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When angry at a particular government policy, some people sit in their armchair and complain, others write letters and organise committees, some participate in social media campaigns, while others still protest or even riot in the street. Read more
When angry at a particular government policy, some people sit in their armchair and complain, others write letters and organise committees, some participate in social media campaigns, while others still protest or even riot in the street. Politicians care about public opinion, so how do we explain these choices? How are reactions shaped by people’s social background, their economic circumstances, their personality, or even their genetic inheritance? Can politicians and the media influence public opinion and if so, how?

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour explores the interaction between the mass public and political elites in advanced industrial democracies. You are introduced to the latest theoretical debates about the nature, significance and measurement of public opinion, exploring when and how these opinions translate into political participation, from voting behaviour and signing petitions to suicide bombing.

You also look at the main theoretical approaches in the study of politics, combined with a selection of optional modules including:
-Quantitative data analysis in political explanations
-Survey measurement and question design
-Political parties in Britain and Europe
-Measuring public opinion
-Democracies in Europe

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our key academic staff for this course are Professor Paul Whiteley, who works on British elections, and Professor Lawrence Ezrow, who works on party ideology and strategy.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our course can lead to a career in the polling industry, market research, British and European Politics or the private sector. You will develop key employability skills including analytical reasoning, survey design, polling, research design, and report writing.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Advanced Research Methods
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science
-MA Dissertation
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design

Read less
When angry at a particular government policy, some people sit in their armchair and complain, others write letters and organise committees, some participate in social media campaigns, while others still protest or even riot in the street. Read more
When angry at a particular government policy, some people sit in their armchair and complain, others write letters and organise committees, some participate in social media campaigns, while others still protest or even riot in the street. Politicians care about public opinion, so how do we explain these choices? How are reactions shaped by people’s social background, their economic circumstances, their personality, or even their genetic inheritance? Can politicians and the media influence public opinion and if so, how?

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour explores the interaction between the mass public and political elites in advanced industrial democracies. You are introduced to the latest theoretical debates about the nature, significance and measurement of public opinion, exploring when and how these opinions translate into political participation, from voting behaviour and signing petitions to suicide bombing.

You also look at the main theoretical approaches in the study of politics, combined with a selection of optional modules including:
-Quantitative data analysis in political explanations
-Survey measurement and question design
-Political parties in Britain and Europe
-Measuring public opinion
-Democracies in Europe

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our key academic staff for this course are Professor Paul Whiteley, who works on British elections, and Professor Lawrence Ezrow, who works on party ideology and strategy.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-The ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our course can lead to a career in the polling industry, market research, British and European Politics or the private sector. You will develop key employability skills including analytical reasoning, survey design, polling, research design, and report writing.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Political Explanation (optional)
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science
-MA Dissertation
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design

Read less
The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Read more
The dynamic interactions between political parties and voters underpin the foundations of modern democratic politics. Our new MSc in Elections, Public Opinion and Parties provides students with a thorough grounding in the empirical theories and methods used for exploring and explaining models of party competition, public opinion and voting behaviour.

The degree’s substantive component gives you insights into the reality of political representation and accountability, as well as how political leaders and the media shape and respond to public preferences. The methodological component provides you with valuable analytical and research skills that will prepare you for careers in government, political consultancy, NGOs and research organisations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscelections,publicopinionandparties.aspx

Why choose this course?

the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

offers an advanced grounding in public opinion and political behavior at both a theoretical and empirical level

you will acquire valuable research methods skills that will equip you to carry out independent research and appraise both qualitative and quantitative research

you will acquire genuinely transferable skills that are highly prized in the job market

our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU- funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: intuitions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave 2012) and James Sloam 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and Political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The New Political Communication Unit's research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O'Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick's The Hybrid Media System, Politics and Power (Oxford University Press 2013), Cristian Vaccari's Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (John Hopkins University Press) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O'Loughlin and Laura Roselle's Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford studies in Digital Politics and Ben O'Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- Elections and Voting Behaviour You will be introduced to the main theories of voting behaviour. We will examine why people vote for different political parties and how their behaviour is shaped by the different mobilisation strategies of political parties and other institutional arrangements. We will consider how social divisions are translated in to political divisions, and how the mechanisms of accountability and representation operate in different political and economic contexts. To what extent do people vote along policy lines? To what extent do they vote along social lines? How have these changed over time?

- Public Opinion and political participation In this unit we will examine the various ways in which people try to influence the political process by participating in different types of political activity. We will examine formal types of participation, such as turnout as well as more direct forms of political action, such as participation in protests and social movements. In doing so we will look at how political behaviour has changed over time and consider the implications for representative democracy.

- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS. No prior expertise in maths or statistics is required.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of political behaviour in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- British Political Parties This unit explains what British political parties stand for and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the 'nuts and bolts'of the parties in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- Public Policy This unit examines the policy making process in comparative context. You will gain knowledge about the actors involved in the policy making process: how policy is made and what impact it has on different policy domains in different institutional contexts.

- Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications.You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to elections, public opinion, public policy and parties

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of inquiry

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) offers intensive, post graduate-level studies to students who wish to qualify as a barrister. Read more
The Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) offers intensive, post graduate-level studies to students who wish to qualify as a barrister.

The BPTC is taken after undergraduate study and before the period of work based training, also known as pupillage, required for those training to become barristers.

This programme will prepare you for the 12 months of pupillage and ensure that you acquire the skills, knowledge of procedure and evidence, attitudes and competence required during your work based training. It will also provide you with a solid foundation in knowledge and skills for your early years of tenancy.

The BPTC aims to foster a professional and ethical approach to practice as a barrister, whilst giving you an informed view of a barrister’s working life.

Distinctive features

We have delivered a high quality and highly regarded Bar Professional Training Course/Bar Vocational Course since 1997. Distinctive features include:

• a guaranteed period of two weeks' placement (offering mini-pupillage with a local Chambers or other placement with the employed Bar, and marshalling with a local Circuit Judge and District Judge);

• a high level of individual feedback and support on performance in oral and written skills;

• a course strongly supported by the local employed Bar, the independent Bar and the Judiciary;

• the opportunity to practise all skills exceeds the Bar Standards Board’s minimum recommended number.

Structure

The BPTC is a one year course studied over three terms. All modules within this programme are compulsory and comprise knowledge areas, core skills and options. An attendance record is kept and 100% attendance at teaching sessions is expected.

During the first and second term you will be taught and assessed in the following areas:

• Civil litigation evidence and remedies
• Criminal litigation evidence & remedies

You will develop the core skills of :

Submission advocacy
Trial advocacy 1 and 2
Conference skills
Drafting
Opinion writing
Professional ethics
Resolution of disputes out of court

In the final term, you will select two optional subjects. As well as developing legal skills within the curriculum, you will have opportunities to acquire hands-on experience by taking part in:

• several pro-bono schemes run by the School of Law and Politics;
• other activities such as mooting, negotiating, client interviewing competitions and legal discussion groups.

These opportunities are designed to increase your confidence, skills and employability.

Please visit the website to see the modules taught on this cause:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/bar-professional-training-course-pgdip

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and small group sessions. Most teaching is delivered in small groups of 12 students with all oral skills teaching in smaller groups of six students.

You will have practice opportunities through your teaching that exceed the minimum indicated by the Bar Standards Board. The timing of teaching sessions and assessments has also been carefully considered to ensure that you have sufficient opportunity to practise and receive feedback. This is essential to enable you to refine your work and skills as a result of feedback received.

Assessment

The BPTC assessments are designed to be fair, rigorous, realistic and provide sufficient depth and/or breadth of coverage of the skills and subjects assessed. Individual assessments will cover a representation of the outcomes in the particular subject or skills area. A practical emphasis will appear throughout.

Each skills teaching session is a formative session; in addition you will undertake a practice assessment for each of the core subjects studied in terms one and two. These assessments will be undertaken in circumstances that reflect the arrangements for the summative assessments.

Three assessments, civil litigation evidence and remedies, criminal litigation evidence and remedies and professional ethics will be assessed by way of a centrally set paper produced by the Bar Standards Board.

For all Cardiff-produced BPTC assessments, the assessment criteria and, where relevant, guidance/explanatory notes will be made available to you from the outset of the subject. The assessment criteria for each subject are clearly aligned with its learning outcomes to ensure you can demonstrate you have achieved the learning outcomes for the subject through the assessment.

There are 12 summative assessments. Four are knowledge assessments, one in each of the following:

Civil litigation and evidence
Criminal litigation, evidence and sentencing
Professional ethics
Resolution of disputes out of court.

There are eight skills assessments, in each of the following:

Conference skills
Opinion writing
Drafting
Advocacy (one assessment with oral plus written components and two oral assessments; examination in chief and cross examination).
Option one (written or oral)
Option two (written or oral)

Career prospects

After completion of the BPTC you will be able to undertake a pupillage in preparation for practice as a barrister.

Alternatively, the BPTC may be lead to legal work in some other capacity, e.g. paralegal or legal executive, with the option of seeking pupillage at a later date.

Placements

Guaranteed placements are offered giving you the opportunity to marshal with both a Circuit Judge and District Judge in addition to undertaking a mini-pupillage.

