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Masters Degrees (Oral Medicine)

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This full-time, one-year Master's programme includes the diagnosis and medical treatment of, and research into, conditions of the mouth, face, salivary glands and jaws. Read more

This full-time, one-year Master's programme includes the diagnosis and medical treatment of, and research into, conditions of the mouth, face, salivary glands and jaws.

About this degree

The programme’s students gain an understanding of aetiopathogenesis, clinical features, investigation and management of disorders of the oral mucosa and salivary glands, non-neoplastic disease of the jawbones and disorders of sensation of the mouth, and develop skills in investigating and managing such diseases.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Principles of Therapeutics and Treatment Core Course (Oral Medicine)
  • Clinical Care Core Course (Oral Medicine)
  • Advanced Clinical Care in Oral Medicine
  • Principles and Practice in Oral Medicine
  • Clinical Science and Research Methods

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

Each student undertakes an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, clinical teaching on a one-to-one basis, seminar teaching, lectures, journals club, case discussion, self-directed learning and problem-based learning.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Oral Medicine MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

After completion of the programme, graduates have typically followed five potential pathways:

  • Academic/hospital positions in oral medicine in countries where no further academic or clinical training is required
  • PhD programmes (typically in the UK, but also in the EU and overseas)
  • NHS clinical training positions, either foundation training or specialist training (in the UK)
  • NHS posts e.g. speciality doctor/dentist in the UK
  • Positions in dental practices in the UK, EU and overseas.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Lecturer, Taibah University/Ministry of Education of Saudi Arabia
  • Specialist Doctor, Newcastle Dental Hospital (NHS)
  • Dental Consultant, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital
  • Associate Dentist, National Dental Practice
  • Senior Health Officer, Eastman Dental Hospital (NHS)

Employability

The institute has an internationally renowned oral medicine unit with staff who are highly active in teaching and research, and the associated Eastman Dental Hospital has a strong patient base that ensures exposure to a wide range of oral medicine conditions. The programme ensures that students lay the groundwork towards an academic and/or hospital career in oral medicine in the UK or abroad.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme’s students benefit from the opportunity to become closely involved in the clinical care of patients, taking full part in the processes of examination, diagnosis, assessment, investigations and the prevention and management of disease. They will also be exposed to the research activities of the unit and gain significant experience in translational research design and delivery.

Accreditation:

Successful completion of the MSc in Oral Medicine might be considered when making allowance for past training and experience in relation to the length of training posts (Specialty Training) in oral medicine in the UK.



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This is a one-year, full-time degree programme aimed at qualified dental clinicians looking to develop competency predominately in clinical oral medicine. Read more
This is a one-year, full-time degree programme aimed at qualified dental clinicians looking to develop competency predominately in clinical oral medicine. It focuses on the recognition, investigation, diagnosis and management of patients presenting with common oral and maxillofacial diseases and will provide a sound grounding in the fundamental principles of UK specialist practice. It also considers and incorporates the basic principles of research that are relevant to clinical and modern translational practice.

Contemporary educational methods will be used to determine and monitor knowledge base, as well as using workplace-based assessments for clinical competency. Students will be supervised by clinical, laboratory and academic staff within an established and integrated specialist clinical training and educational environment. There will be continuous verbal feedback and support to help develop skills for individual reflection and self-assessment. Students will undertake one of the following: a relevant laboratory-based research project, a clinical service review or a literature or data analysis project, leading to the submission of a dissertation.

The UHBristol NHS Trust and North Bristol Trust require those who are granted access to patients must have evidence of immunisation against infectious diseases and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance prior to commencing the clinical sessions within the Trust premises.

International applicants will be required to provide a satisfactory police check/certificate of good conduct from their home country (with a certified translation into English if necessary). This requirement will be included in the conditions of any offer that is made, and will need to be satisfied before the applicant's place on the programme can be confirmed. Basic computer skills and access to a PC with internet connection are required.

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This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. Read more
This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. It also provides a sound educational background so that you can go on to lead academic oral biology programmes within dental schools.

Why study Oral Biology at Dundee?

This course is specifically designed for individuals who wish to pursue career pathways in academic oral biology, with a focus, though not exclusively, on developing individuals who can deliver and, more importantly, lead oral biology courses within dental schools.

Oral Biology is a significant subject area that is integral to undergraduate and postgraduate dental training worldwide. The scope of Oral Biology includes a range of basic and applied sciences that underpin the practise of dentistry. These subjects include: oral and dental anatomy; craniofacial and dental development; oral physiology; oral neuroscience; oral microbiology. These subjects will be integrated with the relevant disease processes, for example, craniofacial anomalies, dental caries and tooth surface loss.

What's so good about studying Oral Biology at Dundee?

This programme focuses on the research and education experience of the staff in the Dental School in Dundee. Such expertise lies in the fields of craniofacial development and anomalies; pain and jaw muscle control; salivary physiology; cancer biology; microbiology; cariology and tooth surface loss.

