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MA Communication Design at Falmouth is a transformative, intensive studio based course, enabling you to develop your individual critical voice in communication design. Read more
MA Communication Design at Falmouth is a transformative, intensive studio based course, enabling you to develop your individual critical voice in communication design. The course prepares you for the demands of a rapidly changing, complex media world, where the ability to create meaningful and effective ideas is paramount.

Benefits:
- Learn from leading global design provocateurs and teachers in project challenges and study set
- Gain commercial experience through internships
- Work in a multi-million pound studio environment that mirrors leading contemporary design studios
- Specialist skills training, relevant for your project interests
- Final semester London show
- Digital final exhibition for global recognition and launch

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/communication-design-ma

How the course is taught

The course is structured over 45 weeks, across three semesters: deconstruction, reconstruction and reinvention.

You'll be in the studio most weekdays working on outcomes rooted in design process and the development of meaningful and innovative ideas. The experience is designed to be supportive yet provocative, so you can take your ideas and practice into new and exciting realms, that challenge you and the wider communications world.

Your learning is delivered across a mixture of set lectures, tutorials, workshops, and peer and tutor review.

Contact hours vary across the course, being most intensive during the first two semesters, with more self directed study as you develop your final project in the third semester. We expect some students to be away at points during the final semester, either working on research and project feedback, or attending internships.

Course outline

The course prioritises fresh and fearless thinking, developing students who see no boundaries to their work, curious to engage and discover while pursuing the highest level of innovation in communication design.

You'll gain an understanding of the global framework of communication design, and an approach to design process that delivers great ideas across diverse media platforms.

Mirroring the success of longstanding programmes at our School of Communication Design, you'll benefit from frequent industry contact, enabling you to stretch and question your practice, gaining inspiration from within and beyond your immediate boundaries.

Attracting a range of applicants, the course prepares you for independent or studio practice, in the applied creative industries, broader arts, or further academic research.

Our priority is to encourage your development by distilling and building your creative voice and ambition. We do so via three semesters, deconstruction, reconstruction and reinvention, with project outcomes mirroring a design process structure.

What you'll do

Semester 1: Deconstruction
- MACD 101: Process
(20 credits)
This module introduces the components of design process in relation to your own personal practice. Through provocation and critical debate you'll reflect on and challenge what you do, seeing how global, experiential and experimental insights can generate the most appropriate process models for a contemporary communications problem.

- MACD 102: Intersections
(20 credits)
This module examines the fundamental components to the production of design: human interaction and collaboration. Whether this interaction is between client and designer, object and user, or experience and emotion, it allows you to experience provocative challenges that hone your own standpoint. You'll learn how social engagement, polar tension or friction can inspire new thinking.

- MACD 103: Boundaries
(20 credits)
This module allows you to take more radical entry points into your understanding of practice; taking project interest into new forms or creating critical design response from more theorised or experimental catalysts.
Provocateurs will continue to challenge and stretch the limits of your enquiry, exploring new theoretical models and examining the debate of 'designer as author'; how works are translated or used; and how they or their work become the provocateur.

Semester 2: Reconstruction
- MACD 104: Curate and build
(40 credits)
You'll deep dive into your emergent interests, exploring how technology and an increasingly complex consumer and cultural landscape may effect your enquiry. Thinking by doing, you'll elect and develop skill sets and a depth of study in both practice and theory. With the module running across the whole semester, it allows you to fully prepare and test ideas and craft, sectors and media as you begin to prepare your main MA project.

- MACD 105: Compete
(20 credits)
Ahead of the final semester, you'll begin to look at avenues and insights for your own practice and from a business or funding perspective. You'll build professional skills relevant to individual need and examine components of design development including publishing, presentations, production and IP.

The module will also examine other methodologies of delivering work around the world, whether through commission or employment, working in known fields of the creative industries or with museums, arts organisations or universities and research bodies.
Student will also engage in competitive projects set by external bodies.

Semester 3: Reinvention
- MACD 106, MA project
(60 credits)
This module allows you to realise your final major project, in a largely self directed semester, bringing together practice, theory and an evaluation phase that provides reflection and potential industry or funding opportunities to be negotiated ahead of graduating.

The first phase leads to exhibiting at a key industry or cultural event, with an interim show. The second sees you gather insights, industry or critical feedback, or undertake an internship, or preparing for the launch of your project. This final phase sees the production of an essay or strategic report, depending on future plans.

