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This programme will show you how to use mathematical techniques to tackle real-life problems ranging from scheduling flights and routing mobile phone calls to managing investments and minimising risks. Read more

Programme description

This programme will show you how to use mathematical techniques to tackle real-life problems ranging from scheduling flights and routing mobile phone calls to managing investments and minimising risks. Operational Research (OR) is an important skill that is in high demand.

This MSc will give an Operational Research perspective on computational optimization.

Programme structure

This programme involves two taught semesters of compulsory and option courses followed by your dissertation project.

Compulsory courses:

Computing for Operational Research and Finance
Fundamentals of Optimization
Fundamentals of Operational Research
Methodology, Modelling and Consulting Skills
Probability and Statistics
Simulation
Stochastic Modelling

As part of your option course choices, Operational Research with Computational Optimization requires you to study a combination from:

Stochastic Optimization
Combinatorial Optimization
Nonlinear Optimization
Large Scale Optimization for Data Science.

Career opportunities

The skills you will learn are in demand by a vast range of high-profile organisations including consultancy firms, companies with operational research departments such as airlines or telecommunications providers, financial firms and the public sector.

Recent graduates have joined British Airways, the Government OR Service, Barclays, Deloitte, Capgemini and smaller specialised OR, finance and energy companies.

Industry-based dissertation projects

The dissertation projects of approximately half the students on this programme take place in public and private sector organisations. Other students choose a University-based project.

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This is an innovative and exciting programme in which you focus on writing a full-length, literary novel of between 90,000 and 150,000 words. Read more
This is an innovative and exciting programme in which you focus on writing a full-length, literary novel of between 90,000 and 150,000 words.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/232/contemporary-novel-practice-as-research

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You meet regularly with your supervisor and have the opportunity to take part in informal reading groups and research seminars to which students, staff and visiting speakers contribute papers. You also benefit from a series of research skills seminars that run in the spring term, which gives you a chance to share the research expertise of staff and postdoctoral members of the department.

As a basis for advanced research, you must take the School and Faculty research methods programmes.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.
The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The recently established Centre for Victorian Literature and Culture provides a stimulating and distinctive research environment for staff and students through seminars, conferences and collaborative research projects. The MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture is the only MA of its kind in the UK, and both the MA and the Centre places a particular emphasis on Victorian literature and culture associated with Kent and the south-east.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving series of events and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Read more

Course outline

The cutting-edge Taught MA in Biography was founded in 1996, remains unique to Buckingham and is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors. Since then, in response to student demand, the available options have been extended to include postgraduate research degrees at three levels: MA by Research, MPhil or DPhil level. Study can be on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Course structure

For their first year of study students on all these courses attend the same weekly seminars as students taking the Taught MA in Biography. These provide the critical awareness of the subject which is an essential prerequisite for dissertation work and they are one of the most distinctive and valuable elements of the MA. They take place as follows:

- Autobiography (September to December)
- Special Paper in Biography (January to June)
- Research Methods (January to June)

The modules on Biography and Autobiography are designed to combine the study of classic biographies and memoirs with contemporary writing. In addition, the Research Methods module provides an invaluable and innovative training, especially devised for biographers.

Guest seminars on the course are led by leading biographers, critics, publishers and agents. Teachers and speakers on the course have included Andrew Motion, Kathryn Hughes, Frances Wilson, Frances Spalding, Jeremy Lewis, Rupert Shortt, Caroline Dawnay, Andrew Lownie and Miranda Seymour.

Research students are expected to produce, as a valuable preliminary to their own research project, written coursework for the Research Methods module (an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format), and one other piece of written work, but the full amount of termly written work required for the taught course is not compulsory. During the early part of the course, research students refine their research proposal under the individual supervision of the course director for eventual discussion with the Research Officer. Once the research proposal has been accepted students concentrate on individual research and the preparation of a dissertation, under the supervision of the course director.