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The UWE Bristol Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) provides the foundation of your career as a barrister. Rigorous and demanding, yet stimulating and rewarding, the course will equip you with the advocacy, research, conference and mediation skills you need to excel at the Bar and beyond. Read more
The UWE Bristol Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) provides the foundation of your career as a barrister. Rigorous and demanding, yet stimulating and rewarding, the course will equip you with the advocacy, research, conference and mediation skills you need to excel at the Bar and beyond.

We aim to be as supportive of your pastoral care as we are of your academic progression, and alongside the teaching, the course provides excellent opportunities to help secure a pupillage.

Key benefits

To increase your chances of obtaining pupillage and improve your employability generally, you will also have the chance to:

• participate in our award-winning pro bono Law Court Clinic;
• hone your mooting skills in our Bristol Chambers sponsored mootingcompetitions;
• appear in the Bristol Crown Court or in the Civil Justice Centre before real life judges in our Chambers sponsored family, criminal and civil commercial advocacy competitions;
• teach legal skills to LLB undergraduates.

Course detail

The BPTC takes you from the initial stages in civil and criminal proceedings through to trial. You will firstly master the compulsory subjects within the criminal and civil areas, before moving on to two specialist options of your choice.

The quality of teaching on the BPTC is nationally and internationally renowned, with tuition provided by a dedicated team of barristers, solicitors and judges and an unrivalled range of facilities to enhance your study experience. Our high student satisfaction rates are testament to the high quality of tuition on the course; and 85% of students would recommend our BPTC to other (BPTC, Bristol UWE, Full time student evaluation survey December 2014).

Modules

Compulsory:

• Civil Advocacy
• Civil Litigation, Remedies and Evidence
• Conferencing Skills
• Criminal Litigation, Evidence and Sentencing
• Opinion Writing
• Drafting
• Professional Conduct
• Resolution of Disputes Out of Court
• Criminal Advocacy

Optional:

• Clinical Negligence
• Criminal Law
• Commercial Law
• Employment Law
• Family
• International Trade
• Landlord and Tenant
• Refugee and Asylum Law

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from legal practice, as well as the academic side of law, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly. Most of the course is taught through small group sessions, meaning you will benefit from substantial face-to-face contact with your tutors.

Certain subjects are also supported with online resources (for example, recorded lectures, MCQ tests and recorded demonstrations) to enable you to supplement your work and knowledge remotely at a time to suit you.

Assessment

Civil Litigation, Criminal Litigation and Professional Conduct assessments are all set centrally by the Bar Standards Board and examined using multiple choice and short answer questions. Opinion Writing and Drafting are set locally as unseen assessments in controlled conditions. All other assessments are also set locally and are either completely seen or partially seen, in that you will receive information in advance to research the relevant areas of law.

Mock assessments with feedback will also be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and deal effectively with all forms of assessment.

Careers / Further study

The BPTC prepares you for a successful career as a barrister and is designed to give you the necessary skills, knowledge and network to secure a pupillage.

Many of our graduates have gone on to secure work as barristers, while others are working as legal associates, managers and legal advisers.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
The UWE Bristol Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) provides the foundation of your career as a barrister. The part-time course provides exactly the same level of training as the full-time BPTC, but runs over two years, with most teaching taking place at the weekend. Read more
The UWE Bristol Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) provides the foundation of your career as a barrister. The part-time course provides exactly the same level of training as the full-time BPTC, but runs over two years, with most teaching taking place at the weekend.

Rigorous and demanding, yet stimulating and rewarding, the course will equip you with the advocacy, research, conference and mediation skills you need to excel at the Bar and beyond. At the same time, you will have access to excellent opportunities to enhance your CV and help secure a pupillage.

Key benefits

To increase your chances of obtaining pupillage and improve your employability generally, you will also have the chance to:

• participate in our award-winning pro bono Law Court Clinic
• hone your mooting skills in our Bristol Chambers sponsored mootingcompetitions
• appear in the Bristol Crown Court or in the Civil Justice Centre before real life judges in our Chambers sponsored family, criminal and civil commercial advocacy competitions.

Course detail

The BPTC takes you from the initial stages in civil and criminal proceedings through to trial. You will firstly master the subjects within the criminal and civil areas, before moving on to two specialist options of your choice in the second year of the course.