Facilities

- Dedicated MA studio space
- Lecture theatres, design lab, break out spaces and meeting rooms
- Digital printing facilities, Risograph machine, woodblock printing and presses, workshop and negotiated access to screen-printing studios
- Apple suite, with Adobe CS and full collection of Monotype typefaces
- Extensive library facilities and digital collections
- Negotiated use of other facilities such as film, photographic, textiles and product design studios

Staff

You'll be taught by staff with backgrounds spanning design, academic, writing and research careers. They offer decades of experience teaching and working for leading studios, working with international clients, arts and cultural organisations, exhibiting and publishing work and research. They are enaged with many of the world's top creative universities and organisations as keynote speakers, external examiners and consultants. Overall they are all inspired by design, teaching, nurturing and encouraging great and motivated students.

Assessment

- Individual project briefs
- Design research journal
- Essay
- Oral presentations, individually and in groups
- Critical review or business plan

Careers

Communication design is a broad field of study, with career choices depending largely on your own personal project focus.

Options include:

- Graphic design
- Advertising
- Packaging and brand design
- Service design
- Photography and film
- Type design or illustration
- Editorial design
- Motion graphics, interactive or digital design
- Information or UX design
- Design criticism and writing
- Teaching, research or PhD study
- Allied fields: television, the heritage sector or exhibition design

Interview and selection process

Please apply via submission of an application form, an outline of your key interest or masters proposal and a portfolio. Details about our portfolio requirements can be found on the application form.

Interviews are held in person at the School, online via Skype or by phone.

Find out how to apply here - https://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MACODEFC_SEP&code2=0001

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design.

Typically this might include teachers, aspiring artists or designers, aspiring academics, or recent graduates in Fine Art or Design who wish to further their professional practice. It will also cater for those students with first degrees outside Art & Design who wish to convert their career path by following a more theoretical route in Art and Design.

The MA Art and Design is designed as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module [RS]) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design will align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design curriculum is designed so that students:
- Explore and develop concepts, skills or philosophies
- Develop creative skills
- Have a trajectory towards progression to MPhil/PhD

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/ma.aspx

Course Content

The suite of Master of Art (Art and Design) pathways currently offered is:
Art History through Practice
Art, Science & Technology
Design Futures
Ecologies
Fashion Design Futures
Philosophy

Learning & Teaching

The MA Art and Design is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the fine-art/design expertise in a respective fine-art/design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA Art and Design students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA Art and Design programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Art and Design Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (75 hours).

- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (125 hours).

- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Employability & Careers

The MA Art and Design acts as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards potential future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. The MA Art and Design programme aims to develop increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Anglia Ruskin University Applied Positive Psychology MSc is a taught postgraduate course offering full-time and part-time study options. Read more

The Anglia Ruskin University Applied Positive Psychology MSc is a taught postgraduate course offering full-time and part-time study options.

Students complete a combination of core and optional modules to earn a full 180 credit Master of Science qualification. Some modules may take place in Cambridge, Paris or online.

Put yourself at the forefront of this developing discipline by joining a strand of applied psychology only offered at a few universities across the world. Discover and discuss the nature of happiness, what helps people thrive and make a difference to everyday lives.

Positive psychology is life changing. Our course helps you investigate the science behind how we can prepare for more successful lives and better well-being, through challenging existing cognitive and emotional patterns and encouraging positivity with evidence-based activities.

You’ll be introduced to research and interventions around topics like positive and negative emotions, character strengths, motivation, resilience, creativity, wisdom and other conditions shown to make a difference to the lives of individuals, groups and organisations. You'll constantly test your skills and apply them to real-life situations, coming to understand which tools and strategies to use in delivering meaningful, high-impact interventions.

You’ll use your new skills to shape businesses, education and communities. Our wide choice of modules means that, whether you work in coaching, business, education or health, you can tailor your studies to your career goals. Our course will also suit you if you have a BSc in psychology and want to further your knowledge.

Our course is taught in Cambridge and Paris. In Paris, teaching takes place at Centre d’Études Diplomatiques et Stratégiques (CEDS), right in the centre of Paris near the Eiffel Tower. In Cambridge, you’ll also have access to our advanced psychology laboratories.

You’ll complete four intensive week-long modules, followed by online research methods teaching and supervision for your major project. In-between times you’ll undertake self-directed study.

Our tutors are leaders in the field of positive psychology. They include:

‌• Dr Ilona Boniwell, CEO of Positran

‌• Dr Richard Piech, cognitive neuroscientist

‌• Dr Christian van Nieuwerburgh, Managing Director of Growth Coaching

‌• Bridget Grenville-Cleave, Director of WorkMad

‌• Alexandre Jost, head of Spinoza Factory, a happiness think-tank

‌• J‌ean-Christophe Barralis and Jean Pages, directors of the French Institute of Appreciative Inquiry.

