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This MA looks at contemporary changes in media and communications, by putting into perspective the transformations that affect the way people live and work, national and international institutions evolve, and how cultural practices develop. Read more

This MA looks at contemporary changes in media and communications, by putting into perspective the transformations that affect the way people live and work, national and international institutions evolve, and how cultural practices develop.

This programme's internationally acclaimed and comparative approach to the events, issues and debates of our times is particularly suited for those interested in exploring the bigger picture as well as the nitty-gritty of transformations in media and communications and their impact on culture, society and politics.

Its cutting-edge and interdisciplinary approach to postgraduate learning, independent study, and life skills provides you with the analytical skills, conceptual knowledge and practical understanding of the real and imagined shifts that are taking place in – and through – the media industries, everyday life online and on the ground at home and abroad. 

The Masters attracts budding scholars, media practitioners, activists, and advocates from many regions, with a variety of educational and professional backgrounds.

It's particularly suitable for those wanting to move their knowledge and analytical skills up a level for further study as well as for those who have experience of studying or working in the media and cultural sectors, non-profits and other third sector organisations, alternative media, the arts, grassroots and international advocacy and activism.

The programme achieves these goals by:

  • exploring the challenges traditional media sectors face as news, entertainment, and services go global and converge on the web
  • critically studying the past, present, and future of the internet and information and communications technologies
  • examining changes to communicative cultures, media production, and services in a ‘post-Web 2.0’ context
  • thinking about how ordinary people, businesses, governments, and multilateral institutions (mis)use ICT
  • looking more closely at how local communities, governments, and transnational corporations look to influence media futures
  • researching differences in how people, cultures, and countries access and use media and communicate across borders
  • debating the implications of the digital divide, media censorship, and digital surveillance by governmental and commercial agencies
  • reading, watching, and hearing how artists, creative entrepreneurs, power elites and ordinary people respond to technological and social change

The Programme Director is Professor Marianne Franklin. Lecturers, guest speakers, and research students on this programme are affiliated to the Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy, the School of Mass Communications at Texas Tech University (USA), the United Nations Internet Governance ForumEdinburgh Law SchoolLe Monde diplomatique, a number of international NGOs, activist and advocacy groups, international academic and media networks.

Modules & structure

The programme is broken into three parts:

  • core modules
  • option modules (where students can devise their own specialisations)
  • dissertation

The themes covered may vary from year to year, depending on research developments and staff availability.

Along with two compulsory (core) modules, research skills module, and a research dissertation, you can choose from a range of theory and practice option modules from Media & Communications as well as other Goldsmiths departments.

Distinguishing Features: this programme's content, structure, and assessment takes an interdisciplinary and innovative approach to:

  • reading, thinking and articulating challenging ideas
  • conducting individual and collaborative research
  • accessing and contributing to current debates
  • incorporating practitioner and activist perspectives
  • teaching and learning that is both research-led and student-inspired
  • supporting excellence in individual and group projects 

Activities: Based on an interactive communication model of learning and teaching, the core programme is organised around lectures, participatory workshops, student presentations, written work, informed debates.

  • It features guest speakers from around the world and various media and communications domains.
  • It involves students in creating their own media-based projects, such as our prize-winning live Video Conference event with international partners.
  • It looks to foster original research dissertation work, formal presentation and collaborative skills.
  • It provides instruction in the fundamentals of designing and successfully completing an independent research dissertation project alongside one to one supervision and workshops

On completing this programme you will be able to (re)enter the workplace, return to your creative pursuits, activism, or advocacy project or, if you wish, continue onto further research with up-to-date knowledge about the facts and fictions around these trends.

Core modules

You also take: 

Research Skills (60 credits)

As an integral part of successfully completing the Dissertation component, students take part in a two-term Research Skills module. Here we cover topics such as: 

  • research design and planning - from start to finish
  • deciding on a topic/research question formulation
  • finding and using the literature at an advanced level
  • selected data-gathering and analysis across the arts, humanities, and social science spectrum
  • academic thinking, writing, and presentation
  • citation formats, ethics that matter, and the theory-method relationship from several angles
  • coping with stress, being creative, and originality

By term’s end students will be fine-tuning their individual research projects, contributing to our study of these themes in class presentations. Workshops and one to one supervision will provide further support for students until the end of the summer teaching term.

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. 

Assessment

Individual and group presentations; live video/web conferences, examined essays and research papers; qualitatively assessed assignments and discussion leading; dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from this programme find work and excel in a number of domains:

  • national and global media corporations
  • government departments
  • global news & broadcasting
  • online media
  • PR and advertising
  • NGOs and non-profits
  • intergovernmental organizations
  • the entertainment industry
  • the arts and cultural sectors

Alumni have found work with the BBC world service, Globo corporation, Carnegie Foundation, European parliament and European Commission, CCTV, NBC, Google, Microsoft, NGOs (eg Greenpeace, Global Partners) and charities (eg Dementia UK), newspapers (eg in South Korea, Brazil, Slovenia, China), alternative media and advocacy networks, museums, theatres and art gallerires, online national and international media outlets (eg Chinese, indigenous Taiwanese), PR and marketing around the world.

Other alumni have continued on to PhD programmes, at Goldsmiths and elsewhere. Many have been successful in gaining research scholarships and funding to further their academic and practitioner careers.