Modules

Compulsory modules:

• Civil Advocacy
• Civil Litigation, Remedies and Evidence
• Conferencing Skills
• Criminal Litigation, Evidence and Sentencing
• Opinion Writing
• Drafting
• Professional Conduct
• Resolution of Disputes Out of Court
• Criminal Advocacy

Option modules:

• Clinical Negligence
• Criminal Law
• Commercial Law
• Competition Law
• Employment Law
• Family
• International Trade
• Landlord and Tenant
• Refugee and Asylum Law

Format

Highly experienced and supportive tutors, drawn from the academic side of law, as well as legal practice, will enable you to develop your knowledge quickly. Most of the course is taught in small groups in dedicated study rooms, meaning you will benefit from substantial face-to-face contact.

Certain subjects are also supported with online resources (for example, recorded lectures, MCQ tests and recorded demonstrations) to enable you to supplement your work and knowledge remotely at a time to suit you.

Monthly skills sessions with written and verbal feedback allow you to continually develop your skills.

Assessment

Civil Litigation, Criminal Litigation and Professional Conduct assessments are all set centrally by the Bar Standards Board and examined using multiple choice and short answer questions. Opinion Writing and Drafting are set locally as unseen assessments in controlled conditions. All other assessments are also set locally and are either completely seen or partially seen, in that you will receive information in advance to research the relevant areas of law.

Mock assessments with feedback will also be given to help you monitor and improve your performance, and deal effectively with all forms of assessment.

Careers / Further study

The BPTC prepares you for a successful career as a barrister and is designed to give you the necessary skills, knowledge and network to secure a pupillage.

Many of our graduates have gone on to secure work as barristers, while others are working as legal associates, managers and legal advisers.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
What is ‘political science’ and how does that approach differ from simply historical reporting of political phenomena? How can politics be used to analyse the real world? What is the relationship between ideas and political practices?. Read more
What is ‘political science’ and how does that approach differ from simply historical reporting of political phenomena? How can politics be used to analyse the real world? What is the relationship between ideas and political practices?

Our MA Politics allows you to explore these questions and more. The course is distinctive from our other Masters in that it allows you complete freedom of choice over the modules you take. It gives a background to the study of politics, but isn’t as preoccupied with theory and methods as our other Masters courses.

You explore topics as wide-ranging as:
-Global environmental problems
-The economy and the state
-International relations
-Theories of justice
-Public opinion

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017)

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our academic staff work on topics ranging from international conflict and violence to British elections, and from the obligations of the younger generation to why authoritarian leaders welcome natural disasters.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

Our MA Politics can lead you to a career in a number of areas such as market research, the media, central and local government and private sector. You will develop key employability skills including analytical reasoning, research design and essay-writing.

Recent graduates have gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

We also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil in the following fields: government; ideology and discourse analysis; international relations; political behaviour; and politics.

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Project (optional)
-MA Dissertation (optional)
-Advanced Research Methods (optional)
-Comparative European Politics (optional)
-Conflict Resolution (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Explanation (optional)
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Public Opinion and Political Behaviour (optional)
-Research Design (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theories of International Relations (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Survey Measurement and Question Design
-International Security Studies (optional)

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Why should we obey the law? Why don’t democratic countries go to war with each other? Why don’t young people vote? Why do oil-rich countries have poor human rights records? These are the kinds of questions addressed in our Graduate Diploma in Politics, which provides a thorough training in all major areas of political science, and is based in the top politics department in the country. Read more
Why should we obey the law? Why don’t democratic countries go to war with each other? Why don’t young people vote? Why do oil-rich countries have poor human rights records? These are the kinds of questions addressed in our Graduate Diploma in Politics, which provides a thorough training in all major areas of political science, and is based in the top politics department in the country.

Our Graduate Diploma in Politics is a nine-month full-time course which provides a bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate study. Our course is for you if you already have an undergraduate degree, but not in politics, and therefore need further study before taking politics at Masters level.

You develop your knowledge and understanding of the major theoretical and conceptual foundations of political science, and master the necessary quantitative methods for your study of politics.

You also choose from a range of optional modules on topics including:
-Mass media and democracy
-Forecasting global trends
-Ethics and public policy
-International security
-Public opinion

Our Department of Government is one of the most prestigious in Europe, with an outstanding record of teaching, research and publication. We are rated top in the UK for research (REF 2014), and have consistently been the highest-rated politics department in the country since national assessments began. Ranked top 10 in the world for political science and international relations according to the Centre for World University Rankings (2017).

Our expert staff

Some of the biggest names in the field work at Essex, giving you unparalleled access to some of the best minds in politics. Our staff are advising the CIA on counter-terrorism, training politicians and civil servants in democratising countries, and commentating on political events in national and international media.

Our academic staff work on topics ranging from international conflict and violence to British elections, and from the obligations of the younger generation to why authoritarian leaders welcome natural disasters.

You join an active and prolific research team, with the opportunity to work alongside a member of staff on their research instead of completing a dissertation; some of these projects have even resulted in joint staff/student publications.