For an informal chat about our course please contact programme leaders Richard Piech or Ilona Boniwell.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-positive-psychology

Careers

You could find yourself using positive psychology within training, government, an organisation or even in life coaching. You might want to use the sustainable well-being and development skills you gain in the charity, social enterprise or heath sectors. Or you could even use the methods to transform a business or help develop and optimise the potential of a group, community or institution.

If you’re a qualified clinical psychologist, counsellor or psychotherapist, you’ll find positive psychology theory, research and applications will benefit your clinical work. Teachers, youth workers and educators also use positive psychology expertise in their work. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Psychology PhD.

Modules & Assessment

Optional modules -

‌• Introduction to Positive Psychology (Cambridge or Paris)

‌• Neuroscience of Well-being (Cambridge)

‌• Positive Child Development (Cambridge)

‌• Positive Relationships (Cambridge)

‌• Positive Psychology for Practitioners (Cambridge)

‌• Well-being: Economic, Social and Behavioural Causes (Cambridge)

‌• Positive Performance (Paris)

‌• Positive Psychology Coaching (Paris)

‌• Positive Education (Paris)

‌• Positive Organisations and Appreciative Inquiry (Paris)

‌• Positive Society (Paris)

Core modules -

‌• Research Methods for Psychology (online)

‌• Major Project (online)

Assessment

100% of your assessment will be through coursework. This could include essays, blogs, a reflective portfolio, self-reflective log, handouts, video presentation, mind maps, reports, a research proposal and a major project. You'll also get the chance to carry out an applied project in either a personal or professional setting, to give you experience of how positive psychology can be implemented in practice.

- Module notes

You’ll choose four modules from the list of 12 available across Cambridge and Paris, including one research module (quantitative or qualitative). You'll also complete a major project.

Where you'll study

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-technology

Where can I study?

Paris - You'll study at Centre d’Études Diplomatiques et Stratégiques (CEDS), near the Eiffel Tower.

http://www.heip.fr/?ceds=true

Cambridge - Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

Funding

The following postgraduate funding may be available to study the Applied Positive Psychology MSc at Anglia Ruskin University.

UK postgraduate loans:

Erasmus funding:

Funding from FindAMasters:

Fees

Full Time (UK / EU): £10,200

Part Time (UK / EU): £4,600

Full Time (international): £12,400

Part Time (international): £6,200



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- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code. M2Q3. - LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4. The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. Read more

LLM (Master of Laws) Law and Economics

- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code: M2Q3
- LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4

The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. It is a specialist programme which aims to provide rigorous training in theoretical and applied economic analysis as a means of analysing law and the legal framework. It is designed for students with a strong academic background in Law or Economics.

Aims of Programme

Graduates of the programme will possess a solid grounding in Legal theory and modern Economics that will enable them to conduct, assess, and supervise both theoretical and applied research in the field. Students who perform well on the programme are encouraged to apply for a joint doctoral study in the School of Economics and Finance and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies. For those seeking to develop or start their careers outside of academia, the new LLM programme will include a number of practical and knowledge transfer components that will allow a better transition to work outside the higher education sector. Students will, for example, have the opportunity to engage in an academic year-long Investment Club. During this time, students will be gaining hands on experience in trading and portfolio analysis alongside their studies.

Who is the course aimed at?

Such interdisciplinary skills make this LLM ideal for those already in, or planning a career in law or economics in academia, the public sector, international institutions, financial or legal industry or management consulting.

Structure of Programme

The LLM in Law and Economics is available to study full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

The programme of study provides a flexible mix of classroom based teaching (assessed by formal examinations and/or coursework) through:
◦An introductory pre-sessional in mathematics and statistics
◦Two compulsory taught modules which lay a foundation to Law and Economics theories
◦A 15,000 word dissertation
◦Choice of optional law and/or economic modules

Modules

Modules

For the LLM in Law and Economics you take a total of 180 credits. The two compulsory modules and the dissertation have a value of 90 credits. The remaining 90 credits are going to be selected from the range of law or economics modules.

You may study on one of two pathways: Jurisprudence, if you have a legal background or an undergraduate degree in law; or Economics, if you have an economic/finance background or have an undergraduate degree in economics or finance.