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Course formats. All of our taught MSc courses are available in several formats. - 12-month intensive MSc for graduates with a good Honours degree. Read more
Course formats

All of our taught MSc courses are available in several formats:

- 12-month intensive MSc for graduates with a good Honours degree
- 2-year International Masters for overseas students with an ordinary Bachelors degree
- With an optional industrial placement (8-50 weeks of paid work experience)
- Part-time over 3 years

Course overview

This conversion course prepares graduates from any discipline for a career in, or involving, computing. No prior knowledge of computer science is required. A broad introduction is provided, including the key technologies and skills needed for employment. You can explore your personal interests through a variety of optional modules. Advanced intellectual, teamwork, communication and other transferable skills are developed.

Hundreds of past graduates from this course are now working across the globe for companies such as IBM, Cisco, Logica/CMG, Pfizer, Reuters, Shell and Zurich Financial. Some chose technical careers in leading software houses, advanced technology companies or commercial sectors. Others work at the interface between technicians and clients, as systems analysts or consultants. Many now hold senior positions as project leaders or managers. You might like to follow in their footsteps.

Funding is available for well-qualified students of any nationality.

Further details: http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/teaching/pg/

Course content (Honours degree entry; see above web page for details of Ordinary degree entry)

If you have not studied programming before, or only a little (introductory stream)

- Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming (Java)
- Advanced Object-Oriented Programming (Java)

If you have a good working knowledge of programming (advanced stream)

- Advanced Java for Programmers

Other core modules for all students:

- Software Engineering
- Web-based Information System Development
- Systems Architecture
- Logic and Logic Programming
- Project Research
- Project and Dissertation

Optional modules available to all students (choose 1):

- Advanced English for Academic Study
- Computer Graphics and Animation
- Contracts, Professional Responsibility and Computing Law
- Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery
- Introduction to Intelligent Systems
- Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

Additional options for advanced stream only (choose 1 more):

- C++ Programming
- Cognitive Neural Networks
- Human-Computer Interaction
- IT Consultancy Methods
- IT Consultancy Practice (includes work experience)
- Networks and Network Security

Optional industrial placement (8-50 weeks of paid work experience).

The options available may vary from year to year and are subject to timetabling and prerequisite constraints.
Advanced English for Academic Study may be compulsory for non-native speakers who need additional support.

Further details: http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/teaching/pg/

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This specialism has been designed as either an introductory course for teachers commencing work in special education or as a refresher course for those who wish to update their knowledge, competencies and instructional approaches. Read more
This specialism has been designed as either an introductory course for teachers commencing work in special education or as a refresher course for those who wish to update their knowledge, competencies and instructional approaches.

This course may be offered in regional Education Centres.

Components Include:

Introduction to Special Education for the Classroom Teacher
Special Needs and the Curriculum
Including Children with Disabilities into the Ordinary Classroom
Special Education Support for the Ordinary School

The course has a taught component and a dissertation. The duration will normally be two years part-time or three years part-time or one year full time.

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Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. Read more
Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. This MSc course enables you to delve deeply into particular aspects of pure and applied mathematics, through a wide choice of modules in fascinating areas such as fractal geometry, coding theory and analytic theory. You’ll complete your MSc with a piece of independent study, exploring the history of modern geometry, advances in approximation theory, variational methods applied to eigenvalue problems, or algebraic graph theory and culminating in a dissertation on the topic of your choice.

Key features of the course

•Ideal for mathematically inclined scientists and engineers as well as mathematicians
•Extends your knowledge and refines your abilities to process information accurately, and critically analyse and communicate complex ideas
•Develops an enhanced skill set that will put you at an advantage in careers as diverse as mathematics, education, computer science, economics, engineering and finance.
•The most popular MSc in mathematics in the UK.
This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see Fees and funding

Course details

You can take a number of different routes towards your qualification - see the full module list for all options.

Modules

The modules in this qualification are categorised as entry, intermediate and dissertation. Check our website for start dates as some modules are not available for study every year.

Entry:

• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)

Intermediate:

• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Applied complex variables (M828) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Analytic number theory II (M829) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Approximation theory (M832) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Advanced mathematical methods (M833) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Fractal geometry (M835) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Coding theory (M836) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Dissertation: Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

Module study order:

•You must normally pass at least one entry level module before studying an intermediate module.
•You must pass Analytic number theory I (M823) before studying Analytic number theory II (M829).
•You must normally pass four modules before studying the Dissertation in mathematics (M840).
•Some topics for the dissertation have prerequisite modules

Otherwise within each category modules may be studied in any order, and you may register for a module while studying a pre-requisite for that module (i.e. before you know whether you have passed the pre-requisite module or not).

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

150 credits from this list:

Optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)

Plus

Compulsory module

Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

For this qualification, we do not allow you to count credit for study you have already done elsewhere.

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​What was the Royal Navy’s role in British history, and that of its empire? Why did Nelson become such a hero and how was he depicted? Through unique collaborations with the National Museum of the Royal Navy and HMS Warrior, this programme explores these questions in the context of 400 years of naval history. Read more

Why take this course?

​What was the Royal Navy’s role in British history, and that of its empire? Why did Nelson become such a hero and how was he depicted? Through unique collaborations with the National Museum of the Royal Navy and HMS Warrior, this programme explores these questions in the context of 400 years of naval history. You will examine the importance of the Royal Navy to British and global history, while engaging with the life of the ordinary sailor in peace and war, the cult of the naval hero, and the navy – and its sailors – in popular culture. To do so, you will draw on a range of naval experts, curators, and primary sources, including the rich collections of Portsmouth’s naval museums. The flexible distance format allows you to learn from leading naval experts as well as the latest scholarship and debates in the field.