In addition it makes use of the extensive resources available for postgraduate programmes: extensive histological collections; virtual microscopy; oral physiology facilities; cell biology and dental materials laboratories.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Oral Biology is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in academic oral biology. The course will be of particular interest for those wishing to establish themselves as oral biology teachers, innovators and course leaders within a dental school.

Teaching and Assessment

The Dental School is well placed to deliver such a course with an established staff of teaching and research active within oral biology, and its related fields, an in-house e-learning technologist and substantial links to the Centre for Medical Education in the School of Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to exit with a PGCert in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 -4 or a Diploma in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 - 7.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered via a blend of methodologies including: face-to-face lectures / seminars / tutorials; on-line learning; directed and self- directed practical work; self-directed study; journal clubs.
What you will study

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August). Semester one (Modules 1 – 4) and Semester 2A, 2B (Modules 5 – 8) will provide participants with wide ranging, in-depth knowledge of oral biology, together with focused training in research (lab-base, dissertation or e- Learning) and its associated methodology. The MSc course is built largely on new modules (5) supported by 2 modules run conjointly with the Centre for Medical Education within the Medical School. All modules are compulsory:

Semester 1:

Module 1: Academic skills 1: principles of learning and teaching (15 credits)
Module 2: Cranio-facial development and anomalies (15 credits)
Module 3: Dental and periodontal tissues, development and structure (20 credits)
Module 4: Oral mucosa and disorders (10 credits)

Semesters 2A and 2B

Module 5a: Academic skills 2a: principles of assessment (15 credits)
Module 5b: Academic Skills 2b:educational skills
Module 6: Neuroscience (20 credits)
Module 7: Oral environment and endemic oral disease (20 credits)
Module 8: Project (60 credits)

The project is designed to encourage students to further develop their skills. This could take the form of a supervised laboratory research project, a literature based dissertation or an educational project. The educational project would be based around the development of an innovative learning resource utilising the experience of the dental school learning technologist.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Careers

The MSc Oral Biology is aimed at dental or science graduates who are either early in their careers or wish to establish themselves as oral biologists within dental schools. Oral Biology is a recognised discipline in many dental schools worldwide. Graduates will have gained sufficient knowledge and skills to enable them to be teachers, innovators and educational leaders in the field. In addition, successful graduates will be well placed to undertake further postgraduate study at PhD level. In some cases, this may possible within the existing research environments within the Dental School, the wider College of Medicine Dentistry and Nursing and the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification of the University of Dundee.

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Our three-year MSc (Clin) Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery course enables dentists to train in the specialty concerned with the diagnosis and management of diseases, injuries and defects affecting the mouth, jaws, face and neck. Read more

Our three-year MSc (Clin) Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery course enables dentists to train in the specialty concerned with the diagnosis and management of diseases, injuries and defects affecting the mouth, jaws, face and neck.

All units are based on the speciality of oral surgery, but within the wider context of maxillofacial surgery. You will undertake minor oral surgery under supervision, carried out under local anaesthesia, conscious sedation and general anaesthesia. You will also attend theatre to assist and observe major surgery and attend consultation clinics, trauma clinics, ward rounds and carry out ward duties.

The clinical component of the course consists of units covering surgical basic sciences, reflective oral surgery practices, dental tissues, bone disease and injury, soft tissues, and salivary tissue, pain and the temporomandibular joint.

You will attend weekly interactive seminars led by senior staff and invited guest speakers. Some of these have actor patients present to allow you to rehearse your clinical skills.

If you study the full three-year MSc, you will also attend external teaching events such as residential blocks for basic science applied to surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

You will become eligible to sit the Royal College of Surgeons examinations for Membership in Oral Surgery on completion of this MSc course.

Aims

The course aims to:

  • provide dental practitioners with the knowledge and skills to undertake oral surgery in the context of wider knowledge of oral and maxillofacial surgery;
  • provide you with the appropriate knowledge, understanding, intellectual skills, practical skills and attitude to practice oral surgery in selected cases;
  • enable you to carry out critical evaluation, problem solving and use sound judgement for clinical problems;
  • give you the knowledge to criticalyl understand the issues involved in the scientific basis of oral and maxillofacial surgery;
  • ensure you are competent in the design and interpretation of original clinical research at the forefront of current dental research (including data collection and statistical analysis using appropriate computer software);
  • provide you with the knowledge and experience to plan, implement and complete a research project showing initiative and personal responsibility.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is by essay and SBAs throughout the course and related to the taught units. You will also maintain a clinical surgical logbook and undertake a clinical competency test. There is also an oral examination.

  • Research Methods: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor marked assignments.
  • Biostatistics: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor marked assignments.
  • Clinical component: This is assessed by written examination and clinical examination in the form of an oral presentation.
  • Dissertation (10,000-15,000 words).

Course unit details

Research Methods Component (15 credits): The aim is to equip you with skills related to design, execution and interpretation of clinical and clinically-related research.

