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Masters Degrees (Oral Tradition)

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This MSc programme is designed to provide students with an in-depth working knowledge of the principles and practice related to Oral Sciences. Read more
This MSc programme is designed to provide students with an in-depth working knowledge of the principles and practice related to Oral Sciences. The major strength of this programme is that the programme is aligned to and delivered by internationally renowned members from the Oral Sciences Research Group located within Glasgow Dental School. Students will experience and participate in cutting edge research within the theme while learning techniques widely relevant to biomedical sciences. This programme will be of particular interest to those interested in pursuing or furthering careers in oral and dental related occupations, as well as laboratory scientists or academics. This programme also enables graduates to gain experience in research before applying to a doctoral programme.

Why this programme

◾If you are passionate about oral sciences and keen to learn through an in-depth, evidence based, critical approach, and enthusiastic about specialising in a particular area – oral disease pathogenesis or infection control and decontamination, then this programme is for you.
◾Our staff are internationally experienced researchers and academics with both clinician and science backgrounds, experts in biofilm infections, oral inflammation and infection control.
◾There is a long tradition of excellence in Oral Sciences at the University of Glasgow, with pioneering research by MacFarlane, Samaranayake and Bagg, and other current Glasgow academics continue to make important contributions in the field of Oral Sciences.
◾A range of transferable skills are integrated and embedded into this programme, which will improve possibilities in the job market.
◾You will undertake research alongside pre- and post-doctoral researchers and learn how to work as a team and improve technical skills and communication.
◾Students can learn first-hand within a dedicated oral sciences research laboratory infrastructure linked directly to clinical research facilities.
◾There is a direct link with our doctoral research programme.

Programme structure

◾Translational research approaches
◾Evidence based medicine and statistics
◾Laboratory techniques in oral sciences
◾Principles of oral sciences
◾Research methods in oral sciences
◾Research dissertation in oral sciences

Core and optional courses

Core

Statistics 1

Evidence based medicine

Translational medical research approaches

Medical research and ethics

Principles and critical interpretation of laboratory methodologies

Research methods

Research Dissertation

Optional

Microbes in medicine

Translational immunology

Pathogenesis in oral disease

Decontamination and infection control

Career prospects

Graduates are well placed for a variety of employment opportunities in the oral and dental industries, as well as a wide array of the biomedical science sectors. This course provides a sound basis from which to apply for employment in laboratory positions in industry or in academia, or to continue professional training in dentistry and oral hygiene, or for further doctoral-level research training for academic or teaching careers.

A high proportion of our graduates go on to complete PhDs in Glasgow or other high quality institutions across the world. Careers of some of our recent graduates include:
◾Clinical research scientist (NHS)
◾Senior clinical scientist (GlaxoSmithKline)
◾Laboratory scientist (BluTest Laboratories)
◾Assistant professor (Khyber Medical University)
◾Associate professor (University Sains Malaysia)
◾Postdoctoral research fellows (University of Glasgow)
◾Scientist (Scottish Environmental Protection Agency)

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Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names. Read more

Training and support

Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names.

Both oral and written sources are emphasised and Scotland offers excellent opportunities for fieldwork in Scots and Gaelic.

We use a combination of traditional and innovative methods to impart research training.

You will be encouraged to make direct contact with original sources and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

Research training and expert research supervision are provided.

Facilities

The School of Scottish Studies Archives includes over 12,000 hours of sound recordings, an extensive photographic and video collection, manuscripts, linguistic and place-name surveys, and donated collections such as:

the John Levy Archive of religious music
the Burton-Manning Collection of Appalachian oral tradition
the Will Forret and Gus MacDonald Collections of Scottish music
the Edgar Ashton Folk Revival Collection

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This programme orientates internationally qualified dental graduates to that of a UK dental practitioner by providing a comprehensive grounding in six key training areas. Read more
This programme orientates internationally qualified dental graduates to that of a UK dental practitioner by providing a comprehensive grounding in six key training areas: basic sciences and their application to modern day dental practice, applied principles of clinical dentistry, clinical skills, communication skills, professionalism, management and leadership.