What will I experience?

On this course you will:

Access the rich archives and expertise of the National Museum of the Royal Navy and HMS Warrior to support your study.
Undertake study through flexible distance learning techniques, with the option to blend this with study days in Portsmouth.
Take advantage of unique connections with both Portsmouth and international maritime museums, with opportunities to go on field trips and experience behind the scenes tours.
Train in historical research and the interpretation of multi-archive sources.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is an excellent opportunity for students with an interest in British and Naval History to learn from experts in the field and develop a real grounding in this subject area. Offering specific real-life learning experience working with archives and museums, this course offers you the opportunity to develop key transferable skills, such as independent learning, written communication, textual analysis and time management. This course also assists you with refining key research skills appropriate for progression to PhD level research.

Possible career opportunities include:

Journalism
Law
Teaching
Administration
Archive and museum work

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

The Wooden Walls – The Royal Navy under Sail, 1509-1815
The navy changed immensely from that of Henry VIII, and his Mary Rose, to that of Nelson and Victory. Britain went from being a second rate European power to the sole world superpower by 1815. This module explores the changes which both navy and nation experienced in the early modern period. To do so, it looks at key events, including battles such as the Armada and Trafalgar, but also assesses how the navy was supplied and manned, and how the experience of the sailor changed in this period. Using the collections of the museums on the University’s doorstep, as well as the historic ships in Portsmouth, the course will look to understand what it was like to serve aboard a wooden sailing ship, and how the navy, and its heroes and ordinary sailors, were portrayed to the nation at large.

Rise and Fall – Naval Hegemony and Decline, 1815-1960
Emerging from the Napoleonic Wars as the dominant naval power, the Royal Navy assumed a role of imperial protector and global policeman. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, however, Britain began to be challenged globally, and found itself at war twice in the twentieth century. The rise of the USA, and the decline of its empire meant that, although victorious in both World Wars, Britain’s global power had disappeared soon after 1945. This module looks to understand how the navy fits into these wider trends, and the role it played in both peace and war. Using the collections of the naval museums, and those historic ships on our doorstep, including the first British ironclad, HMS Warrior, the course also looks at how technological change influenced its role, and how it changed the lives of those aboard.

Programme Assessment

The course can be studied entirely by distance learning through access to high quality interactive resources online, including unique primary sources, secondary literature, and video clips of world renowned experts. Dr Steven Gray, Lecturer in the History of the Royal Navy, will also be on hand to guide you through the course, as well as provide regular feedback and opportunities to discuss your work. Students will also be welcome to join optional campus based elements in Portsmouth, which will allow students to meet others on the course, participate in seminars, and access the resources, archives, historical artefacts and expertise of the naval museums in Portsmouth. There will also be optional field trips further afield, including abroad, that will further students’ understanding of the Royal Navy, and its role in the world. The MA is taught by university specialists in naval history, alongside staff from the National Museum of the Royal Navy and HMS Warrior, expertise, archives and galleries will offered to students at an unprecedented level. This flexible programme of delivery enables participation from students all over the UK and beyond.

Student Destinations

The degree will embed a range of highly desirable transferable skills such a communication, research and writing skills. In addition, the MA affords the student the opportunity to gain invaluable employability skills through internships arranged with the NMRN. Students who hold an MA in Naval History will be equipped for a variety of occupations such as teaching, the civil services, the armed forces, research for strategic studies bodies, and more general post-graduate employment. The MA also provides an ideal foundation for those who would like to embark on a PhD in naval history.

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Applicants must have the following academic qualifications. (a) An honours Bachelor degree (major award at Level 8 on the National Framework of Qualifications) or a major award at Level 9 or a major award at Level 10 on the National Framework of Qualifications, and. Read more

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have the following academic qualifications:
(a) An honours Bachelor degree (major award at Level 8 on the National Framework of Qualifications) or a major award at Level 9 or a major award at Level 10 on the National Framework of Qualifications, and

(b) one of the following sets of second level qualifications:

(i) in the Leaving Certificate Examination from 1969 onwards: a grade C3 or above in Higher Level Irish; a grade D3 or above in Mathematics (Ordinary or Higher level); and a grade C3 or above in English (Ordinary level) or grade D3 or above in English (Higher level); or

(ii) in the Leaving Certificate Examination prior to 1969, Honours in Irish and passes in English and Mathematics; or

(iii) in the Northern Ireland GCSE and GCE A Level Examinations: a Grade C at GCE A Level Irish; a Grade C at GCSE Level in both English and English Literature or Grade B at GCSE Level in either; and a Grade D at GCSE Level in Additional Mathematics or a Grade C at GCSE Level in Mathematics.

Applicants must provide evidence to the Higher Education Institution that their degree is placed as a major award at the appropriate level on the National Framework of Qualifications. Applicants must meet all entry requirements by Friday 3rd July 2016 and provide documentary evidence of meeting these requirements.

Please note that a minimum entry requirement of a H2.2 Bachelor Degree at Level 8 will apply from September 2016.

Alternatives to second-level qualifications in Irish, English or Maths:
A Pass in a University First Arts Examination in Irish, English or Mathematics will be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination GCE/GCSE requirement for the relevant subject.