Biostatistics component (15 credits): This unit aims to equip you with skills in data collection, simple analysis and interpretation of clinical and clinically related research.

Specialist Clinical Component: The aim of this component is to give you an understanding of the scientific basis of oral and maxillofacial surgery, with particular emphasis on current theories relevant to the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of adult patients.

The Specialist Clinical Component encompasses the following:

  • Core lectures to include:
  • Medical emergency management
  • Cross infection control
  • Radiological protection
  • Clinical governance
  • Interactive seminars related to oral surgery
  • Pre-clinical skills course
  • Attend consultation clinics
  • Case reviews

Dissertation

Course content for year 1

Additional teaching and learning specific to the three year course:

  • Additional 3 clinical sessions per week (3 hours each)
  • Head and Neck Anatomy (3 days)
  • Royal College Surgeons of England (3 day residential)
  • ProfSusan Standring
  • Dr Barry Berkovitz
  • Mr Michael Monteiro
  • Further Head and Neck Anatomy, Applied Physiology and Clinical Pathology and Microbiology
  • Royal College Surgeons of England
  • Prof Susan Standring
  • Dr Barry Berkovitz
  • Mr Michael Monteiro
  • Dr Richard Byers
  • Prof Philip Hasleton
  • Dr Ray McMahon
  • Dr Emyr Benbow

Course content for year 2

  • Additional 3 clinical sessions per week (3 hours each)
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery course
  • Royal College of Surgeons (Residential and Distance Learning)
  • Emergency Skills, Ward and Peri-operative Management, Clinical Photography
  • Tutor, Mr Steve Langton
  • British Association of Oral Surgeons
  • Annual UK Scientific Conference (2 days residential)
  • Association of Dental Implantology (ADI)
  • UK Annual Meeting (2 days residential)

Course content for year 3

  • Additional 3 clinical sessions per week (3 hours each)
  • British Association of Oral Surgeons
  • Annual UK Scientific Conference (2 days residential)
  • Association of Dental Implantology (ADI)
  • UK Annual Meeting (2 days residential)
  • International Association of Dental Research
  • International Conference (4 days residential)
  • Examination Preparation Membership in Oral Surgery
  • Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
  • Invited faculty to Manchester

Facilities

You will have access to dedicated postgraduate suites. You will also be able to access a range offacilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

Some selected seminars will provide you with CPD hours.

Career opportunities

MSc courses are designed for dental practitioners who wish to further their knowledge of surgery and are a useful foundation for specialist training in this field.

The three year course provides specialist oral surgery clinical training.

Associated organisations



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This MSc is designed to give clinicians and practitioners a deeper understanding of sports medicine, sports injuries and exercise medicine. Read more

This MSc is designed to give clinicians and practitioners a deeper understanding of sports medicine, sports injuries and exercise medicine. The programme covers the evidence-based management of sports medicine and musculoskeletal injuries, and emphasises the vital role of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. This MSc can be taken full-time over one year, part-time over two years, or via flexible distance learning.

About this degree

The programme focuses on sports injuries and their prevention and treatment, and provides a thorough grounding in relevant areas of anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology and psychology, as well as the fundamentals of exercise in maintaining and improving health. Students develop essential research skills through an independent research project.

All students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project (60 credits). Clinical sessions are spread over the year; commitment is equivalent to one half-day per week over three 12-week semesters. Clinic options include sports injury, physiotherapy and podiatry, exercise testing, and team visits.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules

  • Exercise Physiology
  • Health and Physical Activity
  • Sports Injuries I – Lower Limb
  • Sports Injuries II – Upper Limb
  • Sports Injuries III – Head, Neck and Spine
  • Advanced Sports Injury and Injury Prevention
  • Research Methods

Optional modules

  • Team and Event Medicine
  • Rehabilitation of Sports Injuries

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project from a diverse range of available topics, which culminates in a dissertation, an oral examination and a presentation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered through a combination of formal lectures, hands-on practical sessions, small group seminars, clinics and field trips, and will be delivered by lecturers who are highly experienced in their field. Up-to-date, evidence-based practice will be emphasised throughout and students' contribution through discussion is considered key. Assessment is through written examination, presentations, coursework and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), as well as the dissertation and viva voce (oral) examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will gain a deeper understanding and valuable insights into the key areas of sports injury prevention and management, health and physical activity, and will be able to prescribe exercise safely for a range of medical conditions. This will prepare them for potential work in many areas from elite sports medicine to NHS sports and musculoskeletal clinics, and exercise medicine services.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Physiotherapist and Chiropractor, Barclays
  • Doctor, NHS Health Education East Midlands
  • Rotational and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
  • Senior Therapist, NHS Malta
  • Sports Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist, Princess Grace Hospital

Employability

A Master's-level degree in Sports Medicine, Exercise & Health from UCL will open many doors in the sports and exercise medicine world, from sports injury clinics to developing exercise medicine programmes for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease, and working with sports teams. UCL's MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health is led by local experts with active involvement in the NHS and elite sports and exercise medicine settings. A distinct feature of the programme is the wide variety and large number of distinguished external guest speakers, all experts in their own field locally, nationally and internationally. Students have unrivalled access to our guest speakers for career advice and potential opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of the world's very best universities, consistently placed in the global top 20 in a wide range of world rankings. The UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science is part of one of the most prestigious medical schools in Europe, with a team of nearly 400 people, from surgeons and oncologists to clinical trials specialists and researchers. This programme is based at the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health (ISEH). Our aim is to understand the causes of human disease and develop innovative therapies and technology to improve quality of life.

The MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health at UCL places a strong emphasis on improving health through exercise alongside the management of sports and musculoskeletal injury. The programme has significant clinical content and students benefit from attendance at numerous specialist clinics and opportunities for field visits to sports teams and events.

Graduate students on the MSc in Sports Medicine, Exercise and Health at UCL are from diverse backgrounds reflecting the true multidisciplinary nature of sports and exercise medicine.



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The Aerospace Medicine course aims to provide medical graduates with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and clinical medicine of humans exposed to or working in the aviation environment. Read more

The Aerospace Medicine course aims to provide medical graduates with advanced theoretical and practical training in the physiology, psychology and clinical medicine of humans exposed to or working in the aviation environment.

The programme will also prepare students for the examination in the Diploma in Aviation Medicine, DAVMed which is run through the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM). More details can be found here 

Key Benefits

  • World-class learning programme delivered at a location recognised by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board for higher professional training in aviation and space medicine.
  • Teaching by internationally renowned scientists and clinicians.
  • An advanced study course providing unique opportunities to undertake an aeromedical research project that are carried out in the laboratory or in approved aeromedical centres in the UK and elsewhere.
  • Additional preparation for the Diploma in Aviation Medicine, Faculty of Occupational Medicine (RCP) is available.

Description

The Aerospace Medicine course is a unique study pathway that provides physicians with comprehensive theoretical and practical instruction in advanced aviation physiology, psychology, pathology, clinical and operational aviation medicine.

This course includes time based at the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine (CAM), as the Centre provides an appropriate location for valuable elements of the teaching and visits to some of the service and civilian establishments used. The Centre also offers unique practical facilities which are available to students on the course.

You will complete the MSc course in one year, studying September to September. If you are following the MSc pathway, you must take modules totalling 180 credits to meet the requirements of the qualification, of which 60 will come from a research project and written dissertation.

The Postgraduate Diploma pathway requires modules with a total of 120 credits to complete the programme and can be conducted in just over six months.

Teaching

If carrying out the MSc you will receive approximately 510 contact hours at King’s and various external study locations, primarily the RAF Centre for Aviation Medicine at Henlow – this includes lectures, seminars, practical sessions.

If you are studying for the full MSc qualification, you will be expected to spend approximately 600 hours on the research project module and thesis.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Assessment

The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of oral presentations, written assignments and written examinations.

The MSc research project and dissertation will be assessed on an extended piece of writing. 

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Course accreditation

The course at King’s is delivered at an approved centre of the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) to specifically deliver education and training for individuals wishing to take the RCP, Faculty of Occupational Medicine examination leading to the award of the Diploma in Aviation Medicine.

Location

This course is primarily taught at the King’s College London Guy’s campus, with some teaching at the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine at Henlow as well as other locations, mainly in the UK but commonly with one overseas visit. Please note that locations are determined by where each module is taught and may vary.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in aerospace medicine are varied. Many undertaking specialist training have already been employed specifically for the role and are sponsored to undertake these courses. However others use such training so as to better equip themselves for potential employment.

Areas of possible careers include with airlines, aviation regulators, air traffic services, military aviation and space agencies as well as in academic or commercial research organisations. Some aviation medical examiners (AMEs) undertake the DAvMed. Appointment as an AME in the UK is now restricted to doctors on the GMC specialist register. 

Previous graduates of the M.Sc programme and DAvMed courses have been employed in all these areas and enjoyed a varied and challenging career.



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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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This MSc programme is designed to provide students with an in-depth working knowledge of the principles and practice related to Oral Sciences. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to provide students with an in-depth working knowledge of the principles and practice related to Oral Sciences. The major strength of this programme is that the programme is aligned to and delivered by internationally renowned members from the Oral Sciences Research Group located within Glasgow Dental School. Students will experience and participate in cutting edge research within the theme while learning techniques widely relevant to biomedical sciences. This programme will be of particular interest to those interested in pursuing or furthering careers in oral and dental related occupations, as well as laboratory scientists or academics. This programme also enables graduates to gain experience in research before applying to a doctoral programme.