If you want to review concepts such as statistical distributions and matrix algebra, you also have the option to attend pre-sessional modules during induction week (week zero) and week one of the first term within the School of Economics and Finance. You will be also presented with basic statistics and statistical software during the first term.

You are required to balance your taught modules equally across the two teaching semesters – a full explanation of this process will be available during induction and before module selection.

Jurisprudence Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Lawyers) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation – 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules

Economics Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Economists) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation - 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules.

Visit the LLM in Law and Economics module page to see the full list of modules available on this course. Please note that not all options will be available every year.

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Our Master of Education program provides both teachers and graduates from non-teaching backgrounds with the opportunity to further their qualifications. Read more

Maximise your employment opportunities

Our Master of Education program provides both teachers and graduates from non-teaching backgrounds with the opportunity to further their qualifications.
Graduates from our Masters of Education program have secured employment in:
*Schools;
*other academic organisations;
*research
*consultancy.

While this course is useful for those wanting to further their professional development it does not lead to teacher registration.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers professional development opportunities, student flexibility through course design and structure, as well as a successful history in securing funding for major research programs.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings. Read more
The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings.
Educators are provided with the opportunity to further their qualifications through professional development. This coursework program aligns with the requirements and specifications of the Australian Quality Framework (AQF) and provides three major areas of expertise relevant to professional educators. The Master of Education does not lead to teacher registration.
The flexible 18 month Master of Education coursework program entails four core subjects, including an enquiry-based project, and provides the opportunity to specialise in up to two majors.

Global Contexts Major

The Global Contexts major has been designed for professionals who are seeking to develop a strategic approach to global practices and strategies. It has been developed in response to the steady growth in globalisation and changing international employment relationships.
Studying this major will expand and upgrade your expertise in globalisation and transnational education. Interested parties include: international and national school employees, managerial and non-managerial global careerists, international human resource management staff, professional managers, self-initiated expatriates, cross cultural team members, foreign hires (third country nationals, and mobility managers).
If you undertake our Global Contexts major you will:
*Examine the phenomenon of ‘development’ in Asia- Pacific contexts through an anthropological lens
*Acquire the ability to assess the social and cultural impacts of globalisation and transnationalism, natural resource development and the introduction of new technologies
*Understand the international, national, and relevant state frameworks, statements, policies, curriculum initiatives and resources as regards education for sustainability
*Evaluate educational curriculum and teaching practices in relevant professional settings.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings. Read more
The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings.
Educators are provided with the opportunity to further their qualifications through professional development. This coursework program aligns with the requirements and specifications of the Australian Quality Framework (AQF) and provides three major areas of expertise relevant to professional educators. The Master of Education does not lead to teacher registration.
The flexible 18 month Master of Education coursework program entails four core subjects, including an enquiry-based project, and provides the opportunity to specialise in up to two majors.

Leadership and Management Major

The Leadership and Management major is relevant to aspiring, expectant and existing leaders wanting to raise their effectiveness and improve their performance in leadership and management. This major is relevant to professionals working in schools, universities (as well as Government), community and corporate organisations.
Interested parties include: specialist generalists, lead teachers, head teachers, subject masters and coordinators, administrators, support teachers, educational consultants and supervisors, human resource management team members, and system supervisors.
If you undertake our Leadership and Management major you will:
*Acquire knowledge of concepts, theories and models which underpin current successful educational leadership and management practices in schools and school systems
*Critically analyse issues and literature concerning school improvement, effectiveness, review and evaluation
*Develop strategies to analyse and refl ect upon human relations issues in contemporary work environments
*Integrate interpersonal skills to develop a clearer understanding of relevant issues
*Employ critical analysis of key work issues in the new economy such as global integration, workplace diversity, and the impact of technology
*Explore and appreciate the impact of these issues on their own individual career management strategies.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The course explores local, regional, national and international issues of sustainability and stewardship of national resources. If you undertake our Education for Sustainability course you will. Read more
The course explores local, regional, national and international issues of sustainability and stewardship of national resources.

Make a difference

If you undertake our Education for Sustainability course you will:
*Be exposed to issues associated with local ecosystems, including the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics World Heritage Areas
*explore local, regional, national and international issues for sustainability and stewardship of national resources
*discover the roles local communities can have in contributing to stewardship
*gain an appreciation of our outstanding natural assets within a global context.

Who is this course for?