In the case of Irish, a Grade C in the Matriculation Examination (which existed up to 1992) will also be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCE/GCSE requirement. In addition, the following are accepted as satisfying the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCE/GCSE requirement:
· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, Level C1, NUIG

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, Level B2, NUIG

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge, NUI Maynooth

· Teastas Eorpach na Gaeilge (TEG) at Level B2, NUI Maynooth

· Diploma in Arts (Applied Irish), University College Cork

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge Fheidhmeach, UCD

· Dioplóma sa Ghaeilge (An Ghaeilge sa Saol Comhaimseartha), University of Limerick

· Diploma in Irish at the University of Ulster

In the case of Mathematics, a Pass in that subject in the Matriculation Examination will also be accepted in lieu of the Leaving Certificate Examination/GCSE requirement.

Eligible applicants will be required to undergo an Interview and an Oral Irish Examination. Applicants who get a "fail" grade in either the Interview or oral Irish Examination will be eliminated from the competition. The purpose of the Interview is to ascertain the suitability of the applicant for participation in a primary teacher education programme.

The Oral Irish Examination will comprise:
- conversation on everyday topics and on books read by the applicant; and
- reading correctly and intelligently a suitable passage of prose or poetry and explaining the matter read.

Applicants should note that a high standard of fluency is required in the Oral Irish Examination and should prepare for the examination accordingly.

Applicants will be advised by the relevant Centre (Dublin and/or Limerick) of the date, time, venue, etc, of their Interview and Oral Irish Examination and must attend these examinations at their own expense. The location will be either Dublin and/or Limerick.

Overview

The Professional Masters of Education (Primary) is a full-time, two year course designed to equip student-teachers with the range of knowledge and skill related to the profession of primary school teaching and its curriculum. The course structure enables student-teachers to make real connections between the theory and practice of education. This is achieved through the blend of methodology and foundation discipline courses on offer.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/froebel-department-primary-and-early-childhood-education/our-courses/professional-master-education-primary

Course Structure

The course comprises aspects of teacher education such as foundation studies (e.g. psychology, sociology, history and philosophy of education), professional skills development (e.g. developing high levels of competency in professional English, Mathematics and Irish) and curriculum and methodology (e.g. pedagogy associated with the primary school curriculum).

Career Options

The Professional Masters of Education (Primary) is designed to prepare students to be primary school teachers in the Republic of Ireland.

How To Apply

Applications to Froebel Department of Primary and Early Childhood Education, Maynooth University and Marino Institute of Education, Dublin should be completed online at maestro.mie.ie/appcentre this system will open at 5pm on January 30.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 5p.m. on Friday, 10th March.

All applicants should also note the selection procedure detailed here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/froebel-department-primary-and-early-childhood-education/professional-masters-education-primary-teaching

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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An invitation. A ship is setting sail from England. It’s a very old, very particular kind of ship. It’s the magnificent, creaky timbered, curly roped, burgundy sail kind. Read more

An invitation

A ship is setting sail from England.

It’s a very old, very particular kind of ship.

It’s the magnificent, creaky timbered, curly roped, burgundy sail kind. You’ve seen bigger ships surely, and certainly more streamlined, but this one is hard to get over. It’s the kind that straightens your back and brings a tear to your eye as you shyly lift your gaze to its regal shape. This is the kind of ship that shouldn't exist anymore. 

Standing on the dock in the dusking light, you can hear singing carried over the waves, and excited laughter. Figures are calling to you from the deck, beckoning to you, calling to you in your old names. These are the names no one should know, the ancient names, how can this possibly be happening?

The evening moon is emerging from behind clouds. But let us lean forward, the captain is lifting her lantern: To all scholar-explorers and heretical investigators … there is something pressing to say, something urgent. This is an invitation.

We are setting sail to un-map the world.

Join us for this voyage … the world’s first postgraduate programme in Myth and Ecology – The Mundus Imaginalis.

Background

In a time when every square inch of the globe seems to be neutered, quartered and googled, we intrepids are journeying out to glimpse the Otherworld that is secreted most wonderfully in this one - to peer into the steaming foliage and bright feathered world that still exists underneath the grid - whilst we still can. The hour is late.

This is an Otherworld that wriggles in your fist like the archaic trout of the smoky Thames and disappears (carrying all of Shakespeare in its scales) when we attempt to tell it what-it-is. This right-by-our-side Otherworld causes ink to slide off the page and evaporate when we produce the T-square too avidly.

We set sail to do nothing less ambitious than to court the mysteries: the small and gentle ones, the elaborate and complex gnashing teethed ones, the ones you glimpsed at the edge of your garden when you were little. We set sail to un-map our presumption that we know what the earth is.

When we un-map the world, we start the un-colonising of our own imagination and we move from personal fantasy to an imagination that is bigger than ourselves. We understand that psyches don’t only dwell within, we dwell amidst them, and their imagination help create our reality every day. When we un-map the world it starts to talk back to us, we begin to trail not trap. We start to witness not just thinking about the earth, but thoughts from the earth.

Our travels through the waters of time and place will bring us to people and traditions where the weaving of the human and non-human are at their most permeable, their most acute and most sophisticated. In the end, we will trade our tired maps for the best compass of all, the one that really matters - a truth north - what the Troubadours called ‘the educated heart’. It is time, as the poets say; ‘to think in ways we’ve never thought before’. It is time to trade comfort for shelter.