Why this programme

  • If you are passionate about oral sciences and keen to learn through an in-depth, evidence based, critical approach, and enthusiastic about specialising in a particular area – oral disease pathogenesis or infection control and decontamination, then this programme is for you.
  • Our staff are internationally experienced researchers and academics with both clinician and science backgrounds, experts in biofilm infections, oral inflammation and infection control.
  • There is a long tradition of excellence in Oral Sciences at the University of Glasgow, with pioneering research by MacFarlane, Samaranayake and Bagg, and other current Glasgow academics continue to make important contributions in the field of Oral Sciences.
  • A range of transferable skills are integrated and embedded into this programme, which will improve possibilities in the job market.
  • You will undertake research alongside pre and post-doctoral researchers and learn how to work as a team and improve technical skills and communication.
  • Students can learn first-hand within a dedicated oral sciences research laboratory infrastructure linked directly to clinical research facilities.
  • There is a direct link with our doctoral research programme.

Programme structure

  • Translational research approaches
  • Evidence based medicine and statistics
  • Laboratory techniques in oral sciences
  • Principles of oral sciences
  • Research methods in oral sciences
  • Research dissertation in oral sciences

Career prospects

Graduates are well placed for a variety of employment opportunities in the oral and dental industries, as well as a wide array of the biomedical science sectors. This course provides a sound basis from which to apply for employment in laboratory positions in industry or in academia, or to continue professional training in dentistry and oral hygiene, or for further doctoral-level research training for academic or teaching careers. 

A high proportion of our graduates go on to complete PhDs in Glasgow or other high quality institutions across the world. Careers of some of our recent graduates include:

  • Clinical research scientist (NHS)
  • Senior clinical scientist (GlaxoSmithKline)
  • Laboratory scientist (BluTest Laboratories)
  • Assistant professor (Khyber Medical University)
  • Associate professor (University Sains Malaysia)
  • Postdoctoral research fellows (University of Glasgow)
  • Scientist (Scottish Environmental Protection Agency)


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Our MRes Tissue Engineering for Regenerative Medicine course gives students from biological, engineering and/or medical-related backgrounds the specialist knowledge and research skills to pursue a career in this field. Read more

Our MRes Tissue Engineering for Regenerative Medicine course gives students from biological, engineering and/or medical-related backgrounds the specialist knowledge and research skills to pursue a career in this field.

You will focus on strategies to repair, replace and regenerate various tissues and organs to solve major clinical problems, gaining insights into topical issues including stem cells, polymer technology, biomaterial fabrication/characterisation and gene delivery. You will learn how to identify major clinical needs and formulate novel therapeutic solutions.

This course has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience. You will learn practical skills through two research placements.

Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a discipline shows enormous potential for future health and, economically, there is a national demand for specific interdisciplinary training in this area.

We have a vast research network in this field comprising international experts from multiple disciplines and, as such, this course is a collaborative degree from the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health and the Faculty of Science and Engineering.

Teaching and learning

This course is structured around taught elements and laboratory-based research projects, with an emphasis on the research-based element.

You will gain hands-on laboratory experience through both the practical skills unit and research placements in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine-focused laboratories at the University lasting 25 weeks.

The course comprises five compulsory components:

  • research methods course unit - 15 credits;
  • tutorial course unit - 15 credits;
  • masterclass course unit - 15 credits;
  • practical skills course unit - 15 credits;
  • research placements:
  • part 1 - literature review and project proposal - 30 credits;
  • part 2 - a 25-week project including practical work, oral presentation and final dissertation, and an assessment of research performance - 90 credits.

You will experience the interdisciplinary nature of the field during the course and gradually increase the depth and complexity of your research through the masterclass unit.

Each project is written up and assessed separately when submitted during the year.

You will be allocated a personal tutor and a personal logbook is introduced at the start of the programme to monitor progress through the course and assess learning and career objectives.

Research placements

The research placements are the largest component of the course and aim to give you the specialist knowledge and practical skills to pursue a research career in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, as well as develop your practical research expertise in a chosen area and enhance your ability to analyse and interpret data and summarise your findings in the form of written reports and an oral presentation.

The first placement runs alongside the taught units in Semester 1 and involves writing a comprehensive literature review and formulating a research project proposal.

The second placement (25 weeks) runs concurrently with the tutorial course unit for the first part, but is full-time thereafter. It involves hands-on practical experience in a laboratory and integration within a research team. The project is assessed by oral presentation at an end of year symposium, research performance and by submission of a dissertation.

You will choose from a list of research projects (see sample research projects ) and supervisors. Close interaction with the project supervisor at the start of the project and regular monitoring allows you to take responsibility for your own research development. The development of an interactive supervisory/student arrangement is often a useful grounding for future PhD collaboration.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed continually during the year through:

  • oral presentations;
  • group participation;
  • multiple choice questionnaires;
  • written reports;
  • a final dissertation.

Facilities

You will have access to a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office .

Career opportunities

After the course, many students continue their studies and register for a PhD.

However, the course is also of value to students wishing to progress in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry, or go into specialist clinical training.