Specialist facilities

-Laboratories of networked computers featuring extensive software for political analysis
-ESSEXLab provides opportunities for experimental lab research
-Student societies for politics, debating, and Model UN
-We organise the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis
-A programme of seminars and events run by the department

Your future

All Essex politics graduates have the distinction of a qualification from one of the world’s leading politics departments.

As well as enabling you to go on to a Masters course of your choice in politics, this course will also develop key employability skills including analytical reasoning, research design, quantitative methods, data analysis and essay-writing.

Our graduates go on to enjoy influential careers in British, European and international politics. This includes working as an MP, being the Speaker of the House of Commons and employment as political lobbyists or staff assistants to MPs and MEPs.

Our graduates have also gone on to work for the following high-profile organisations:
-The Civil Service
-Local government
-The World Bank
-The United Nations
-NATO
-YouGov and YouGov America

Our academic reputation is illustrated by the fact that many of our graduates now teach or research at universities, colleges of higher education and schools. For example, recent graduates are now research fellows and academic staff at: Mannheim, Germany; ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Duke University, USA; NATO/SHAPE, Belgium; and University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Conflict Analysis
-Measuring Public Opinion (optional)
-Political Analysis: Introduction to OLS (optional)
-Ethics and Public Policy
-Principles of Social Justice
-American Political Institutions (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Development, State Building and Conflict (optional)
-Domestic Politics and International Relations
-Electoral Behaviour
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Future Global Trends: Forecasting Scenarios
-Human Rights and Global Justice (optional)
-International Negotiation (optional)
-International Security Studies (optional)
-Mass Media and Democracy (optional)
-Placement-Linked Project
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Economy of International Development
-Political Parties in Britain and Europe (optional)
-Project: Collaborative Faculty - Student Research Experience (optional)
-Project: Politics (optional)
-Quantitative Political Analysis (optional)
-Authoritarianism (optional)
-The Analysis of Conflict and Peace (optional)
-Seminar in Legislative Politics (optional)
-Representation and Policy-Making (optional)

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This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. Read more
This programme provides you with the systematic knowledge and intellectual tools to critically review developments in the theory and practice of international relations. It enables you to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion concepts, theories and paradigms within the broad field of international relations, drawing lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations.

Students are able to develop their ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship. Each study route aims to provide advanced knowledge and understanding of the dynamics, including cultural and local political and ideological factors, which shape the contemporary international relations of the area.

The course also provides an opportunity for studying international relations and in comparative and historical perspective taking account of regional specific political and economic factors.

Student Profiles

“Attending the Master in International Relations (European) at Durham University has been so far the best experience of my life. Indeed engaging in conversation with colleagues from different nationalities and professors willing to listen to your opinion has helped me analyse the world dynamics from different perspectives. Honestly I have learned more in the last year than throughout any of my academic experience. In sum living and studying at Durham has had a great impact on my life to the extent that it made me realize my real potential and what my future career could be like. Therefore I would certainly recommend studying this course at Durham University as it has positively changed my life and it might have the same effect on you.” Luca Marro, 2015/16

“Undertaking postgraduate study is a huge commitment. Not only is it a period of intensive academic study, it is a financial and time consuming one too. Therefore, I was naturally very thorough when deciding upon which university I wanted to attend. Ultimately, my decision to study at SGIA was based on two factors. Firstly, the reputation of Durham University ensures that I receive a degree which is highly valued and respected by employers. Secondly, by undertaking the MA in International Relations (Europe) I have been able to develop an area specialisation and study a topic which is of immense interest to me. These two points proved fruitful results, when, during my first term at Durham, I was able to secure graduate level employment for when I leave. A high point of this perhaps, was attending the assessment centre for the position only to find three other people from SGIA at the event - you can thus be confident that deciding to undertake an MA puts you in a very good position!” Thomas Knight, 2015/16

As a Master’s student in International Relations (Europe), I have benefitted from the vast knowledge of the academics who are specialised in the European Union. I learnt both technical and theoretical details about the EU. Therefore, as a EU-funded Jean Monnet Scholarship holder, MA in International Relations (Europe) met the aim of my scholarship to develop Turkey’s human resources with trained EU experts for the accession. Not only the vigour of academic staff of the SGIA but also the good research facilities as well as the extremely helpful team of the School Office have made this experience unforgettable and fruitful for me." Asli Kandemir, 2014/15

Course Content

Students will take five core modules to the value of 150 credits and optional modules to the value of 30 credits, 15 of which must be from the regional module list.