Make no mistake, study awaits. An un-gridded world reveals not just knowledge but wisdom, an un-mapped world will reveal not chaos but cosmos. With that wisdom, with that cosmos, comes tangible learning and focused application. Be prepared. This will be the most exacting journey. Take not one single step towards the gangplank without knowing that we take no passengers. So, here we stand on the dock. It is night, but the scholar-explorers are preparing to raise anchor. The captain leans forward with her lantern one more time, peers towards us and asks:

“Shall we go?”

Aboard The Ship


This is a residential and immersive postgraduate programme that takes imagination seriously. It is delivered by Schumacher College, and is validated by University of Wales Trinity Saint David and led by mythologist Dr Martin Shaw and anthropologist Dr Carla Stang. Carla brings her knowledge of different cultures, her fieldwork and phenomenological study, Martin brings mythology and two decades of work as a wilderness rites-of-passage guide. As they rove through mythology, anthropology, philosophy and poetics, they will also invite guest teachers on a module by module basis.

This is a year-long programme where you will walk in and out of other centuries. It will be a deep and exacting study of image, cosmology, storytelling, myth and lived experience that reaches out to an earth that is profoundly more than human. From Amazonia to Siberia, from the Hermetic, Troubadour, Sufi and Romantic faiths and traditions, we are journeying out to study cultures that celebrate a world ensouled, alive and radiating intelligence.

The main counterweights of the year will be a progression through western mythologies (many hidden or barely remembered), and the lived philosophy of the Mehinaku people of Amazonia. There will be the study of many other lifeworlds, together with which we will learn how people in different times and places have and do respond to an earthy consciousness of extraordinary wonder, regarding such as both magical and utterly ordinary. Such experiential study is how we will begin to tune our ear.

Cloistered in the beautiful setting of the Dartington estate and upon the wild moors of Devon, England, is the chance to apprentice to subtle and often secret knowledge, the reason being that we are living in a time when many of these secrets need to become public, need to be practiced and need to be lived. In doing so we encounter the wonder of ordinary reality and that far from being a rarefied state available to only a few, we will find that a dynamic relationship to what the neo-platonists called the ‘Anima Mundi’- is our natural state.



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The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. Read more

The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. In a fast changing, global economy, the MSc will equip you to assess the wider interconnections between organisations and their local, national and international contexts. You will build up a solid understanding of key management practice and develop your critical insight.

This MSc is specifically designed for anyone who may be looking to complement their non-business degree and has little or no prior business background. Alternatively, you may have completed to ordinary degree level and be aiming to enhance your qualifications. You will study a range of modules and complete a community based project where you will work with either a commercial business, community, voluntary or social enterprise. You can study for the general MSc International Management and Leadership or tailor your studies with our routes in Events, Family and Smaller Enterprise, Hospitality and Tourism (as follows).

Teaching learning and assessment

You will attend lectures and seminars, work in groups and carry out independent learning. You will be expected to participate in discussions, develop ideas and engage with experiential learning. Assessment methods will include management reports, essays, web-based discussions, reflections on practice and group work with presentations. A central part of the course experience is the regular involvement with industry, through specific visits, guest speakers and events all of which provide valuable insights into practice, contemporary trends and thinking. Class sizes are normally 10-30.

Teaching hours and attendance

Modules studied on campus require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Attendance requirements at QMU will depend on which module you are studying and whether you are full or part-time. In most instances the taught elements of the full-time course occur on Tuesday, Wednesday (AM) and Thursday. Part-time students have the option to select different modules each year.

Links with industry/professional bodies

We work continually with a wide range of business organisations and public services, as well as the third sector, individual business leaders and industry experts to develop our courses. This ensures that along with in-depth theoretical underpinnings, the courses are rooted in relevance and industry practice. As your course progresses you will hear from guest lecturers, participate in visits to a wide range of industries and organisations, and engage in a range of other networking opportunities with staff and industry experts. In recent years we have engaged with: Diageo; New Lanark Heritage Centre and Hotel; Nairns; AG Barr (Irn-Bru); Waldorff Astoria, Edinburgh; Glenkinchie Distillery; Henderson’s restaurants; Isle of Eriska Hotel; Scottish Ambulance Service; Turcan Connell; and Dakota hotels, to name but a few.

Modules

Contemporary Issues in International Management/ Strategic Thinking/ International Marketing/ Introduction to Management Accounting and Finance/ Organisational Behaviour All MSc students will then take three further modules in their specific area, for example: Events Leadership in Action (Events)/ Family Business Governance (FASE)/ International Leadership Power and Policy (General)/ Critical Issues in Hospitality and Tourism Leadership (Hospitality/ Tourism)

You will also complete a 60 credit project (Community Impact and Practice) focused towards your specialism in partnership with an external organisation. The project is designed to have a positive community outcome and could be based within the commercial, public or third sector. This is your opportunity to discover, propose, plan, lead and deliver an externally driven project. whilst developing your skills of reflective  practice and personal development planning.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses are designed to enhance your career prospects by opening up a wide range of global opportunities. Our graduates take with them enhanced employability and confidence whether they obtain a position with a multinational organisation, work within the public sector, create their own business, gain employment in the third sector or go on to further studies.

Quick Facts

There is a practical project instead of a dissertation. Students are challenged to research, plan, manage and evaluate a project in conjunction with an external business or organisation, allowing them to develop career-enhancing skills, confidence and opportunities.

Reflecting contemporary working practice, our teaching and assessment takes a strong group and team focus.