It is also ideal for MBChB intercalating students who wish to undertake directly channelled research training in the tissue engineering/regenerative medicine field.

Associated organisations

You will benefit from close interaction with members of the following groups.



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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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The Medicine, Health & Public Policy study course examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, biosciences and health. Read more

The Medicine, Health & Public Policy study course examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, biosciences and health. The multidisciplinary nature of the course creates an ideal study pathway for health professionals, graduates and policy-makers to gain an understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society.

Key benefits

  • Internationally recognised faculty, who have trained across a range of disciplines from sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, socio-legal studies and political science to psychology, bioethics, philosophy, biology and medicine.
  • Covers a broad range of substantive topics and offers a wide selection of specialist options addressing critical social and ethical concerns.
  • You will learn to think analytically and independently about key issues and develop essential skills to support critical policy and qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  • Interdepartmental study course offers a varied and exciting range of research options.
  • Opportunities to join a thriving research community, to participate with active researchers in a range of extra-curricular events such as reading groups and roundtable discussions.

Description

The Medicine, Health and Public Policy course offers you flexibility with the choice to study either full or part-time. You will gain in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the policy implications of developments in health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives.

The course is made up of optional and required modules totalling 180 credits to complete the course, 60 credits will come from a dissertation of around 10,000 - 12,000 words.

If you are studying full-time you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete; Part-time MSc students will be expected to take The Politics of Health & Medicine, Critical Policy Research and one optional module in year one, with the remaining required modules taken in year two.

Course purpose

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 15 hours of this per module over a 10 week term. We also expect you to undertake 135 hours of independent study for each module. For your Dissertation, we will provide three 2-hour workshops and sixteen 30-minutes supervisory sessions to complement your 591 hours of independent study. Typically, 1 credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The department assesses students on a combination of essays, written examinations, oral presentations and the dissertation. The nature of assessment varies by module. The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect.

Career prospects

The MSc in Medicine, Health & Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.



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This MSc will provide you with the knowledge and skills to manage sports injuries and illness and to explore the relationship between physical activity and health. Read more

Overview

This MSc will provide you with the knowledge and skills to manage sports injuries and illness and to explore the relationship between physical activity and health.

The clinical SEM course is aimed at doctors, physiotherapists and allied professionals with a strong musculoskeletal clinical background. We feel strongly that the range of backgrounds of the students provides students with a rounded education, drawing on the wide ranging clinical experience and different expertise of the students and lecturers.

Key facts

Clinical exposure - The MSc offers students the opportunity to sit in Sports Medicine clinics with consultant SEM doctors and physiotherapists. In these clinics the student will have exposure to all sections of the community, children, recreational athletes, elite athletes and the elderly. The student will see a wide ranging spectrum of musculoskeletal problems and first hand investigation and treatment.

Face to face teaching - One of the strengths of the Nottingham MSc is the face to face teaching that take place. This allows students real time interaction with clinicians, scientists and lecturers, enabling in depth exchange of knowledge and ideas. We believe that with this the student has a much greater understanding of the subject than with distance learning.

Pitch side exposure - Included in the fees is a Gold standard pitch side emergency care course (EMMiITS). This takes place at the beginning of the academic year and success in this course enables the student to undertake pitch side emergency care at the weekly BUCS matches. Students may wish to undertake a placement with a professional team and we will facilitate this whether ever possible.

Full and part-time option - As many of our students are practising professionals we have developed a range of study options to enable them to continue with their clinical practice whilst studying. The full time course is undertaken over one year. The part time course covers the same modules but can be taken over 2, 3, or 4 years.

Research projects - The research projects are a key strength of the course. Students are encouraged to undertake a project in a field of interest. However we acknowledge that not all students will be able to do this and we have a range of projects within the department that students can undertake, within both clinical SEM and also in nutrition and muscle physiology within the School of Life Sciences. International students have the opportunity to develop research and undertake research projects within their home country.

Course quality - The MSc has a faculty of excellent internal and external lecturers of all disciplines, all experts in their field. Many of the lecturers work at a national and international level in Sport and Exercise Medicine. Established in 1991, the MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine is one of the longest running SEM courses in the country and is constantly updated and improved. This successful programme is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the top sports and exercise medicine courses for the rounded sports medicine specialist.

This course is now delivered as part of the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine – East Midlands (NCSEM-EM), which is a London 2012 legacy funded project aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of the nation.

Structure

The MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine can be taken full-time over one year or part-time over two to four years. As an MSc student, you will study a series of core modules in sports and exercise medicine, which includes research methods tutorials, in addition to the compulsory project and dissertation module. This is an exciting opportunity to undertake research on a subject related to sports and exercise medicine or exercise physiology under the supervision of an appropriate member of academic staff. There are also a wide variety of optional modules to meet your specific interests.

This course can also be taken as a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) by those who do not wish to complete a research project and dissertation. The PGDip can be taken full-time over 9 months or part-time over 18 months.

