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Masters Degrees (Organic Electronics)

We have 17 Masters Degrees (Organic Electronics)

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The Master’s programme Organic Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry provides knowledge on the design, synthesis and evaluation of low-weight organic substances. Read more

The Master’s programme Organic Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry provides knowledge on the design, synthesis and evaluation of low-weight organic substances. It also covers protein chemistry and biomolecular design, preparing you for a career in the pharmaceutical industry.

Biologically active substances with low molecular weight represent the core of life-science research. Knowledge of molecular structures and their properties are crucial to our understanding of vast scientific areas, from pharmaceutically active compounds in designer drugs to organic electronics and their incorporation into diagnostic tools such as biosensors. Our research facilities are well equipped with all the necessary analytical and diagnostic tools found in industrial research facilities, which will advance your practical capabilities.

Organic and medicinal chemistry

This master’s programme aims to provide students with knowledge on the design, synthesis and evaluation of low molecular weight biologically active organic substances. The programme begins with courses in organic chemistry and organic synthesis, building from the basic concepts to the advanced level, followed by an introduction in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology. It also covers protein chemistry and biomolecular design, which broadens your knowledge in the field of bio-organic chemistry. A key part of the programme is a one-year degree project, undertaken either in a research group at LiU or in industry.



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The School of Electronic Engineering at Bangor is ranked as 2nd in the UK for research by the UK Government in its most recent Research Assessment Exercise and as such the School houses academics, researchers and students of international standing. Read more
The School of Electronic Engineering at Bangor is ranked as 2nd in the UK for research by the UK Government in its most recent Research Assessment Exercise and as such the School houses academics, researchers and students of international standing. The School offers an MRes programme in Electronic Engineering, with a variety of specialist areas of study available. Each programme is aligned to the research conducted within the School:

MRes Electronic Engineering Optoelectronics
MRes Electronic Engineering Optical Communications
MRes Electronic Engineering Organic Electronics
MRes Electronic Engineering Polymer Electronics
MRes Electronic Engineering Micromachining
MRes Electronic Engineering Nanotechnology
MRes Electronic Engineering VLSI Design
MRes Electronic Engineering Bio-Electronics

The MRes programme provides a dedicated route for high-calibre students who (may have a specific research aim in mind) are ready to carry out independent research leading to PhD level study or who are seeking a stand alone research based qualification suitable for a career in research with transferable skills for graduate employment.
It is the normal expectation that the independent research thesis (120 credits) should be of at a publishable standard in a high quality peer reviewed journal.
The MRes programme is a full-time one year course consisting of 60 taught credits at the beginning of the programme which lead on to the 120 credit thesis.
Each MRes shares the taught element of the course, after successful completion of the taught element students are then able to specialise in a specific subject for their thesis.
The taught provision has four distinct 15 credit modules that concentrate on specific generic skill.

Modelling and Design
Focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.

Introduction to Nanotechnology and Microsystems
Focuses on the device fabrication techniques at the nano and micro scale, as well as introducing some of the diagnostic tools available to test the quality and characteristics of devices.

Project Planning
Focuses on the skills required to scope, plan, execute and report the
outcomes of a business and research project.

Mini Project
Focuses on applying the skills and techniques to a mini project, whose theme will form the basis of the substantive research project.
MRes Research Project: After the successful completions of the taught component of the programme, the major individual thesis will be undertaken within the world-leading research groups of the School.
Student Study Support
All students are assigned a designated supervisor, an academic member of staff who will provide formal supervision and support on a daily basis.
The School’s Director of Graduate Studies will ensure that the appropriate level of support and guidance is available for all postgraduate students, and each Course Director is available to help and advise their students as and when required.

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The PCCP program aims to integrate Master students within academic and industrial fields of fundamental physical chemistry. Read more

The PCCP program aims to integrate Master students within academic and industrial fields of fundamental physical chemistry. Various aspects are concerned: study of matter and its transformations, analysis and control of physical and chemical processes, light-matter interactions and spectroscopy techniques, modelling of physical and chemical processes from molecular to macroscopic scale. Applications cover scientific fields ranging from nanotechnologies, photonics, optoelectronics and organic electronics, to environmental sensors and detection systems.

The PCCP Master is supported by high-level educational and research partners, represented by the consortium of universities engaged in the program. Students follow their courses within a challenging, international environment. Annual summer schools, organized by the consortium partners, complete the students’ training by offering a focus on several topics relative to PCCP.

Program structure

The first year of the Master degree is focused on the fundamental aspects of Physical Chemistry (thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, spectroscopy and numerical tools). International aspects of the program are introduced progressively during the first year, with some courses taught in English. A remote research project is also programmed to promote collaboration between students of the partner universities within the context of international scientific project management.