Teaching methods

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995) and The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement. She is currently completing a biography of Edward VII, for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust.

Location

Teaching takes place in London. See the University's website for more information.

Timescale

The normal periods of study for achieving these research degrees are as follows:

- MA Res– 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time
- MPhil – 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time
- DPhil – 3 years full-time or 6 years part-time

Administrative arrangements

A system of preliminary registration for all research degrees is in operation to allow students to prepare a formal proposal during the early part of their course. Admission to research degrees is normally on a provisional basis while the candidate, with the help of the supervisor, refines the proposal for the research, including developing a work plan and identifying the requirements for support and resources and how these will be met. Students for the MA degree in Biography by Research are registered initially for the taught MA until the research proposal has been accepted. Postgraduate students wishing to register for the DPhil programme in Biography must first register for the MPhil and seek conversion at a later stage. Registration is upgraded to DPhil, normally between 12 and 18 months from first registration, once the student has demonstrated through the submission of draft written work that he or she has the ability to conduct research at the advanced level required for the award of the degree. All research students must also subject their work to an annual progress review.

Changing the level of the research degree after the start of the course, although not impossible, can produce complications. Prospective students uncertain about the level or length of course best suited to them are strongly advised to discuss this with the course director before applying.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/mres/biography.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Biosciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study Biosciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This MRes in Biosciences programme will provide you with research training in one or more of our Research Pathways and you will benefit from training in our Specialist Research Facilities. Research staff will share their expertise and assist you in developing the skills necessary to do independent research, leading to a dissertation written as a scientific paper.

All research students in Biosciences undertake taught modules followed by a major research project under the guidance of academic staff in one or more of our Research Pathways, and benefitting from training in our specialist research facilities.

The MRes Biosciences is a one-year programme. All research students undertake taught modules followed by a major research project under the guidance of academic staff in one or more of our Research Pathways , and benefiting from training in our Specialist Research Facilities.

Biosciences at Swansea has a good relationship with a wide range of external partners, including SMEs, Government Agencies, Local Government, UK and overseas research institutes and universities.

Research Pathways

1) Behavioural and Movement Ecology
Studying adaptations, and the selective pressures in the social and ecological environment that bring them about. We specialise in the movement ecology of individuals and collectives and can provide specialist research training to understand the role of the environment in structuring the properties of animal movement and behaviour.

2) Evolutionary and Molecular Biology
Understanding the diversity of life from a molecular perspective. We use the latest genetic and genomics techniques to address key questions in ecology, behaviour and conservation from an evolutionary perspective in a range of non-model organisms, from fungi to plants and animals.

3) Marine Biology, Fisheries and Aquaculture
From developing new techniques in fish husbandry and rearing of commercially important aquaculture species, to research in food and fuel security, low carbon technologies, biogeochemical cycles and climate change. Specialist research training can be provided on a diverse range of temperate to tropical aquatic organisms, from microplankton to invertebrates to fish, inhabiting marine to freshwater environments.

4) Mathematical and Statistical Ecology
Research that complements the full range of our academic expertise, from theoretical investigations of ecosystem complexity, stoichiometric ecology, pattern formation and animal movement, to practical agricultural applications and the operation of micro-algal biotechnology.

5) Population and Community Ecology
Combining experimental and theoretical approaches to develop our understanding of how species interactions with their environment (including other species) generate the spatial-temporal biodiversity patterns we observe in nature. Study systems include plankton ecosystems, coastal ecosystem functioning, disease control, conservation, and the impact of spatial-temporal environmental variation on community dynamics.

6) Whole Organism Biology
Our staff comprises world-leading experts on a range of organisms studied around the world, and welcome students who want to develop projects around such species.

7) Wildlife Diseases and Pest Control
Research focused on developing natural agents and solutions for the control of wildlife diseases and invertebrate pests that impact on food security and human and animal health. Research training provided in disease detection methods, disease management, and the socioeconomic benefits of pest control.