The syllabus is covered by lectures, seminars, sport placements, anatomy teaching in our dissection room, eLearning and practical sessions. The course includes a two-day programme in Emergency Medical Management in Individual and Team Sports (EMMiITS).

Compulsory Modules

Module A34614 - Sports Injury Anatomy (20 credits)

Module A34628 - Clinical Sports Injury (10 credits)

Module A34632 - Sports Injury Assessment (10 credits)

Module A34633 - Pitchside Care of the Injured Athlete (10 credits)

Module A34616 - Physical Activity in Health and Disease (20 credits)

Module A34621 - Research Methods (10 credits)

Module A34631 - Project and Dissertation: Sports and Exercise Medicine (60 credits)

Students can also choose modules totalling a further 40 credits from a selection of optional modules. Full details can be found online.

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. This list is an example of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

Assessment

Your work will be assessed by a number of methods including both written and practical examinations, oral presentations, essays, reflective portfolio as well as the dissertation.

Careers

On completion of the MSc course, our graduates become involved in a wide range of sport and exercise related activities from General Practice and consultants in Sports Medicine to the provision of medical care for professional athletes and teams.

Graduates have gone on to successful careers including the Head of Sports Medicine for the Rugby Football League, the Chief Medical Officer to the England and Wales Cricket Board, the Director of Training and Conditioning for the New York Knicks Basketball team, Lead Physiotherapist for the Indian Cricket team, league football club physiotherapists and county cricket club doctors and physiotherapists.

Other achievements include winning the Health Specialist of the Year award in Dubai 2014 and presentation at various conferences.

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This programme orientates internationally qualified dental graduates to that of a UK dental practitioner by providing a comprehensive grounding in six key training areas. Read more
This programme orientates internationally qualified dental graduates to that of a UK dental practitioner by providing a comprehensive grounding in six key training areas: basic sciences and their application to modern day dental practice, applied principles of clinical dentistry, clinical skills, communication skills, professionalism, management and leadership.

The course is delivered under three broad headings:

1. Taught
Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of:

-Relevant basic sciences including anatomy, physiology, immunology, microbiology and molecular biology with respect to health and how these are altered in disease states
-Patho-physiological and anatomical basis for clinical signs of oral and craniofacial health and disease
-Relationships between dental disease, population risk factors and the preventative measures

And integrate this knowledge to dental areas through discussions in:

-Basic and clinical science associated with pharmacology and therapeutics used in dentistry
-The science underpinning the key properties of dental materials and evaluate their clinical applications


2. Clinical
Students' clinical skills will be augmented through practical, laboratory based sessions using typodont teeth set in a manikin head.

-Operative skills will be taught to ensure students can undertake skilled, competent and safe dental procedures including: cavity design, extra-coronal restorations and non-surgical endodontic treatment.
-Simulated clinical techniques will be undertaken and the student will be introduced to decision making processes leading to tooth loss and replacement and execution of appropriate operative techniques for all stages of planned prosthodontic treatment (excluding bridges and implants) in conjunction, as necessary, with other specialists and technicians.

Students will observe current UK dental practise via clinics in oral medicine, oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontology, paediatrics, prosthodontics, radiology and orthodontics.

Tutoring in Objective Structured Clinical Reasoning Examinations (OSCE) and Structured Clinical Reasoning (SCR) Exams will be carried out using the advanced facilities in the state of the art dental skills laboratory.

3. Research
The research component consists of a structured literature review and clinical audit report. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of:

-Critical appraisal and analysis of scientific and clinical literature
-How clinical audit identifies problems in clinical service and helps formulate solutions
-Appropriate tools for searching the literature (search engines, web-based libraries, electronic documents)

Students will develop the analytical skills to be able to:

-Critically appraise, analyse and evaluate scientific papers and clinical literature applying the principles of evidence based dentistry
-Evaluate evidence of the latest developments in Dentistry
-Communication skills will be developed throughout the taught, clinical and research elements of the course with specific topic presentations during seminars as well as through journal club reports and presentations on dental and clinical governance topics.

The application deadline is 30th June 2017. Once we have received applications by the deadline the first selection process will begin. We reserve the right to receive further application after the deadline and make decisions on those applications in July/August subject to places being available.

Why study for your MSc in Dental Science for Clinical Practice at Queen Mary?

The School of Medicine and Dentistry has an unrivalled tradition of excellence in research and teaching extending as far back as 1123 with the founding of St Bartholomew’s Hospital. The London Hospital Medical College was the first Medical School in England, founded in 1785, and our Dental School was established well over a century ago. We are ranked 3rd in the UK for Dentistry (Guardian University Guide 2017) and our research is ranked among the best in the UK according to the most recent Research Excellent Framework (REF 2014).