Class sizes are beneficially small: this enables students to work closely with fellow students from diverse backgrounds and allows lecturers to develop strong relationships with the students. The smaller cohort of students also allows for participation in regular visits and events.




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We offer MPhil and PhD supervision across a wide range of human and physical geography topics. Our research engages with applied issues and public policy concerns, as well as more abstract cultural and theoretical issues. Read more
We offer MPhil and PhD supervision across a wide range of human and physical geography topics. Our research engages with applied issues and public policy concerns, as well as more abstract cultural and theoretical issues.

We were recently ranked within the top 30 geography departments in the world (QS World University Rankings by subject). Almost all our research is world-leading or internationally excellent (Research Excellence Framework, 2014).

Our staff provide supervision in a range of specialisms. Our research focusses on four research clusters:

Physical geography

Our research strengths in physical geography include:
-Paleoclimatology
-Landscape evolution
-Applied geomorphology and natural hazards
-Quaternary geochronology
-Glaciology
-Water science

We carry out research through active collaboration with colleagues in Newcastle University and beyond. Our research takes us to a wide variety of environments across the globe, including:
-The UK
-Greenland
-Iceland
-Patagonia
-Turkey
-USA
-Tibet
-Japan

Economic geographies

Our research in economic geographies is theoretically-informed and politically-engaged. It covers the production, forms, experiences and impacts of uneven geographies of:
-Commodities
-People
-Finance
-Knowledge
-Technology

Our location in the north east is a European periphery. Our researchers in this theme explore 'ordinary', diverse and/or marginalised economies and subjectivities. They also scrutinise orthodox socio-economic models and practices in the following contexts:
-Western industrialised
-Post-socialist
-Post-colonial

Power, space, politics

In power, space, politics our research focuses on the expression of political power across space and includes topics around:
-Borders and boundaries
-Critical geopolitics
-International development
-Militarism and military geographies
-The politics of representation
-Issues of resistance, justice and peace

We conduct research on a range of scales. From the international and national to the individual, with reference to a range of global contexts. Our work is methodologically innovative, drawing on:
-Interactional research
-Ethnographic research
-Discourse analysis
-Participatory research
-Visual research

This enables us to produce grounded, empirically-informed reflections on the multiple ways in which concepts of power, space and politics intersect.

Geographies of social change

In geographies of social change we explore and extend an applied, critical understanding of cities and urbanism. Ideas that run through our research include:
-Identity
-Families and households
-Health
-Welfare and care
-Infrastructures
-Community

These lead us to connect with issues of:
-Gender
-Race
-Ethnicity
-Migration
-Youth
-Religion
-Class
-Size
-Generation

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The Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management (EEDM) MSc combines specialist structural and earthquake engineering knowledge with an advanced understanding of risk modelling for natural hazards in order to produce engineers who can deliver design holistic solutions and are able to work in engineering, catastrophe modelling and disaster management roles. Read more

The Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management (EEDM) MSc combines specialist structural and earthquake engineering knowledge with an advanced understanding of risk modelling for natural hazards in order to produce engineers who can deliver design holistic solutions and are able to work in engineering, catastrophe modelling and disaster management roles.

About this degree

Graduates will be able to:

  • determine the vulnerability of ordinary and special structures to seismic actions
  • apply both current seismic codes and novel unconventional methodologies of seismic design, repair and assessment
  • assess the adequacy, economic viability and life-saving effectiveness of pre-event risk mitigation and post-event risk management solutions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) consisting of seven core modules (105 credits) and one optional module (15 credits) is offered.

Core modules

  • Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering
  • Structural Dynamics
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Introduction to Seismic Design of Structures
  • Advanced Seismic Design Structures
  • Seismic Risk Assessment
  • Seismic Loss Mitigation and Strengthening of Low-Engineered Buildings

Optional modules

  • Advanced Structural Analysis
  • Catastrophe Risk Modelling
  • Finite Element Modelling and Numerical Methods
  • Natural and Environmental Disasters
  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Taught modules have been developed and are delivered in collaboration with experts from industry and non-governmental organisations. In addition a field trip is organised every year to an earthquake affected region.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management MSc

Careers

Students graduate with strong technical engineering skills and rarely taught knowledge of risk evaluation. They are also able to understand the wider implications of disasters and are exposed to both industry and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates have gone on to successful careers in the civil engineering industry, in international NGOs, in the financial sector, and in academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Engineer, Wuzhou Engineering Corporation Ltd.
  • Design Civil Engineer, Cyprus Ministry of Education and Culture
  • ENgineer in HSE and Disaster management, MHS, Mabna Sazeh Houshmand , IRAN
  • PhD Earthquake Sciences,UCL
  • PhD Strengthening Buildings and Structure, The Cyprus University of Technology

Employability

The programme aims to create a new type of global earthquake engineer able to take a holistic approach to earthquake engineering and disaster management. Graduates of the programme will have developed the specialist skills necessary for a career in the engineering sector and other areas that require knowledge and understanding of earthquake engineering and disaster risk management/mitigation principles. The MSc is accredited by the Institute of Civil Engineers as a further learning programme that can count towards chartership.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering hosts EPICentre, a leading research centre in earthquake engineering, and provides an exciting environment in which to explore this new, multidisciplinary and constantly evolving science.

The programme has extensive links to industry through professional engineers and disaster managers who deliver lectures and seminars and support students on their research projects as industrial supervisors.

