
  • Client Service Representative, Ministry of the Attorney General

Employability

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Security & Crime Science is a world-first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

The Crime Science MSc is a multidisciplinary degree, drawing on expertise in psychology, social science, statistics, mathematics, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. Read more

This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of how science and scientifically-based techniques can deliver immediate and sustainable reductions in crime. The programme focuses on how to apply science better to understand crime problems, develop investigative strategies for preventing them and increase the probability of detecting and arresting offenders.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to apply scientific principles to crime control, think more strategically in developing and implementing crime control policies, appreciate the complexity of implementation issues, critically assess the likely impact of planned crime reduction initiatives and generate more innovative proposals for reducing particular crime problems.

This programme can be taken as classroom based (full time or flexible) or by distance learning. Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits).

Core modules

  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Preventing Crimes
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Qualitative Methods
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Prevention and Disruption

Dissertation/report

Not applicable.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects, laboratory classes, and practical exercises. Practical work will involve the analysis and interpretation of datasets, and the development of new ideas for solving problems. Assessment is through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examinations, coursework and presentations.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Security and Crime Science PG Cert

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Many graduates now work in the field of crime prevention and detection for public sector employers such as the Home Office, police and Ministry of Defence (MOD), or private sector companies with a crime prevention and community safety focus. Other graduates go on to further doctoral research.

Employability

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Security & Crime Science is a world first, devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

Crime science is supported by the police, forensic psychologists, applied criminologists, economists, architects, statisticians and geographers, and has been strongly endorsed by the government.

This multidisciplinary programme draws on expertise in psychology, geography, criminology, philosophy and a range of forensic sciences. Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.



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The MSc in Policing is aimed at police and law enforcement professionals wishing to become future leaders and managers. Read more

The MSc in Policing is aimed at police and law enforcement professionals wishing to become future leaders and managers. The focus is on providing an evidence-based approach to address modern challenges of policing diverse communities and dealing with transnational organised crime, terrorism, cybercrime and evolving security threats, while upholding principles of procedural justice to increase police legitimacy and public confidence.

About this degree

The programme will outline the philosophical and theoretical bases for evidence-based policing practice. Issues will be examined with respect to ethical, policy and political contexts. It is a multidisciplinary programme drawing on psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, architecture, forensic sciences, design, geography and computing and is designed to enable graduates to be effective leaders and managers of a modern diverse police service.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Ethical Policing
  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Police and the Public
  • Models of Policing for Crime Reduction
  • Quantitative Methods or Designing and Doing Research (you will take one of these)
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Investigation and Detection
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Management Skills for Police Leaders
  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Prevention and Disruption
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity
  • Cybercrime
  • Hotspot Policing

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops. Distance learning students will have access to enhanced Internet-based tools and resources and virtual links between staff and students. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework, presentations, reports and project assignments.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Policing MSc

Funding

UCL Security & Crime Science is offering up to 14 bursary scholarships of between £2,500 and £10,000 to outstanding applicants who have been offered places on one of our MSc programmes. Further information is available on the departmental website.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

The programme will enable students to gain the skills to conduct rigorous analysis, use evidence-based approaches and develop a scientific approach as well as the ability to make sound policy decisions, and to become leaders in modern police forces. Graduates who are serving police officers will gain analytical and other critical skills to progress in their current career. It is likely to lead to further future careers opportunities in:

  • law enforcement
  • security industry related companies
  • government policy advisory roles
  • strategic advisors to government and security agencies.

Employability

The programme is offered mainly to serving police and security personnel with the aim of equipping them to become future leaders and managers. The focus on an evidence-based approach will enable practitioners to become professionals by adopting a scientific approach to effectively tackle crime, security, and law and order problems. The programme aims to enhance strategic thinking skills as well as management and effective leadership skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This programme’s practical and pragmatic approach to shaping successful and forward-thinking practitioners will have great appeal and offers excellent value to police organisations and governments wishing to invest in future leaders.

Seminars and a diverse international student cohort will provide excellent networking opportunities.



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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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Overview. Criminology can be described as the study of crime, criminals and the criminal justice system. The MA in Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice gives students the opportunity to develop a specialist knowledge of debates around crime causation and control, within a comparative and international context. Read more

Overview

Criminology can be described as the study of crime, criminals and the criminal justice system. The MA in Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice gives students the opportunity to develop a specialist knowledge of debates around crime causation and control, within a comparative and international context. Students undertake a wide variety of modules which aim to combine theoretical concepts with real-world problems such as terrorism and organised crime.

As a student in Maynooth you will be part of our vibrant community of students and scholars working in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. Our expert academic team, drawing on their extensive research and professional experience, deliver an interdisciplinary programme with a strong emphasis on enhanced research skills. These skills are highly sought-after by employers in the area. There is a strong focus on employability throughout the programme, including opportunities for student placements with criminal justice organisations and civil society.

In addition to the range of optional modules, the core modules were essential to the development of my research and oral presentation skills. Unlike other postgraduate degrees, this MA boasts entire modules specifically designed to expand students' research skills. The range of diverse backgrounds of those attracted to the study of criminology meant that topics in class could be discussed from various approaches, whether it be legal, sociological, anthropological, philosophical etc. 

This MA prepares you for whatever you want to do after graduation, whether that be further research, or entering the workforce."

Pamela Drumgoole, MA (Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice)

Course Structure

Criminology can be described as the study of crime, criminals and the criminal justice system. The MA in Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice gives students the opportunity to develop a specialist knowledge of debates around crime causation and control, within a comparative and international context. Students undertake a wide variety of modules which aim to combine theoretical concepts with real-world problems such as terrorism and organised crime.