In April 2014, QMUL’s new Dental School opened its doors to patients and students - the first new dental school in the UK to be built in 40 years. The £78m new school houses the most modern dental facilities in the UK, following more than a decade of planning and work. The new premises provide cutting-edge technology, superb education and research facilities for clinical dentistry and a vastly improved patient experience.


Students’ postgraduate learning experience is enhanced by our fantastic location in the east of London. Not only are we in one of the capital’s most vibrant areas to live and work but we also serve a diverse local community, where students develop their clinical skills and knowledge. Moreover, the Dental School offers students many exciting opportunities to develop an understanding of health and the treatment of disease in a global and international context.


The Institute of Dentistry is a special place to undertake postgraduate studies, bringing together a number of world-leading researchers in basic and clinical sciences who supervise research students in the fields of oral medicine, oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral epidemiology, oncology, dental biomaterials, dental biophysics, dental public health, dental education, periodontology, orthodontics, paediatric dentistry, prosthetic and conservative dentistry.


You will have the opportunity to attend Continuing Development Courses of the London Deanery, Royal Society of Medicine (Odontology Section) as well as internal Departmental and Dental and Blizard Institute seminars.


You will prepare a professional development portfolio based on evidence gathered from lectures, tutorials, clinics, self-study and self-reflection sessions.


Facilities
You will have access to a range of facilities including: medical and dental libraries located at the Royal London and at Barts hospitals, as well as the Mile End library.

Postgraduate Dental students will have access to the Dental Clinical Skills Laboratory based in the Garrod building at the Whitechapel Site.

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The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. Read more
The Narrative Medicine master's program seeks to strengthen the overarching goals of medicine, public health, and social justice, as well as the intimate, interpersonal experiences of the clinical encounter. The program fulfills these objectives by educating a leadership corps of health professionals and scholars from the humanities and social sciences who will imbue patient care and professional education with the skills and values of narrative understanding.
Health care and the illness experience are marked by uneasy and costly divides: between those in need who can access care and those who cannot, between health care professionals and patients, and between and among health care professionals themselves. Narrative medicine is an interdisciplinary field that challenges those divisions and seeks to bridge those divides. It addresses the need of patients and caregivers to voice their experience, to be heard and to be valued, and it acknowledges the power of narrative to change the way care is given and received.

Program structure

The Narrative Medicine graduate degree requires 38 points to complete. Those studying full-time can complete the program in one academic year plus the following summer, and for a few students, in one academic year. Students electing to study on a part-time basis can complete the degree in two years. The part-time option is designed to accommodate the professional obligations of students who are employed. This is a rigorous and concentrated program that demands a serious commitment of time and energy. Students are expected to devote significant time to completing reading assignments, class assignments, and term projects outside of class.
Degree requirements include the five Core Courses in Narrative Medicine (22 points) and the Research Methodology course (4 points), which is required for all students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research. The remaining 12 to 16 points may include any combination of (1) additional Topics in Narrative Medicine courses; (2) elective courses chosen from other departments (up to six points: note that many graduate courses in other departments are three points each); Independent Study (one to four points) and/or (4) a Capstone (two to four points).
The core curriculum of this pioneering M.S. in Narrative Medicine combines intensive exposure to narrative writing and close reading skills, literary and philosophical analysis, and experiential work, with the opportunity to apply this learning in clinical and educational settings. Core courses provide the conceptual grounding for work in narrative medicine, and introduce the direct practice of teaching narrative competence to others. Students combine core curriculum work with more focused study of important and current topics in the field. Focused seminars draw on the resources of more than one discipline. Courses rotate to reflect the current concerns, methodologies, and analytic approaches of narrative scholars and practitioners. To allow students to individualize their professional education in narrative medicine, they may choose electives from among a wide range of offerings at the University, with advice and approval of the faculty adviser. Electives enable students to gain knowledge in academic disciplines they wish to pursue (e.g., medical anthropology) or in subject areas of special professional interest (e.g. aging).The optional Capstone Project offers a wide range of opportunities for supervised or mentored work: a clinical placement, a program development and/or evaluation project, a scholarly thesis, or a writing project. It may combine independent work with a summer intensive workshop, such as the Columbia University Oral History summer workshop or an intensive writing workshop. The requirement can also be satisfied by clinical practicums that may include teaching, witnessing, or serving as a teaching assistant.

For more information on the courses please visit the website: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/courses

Research Methodology

All students who have not taken a graduate-level course in research methodology, with a focus on qualitative research and/or evaluative research, are required to take our Research Methods in Narrative Medicine course

Funding and Financial Resources

We want to make sure that the cost of your continuing education and professional studies do not stand in the way of your goals.
Most students at the School of Professional Studies use a combination of savings, scholarships, loans, outside grants, sponsors, or employer tuition benefits to cover the cost of attendance. However you choose to finance your education, consider it an investment in your future, and know that we, in conjunction with the Office of Student Financial Planning, are here to help and advise you along the way.

You can find more information on the funding available here: http://sps.columbia.edu/narrative-medicine/tuition-and-financing/financial-resources

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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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