The second year is dedicated to specialized topics (advanced spectroscopy and imaging, photonics, computational chemistry, environmental sciences). All courses are taught in English and international mobility is mandatory (at least during the second semester for the Master thesis work), thus strengthening the international dimension of the degree. Numerous mutualized lectures are carried out featuring high-level, local research activity. Practical aspects are emphasized to favor the future integration of the student within the working world. 

Master students following the specific UBx-USFQ double degree program spend between five and nine months in Quito (Ecuador) to complete the Master thesis. During this period, assistant professor positions at the USFQ are available for Master students of the program. 

Year 1: Courses are in French, except when international students are attending.

  • Numerical methods (6 ECTS)
  • Thermodynamics (6 ECTS)
  • Quantum mechanics (6 ECTS)
  • Inorganic materials or structural analysis (6 ECTS)
  • Theory of chemical bond (6 ECTS)
  • Solid state physics (6 ECTS)
  • Analytical chemistry (6 ECTS)
  • Spectroscopy (6 ECTS)
  • Quantum Chemistry and molecular simulation (6 ECTS)
  • Remote research project/English (6 ECTS)

Year 2: Courses are in English.

  • Photonics, lasers and imaging (6 ECTS)
  • Dielectric and magnetic properties (6 ECTS)
  • Large scale facilities or auto-assembly, polymers and surfactants, or hybrid and nano-materials (6 ECTS)
  • Computational chemistry or energy, communication and information (6 ECTS)
  • Research project/English (6 ECTS)
  • Professional project (6 ECTS)
  • Master thesis/internship in one of the universities of the consortium (24 ECTS)

Strengths of this Master program

  • High-level educational and research environment, proposed by the partner institutions.
  • Master students acquire project management skills at an international level.
  • Mobility during the second year offers access to a wide range of courses and training.
  • International mobility facilitates integration within both academic and industrial domains.
  • Supported by the International Master program of the Bordeaux “Initiative of Excellence” program.

After this Master program?

After graduation, students are fully prepared to pursue doctoral studies and a career in research. They may also work as scientists or R&D engineers within the industrial field.

Associated business sectors:

  • Chemical analysis
  • Chemistry of the atmosphere and environmental science
  • Energy and photovoltaic technologies
  • Nanotechnologies
  • Aeronautics and space
  • Chemical industries, pharmaceutical technologies
  • Fine chemicals and cosmetics
  • Forensic science and artwork restoration
  • Molecular modeling and simulation

Academic research domains:

  • Spectroscopy/analytical chemistry
  • Astrochemistry
  • Properties of materials, solid state physics, reactivity at the interfaces
  • Nanotechnology
  • Imaging, bio-detection
  • Organic electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics
  • Theoretical chemistry, molecular modeling and simulation etc.

Other possible activities:

  • Teaching, education and dissemination of scientific knowledge
  • Linking public and private actors in research, development and marketing
  • Participating in the purchase and investment of scientific equipment


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Oxford’s MSc in Microelectronics, Optoelectronics and Communications offers a fantastic opportunity to study a part-time engineering conversion course, helping students to gain the key skills needed to embark on an engineering career. Read more
Oxford’s MSc in Microelectronics, Optoelectronics and Communications offers a fantastic opportunity to study a part-time engineering conversion course, helping students to gain the key skills needed to embark on an engineering career. The course is designed to fit around busy working schedules, and offers both foundational and advanced modules in the three sub-disciplines.

This conversion course aims to provide students with all the essential transferrable skills and analytical abilities needed to progress in the engineering sector.

This is a joint programme drawing on the Department of Engineering Science's research expertise with the flexible learning approach offered by the Department for Continuing Education's Continuing Professional Development Centre.

Topics

Fundamentals of Microelectronics and Communications
Advanced Microelectronics
Wireless Communications
Fundamentals of Optoelectronic Devices and Applied Optics
Optical Communications
Engineering in Society or
Organic Electronics and Nanotechnology for Optoelectronic Devices

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Degree. Master of Science (two years) with a major in Applied Physics or Master of Science (two years) with a major in Physics. Teaching language. Read more

Degree: Master of Science (two years) with a major in Applied Physics or Master of Science (two years) with a major in Physics

Teaching language: English

The Material Physics and Nanotechnology master's programme provides students with specialist knowledge in the area of new materials. Huge advances in modern technology and products in recent decades have to a large extent relied on developments in this field.

The importance of advanced materials in today’s technology is best exemplified by the highly purified semiconductor crystals that are the basis of the electronic age. Future implementations and applications of materials in electronics and photonics involve such subjects as nano-scale physics, molecular electronics and non-linear optics.

With support from internationally competitive research activities in materials physics at Linköping University, the programme has been established with distinct features that offer students high‑level interdisciplinary education and training in fundamental solid state physics and materials science within the following areas:

  • Electronic materials and devices
  • Surface and nano-sciences
  • Theory and modelling of materials
  • Organic/molecular electronics and sensors.