As a student in Maynooth you will be part of our vibrant community of students and scholars working in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. Our expert academic team, drawing on their extensive research and professional experience, deliver an interdisciplinary programme with a strong emphasis on enhanced research skills. These skills are highly sought-after by employers in the area. There is a strong focus on employability throughout the programme, including opportunities for student placements with criminal justice organisations and civil society.

In addition to the range of optional modules, the core modules were essential to the development of my research and oral presentation skills. Unlike other postgraduate degrees, this MA boasts entire modules specifically designed to expand students' research skills. The range of diverse backgrounds of those attracted to the study of criminology meant that topics in class could be discussed from various approaches, whether it be legal, sociological, anthropological, philosophical etc. 

This MA prepares you for whatever you want to do after graduation, whether that be further research, or entering the workforce."

Pamela Drumgoole, MA (Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice)

Commences

September



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In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS). Read more
In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Programme Content

In the light of the close inter-relationship of international criminal justice and human rights, the International Criminal Justice & Human Rights programme offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of both these areas of law. The international criminal justice side of the programme sets out to provide students with a detailed understanding of contemporary issues relating to international criminal justice. Organised crime, terrorist threats and internal civil wars transcend national boundaries, impacting far beyond the interests of individual nation states. The effective detection, investigation and prosecution of crime are now dependent upon increased harmonisation and co-operation amongst global institutions. It is therefore no longer helpful or sufficient to confine the study of criminal justice to narrow jurisdictional confines. Similarly, the human rights dimension of the programme seeks to develop students' understanding of the main global and regional systems for the protection of human rights, as well as their appreciation of a selection of major issues of controversy in contemporary human rights law.

The programme offers five modules

Individual Criminal Liability in International Law focuses on the principles of individual liability and procedures in regard to the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Transnational Crime and Counter-Terrorism considers the impact of the international response to organised crime and terrorism on traditional liberties and fundamental tenets such as freedom from torture, coercion and oppression in the state's pursuit of criminal investigations. It examines the judicial response to the admissibility of evidence obtained by torture into the legal process and explores the developing tensions between human rights and the duty of governments to protect their citizens from attack by organised terrorist networks.

UN Human Rights Law introduces students to the major UN human rights treaties and the other UN mechanisms for the protection and promotion of human rights. Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Africa, America, and Europe focuses on three advanced regional legal systems governing and affecting fundamental rights, examining their constituting treaties and associated institutions. Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations seeks to promote students' understanding of human rights at a conceptual level by considering the issue of the universality of human rights in the light of varying cultural traditions from across the globe.

Methods of Assessment

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

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The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries. Read more
The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries.

-Commences January 2017
-Discover how policing is carried out across geographical boundaries
-Explore policing issues arising from differing jurisdictions, policies and procedures
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent career opportunities across the criminal justice system and international policing organisations
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

his MSc gives you the rare opportunity to pursue academic interests in policing from an international and transnational perspective in a nurturing and multi-disciplinary environment.

​Under the guidance of specialist supervision and among a diverse community of fellow researchers, you will gain a valuable foundation, building skills in research, analysis, conceptualisation, argument and presentation – all highly prized in many areas of employment.

The programme combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.

Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

International and Transnational Policing

Develop your critical understanding of different policing jurisdictions and the agencies that work within them by examining International Legal Instruments and broader issues, including Human Rights

Transnational and Organised Crime

Identify the origin and development of internal and transnational policing cooperation, and examine the impacts of organised crime in areas such as human trafficking, modern slavery, drugs and corruption

Policing in Conflict and Post-Conflict Zones

Critically examine and develop an understanding of the key strategies that are current and relevant in the policing of conflict/post-conflict zones

Terrorism

Understand key concepts in relation to terrorism by exploring a number of issues including, definitions of terrorism, ideologies, typology, methods of operation, state response and impact of the media

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Course overview. The MA in Criminology offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is academically rigorous and gives you the skills to pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and security. . Read more

Course overview

The MA in Criminology offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is academically rigorous and gives you the skills to pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and security. 

Global security, organised crime, terrorism and online security are emerging as the key issues in the 21st century justice system and the University of West London is one of very few universities in the UK to offer a specialised suite of courses in this area. 

Why choose this course?

This course is for you if you want to graduate with a general MA in Criminology and you would like a more flexible choice of modules than those offered on our three specialist pathways.

The course includes the following core modules to give you an excellent grounding in criminological issues at Masters level:

  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation
  • Theories of Criminal Behaviour
  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice

A choice of optional modules is also available (see 'course details' for more information).

As well as providing students with subject specific knowledge and understanding, we aim to produce graduates with strong transferable skills in:

  • research
  • communication
  • analysis
  • creative problem solving

This ensures you are well-placed to seek employment with in relevant sectors.

Modules

Semester 1:

  • Criminological Theory (core)
  • Research Methods (core)
  • One option from the following: Cybercrime and Internet Policing, International and European Criminal Law, Transnational Organised Crime

Semester 2:

  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice (core)
  • Dissertation (core) 
  • One option from the following: Financial Crime, Transitional Justice, Counter-terrorism

Career and Study Progression

This course will particularly suit students who are interested in careers in the following areas:

  • Policing and police research
  • National Offender Management Service
  • Crown Prosecution Service
  • Home Office
  • Intelligence Services
  • Policy development
  • Digital / global security
  • Further study on an MPhil / PhD programme

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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