Facilities

As a student on the MRes Biosciences programme, you will benefit from a range of facilities such as:

Our excellent facilities include a unique built Animal Movement Visualisation Suite (£1.35m), incorporating an electronic wall linked to a computer-tesla cluster for high-speed processing and visualisation of complex accelerometry and magnetometry data derived from animals. Coupled with this facility is the Electronics Lab with capacity for research, development and realisation of animal tags with new capacities (sensors, energy-harvesting systems, miniaturization, 3-D printing of housings etc.); a custom-designed 18m on coastal research vessel; a recent investment of £4.2m on a new suite of state-of-the art Science laboratories; and the £2m unique Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR) with a 750 m2 controlled environment building, with programmable recirculating aquatic systems, unique within the UK’s higher-education sector. These are tailored for research on a diverse range of organisms, ranging from temperate to tropical and marine to freshwater. Coupled with this are nutrient and biochemical analytical capabilities.

Theoretical/mathematical research uses advanced university computing facilities that includes high-end graphics workstations, high-speed network links and the Blue Ice supercomputer located at the Mike Barnsley Centre for Climatic Change Research.

Several dedicated Bioscience labs housed within our grade 2 listed Wallace Building recently benefitted from a £4.2 million renovation programme, providing world-class research facilities that includes a specialist molecular ecology lab and a dedicated arthropod facility.

Research

We are 7th in the UK and top in Wales for research excellence (REF 2014)

93.8% of our research outputs were regarded as world-leading or internationally excellent and Swansea Biosciences had the highest percentage of publications judged ‘world-leading’ in the sector. This is a great achievement for the Department, for the College of Science and indeed for Swansea University.

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Staff supervise research in most areas of English and associated studies, and have expertise in the following areas. Read more
Staff supervise research in most areas of English and associated studies, and have expertise in the following areas: theory, modernism and postmodernism, 18th and 19th-century studies, women’s writing, literature and visual arts, Shakespeare and the Renaissance, early modern literature and culture, medieval studies, American literature, postcolonial literature and modern poetry.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/231/english

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.
The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The recently established Centre for Victorian Literature and Culture provides a stimulating and distinctive research environment for staff and students through seminars, conferences and collaborative research projects. The MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture is the only MA of its kind in the UK, and both the MA and the Centre places a particular emphasis on Victorian literature and culture associated with Kent and the south-east.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving series of events and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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On this course, you will gain substantial research experience, working alongside our leading subject specialists. You will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. Read more

Summary

On this course, you will gain substantial research experience, working alongside our leading subject specialists. You will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. You will also improve your knowledge of ancient languages.

This research-focused programme is designed to enhance the abilities of classics and ancient history students to conduct research at a high intellectual, methodological and theoretical level. You will receive training and guidance on conducting a piece of original research and its written presentation from a specialist in your area of interest on the programme team. The course will offer focused preparation for doctoral research. It will also present specific preparation for a range of professional careers that require highly-developed research and writing skills. You will also gain experience in how to present and discuss papers and posters at conferences.

As part of the intensive research training on offer, you will engage critically and creatively with classical texts, objects and images, and with their reception in later periods of history. The knowledge and experience of working with a variety of media will underlie your own original and innovative studies of the classical past. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to receive focused instruction in relevant subject areas for example epigraphy, numismatics and material culture. To further bolster your classical research skills, we offer tuition in both Latin and Ancient Greek, knowledge of which underpins a successful career in classical academia. As well as developing your practical research skills, the course will provide a deep understanding of the theoretical concepts that inform academic enquiry in classics and ancient history. Using your improved knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the research methods, you will be in a position to contribute to the national and international research profile of classical studies at Roehampton and to take advantage of opportunities for co-operation and collaboration in the UK and beyond.