Advanced equipment training

The programme emphasises the comprehension of scientific principles and the development of personal and professional skills in solving practical engineering problems. Studies begin with mandatory courses, including nanotechnology, quantum mechanics, surface physics and the physics of condensed matter, in order to provide students with a solid knowledge foundation for modern materials science and nanotechnology. Moreover, through courses in experimental physics and analytical methods in materials science, students gain extensive training in operating the advanced instruments and equipment currently used in the research and development of new materials.

In-depth CDIO courses

A variety of elective courses is offered from the second term onwards, many of them involving the use of cutting-edge technology. These courses give students a broad perspective of today’s materials science research and links to applications in semiconductor technology, optoelectronics, bioengineering (biocompatibility), chemical sensors and biosensors, and mechanical applications for high hardness and elasticity. Students will also be instructed through in-depth CDIO (Conceive – Design – Implement – Operate) project courses, to develop abilities in creative thinking and problem solving.

Students complete a thesis project in the area of materials science and nanotechnology, either with an in-house research group or the industry.



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This course is designed with industry in mind. We have also partnered with Engineering Materials and Physics to encompass the breadth of modern polymer science and technology. Read more

About the course

This course is designed with industry in mind. We have also partnered with Engineering Materials and Physics to encompass the breadth of modern polymer science and technology. You’ll become the kind of high-calibre polymer science graduate needed to develop new products and processes in a variety of industries.

Through a combination of theory and practice, we’ll teach you about polymer synthesis, physics, characterisation and the latest developments in polymer research. When you design and conduct your own extended research project, you can look in more detail at the areas you’re most interested in and learn how to communicate your science to the chemical community.

Your future

Our graduates are highly valued in the chemical and pharmaceutical sector. They work all over the world for companies including AkzoNobel, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Corus, Dow Chemicals, GSK, Smith and Nephew and Syngenta. Many move on to PhD study, then careers in research or teaching.

Chemistry is vital to the way we live. It helps power industry and drive economic growth. Polymer science contributes to advances in everything from biology to engineering and medicine. As a researcher in industry or academia you could be involved in work that improves lives and changes the way we see the world.

Learn from world-class research

Top-quality research directly informs our teaching. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rates 98 per cent of our work world-class or internationally excellent. You’ll learn about the very latest developments from experts in theory and spectroscopy, synthesis, analytical science, chemical biology and materials.

Labs, equipment and training

We’ll train you to use our modern analytical instrumentation. We have NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, x-ray crystallography, polymer characterisation methods and advanced microscopy. We also have a team of technicians to assist with spectroscopic services. There are labs for molecular biology, protein chemistry, polymer/colloid synthesis and materials characterisation.

Core modules

Fundamental Polymer Chemistry; The Physics of Polymers; Biopolymers and Biomaterials; Polymer Characterisation and Analysis; Research and Presentation Skills and Polymer Laboratory Skills; Extended Research Project.

Examples of optional modules

Smart Polymers and Polymeric Materials; Polymers with Controlled Structures; Design and Manufacture of Composites; Polymer Fibre Composite Materials; Macromolecules at Interfaces and Structured Organic Films; Electronics and Photonics.

Teaching and assessment

We use a mixture of lectures, practicals, workshops and individual research projects. The optional modules in the second semester enable you to specialise in two specific areas of polymer science. You can also tailor your research project to your particular interests.

For all taught modules, written exams contribute 75 per cent towards your final grade. The other 25 per cent comes from continuous assessment, which might include essays on specialised topics or assessed workshops. You also produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Your research project

This can be based in an academic group at the University, or in industry. If it’s industry- based, the topic is usually suggested by the company you’re working with. You may be expected to liaise closely with the company to organise your project.

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Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources. Read more
Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources.

We can supervise MPhil projects in topics that relate to our main areas of research, which are:

Bio-energy

Our research spans the whole supply chain:
-Growing novel feedstocks (various biomass crops, algae etc)
-Processing feedstocks in novel ways
-Converting feedstocks into fuels and chemical feedstocks
-Developing new engines to use the products

Cockle Park Farm has an innovative anaerobic digestion facility. Work at the farm will develop, integrate and exploit technologies associated with the generation and efficient utilisation of renewable energy from land-based resources, including biomass, biofuel and agricultural residues.

We also develop novel technologies for gasification and pyrolysis. This large multidisciplinary project brings together expertise in agronomy, land use and social science with process technologists and engineers and is complemented by molecular studies on the biology of non-edible oilseeds as sources for production of biodiesel.

Novel geo-energy

New ways of obtaining clean energy from the geosphere is a vital area of research, particularly given current concerns over the limited remaining resources of fossil fuels.