Students benefit from a voluntary field trip to the closest location of a recent major earthquake to study disaster management and the effects of the earthquake on the built environment, structural strengthening techniques and disaster management.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

60% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment. Read more
The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment.

Course Overview

In recent years, local history groups have flourished in our communities. This course offers the guidance and support of professional historians for such interests. Although it focuses upon the specific local history of South West Wales, it will also draw upon a general awareness of historical trends and a detailed working knowledge of Welsh history.

The practical research element will familiarise students with research strategies and resources and will encourage them to undertake their own individual original research based upon their personal interests. Successful presentations could be considered for publication in relevant local history journals or as monographs.

The course offers focused support in practical research skills and techniques and detailed analysis of primary material, much of it untapped, which exists in both Welsh and English. Students will be able to make use of the excellent facilities available in local county libraries and record offices.

The course will explore a range of questions that include : How do we define 'local history'? How does local history relate to the wider Welsh and British contexts? What factors forged the lives of the ordinary people of South West Wales in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? What sources are available for in depth local history research? And what skills will be fostered by an MA in Local History?

Modules

-Agricultural Experiences
-Educational Experiences
-Industrial Experiences
-Popular Culture 1860 - 1960
-Social Experiences.
-Research Methods

Key Features

-Established in 1995 - this course is unique in Wales
-Experienced and dedicated staff
-An opportunity to pursue an individual, personal and original research project in local and regional history
-Attractive to anyone interested in the history of South West Wales, in the methodology of practical historical research and of course in historical debate and inquiry
-Ample library and archival resources in the locality
-An opportunity to submit work in Welsh and, if there is sufficient demand, to take certain modules through the medium of Welsh
-High success rate

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

This course is aimed at those with an interest in local and regional history and how it relates to the national and international perspective. It is ideal for the continuing professional develop of those working in the fields of teaching, research, librarianship, the Museum Service as well as the heritage and tourism industry.

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This unique and highly innovative Masters degree programme gives a taste of what it is like to run your own business and will appeal equally to aspiring entrepreneurs and those seeking leadership positions within larger organisations. Read more

This unique and highly innovative Masters degree programme gives a taste of what it is like to run your own business and will appeal equally to aspiring entrepreneurs and those seeking leadership positions within larger organisations.

Much of the learning takes place outside the classroom so that students can see first-hand how business works in China and can develop an understanding of how to engage effectively with international partners and clients.

You will gain hands on experience by formulating and developing a business idea into a real business plan, while the Entrepreneurial Project will provide the opportunity to be embedded in a company where you can develop your innovative skills. These activities will engage you face-to-face with entrepreneurs in practice and expose you to real world business problem solving.  

Objectives

The MSc Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management programme is designed to enable students to:

  • engage in a study of organisations (mostly new ventures and SMEs), their management and operation, and the changing economic and political climate in which they operate. 
  • prepare for and to develop a career in business and management. 
  • enhance lifelong learning skills and personal development to contribute to society at large. 
  • provide insights into the historical and current ideas in entrepreneurship. 
  • develop skills in creative thinking and problem solving. 
  • examine and assess the importance of innovation and its management. 
  • provide students with a clear understanding of the issues in financing and marketing that face the entrepreneur. 
  • develop skills in experiential, interactive and integrative learning. 
  • enable students to develop team working skills. 
  • enable students with an overview on the patterns and the practices of entrepreneurship in Greater China.

Programme outline

The MSc Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management programme can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis and commences in the September of each year. Students are required to take taught modules and prepare an individual dissertation or an extended business plan.

The structure of this programme is modular, with individual taught modules each typically have a weighting of 15 credits. One credit represents 10 hours of student work, meaning that a 15 credit module represents 150 hours of study including formal teaching, independent study, revision, and preparation for assessments. This degree requires the successful completion of 180 credits; 90 of which consist of taught modules, 30 for an Entrepreneurship project and 60 credits for the Entrepreneurship Business Plan or Dissertation project. 

Programme structure

Students must complete 180 credits in total.

Semester 1 modules

  • Entrepreneurship and Creativity
  • Marketing for Entrepreneurial Firms
  • Entrepreneurial Finance and Accounting
  • Innovation Management

Semester 2 modules

  • Entrepreneurship Project

plus two modules form the list below:

  • Managing International Business in China
  • Entrepreneurial Management
  • Launching New Ventures
  • E-Business
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning sessions are highly interactive, with a case study focus, so that there is less emphasis on abstract theory and more emphasis on acquiring knowledge and decision-making skills that can be applied. Unlike ordinary marketing, finance and accounting programmes, entrepreneurship students will explore these subjects from the unique perspective of an entrepreneur, helping them to gain an understanding of the specific challenges faced when starting and developing a new business.

Career options for this degree

This degree provides an ideal study path for people wishing to start their own business or be involved in early stage start-up companies. Equally, as larger organisations are increasingly valuing people who can innovate and act entrepreneurially from a management perspective, those looking to pursue management careers will gain highly relevant and applicable skills.

Additionally the programme provides a strong base from which to undertake post graduate research study into the area of entrepreneurship.  



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This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. Read more
This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. It explores connections between histories of empire and contemporary social formations and inequalities in the UK, and considers how local debates on 'race' and racism are shaped by the global geopolitics of the twenty-first century.