Content

You will be introduced to some of the most important theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship. Whilst some of the theories have arisen from the work of classicists and ancient historians themselves, others have been imported from other disciplines. All of them seek to address the agenda of classical scholars not merely to describe the ancient world, but to explain it. Relevant scholarly texts and sources related to this interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary nature will be studied, introducing you to the specialised skills you will need as a researcher.

With your grounding in the theoretical premises of classical research, you will begin your dissertation research project. This represents substantial independent research into a topic in classical studies or ancient history, and can be undertaken in a broad range of areas. The research project provides an opportunity for you to explore and train your research skills, pursuing a specific problem or topic in considerable depth. This project is a great opportunity to prepare for a three- to four-year PhD programme before committing to it.

A third important aspect of the course is the delivery of language and commentary skills in Latin and Ancient Greek. Students can take modules in one or both of the ancient languages which are prerequisites for successful study of original ancient documents. The languages are offered from beginner level to the study of an ancient author in depth.

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Recent years have been characterised by a rapid development of functional imaging technology, with increasing availability worldwide of high-resolution scanners for research and clinical applications. Read more
Recent years have been characterised by a rapid development of functional imaging technology, with increasing availability worldwide of high-resolution scanners for research and clinical applications. Functional brain imaging requires an understanding of current concepts in cognitive neuroscience and psychology, as well as a basic appreciation of neuroimaging techniques and of the mathematical and statistical foundations for data analysis.

The rapid development of functional imaging technology and research has contributed to the call for improved education and training in functional imaging. Within this context the aim of the programme is to provide a strong theoretical and practical introduction to the world of neuroimaging research. It will equip students with a range of practical research skills to enable them to successfully complete research of this kind, either as part of a research team or as an individual.

The course will also provide the necessary training in safety and in the rules of scanner operation. This will allow students to conduct a neuroimaging research project under the supervision of an Authorised User on Brunel’s 3T scanner, or else to conduct a project in one of its related ERP imaging or psychological laboratory facilities.

Who is this degree for?
If you want to know how to use an MRI scanner and learn what neuroimaging has already taught us, this MSc is for you. Whether you want to pursue neuroimaging research, or simply become an expert in this important field of science, the Functional Neuroimaging MSc provides the relevant skills and knowledge. The course is a good preparation for a PhD in functional brain imaging, or for working as part of a neuroimaging team with fMRI and/or other imaging modalities.

Course Content
Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing modules (all core) are likely to be drawn from the following areas:
Principles of Neuroimaging; Practical Neuroimaging; Cognitive Neuroscience; Visual Neuroscience. Check the web for the latest updates.

Assessment
Assessment is by coursework, one multiple choice exam and a final research project. Under the supervision of one of the Centre for Cognition and Neuroimaging’s research team, students will conduct a functional imaging experiment. This may involve use of the in-house EEG or fMRI facilities.

Careers
The MSc in Functional Neuroimaging is an invaluable companion or prelude to a research degree or research position in functional neuroimaging, one of the most rapidly growing fields of scientific research. Academic or research positions include:
MPhil/PhD in neuroimaging or related subjects; Research Assistant on a neuroscience project, or a related project in psychology or biology. Imaging now has applications from the physical sciences to projects in economics and the social sciences; Technical Assistant in functional neuroimaging. Non-academic positions include: any occupation that requires a higher level of analytical, technical and presentation skills than can be offered by a graduate in social sciences.