The course is delivered under three broad headings:

1. Taught
Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of:

-Relevant basic sciences including anatomy, physiology, immunology, microbiology and molecular biology with respect to health and how these are altered in disease states
-Patho-physiological and anatomical basis for clinical signs of oral and craniofacial health and disease
-Relationships between dental disease, population risk factors and the preventative measures

And integrate this knowledge to dental areas through discussions in:

-Basic and clinical science associated with pharmacology and therapeutics used in dentistry
-The science underpinning the key properties of dental materials and evaluate their clinical applications


2. Clinical
Students' clinical skills will be augmented through practical, laboratory based sessions using typodont teeth set in a manikin head.

-Operative skills will be taught to ensure students can undertake skilled, competent and safe dental procedures including: cavity design, extra-coronal restorations and non-surgical endodontic treatment.
-Simulated clinical techniques will be undertaken and the student will be introduced to decision making processes leading to tooth loss and replacement and execution of appropriate operative techniques for all stages of planned prosthodontic treatment (excluding bridges and implants) in conjunction, as necessary, with other specialists and technicians.

Students will observe current UK dental practise via clinics in oral medicine, oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontology, paediatrics, prosthodontics, radiology and orthodontics.

Tutoring in Objective Structured Clinical Reasoning Examinations (OSCE) and Structured Clinical Reasoning (SCR) Exams will be carried out using the advanced facilities in the state of the art dental skills laboratory.

3. Research
The research component consists of a structured literature review and clinical audit report. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of:

-Critical appraisal and analysis of scientific and clinical literature
-How clinical audit identifies problems in clinical service and helps formulate solutions
-Appropriate tools for searching the literature (search engines, web-based libraries, electronic documents)

Students will develop the analytical skills to be able to:

-Critically appraise, analyse and evaluate scientific papers and clinical literature applying the principles of evidence based dentistry
-Evaluate evidence of the latest developments in Dentistry
-Communication skills will be developed throughout the taught, clinical and research elements of the course with specific topic presentations during seminars as well as through journal club reports and presentations on dental and clinical governance topics.

The application deadline is 30th June 2017. Once we have received applications by the deadline the first selection process will begin. We reserve the right to receive further application after the deadline and make decisions on those applications in July/August subject to places being available.

Why study for your MSc in Dental Science for Clinical Practice at Queen Mary?

The School of Medicine and Dentistry has an unrivalled tradition of excellence in research and teaching extending as far back as 1123 with the founding of St Bartholomew’s Hospital. The London Hospital Medical College was the first Medical School in England, founded in 1785, and our Dental School was established well over a century ago. We are ranked 3rd in the UK for Dentistry (Guardian University Guide 2017) and our research is ranked among the best in the UK according to the most recent Research Excellent Framework (REF 2014).


In April 2014, QMUL’s new Dental School opened its doors to patients and students - the first new dental school in the UK to be built in 40 years. The £78m new school houses the most modern dental facilities in the UK, following more than a decade of planning and work. The new premises provide cutting-edge technology, superb education and research facilities for clinical dentistry and a vastly improved patient experience.


Students’ postgraduate learning experience is enhanced by our fantastic location in the east of London. Not only are we in one of the capital’s most vibrant areas to live and work but we also serve a diverse local community, where students develop their clinical skills and knowledge. Moreover, the Dental School offers students many exciting opportunities to develop an understanding of health and the treatment of disease in a global and international context.


The Institute of Dentistry is a special place to undertake postgraduate studies, bringing together a number of world-leading researchers in basic and clinical sciences who supervise research students in the fields of oral medicine, oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral epidemiology, oncology, dental biomaterials, dental biophysics, dental public health, dental education, periodontology, orthodontics, paediatric dentistry, prosthetic and conservative dentistry.


You will have the opportunity to attend Continuing Development Courses of the London Deanery, Royal Society of Medicine (Odontology Section) as well as internal Departmental and Dental and Blizard Institute seminars.


You will prepare a professional development portfolio based on evidence gathered from lectures, tutorials, clinics, self-study and self-reflection sessions.


Facilities
You will have access to a range of facilities including: medical and dental libraries located at the Royal London and at Barts hospitals, as well as the Mile End library.

Postgraduate Dental students will have access to the Dental Clinical Skills Laboratory based in the Garrod building at the Whitechapel Site.

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The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Read more
The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Students will also be introduced to primary sources and bibliographical methods.

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in subjects such as codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They must attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammparb

Course detail

The one year course MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) will have the following structure:

- (i) three modules each assessed by a written examination or a 5,000 word essay or by an Alternative Exercise.