This course is relevant to teachers, trainers, school leaders, administrators; education and communication officer and to any individual seeking to upgrade their sustainability expertise.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

JCU is now a signatory to the Talloires Declaration – an international commitment to sustainability in higher education making us one of 350 universities across 40 countries to commit to a ten-point action plan for incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy in teaching, research, operations and outreach.
James Cook University offers courses to develop knowledge and skills for education for sustainability based on principles and practice implemented through the United Nation’s Decade of Sustainable Development 2005-2014.
Education subjects cover the challenges of learning in the Anthropocene, the current Australian curriculum and national and international framing documents and ideas as well as communication skills, pedagogies and the latest developments in education for sustainability research and practice.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Fine Art (MFA) programme caters for students who wish to develop their professional practice or knowledge within the discipline of Fine Art. Typically this might include teachers, practicing artists, community workers, arts administrators, or recent graduates in Fine Art who wish to further their professional practice.

The MFA is designed to respond to students who already have a practice and who are able to readily determine where they are in relation to a field and its histories of practices and ways of working. It is the role of the MFA to work outwards, as it were, towards a context for the students practice.

​The student focus will be on their development of Art Practice relevant to the CSAD Subjects of: Fine Art; Textiles; Ceramics; Artist Designer Maker; and Illustration.

The MFA curriculum is designed so that students in the field of Fine Art:
- Kick-start a career or develop an idea
- Develop professional skills
- Become able, professional and directed
- Have a trajectory towards progression to a future Professional Doctorate

Course Content

The MFA programme is offered as One Year Full Time.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MFA students:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits).
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits)
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits)
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits. All students must attend the year-long Research & Ideas Seminars which happen on a weekly basis.)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing the Context module (60 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate.
- On competing the Context and Exploration modules (120 credits in total) students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing Realisation in addition to the above, (180 credits in total) students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (Master of Fine Art).

Learning & Teaching

The MFA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MFA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MFA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MFA Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours).
- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours).
- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- ART7007: Position (60 credits). Design practice, Website / blog & reflective commentary / report (Personal Development Plan/Portfolio - PDP)/ 4,000 words.
- ART7008: Exploration (60 credits) Portfolio Submission: Substantial body of practical work. PDP: 1,000-2,000 words
- ART7009: Realisation (60 credits) Final body of work in the form of a public presentation through exhibition. A 3000 word Critical Paper and Viva Voce.
- ART7005: Research and Ideas Seminars (0 credits). Assessed through PDP undertaken in the other modules.

Support will be available through weekly small group seminars (normally no more than 16 students per group) after each lecture, exploring the theme of the lecture and allowing students to clarify their understanding. These sessions may also be run as workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation, are run.

This may include, for example, communal writing (via computer and data projector) or small group discourse analysis. Weekly tutorials will also be available.

Employability & Careers

The MFA programme acts as a gateway for students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers or architectural technologists, leading towards a career or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MFA programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. It goes without saying that the MFA programme develops increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

The MFA is particularly focused on students who have already commenced their professional practice, designed about the provision of opportunities for ‘learning in employment’, and thus by implication exhibit the qualities necessary for employment.

All students’ will complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Read more
The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

The course

The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

Pharmacy technicians or other pharmacy staff may study the taught modules at a lower academic level which would incorporate appropriate SQP qualifications and lead to a University College Diploma.

The full programme would typically be delivered on a part-time basis and studied over three academic years, with students completing the ‘taught’ modules to achieve a PgD or UCD within the first two years and those continuing to MSc completing the Masters Dissertation within an individually negotiated timescale over a one to two year period.

How will it benefit me?

Completion of this award will be representative of an individual’s commitment and on-going industrial Continuous Professional Development (CPD) as required by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Successful candidates will gain accreditation from a leading academic provider in the sector but also an award which has the potential to add gravitas and improve the perceived status of those who undertake it, while providing them the opportunity to further develop their higher level discipline specific skills.

Entry requirements

The programmes are offered at different levels of study, therefore for each award there is a different entry requirement:

UCDip (level 5)

Candidates should have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, or equivalent. These should normally include English, Mathematics and a Science or their equivalent. Candidates should also be able to provide evidence of a sufficient standard of core educational skills to benefit from, and succeed in higher education and substantial industrial and professional experience and responsibility or an NVQ at level FE2,3 or 4 as appropriate.

For candidates with no higher education qualifications, such experience should normally be of 5 years or more.

PgC / PgD / MSc

For admission to the University College PgC/PgD/MSc Veterinary Pharmacy candidates would be expected to have obtained a minimum of an upper second class degree in Pharmacy or a related animal science subject.