Here is what a few of our past students have to say:
Anna: “After completing an MSc degree in Educational Psychology in Poland I moved to the UK where I worked clinically with people suffering from epilepsy. During that placement, inspired by the state-of-the-art research conducted there, I developed a strong interest in neuropsychology. As a result I took up an MSc in Functional Neuroimaging at Brunel. The course appealed to me not only because it was an excellent introduction to this method, but also because it provided invaluable hands-on experience. The course was delivered by very competent and knowledgeable staff, who were enthusiastic about their subject. Their approachability and enthusiasm helped in managing course workload, as well as in developing my passion for research. Functional neuroimaging, being primarily used as a research tool in cognitive neuroscience, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and social neuroscience, was taught in a very uncomplicated yet comprehensive manner. The course opened up research opportunities at many well-established research centres in the country and proved to be a key skill when applying for jobs after graduation. I now work partly at the University of Cambridge, and partly at the neuropsychological centre providing rehabilitation for people who have sustained brain injury. This is a fabulous chance to combine research and clinical experience, and knowledge and skills gained during the MSc prove extremely helpful in my work. I will always be very grateful to all Brunel’s staff for the support and help that they provided, even after graduation!”

Priya used her MSc as a transition to research work : “My year in Brunel’s MSc program in Functional Neuroimaging provided a crucial bridge for me between my undergraduate and doctoral studies. As an undergraduate I studied Cognitive Science and was interested in neuroimaging, but had few opportunities to work with a scanner. One of the aspects that drew me to the program at Brunel was the chance to design and carry out my own fMRI study; in addition to submitting the results as part of my degree requirements, I was able to present them as a poster at a scientific conference. The substantive coursework was also helpful for me in transitioning from undergraduate to postgraduate studies in neuroscience. Going into my MSc year at Brunel, I was not sure whether I was ready for or interested in a career in neuroscience research. Today I enjoy my doctoral studies and do research in an fMRI laboratory.”

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Our MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level.

International Relations pathway

The Postgraduate Diploma in Social Science Research Methods (International Relations) aims to provide advanced training in research methods. This programme will offer you an opportunity to develop analytical skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base, and a practical understanding of research in International Relations.

This programme will provide you with:

A thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies.
Information on the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist.
The principal methods of analysing social scientific data.
You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

In order to have meaningful contact with research being conducted by staff in the School, you will be linked to a research group. The Politics and International Relations pathways are closely associated with the operation of the School’s research units and centres. The International Relations pathway is closely associated with the research activities of the International Studies Research Unit (ISRU) which encompasses a wide range of areas.

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This is a research degree for senior practitioners/managers in the community and criminal justice (CCJ) sectors (police, prisons, probation, youth justice and the third sector) who wish to study at doctoral level and develop research skills appropriate for conducting research into practice. Read more
This is a research degree for senior practitioners/managers in the community and criminal justice (CCJ) sectors (police, prisons, probation, youth justice and the third sector) who wish to study at doctoral level and develop research skills appropriate for conducting research into practice. This course is an interprofessional doctoral where students from across the CCJ sectors
together with students from allied health professions study together in the pursuit of knowledge applied to practice. The doctorate enables you, within your own practice area, to:

•Engage in a programme of research
•Develop as an expert practitioner
•Develop inter-professional working, and learn alongside other healthcare practitioners
•Develop leadership and management expertise including the ability to influence and inform policy-making
•Further your knowledge, understanding and skills in the development and application of anti-oppressive research methods and an understanding of diversity in its widest sense

Course Modules:

The course is structured in two phases. Phase one consists of five taught research modules totalling 120 level 7 credits. These modules may be taken over a period of two-four years, but must be completed before phase two begins. The modules are:

•Criminological research (30 credits)
•Research dilemmas and Strategies (30 credits)
•Qualitative and quantitative methods (30 credits)
•Advanced Statistics and data analysis (15 credits)
•Research into Practice (15 credits)

The research modules are designed to enable you to gain a complete understanding of research design and methodology as a prerequisite to undertaking an independent research study applied to your particular practice discipline. You must achieve an average of 60 per cent across all five modules in order to progress to phase two. If you choose to step off the course during
phase one you may be eligible for the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal
Justice) (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal Justice) (120 credits) depending on the achievement of the appropriate number of credits.