The cumulative score of these three papers will be worth 50% of the final mark.

- (ii) a 15,000 word dissertation. The mark for the dissertation constitutes 50% of the overall mark for this course.

The following papers will be available for the MPhil pathway in Classical Arabic Studies in 2016 - 2017. You need to choose three of the following papers:

- Classical Arabic Literary Creativity
- Science and Religion in Medieval Islam
- Qur’an and Hadith
- Islamic Law
- The Arabic Grammatical Tradition
- Modes of Legitimation in the pre-modern Islamic world
- Alternative Exercise [to be arranged with specific instructors]

An individual student or a group of students sharing similar interests can arrange an 'Alternative Exercise'. Possible topics include:

- Al-Jahiz and the Ninth Century
- The Qira’at Tradition
- The Arabic Geographical Tradition
- Al-Ash’ari’s K. Maqalat al-Islamiyyin

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Classical Arabic;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Pre-Modern Middle Eastern culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may submit essays as part of their degree:
With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:
Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- There is no practical assessment associated with this course.

- An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.

Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy.

Drawing on core research and teaching strengths in 19th and 20th-century French and German thought, the MA gives students the opportunity to study the development of European philosophy from Kant’s critical philosophy onwards, with a focus on German Idealism, the German phenomenologists and the Frankfurt School on one side, and the French philosophical movements in the 20th Century from Bergson and the existentialist movement through to poststructuralism and psychoanalysis.

Options focus a variety of topics and thinkers, focusing on the Continental tradition in political philosophy, the Frankfurt School, the role of aesthetics in the development of European thought, and more.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/maeuropeanphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- you will be able to explore key issues, thinkers and texts from the European tradition on one of the few programmes in the country to specialise in European philosophy

- academic staff have a broad range of interests including German Idealism, the Frankfurt School, French and German phenomenology, poststructuralism, and modern European political theory

- the flexible structure of the course allows students to concentrate on European philosophy, or to also engage with a broader range of options

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- you will have access to the vibrant intellectual community provided by being a part of the University of London.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood

Course content and structure

- Programme structure
Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two courses from among:
Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit); The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit); and Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)
The unit will involve ten two-hour seminars on key figures in European Philosophy. The course will run through a number of central figures and problems from Immanuel Kant to the work of Jacques Derrida and Theodor Adorno. Texts will not necessarily be read in their entirety.

- Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)
This course will trace the development of French philosophical thought from its early assimilation of Husserl’s phenomenology to later post-modern and post-structuralist thinkers. The course is research-led, and so specific philosophers covered on the course are subject to change, but indicative philosophers would include Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Alain Badiou.

- Dissertation on European Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
- Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)
- Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)
- The Frankfurt School (½ unit)
- The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)
- Human Rights (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)
- Legacies of Wittgenstein (½ unit)
- Neo-Platonism (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)
- Political Concepts (½ unit)
- Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of philosophical approaches adopted in the European tradition, such as phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, and transcendental empiricism

- detailed understanding of some of the key philosophers in the European tradition

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of European philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. Read more
World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. It draws upon the expertise of faculty members in each of these areas, as well as in Middle Eastern, Oceanic and American history. The MPhil in World History enables students to develop strong expertise in this rich and expanding field of historical scholarship. The MPhil in World History combines courses and a dissertation over a 9-month program. The core course focuses on historiographical debates in world history, leading to two options, usually in the history of a world region. From first term, students also begin directed research for a 15–20,000 word dissertation, working closely with a supervisor from the Cambridge World History Group. Students will also take language classes, a component that is required but not examined. This may be in any language offered in the Cambridge University Language Program, and may be elementary, continuing or advanced. In this way, the Cambridge MPhil in World History offers students thorough preparation for an advanced research degree. Cambridge graduates in World History have taken up posts in universities and academic-related spheres of work around the world. The MPhil in World History provides a point of entry into this rich tradition.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpwhs

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- knowledge of key debates and trends in world history and historiography
- skills in presenting work in both oral and written form
- acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field

Format

The MPhil in World History course has five elements, combining taught classes, a research project, language acquisition and participation in research seminar:

1. The core course, Debates in World History (10%) This course is historiographically based, engaging students with key scholarship, classic texts, and their revisions. Several origins and traditions of world history, global history, transnational history, and regional history will be established and questioned in student-led seminar discussion.