Core Modules:
-International Relations Theory
-Model United Nations
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production
-Dissertation

European Route Core Module:
-European Security

Regional Modules:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-Collective Memory & Identity in Post War Europe

Non-regional Modules - In previous years these have included:
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of the US Foreign Policy
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-Nationalism Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development of Chinese Business
-Political Ideology
-Region, Nation and Citizen in Southeast Asia
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into four core and two optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This programme is for students who wish to gain a deeper and contextual understanding of how commercial law operates in practice. Read more

Programme description

This programme is for students who wish to gain a deeper and contextual understanding of how commercial law operates in practice. It allows you to choose from over 25 courses, to reflect your interests, experience and industry focus.

This programme aims to provide you with a deeper understanding of how international commercial law operates in practice, with course options to reflect interests, experience and industry focus.

Globalisation and developments in technology have led to a marked increase in international trade in goods and services, in international investment, and in the development of global financial markets. In parallel, the world of international commerce has seen major growth in the regulation of commercial activity at a national and international level, and in international litigation and arbitration. This LLM aims to help you understand the international context in which business currently operates.

The programme focuses on the legal responses to the developments shaping international commerce today, as lawyers and business professionals are increasingly required to look beyond domestic law to find solutions appropriate to their international business needs and opportunities.

Online learning

The programme is delivered by online distance learning, through our bespoke online learning environment ‘eScript’.

The learning process is interactive and research-focused. Courses are taught by leading academics in the field in question; some are also conducted by eminent practitioners with specific expertise in the chosen subject, in conjunction with academics from the School of Law.

Each session comprises a variety of activities, which could include (combinations of) any of the following:

questions, answers (or partial answers) to which may be posted on eScript
multiple choice questions
responses to legislative developments
data and opinion gathering, e.g. for use in an assignment
debates; assignments
master classes (access to expert)
collaboration (encourage free exchange of information followed by a summary)
student ‘brainstorming’ / generation of ideas and problem solving

Programme structure

The LLM in International Commercial Law and Practice requires that you complete a total of six courses (120 credit points), four of which must be from the core courses listed below. You must also complete a dissertation (60 credits) over your chosen period of study.

Core courses:

Contract Law in Europe
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law, Human Rights and Corporate Accountability
Dispute Resolution Methods
Principles of International Taxation
Corporate Compliance: Case Studies in Law and Ethics
Comparative and International Corporate Governance
International Oil and Gas Law
Law of Climate Change

Learning outcomes

The LLM in International Commercial Law & Practice will enable you to engage with a wide range of subject areas and to gain advanced knowledge and understanding of international legal principles.

The courses allow you to develop a practical understanding of the legal issues surrounding specific industries, markets and commercial relationships. They also facilitates a broader and more generic understanding of underlying themes such as harmonisation, regulation and compliance.

The programme will enable you to look beyond the technical content of the relevant law and to think critically about the underlying problems and conflicting solutions. Having studied the programme, you will emerge with an understanding not just of legal issues, but regard to ethical principles and the social and economic context. Here, particular emphasis is placed on the economic and commercial context.

Career opportunities

The majority of students on the Law School’s LLM programmes by online distance learning are mid-career, and they often work across international boundaries. Many will already be established in their career, but wish to use the programme to consolidate skills and knowledge accumulated over time.

Graduates of our online distance learning programmes progress to a range of careers in law and related legal fields, including work in local and international firms, government legal departments, other public institutions, international organisations and in academia. The programmes are also an ideal platform for advanced research.

For some graduates, successful completion of the programme will lead to a promotion within their current positions. Others aim to develop a new professional direction altogether. The programme aims to support students in whichever outcome they aspire to, through developing their knowledge and understanding of the law, but also through acquiring transferable skills and, not least, the experience of engaging with leading academics in the field and with fellow students.

The profile of online distance learning LLM students, and their needs for career guidance, are recognised by the University careers service, which offers information resources relevant to international and non-Law careers, and the opportunity to arrange individual consultations with students who are based remotely.

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This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Read more
This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Our methodologies are drawn from social, political and cultural history. The Masters in Early Modern History provides you with thorough research training, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

◾Our links with The Hunterian, the University’s own museum and art gallery, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
◾You will enjoy ready access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
◾The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
◾A regular Early Modern Research Seminar brings together staff, PhD and Masters students on an informal basis, including eminent active scholars with continuing attachments to history.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Early Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
◾Research resources and skills for historians
◾Approaches to history.