Newcastle University has been awarded a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for its world-renowned Hydrogeochemical Engineering Research and Outreach (HERO) programme. Building on this record of excellence, the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research seeks to place the North East at the forefront of research in ground-source heat pump systems, and other larger-scale sources of essentially carbon-free geothermal energy, and developing more responsible modes of fossil fuel use.

Our fossil fuel research encompasses both the use of a novel microbial process, recently patented by Newcastle University, to convert heavy oil (and, by extension, coal) to methane, and the coupling of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to underground coal gasification (UCG) using directionally drilled boreholes. This hybrid technology (UCG-CCS) is exceptionally well suited to early development in the North East, which still has 75% of its total coal resources in place.

Sustainable power

We undertake fundamental and applied research into various aspects of power generation and energy systems, including:
-The application of alternative fuels such as hydrogen and biofuels to engines and dual fuel engines
-Domestic combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling, heating and power (trigeneration) systems using waste vegetable oil and/or raw inedible oils
-Biowaste methanisation
-Biomass and biowaste combustion, gasification
-Biomass co-combustion with coal in thermal power plants
-CO2 capture and storage for thermal power systems
-Trigeneration with novel energy storage systems (including the storage of electrical energy, heat and cooling energy)
-Engine and power plant emissions monitoring and reduction technology
-Novel engine configurations such as free-piston engines and the reciprocating Joule cycle engine

Fuel cell and hydrogen technologies

We are recognised as world leaders in hydrogen storage research. Our work covers the entire range of fuel cell technologies, from high-temperature hydrogen cells to low-temperature microbial fuel cells, and addresses some of the complex challenges which are slowing the uptake and impact of fuel cell technology.

Key areas of research include:
-Biomineralisation
-Liquid organic hydrides
-Adsorption onto solid phase, nano-porous metallo-carbon complexes

Sustainable development and use of key resources

Our research in this area has resulted in the development and commercialisation of novel gasifier technology for hydrogen production and subsequent energy generation.

We have developed ways to produce alternative fuels, in particular a novel biodiesel pilot plant that has attracted an Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) AspenTech Innovative Business Practice Award.

Major funding has been awarded for the development of fuel cells for commercial application and this has led to both patent activity and highly-cited research. Newcastle is a key member of the SUPERGEN Fuel Cell Consortium. Significant developments have been made in fuel cell modelling, membrane technology, anode development and catalyst and fuel cell performance improvements.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student you will be based in the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research. Depending on your chosen area of study, you may also work with one or more of our partner schools, providing you with a unique and personally designed training and supervision programme.

You have access to:
-A modern open-plan office environment
-A full range of chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and marine engineering laboratories
-Dedicated desk and PC facilities for each student within the research centre or partner schools

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Employability is central to this postgraduate course, which provides a broad perspective of analytical techniques covering both the analysis of organic and inorganic analytes in both liquid and solid form. Read more
Employability is central to this postgraduate course, which provides a broad perspective of analytical techniques covering both the analysis of organic and inorganic analytes in both liquid and solid form. Career opportunities are therefore maximised across the broadest possible range of employers within the chemicals sector and related industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to micro-electronics.

The fundamental ethos of the Instrumental Analysis course is to underpin the theoretical knowledge gained within the class room with extensive laboratory sessions. This cumulates in an 80 credit project where you will have the opportunity to specialise in various areas of instrumental analysis. This course will appeal to graduates from chemistry, chemical physics and other related disciplines.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Computing Facilities are available in the general computing suites found within the building and throughout campus. Extensive Resources are available to support your studies provided by Learning & Information Services (LIS) – library and IT staff. You are advised to take advantage of the free training sessions designed to enable you to gain all the skills you need for your research and study.

LIS provide access to a huge range of electronic resources – e-journals and databases, e-books, images and texts.

Course and module materials are not provided in ‘hard copy’ format, however, wherever practicable, lecture notes and/or presentations, seminar materials, assignment briefs and materials and other relevant information and resources are made available in electronic form via eLearn. This is the brand name for the on-line Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that the University uses to support and enhance teaching and learning.

You can access the eLearn spaces for the course and modules that they are registered for. Once logged into your eLearn area you can access material from the course and all of the modules you are studying without having to log in to each module separately.

The modules are assessed by both coursework and examination. To ensure that you do not have an excessive amount of assessment at any one time, the coursework assessment will take place uniformly throughout the course.

OPPORTUNITIES

The course is designed to equip you with the skills, knowledge and understanding to work in any analytical chemistry environment.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Semester 1 of the course is designed to ensure that you have the basic skills needed to obtain an MSc. It is important that you enhance the skills you have that will be of benefit when you gain employment after the course. The main skills that you will enhance will be presentational skills, report writing, independent working and problem solving.

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