2. Two elective courses, selected from a suite of options (20%). Options will vary from year to year, but will include courses such as “Global Thinkers”, “Global China”, “Inequality: a Global History”.

3. A dissertation (15-20,000 words) (70%).

4. A language (non-examined). This may be preliminary, intermediate or advanced, in any language.

5. Participation in the Cambridge World History Seminar.

Students will receive both formal and informal feedback in all three modules, as well as from their thesis supervisor throughout the period of teaching.

Students will receive feedback via the following routes:

- Supervision: regular oral feedback in addition to termly online feedback reports (CGSRS)
- Core course and Option essays: written feedback
- Graduate Workshop / Seminars: oral feedback
- Language classes (if taken): oral and possible written feedback from teachers
- Dissertation examination: formal written feedback from two examiners after submission and examination of dissertation

Assessment

15,000–20,000 words. The dissertation will be examined by an internal and an external examiner. The dissertation is worth 70% of the final mark. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Core: 3-4,000 word Essay (10% of final mark)
Options: 2 x 3-4,000 word Essay (20% of final mark)

NB: Language Component is compulsory but is not examined.

Students will also prepare a 2,000 word dissertation proposal essay due in the Lent Term. This essay will be unassessed but students will meet with their supervisor to discuss the essay and receive feedback.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Welsh Writing in English offers students a dynamic engagement with the anglophone literature of Wales in its various cultural contexts. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Welsh Writing in English offers students a dynamic engagement with the anglophone literature of Wales in its various cultural contexts. By familiarizing you with critical debates and theory related to this distinguished body of writing, you will acquire the necessary skills to conduct your own independent research. Our enthusiastic and committed staff will guide your studies. Aberystwyth is at the heart of new developments in the study of Welsh Writing in English, and students on this MA will be ideally placed to engage with the major preoccupations of this vibrant literary tradition. You will also have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-welsh-writing-in-english-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. In their third semester, each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Welsh Writing in English. 

Overview

You will study two core modules together with two option modules. Specialist MA modules in Welsh writing in English provide a rigorous and detailed interrogation of developments in the field. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to engage with different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level and beyond.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in the field of Welsh Writing in English that is of most particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Welsh Writing in English

This degree will suit you...
- If you have a specific interest in Welsh Writing in English
- If you want a rigorous training for future work as a researcher
- If you want to develop your literary research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Welsh Writing in English writing provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of Welsh Writing in English and key transferrable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of employment opportunities. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers. The creative industries are an increasingly important part of the modern economy and this degree is an excellent stepping stone to a career in a broad range of fields in the arts, literature, journalism and many more.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by many employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by expert University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skills
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Welsh Writing in English provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. When you graduate you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-welsh-writing-in-english-masters/#how-to-apply

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in American Literature gives students the opportunity to interrogate the major preoccupations and cultural range of American writing. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in American Literature gives students the opportunity to interrogate the major preoccupations and cultural range of American writing. It also offers a firm grounding in the latest developments in literary criticism and analysis, and provides you with the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies American Literature pathway is the combination of the study of imaginative writing alongside the development of key transferable skills. As a student on the MA in Literary Studies, pathway in American Literature at Aberystwyth, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-american-studies-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. Each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of American Literature in the third semester.

Overview

You will study two core modules together with two optional modules. A specialist module in American literature provides a rigorous and detailed engagement with particular aspects of the literature of America. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also illustrate and interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, that need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in a field of American Literature that is of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details:
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway in American Literature

This degree will suit you...
- If you have a specific interest in American Literature
- If you want a rigorous training for future work as a researcher
- If you want to develop your literary research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in American Literature provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of American Literature and key transferable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of employment opportunities. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers. The creative industries are an increasingly important part of the modern economy and this degree is an excellent stepping stone to a career in a broad range of fields in the arts, literature, journalism and many more.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources. The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by many employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at Masters’ level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by expert University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skill:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in American Studies provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. When you graduate you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-american-studies-masters/#how-to-apply

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The MA in Literary Studies pathway in Postmodern Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with literary responses to postmodernism. Read more
The MA in Literary Studies pathway in Postmodern Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with literary responses to postmodernism. The course provides a firm grounding in the latest developments in the highly topical field of postmodern writing. It also offers the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the MA pathway in Postmodern Writing is the combination of the study of postmodernism alongside the development of key transferable skills. As a student on this MA scheme, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-post-modern-writing-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. In the third semester, each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Postmodern Writing.