Phase two consists of an independent research study leading to a thesis of 50,000–55,000 words and examined at doctoral level in part by viva voce (oral exam). Phase two builds on the work undertaken in phase one and leads to the production
of original work of publishable quality. Phase two will take a minimum of two years to complete. If you step off the course or cannot complete the course you may be eligible for the award of Master of Arts in Applied Research Design (Criminology and Criminal Justice).

Teaching and Assessment:

We aim to develop independent researchers who are able to integrate theoretical knowledge of research into professional
practice. You will be actively engaged in the pursuit of original knowledge in your professional field.
Assessment in phase one is via a number of different methods including assignments, presentations and research proposals.

In addition you will develop and maintain a scholarly portfolio supported by your supervisory team which will include
two doctoral supervisors and a practice adviser from your own area of employment.

Expertise:

All staff who support students on the course have backgrounds in the CCJ sector including probation, policing, youth justice, prisons and the third sector, and have researched and published extensively. For example; Professor Hazel Kemshall
is a leading expert in the theory and practice of risk assessment and management; Rob Canton is professor of community and criminal justice. He has taught, researched and written on a number of probation and penal topics. He was appointed by the Council of Penological Co-operation within the Council of Europe as an expert and drafted the European Probation Rules. In 2010 he was appointed as a specialist adviser to the House of Commons Justice Select Committee in its enquiry into the role of the probation service.

Graduate careers:

This is a research degree culminating in an independent research study examined at doctoral level. As such it is the highest award a university can confer, equivalent to a PhD.

This course enables senior practitioners and managers to further enhance their careers in the area of research, management and education. Practitioners and managers holding the doctorate will be equipped with the highest level of research skills and will be enabled to apply research to their own practice. The doctorate enables such staff to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the practice discipline and to be at the forefront of policy making for the future benefit of all stakeholders in the community and criminal justice sectors.


"I have always been impressed with De Montfort’s approach to probation training, and recognise that over many years you and your colleagues have contributed enormously to the development of probation staff. The courses at De Montfort University have given a strong ethical basis for their probation practice, and a sound understanding of the theory underpinning their practice."

Steve Pestell, Director of Corporate Services, Norfolk and Suffolk Probation Trust

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Both natural environments and those heavily influenced and altered by human activities are ever-changing. Read more

Overview

Both natural environments and those heavily influenced and altered by human activities are ever-changing. This programme will allow you to investigate aspects of envionmental change with either an environmental science or physical geography focus at time-sclase ranging from the present to several hundreds of thousands of years. You will be able to learn techniques that incorporate cutting-edge field and/or laboratory methods and equipment with an expert in your filed. The support available can be on a one-to-one basis and culminates in a substantial MSc thesis - ideal for those looking to continue on to PhD or to work independently as a consultant, for example.

The programme:

- places you with one or more internationally acknowledged experts in a field of study, with superb research and analytical facilities, ensuring a top-quality learning environment
- offers you the opportunity to link with partner organisations, providing work experience opportunities and insights into the structure and operation of these organisations
- combines a taught element to provide key research methodology, approaches and debates relevant to the field of study along with a research element to focus on a specific area of interest
- provides access to superb research and analytical facilities and a top-quality research environment
- provides you with a range of transferable skills suitable for further research and employment, including analytical field and laboratory skills, data modelling, statistical analysis, project management and critical evaluation of information.

Which topics can I study?

Projects available from our Earth Surface Science specialists change every year and a full list is available at http://www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/docs/pgadmissions/191924.pdf.

Employer Links

The programme will equip students with a range of transferable skills and attributes sought by diverse graduate employers. In addition, the programme will provide students with knowledge and understanding relevant to employment in organisations such as Environment Agency, Defra, Natural England, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, British Geological Survey and environmental consultancies. The opportunity to develop links with partner organisations as part of the research project will create work experience opportunities and provide insights into the structure and operation of these organisations.

Why study at QMUL Geography?