The programme explores debates on empire and the formation of modern Britain and contemporary transnational political communities, social identities and urban cultures. The MA aims to draw connections between interlocking colonial histories across the globe and our ordinary, local, everyday life here in contemporary Britain.

The programme focuses on subjects such as histories of colonisation, systems of slavery, the concept of 'race' and the invention of 'the West'; colonial cultures, class, nationalisms, 'respectability' and the invention of 'whiteness'; histories of criminalisation and imprisonment; human rights; 'the war on terror'; diaspora, place and belonging; psychoanalysis and 'race', 'hybridity', 'mixedness', 'whiteness', 'race' and 'beauty' and 'race', gender, sexuality and desire. It offers the opportunity to study a wide range of different subjects in this broad multidisciplinary area.

The MA is convened by academics who have interests in racialisation, postcoloniality, urban multiculture and psychoanalysis. You can also choose from a range of option modules convened by other academics in other departments across the College.

This innovative, interdisciplinary postgraduate programme will be of interest to those who want to develop careers in social research, education, law, journalism, youth and community work, urban planning, housing, politics, the arts and cultural industries, health and social care, and numerous other areas. It will also be of interest to those who wish to pursue an academic career in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, psychosocial studies, or in the social sciences or humanities more generally and to those who simply wish to develop an advanced understanding of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The programme introduces you to different historical and political debates and theoretical perspectives in the broad multidisciplinary area of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.
You will participate in a vibrant, stimulating and diverse intellectual environment. There is a Race Forum and several other research institutes at Birkbeck that focus on relevant subject areas.
The programme is flexibly designed for students from all backgrounds to pursue their own particular research and professional interests.
The MA draws from sociology, cultural studies, history, urban studies, literary studies, psychosocial studies, philosophy and politics.
The Department of Psychosocial Studies has a formal link with the University of São Paulo, Brazil. This link enables students on this programme to undertake an optional module at the University of São Paulo as part of their programme of study at Birkbeck.
You will join a flourishing and diverse postgraduate student community and a growing research culture. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and learning resources in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, psychosocial studies and related disciplines. You will also be able to use the rich research resources nearby including Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (the LSE Library), the SOAS Library and the British Library.
There are also research institutes which focus on relevant subject areas such as the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck Law School Centre for Law and the Humanities and the Centre for Media, Culture and Creative Practice and reading groups such as the Postcolonial Studies Reading Group.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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We live in a communications-saturated world where 24-hour news coverage, access to the internet and the use of social media have become the norm for millions of people. Read more
We live in a communications-saturated world where 24-hour news coverage, access to the internet and the use of social media have become the norm for millions of people. Global events are instantly reported by the news media, analysed and interpreted by them and millions of ordinary citizens. These developments challenge the traditionally secretive practices of international diplomacy and the ability of governments to control information whilst also creating powerful new tools for propaganda; they enhance the importance of cultural or ‘soft’ power in international relations and they have also transformed the nature of warfare.

This course is run by the Department of History, Politics and Philosophy in conjunction with the Department of Information and Communication.

Features and benefits of the course

The chance to develop a sophisticated understanding of contemporary international relations and key developments in ICTs and of the interaction between the two.

The opportunity to develop a wide range of analytical and work-related skills such as oral and group presentations, report and policy-paper writing.

Individual support available throughout the course.

Recent dissertation topics have included:
•Social media and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
•UK-EU relations in the Twitter-sphere
•Media discourse on the Ebola Crisis and International Aid in Africa
•Media coverage of the Somalian piracy issue
•US government use of social media against ISIS

Placement options

You will also have the opportunity to undertake a voluntary placement as part of this course. This will be with a local Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) and we will help you to arrange this.

About the Course

This programme combines the study of contemporary international relations with that of key developments in global communications and ICTs. In so doing it adds an extra dimension to the study of international relations which provides graduates with deeper insights than those doing traditional MAs in International Relations. We will provide you with the knowledge, methods and techniques to effectively engage with and critically evaluate the interaction between these two areas of study.

Assessment details

Assessment across the programme takes a wide variety of forms including oral presentations, policy papers and reports, group projects, essays and a dissertation.

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To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows. Stage 1. 60 credits from List A. List A. optional modules. Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824). Read more

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Stage 1

60 credits from List A:

List A: optional modules

• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

Plus 30 credits from List B:

List B: optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Advanced routing - CCNP 1 (T824)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Data management (M816)
• Developing research skills in science (S825)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Digital forensics (M812)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Finite element analysis: basic principles and applications (T804)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Information security (M811)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)
• Managing for sustainability (T867)
• Managing systemic change: inquiry, action and interaction (TU812)
• Managing technological innovation (T848)
• Manufacture materials design (T805)
• Multilayer switching - CCNP 3 (T826)
• Network security (T828)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Optimising networks - CCNP 4 (T827)
• Problem solving and improvement: quality and other approaches (T889)
• Project management (M815)
• Researching mathematics learning (ME825)*
• Software development (M813)
• Software engineering (M814)
• Space science (S818) NEW1
• Strategic capabilities for technological innovation (T849)
• Thinking strategically: systems tools for managing change (TU811)

* 60-credit module of which only 30 credits count towards this qualification

Plus 30 credits from:

Compulsory module

Team engineering (T885)

Stage 2

60 credits from:

Compulsory module

Research project (T802)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

Credit transfer is not permitted for the MSc except for any awarded as part of the Postgraduate Diploma in Engineering.
For further advice and guidance, please email us.

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