Optional courses

Course options may include
◾Politics and literature in Jacobean Scotland
◾Print, public opinion and Enlightenment in 18th-century Europe
◾The History of Medicine I: studies in the History of medicine before 1850
◾Reformation! Europe in the age of religious wars
◾Scottish popular culture.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as
◾Early modern warfare
◾Climate and civilisation
◾Lessons from the greats
◾Decline and fall: organisational failure, ancient and modern
◾The authority of the state and duties of the citizen.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The MA Modern History at Aberystwyth offers you the opportunity to study modern British, continental European, American and/or world history from the early 19th century to the present with a team of leading specialists in their fields. Read more

About the course

The MA Modern History at Aberystwyth offers you the opportunity to study modern British, continental European, American and/or world history from the early 19th century to the present with a team of leading specialists in their fields. The course embraces a range of perspectives including political, diplomatic, social, cultural and media history, and also provides you with intensive training in research skills and methods for modern history, including the opportunity to develop or enhance your knowledge of a European language.

Why study MA Modern History at Aberystwyth University?

Study just five minutes away from one of five UK copyright libraries, the National Library of Wales

History has been taught in Aberystwyth since 1872, making our department the oldest in Wales and one of the foremost in Britain

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work

Benefit from small group teaching

Opportunity to undertake a work placement as part of this course with an institution that engages on a daily basis with history

Engage with a variety of paradigms, perspectives, methodologies, sources and interdisciplinary approaches to history

Develop your own research interests in the field of modern history (18th 19th, 20th centuries including the contemporary period) aided by the longstanding expertise of the Department of History and Welsh History

A wide variety of option modules are available as part of this course and staff expertise within the Department is varied and expansive

Course structure and content

When studied full-time, the first two semesters consist of six 20 credit modules. Students will take a core module that addresses the concept of political culture in the modern era and a research training module - Research Methods and Professional Skills in History.

Students will then take a further four optional modules. Option modules are varied and allow students to direct their study into a diverse range of topics. Students will also be able to undertake additional research training modules tailored to their own particular research interests (such as the use of public opinion data or private correspondence, visual and sound media, newspapers and broadcast sources, and oral history). Students on this course will also have the opportunity to study a modern European language at either beginners or advanced level.

In the final semester, students complete their MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

Core modules:

Dissertation *
Political Culture in Modern Britain, Europe and the Usa
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History

Optional modules:

Class and Community in Wales 1850 - 1939
Concepts and Sources in Heritage Studies
Heritage Organisations and the Presentation of the Past
Information and Society
Landownership and Society in Wales
Media History: An Introduction
Political Power and the Media in Britain
Politics and Culture of the Cold War in Southeast Asia
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (1120)
Science, Place and Victorian Culture
Sources for Postgraduate Research in the Modern Humanities and Social Sciences
The American Public, Washington and the World
The European Powers in the Age of World Wars
The Georgian Spa and Seaside Resort
The Making of Modern Wales
Understanding the Cold War
Working with History

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 10 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment for this course is largely essay based, with some optional modules also incorporating report writing and oral assessment.

The Research Methods and Professional Skills in History module will be assessed via an oral assessment of MA conference presentation, an assessed outline of an MA conference presentation, a critical assessment of a departmental research seminar, and a dissertation research proposal.

Successful submission of the MA dissertation in the final semester leads to the award of an MA.

Skills

This course will empower you to:

• Increase your critical faculties
• Develop study and research skills
• Develop strong writing and analytical skills as well as the capacity to work independently
• Develop your abilities in structuring and communicating complex ideas clearly, accurately, and authoritatively
• Interrogate historical practices at an advanced level
• Develop practical skills and hands-on experience in researching Modern History

Careers

Graduates from the Department of History and Welsh History at Aberystwyth University have expansive and varied careers.

Examples of pathways our previous graduates have taken include:

• Archivists
• Publishers
• Local and national politics
• Tourism
• Heritage administration
• Public administration
• Real Estate Development
• Law
• Civil Service
• Journalism
• Broadcast media
• Armed Forces
• Education
• Management
• Accountancy
• Entrepreneurs
• Academia/further study

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Our intensive MSc Psychology (Conversion) programme is designed to provide students with a grounding in the theories and research practice of contemporary psychology. Read more
Our intensive MSc Psychology (Conversion) programme is designed to provide students with a grounding in the theories and research practice of contemporary psychology.

It places particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, based on a combination of pure and applied research.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This competitive BPS-accredited programme is aimed primarily towards people wishing to pursue a career change in any field of psychology. It prepares students for their professional journey by helping them develop a broad knowledge base across the key areas of psychology in a contained period of time.

As a student, you will learn about the core areas of psychology, such as social, developmental and cognitive psychology, biological bases of psychology, and individual differences.