Applications may also be considered from candidates with a lower second class honours degree, Foundation Degree or good HND (together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years) or a Graduate Diploma/Graduate Certificate or equivalent. For all applicants, evidence of previous qualifications is required. However, all are judged on their individual merits. Non-graduates with significant work experience are also invited to apply. Where a candidate's honours degree (or equivalent) was not assessed in English, their English language skill will, typically, be evaluated by interview and/or via an approved English Language test.

Further information and applications

For course structure information select the 'Course structure' tab, or download our Course Information PDF.

Due to this being a part time course only, Harper Adams are unable to accept International Students who will require a Tier 4 Visa. If you require more information on this please visit the UK Borders Agency website.

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more

This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives

Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions

Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:

- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences

- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy

- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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In this MA programme, students explore political and philosophical debates that have influenced learning and teaching in citizenship, history and religious education. Read more

In this MA programme, students explore political and philosophical debates that have influenced learning and teaching in citizenship, history and religious education. Students nominate one of these subjects as their main specialism, and are encouraged and enabled to critically reflect on principles and issues that relate to policy and professional practice in their specialist subject.

About this degree

Students explore the key concepts involved in understanding education in their subject specialism, of Citizenship, History or Religious Education. They will develop an understanding of contemporary issues and key research findings associated with their subject specialism and related areas, and be supported to apply this knowledge in practice and in wider school life. In addition to a main subject, students can choose to nominate a second 'minor' specialism.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules

Students take one core module and one subject-specific compulsory module. Subject-specific compulsory modules vary each year. Please see below for the core module (listed first), followed by the subject-specific compulsory modules for 2018/19.

  • What is Education?
  • Learning to Live Together: Children’s Rights, Citizenship and Identities
  • Effective Learning in History
  • Issues and Debates in Religious Education

Optional modules

Students choose either two or three optional modules from a range available either within the programme or from the wider UCL Institute of Education (IOE) offering. 

Please contact the Programme Leader for advice about optional modules. 

Dissertation/report

All students submit either a 2,000-word proposal and a 17,000-word dissertation, or a 1,500-word proposal and 8,000-word report.

Teaching and learning

The dissertation/report module includes an online ‘Integrated Research Methods’ course which students take at the beginning.

Students are allocated a dissertation/report supervisor. For most of the module, teaching and learning takes place through regular one-to-one research supervision. These supervisions can be conducted face-to-face and/or via distance learning. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Citizenship, History or Religious Education (Humanities) MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers, senior leaders and head teachers in schools (in the UK and internationally), while others work for governments in curriculum design. At least one graduate from this programme can be found working as a senior officer for the United Nations Development Programme.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Department Manager, George Washington University
  • Humanities and History Co-ordinator, Singapore International School
  • Secondary School Teacher, North London Secondary School
  • Teacher (History), Unspecified Primary School

Employability

The programme develops students' ability to think critically and analytically about theory and practice in educational settings and the ability to organise and evaluate empirical and theoretical claims and arguments about educational aims and practices. Students learn to organise, evaluate and present data and argument in robust and critically informed ways and to read, design, conduct and evaluate educational research, taking account of relevant practical, theoretical and ethical issues. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is located in the Department of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment, a world-leading centre for subject-specialist education. By studying this MA you will have the opportunity to reflect on practice in your chosen subject specialism – Citizenship, History or Religious Education - and, through assignments focused on contemporary subject-specific teaching and learning, you will have opportunities to develop and evaluate interventions to enhance teaching and learning in your subject specialism. You will be encouraged to read widely specialist literature, to innovate and test ideas and to contribute to ongoing discussions about improving subject-specialist education.

Our programme offers students the opportunity to combine online study with face-to-face sessions, or to pursue their studies entirely by online learning. We recognise that many students value face-to-face interaction, and most of our modules include a small number of seminars at UCL Institute of Education. There is scope however for online interaction for those participating from a distance.

Most students will exit the programme with a Master's degree in Citizenship Education, History Education, or Religious Education. Depending on the combination of modules taken, some students may be able to exit with an MA in two subjects (major/minor). Please contact the Programme Leader for further information.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Curriculum, Pedagogy & Assessment

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right.

When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

Music and Music Technology

Keele’s taught Masters of Research (M.Res.) degrees in Music or Music Technology offer students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research, under the supervision of specialised scholars, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills. Depending on the area of research chosen, students will plan, research and produce an extended dissertation, a composition portfolio, a recital or a music technology project. All students locate their specific topic within the context of relevant debates within their discipline and the humanities more generally. The course is an ideal preparation for students who wish to proceed to doctoral research, but also develops practical and critical skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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