Overview

You will study two core modules, together with two option modules. A specialist MA module in postmodern writing provides a rigorous and detailed interrogation of particular developments in this important area of literature. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to engage with different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation on an aspect of Postmodern Writing of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing 

This degree will suit you...
- If you have a specific interest in Post-modern Writing
- If you want rigorous training for future work as a research
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies.

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of Postmodern Writing and key transferrable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of employment opportunities. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers. The creative industries are an increasingly important part of the modern economy and this degree is an excellent stepping stone to a career in a broad range of fields in the arts, literature, journalism and many more.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by many employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by expert University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Postmodern Writing provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. When you graduate you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-post-modern-writing-masters/#how-to-apply

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism offers you a dynamic engagement with Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism in their cultural contexts. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism offers you a dynamic engagement with Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism in their cultural contexts. The course provides you with a firm grounding in the latest developments in literary criticism and analysis. It also provides you with the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism pathway is the combination of the study of the literature of this period with the development of key transferable skills. As a student on this MA scheme, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivaled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-eighteenth-century-writing-and-romanticism-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. Each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism in the third semester.

Overview

You will study two core modules, together with two option modules. Specialist MA modules in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism provide a rigorous and detailed engagement with specific aspects of the literature of the period. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in an aspect of Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism that is of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism

This degree will suit you:
- If you have a specific interest in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism
- If you want a rigorous training for future work as a researcher
- If you want to develop your literary research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of the literature, history and culture of this period and key transferable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of occupations. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by a broad range of employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. Students will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-eighteenth-century-writing-and-romanticism-masters/#how-to-apply

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with the literature of these periods in its various cultural contexts. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing offers students a dynamic engagement with the literature of these periods in its various cultural contexts. The course provides you with a firm knowledge of the latest developments in literary criticism and analysis. It also provides you with the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the Aberystwyth MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing is the combination of the study of the literature of these periods alongside the development of key transferable skills. As a student on this MA scheme, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-medieval-and-renaissance-writing/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. In their third semester, each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Medieval and Renaissance Writing.

Overview

You will study two core modules together with two optional modules. Specialist MA modules in Medieval and Renaissance Writing provide a rigorous and detailed interrogation of particular aspects of the literature of these periods. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level and beyond.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in the field of Medieval and Renaissance Writing that is of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details:
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing

This degree will suit you...
- If you have a specific interest in Medieval and Renaissance Writing
- If you want a rigorous training for future work as a researcher
- If you want to develop your literary research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies

- Employability:
An MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of Medieval and Renaissance Writing and key transferrable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of occupations. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers. The creative industries are an increasingly important part of the modern economy and this degree is an excellent stepping stone to a career in a broad range of fields in the arts, literature, journalism and many more.

- Key Skills and Competencies Study Skills:
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources. The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by many employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by expert University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skill:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Writing provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. When you graduate you will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-medieval-and-renaissance-writing/#how-to-apply

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This distance learning programme, offered in partnership with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, a Skye-based college of the University of the Highlands and Islands, presents a unique and innovative opportunity to engage with the culture of Scotland through its wealth of popular and creative arts, and to contribute to international debates concerning the role of tradition and heritage in the 21st century. Read more

Programme description

This distance learning programme, offered in partnership with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, a Skye-based college of the University of the Highlands and Islands, presents a unique and innovative opportunity to engage with the culture of Scotland through its wealth of popular and creative arts, and to contribute to international debates concerning the role of tradition and heritage in the 21st century.

You will engage with a newly available range of digitised archival resources, including Tobar an Dualchais – Kist o Riches, a major online collection of audio recordings relating to all aspects of Scotland’s oral heritage. You will study the principles of folklore and ethnology and take courses that open your eyes and ears to song, storytelling, custom, tradition and heritage.

Online learning

All of your learning and engagement with tutors and fellow students will take place in a high quality virtual learning environment (VLE), designed and led by top scholars from both institutions.

You will become part of a virtual community of students, accessing a full range of teaching resources and participative sessions through the VLE.

Teaching and learning takes the form of video presentations, audio podcasts, guided reading and research, discussion board threads and participation in a virtual classroom setting in real time.