In addition, you will acquire statistical and research methods skills needed to conduct, under expert supervision, your independent research project on a topic of your choosing.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. All modules are compulsory, there are no elective modules, and modules may be subject to change.
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Brain and Behaviour with Research Methods
-Fundamental Concepts in Social Psychology with Research Methods
-Statistics and Data Analysis for the MSc in Psychology (Conversion)
-Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology (MSc Level)
-Social and Cognitive Development with Research Methods
-Cognitive Psychology with Research Methods
-Personality, Intelligence, Individual Differences & Psychopathology
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Fundamental scientific understanding of the mind, behaviour and experiences and the complex interactions between these
Ability to present multiple perspectives is a way to foster critical thinking and evaluation of research
-Provide an understanding for real life applications of theory to the full range of experience and behaviour
-Ability to show deepened understanding of the role of empirical evidence in the creation and constraint of theory, and also in how theory guides the collection, analysis and interpretation of empirical data
-Acquisition and knowledge of a range of research skills and methods for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in an ability to conduct research independently
-Develop scientific psychological knowledge, leading to an ability to appreciate and critically evaluate theory, research findings, and application

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A critical understanding of all elements of psychology and the ability to assess their relevance in the understanding of the contemporary world
-A reflective understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and debates of psychology and their relevance to a range of areas
-An ability to identify, summarise and apply key concepts in psychology to a range of psychology areas
-An ability to distinguish between and evaluate different methodological approaches to the study of mind, behaviour and experiences
-An ability to conduct a research project on the post graduate level.

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Summarise and apply key concepts in psychology to a range of research areas
-Read psychology research, critically evaluate it and identify the key points
-Distinguish between and evaluate different methodological approaches to study psychology
-Assemble data from a variety of sources, discern and establish connections, and draw well-grounded conclusions
-Evaluate the integrity of evidence and of ‘data’ and to discern the difference between opinion an evidence
-Design and execute psychological research studies, and be competent in the collection, management and analysis of research data and derivation of conclusions
-Form grounded defensible theories, reasoned arguments in relation to evidence, and interpretations of findings. In addition students should be able to compare and contrast different theoretical approaches within the discipline
-Ask questions from a range of different angles and to challenge given views drawing on theory, evidence, and critical insight
-Plan, conduct, analyse and report an individual study to test formulated hypotheses for the dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate competence in commonly used psychology research methodology
-Design and carry out psychological research using a variant of psychological research methods
-Gather, analyse and interpret qualitative and quantitative data
-Use information and computer technology to collect, analyse, and report on psychological research
-Collect, evaluate, and utilise information from primary and secondary sources in order to inform psychological questions
-Produce and present a poster
-Write a scientific research proposal and research reports in accordance with guidelines
-Write essays in accordance with guidelines
-Effectively communicate both orally and in writing
-Learn and think independently, as well as part of a group
-Demonstrate good time management and personal organisation
-Plan and execute an investigation/experiment, act autonomously and demonstrate originality

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral, written and visual means
-Formulate and solve problems, both individually and as part of a team
-Apply statistical and numerical skills to psychological data
-Execute research skills through the formulation of questions / hypotheses, designing studies that address these questions / hypotheses, collecting and managing ‘evidence’ through various data management techniques, making sense, and disseminating findings
-Acquire and demonstrate a research-based orientation to real world and scientific problems
-Use Information and communication technology e.g. WWW, databases, statistical software, Microsoft Office, and literature search tools, for a variety of generic and subject-specific purposes
-Work effectively and independently on a given project or task
-Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common goal/outcome
-Work towards targets and deadlines under pressure through discipline and careful organisation
-Demonstrate personal organisation and time management skills through meeting multiple deadlines

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The Legal Practice Course (LPC) at Nottingham Law School has a reputation that is second to none. The course has continuously received the highest possible grading from the Solicitor's Regulation Authority of commendable practice in every area of the course. Read more
The Legal Practice Course (LPC) at Nottingham Law School has a reputation that is second to none. The course has continuously received the highest possible grading from the Solicitor's Regulation Authority of commendable practice in every area of the course.

In the opinion of the profession and former students, Nottingham Law School is an outstanding place to study the LPC. The course has an excellent reputation amongst employers and students and provides you with the best foundation for a new and exciting career as a solicitor.

Nottingham Law School is fully aware of the challenges for law students in the current legal employment market. For that reason they are always looking for ways to ensure that the LPC is designed to provide you with the qualifications and practical knowledge and insight employers regard as essential.

Their LPC has recently been revalidated so that the successful completion of all its elements will result in the award of a Master's degree: LLM Legal Practice Course. As well as providing you with an internationally recognised qualification, you will leave Nottingham Law School with enhanced insight into the legal profession and better equipped to succeed.

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