Programme structure

This programme has been designed to deal with both the theory and practice of the cultural traditions and heritage of Scotland, but is set in an international comparative context.

You will take a compulsory course in Resources and Research Methods, as well as two shorter thematic courses in semester 1 and two more in semester 2:

Resources and Research Methods (taken over two semesters)
Tobar an Dualchais / Kist o Riches: Analytical Case Study
The Traditional Arts in Scotland: History and Context
Tradition and Modernity
Understanding Heritage

Career opportunities

Successful completion of this programme will prepare you for a variety of career opportunities including in broadcasting and other media, heritage and conservation organisations, publishing, arts development, tourism, local or national government, research, management or education.

Having an enhanced knowledge of Scottish culture is relevant to employers both in a national context and overseas, given Scotland’s links to many countries around the world. The ability to undertake original research through cultural fieldwork as well as professional media editing, emphasised in several of the courses on this programme, is a key skill within many modern professions.

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This MSc has the approval of the Royal Colleges of Surgery and aims to improve the level of scientific appreciation of surgical trainees by exposing them to scientific principles and methods. Read more
This MSc has the approval of the Royal Colleges of Surgery and aims to improve the level of scientific appreciation of surgical trainees by exposing them to scientific principles and methods. The programme is suitable for both surgical and dental trainees and is primarily intended to provide scientific research experience prior to or as part of the surgical training programme.

Degree information

Students gain skills in the verbal and written communication of science, together with an in-depth understanding of science-based subjects of clinical relevance. Students also undertaken in-depth scientific research project (50% of final mark) and an appreciation of scientific research which further trains them to appraise the current scientific literature/evidence and experimental design, practice and analysis.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Surgical Skills (Microsurgery)
-Advanced Surgical Skills (Robotics)
-Research Methodology and Transferable Skills (Part I)

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Research Methodology and Transferable Skills (Part II)
-Applied Tissue Engineering
-Biomaterials in Tissue Regeneration: Micro and Nanoscale Surface Structuring
-Clinical Experience in Musculoskeletal Surgery
-Experimental Models in Surgical Research
-Heart and Circulation
-Musculoskeletal Biology (Part I)
-Musculoskeletal Biology (Part II)
-Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Biomaterials (Part I)
-Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Biomaterials (Part II)
-Nanotechnology
-Pain
-Performing Systematic Reviews of Interventions (Part I)
-Performing Systematic Reviews of Interventions (Part II)
-Surgical Oncology
-Translation of Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine (Bench to Bedside)
-Translation of Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine (Bench to Bedside)

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a subject of relevance to their clinical interests which culminates in a dissertation of 13,000 words and contributes 50% of the final mark. We encourage students to submit their work for presentation at conferences and for publication.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination papers, written reports, oral presentations, written coursework and oral examinations, and a dissertation and oral examination for the research project.

Careers

First destinations of recent graduates as junior surgeons in surgical training include: Southend Hospital: Surgeon; Bangor Hospital: Doctor; Royal Derby Hospital: Core Surgical Trainee; Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital: Academic Clinical Fellow; King's College Hospital NHS Trust: Specialist Registrar in Cardiothoracic; Greater Glasgow NHS: Paediatric Surgery Registrar and Training Surgeon. The majority of older graduates have become consultants in specialist surgical fields, e.g. at the Royal Free Hospital, Birmingham, Great Ormond Street, UCLH and generally throughout the UK and abroad.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Surgery & Interventional Science is part of one of the most prestigious medical schools in Europe, with a team of nearly 400 people, from surgeons and oncologists to clinical trials specialists and researchers. Our aim is to understand the causes of human disease and develop innovative therapies and technology to improve the quality of life of the people around us.

The UCL Medical School has highly rated science expertise within its academic and clinical departments thus guaranteeing an excellent research environment.

Students have the advantages of studying in a multi-faculty university with a long tradition of excellence, situated within the heart of one of the world's greatest cities.

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All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Read more
All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants for this course are expected to have a university qualification in either Hebrew or Arabic (Muslim-Jewish Relations stream) or Persian (Persian Cultural History stream).

Once admitted onto the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies), applicants will have the option of studying one of two streams:

- Muslim-Jewish Relations;
or
- Persian Cultural History

For each of these streams, students are required to choose three papers - courses usually run over two terms - in addition to doing a 15,000-word MPhil dissertation under the supervision of a supervisor. The dissertations are submitted no later than mid-August following the start of the course.

MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They may attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei

Course detail

* Muslim-Jewish Relations*

Students taking the Muslim-Jewish Relations stream will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying Muslim-Jewish relations, primary sources in translation and original language, bibliographical method, objectivity in the study of interfaith relations and controversial themes. Topics may include the Jewish languages of the Islamic world; key historical documents in the study of Muslim-Jewish Relations; Muslim and Jewish thought; Law and Society and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

* Persian Cultural History*

Students taking the Persian Cultural History stream will be offered readings in Persian cultural history, identifying persisting trends in Persian literature and cultural production from the medieval period down to modern times. These themes revolve around kingship and the image of the ideal prince, theories of justice and good government, and competing sources of secular and religious authority. Similarly, the motif of love, both earthly and divine, is a common thread running through Persian literature and entails also the extensive use of imagery of the natural world. In the modern world, the course examines a number of issues by studying Iranian cinema and focusing on gender, historical adaptation, nation and approaches to narration and resistance to dominant discourses, reflecting also on how the stories and legends of the classical tradition are adapted for contemporary literature and media. In discussing these topics, attention is paid to their visual as well as written representation.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Muslim and Jewish or Persian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

The one-year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies) will have the following structure for the (1) Muslim-Jewish Relations option and (2) Persian Cultural History option:

1. Three modules each assessed by an examination or a 5,000 word course exercise
2. A 15,000 word dissertation.

With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei/apply

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We offer research programmes in a variety of areas encompassing our Research Centres, Units and groups. The Department of Mechanical Engineering (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/) has a proud record of achievement in education and research. Read more
We offer research programmes in a variety of areas encompassing our Research Centres, Units and groups.

Our research

The Department of Mechanical Engineering (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/) has a proud record of achievement in education and research. Our research impact was officially recognised in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/performance/). 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Our research activities cover the full spectrum extending from fundamental investigations to applied research. Many of these activities are carried out in conjunction with industry and other universities, both in the UK and overseas.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/mechphd/index.html

Our applicants

We seek applications from outstanding individuals from anywhere in the world who are strongly committed to and potentially capable of high-quality academic research in any of the disciplinary areas covered by our Research Centres (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/research/).

We encourage a wide range of interests. Academic staff are always open to ideas which extend existing work or introduce new topics to their existing subject areas.

Working with us

Successful applicants are welcomed very much as junior academic colleagues rather than students, and are expected to play a full and professional role in contributing to the Department’s objective of international academic excellence.

In many cases postgraduate projects are linked to industrial companies and are often carried out in collaboration with other departments within the University and other institutions. Postgraduates thus have the opportunity to work on interdisciplinary projects with a strong industrial relevance as well as on more fundamental engineering topics.

The dissemination of research findings is seen as a vital component of the research process and graduate students are encouraged to prepare papers for publication as part of their research training.

Structure

The MPhil and PhD programmes combine taught research training and applied research practice. Candidates join the Department as a member of the Research Centre in which they initially have a broad research interest and that will have overseen their acceptance into the Department.

Most research students who ‘do a PhD’ register in the first instance as probationer for the programme of PhD. Confirmation of PhD registration is subject to your passing an assessment process, which normally involves submission of written work and an oral examination.

Candidates are expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of their chosen subject, which must then be written up as a substantial thesis.

The final stage of the PhD programme is the oral or viva voce examination, in which students are required to defend the thesis to a Board of Examiners.

International students

See the International students website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/qualifications/index.html) for details of entry requirements based on qualifications from your country.

All non-native speakers of English are required to have passed English language tests.

If you need to develop your English language skills, the University’s Academic Skills Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/asc/) offers a number of courses.

About the department

Bath has a strong tradition of achievement in mechanical engineering research and education.

We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

We offer taught MSc students the chance to carry out projects within outstanding research groupings.

Our research impact is wide and we are dedicated to working with industry to find innovative solutions to problems that affect all areas of society.

We are consistently ranked among the UK’s top 10 mechanical engineering departments in the annual league tables.

We believe in producing leaders, not just engineers.

We will give you the edge over your competitors by teaching you how technology fits into commercial settings. You will not only have access to cutting edge science and technology, we will also provide you with the skills you need to manage a workforce in demanding business environments.

For further information visit our departmental website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/mech-eng/pgt/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/index.html

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