- Professional and friendly environment: We are recognised as an international centre for excellence in teaching and research. Our work is at the forefront of human geography, shaping debates and providing significant new insight and understanding. We are also known for our friendly, collegial and welcoming ethos and are home to many of contemporary human geography's best known scholars.
- Research excellence: Almost 80 per cent of our research outputs (books and articles) are rated as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*) placing us 5th in the UK for this measure. Our research scores increased across all areas in the latest UK score of research excellence (REF 2014) and we're ranked joint 11th for geography in the UK overall. We're also proud to feature in the top 100 departments in the world to study geography (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016).
- Employability: 94% of respondents from our postgraduates were in work or further study six month after graduation; 91% at graduate level (DLHE 2015).
- Capital location: We're a School that cares about the world beyond the university, working with a range of community groups, artists, cultural and heritage institutions and policy makers, particularly here in east London. Our passion is to demonstrate through research and teaching the intellectual and political significance of geographical research and understanding. We encourage our students to become part of this vibrant intellectual culture.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Following a specialisation in International Criminal Justice enables you to develop a critical understanding of the operation of international and transnational criminal justice, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You learn about the main legal instruments and institutions that provide for international co-operation and prosecution of international, transnational and national crime and the impact of human rights and combine this with critical reflection of the broader context and of the effectiveness of law.

There is co-operation with the MA in Criminology, run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. In addition to available law options, you may choose one module from the MA in Criminology. This includes modules on terrorism and sociological theories of violence and gender and crime in a globalised world.

You are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the Kent Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL).

International Criminal Justice will be of particular interest to those who work, intend to work, or have an interest in the fields of international and transnational criminal justice, criminal justice and human rights more broadly.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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Our MRes in History offers a research-rich master’s programme for those students wanting to develop specialist knowledge and scholarly techniques, as the first step on the path to doctoral research or research-related career paths. Read more

Summary

Our MRes in History offers a research-rich master’s programme for those students wanting to develop specialist knowledge and scholarly techniques, as the first step on the path to doctoral research or research-related career paths. We offer a unique combination of focused expertise and applied historical experience in a friendly, supportive graduate environment.

On this course, you will work closely with members of our History staff, who have internationally-recognised expertise in a wide range of subjects, periods and geographical areas. The programme would suit students who already have a well-defined research interest, and the course will help you to work at that higher level, primarily via research. You will engage with a broad range of research methods relevant for advanced historical research.

You will be closely supported in your research journey through informed, innovative and expert supervision, and receive training for doctoral work, particularly in the field of history. However, this course will also prepare you for a wide range of professional careers that require advanced level research and communication skills. Your training will consist of study in relevant methodological processes for research, including language skills, palaeography, quantitative methods, data presentation, and oral history.

Using these skills, you will gain experience of applied historical research in a range of working environments, via a tailored research internship. Students on this course will prepare an original, extended research project, engaging critically and creatively with historical texts, objects and images as well as extant research in historiography and history.

As part of having the opportunity to contribute to the national and international research profile of the University, as a student on the MRes in History, you will have access to opportunities for co-operation and collaboration with related institutions in the UK.

Content

The core module of the course is a 30,000 word dissertation. This is an intellectually-stimulating and challenging experience, representing substantial independent research into a topic in any period of history, approved in concert with an appointed supervisor. In this module, students will apply their advanced research skills developed on the rest of the course.

Another key module on the course is the Research Internship. It will provide a link between your academic training and practical research in cultural institutions such as museums, libraries, archives or archaeological sites. The placement will further develop your skills in critical and historical analysis and interpretation, and allow you to see them in use in your chosen area of employment. Students will come to understand and critically evaluate the range of possible career opportunities associated with the professional application of historical research skills, within an institutional setting in the private or public sector.

Other modules are designed to provide you with opportunities to engage with primary documents, and to use these to develop your research skills. There is an emphasis in these optional modules on developing a historiographical understanding of the study of history in areas such as the politics of health in recent Britain; Gender and Sexuality in Modern Europe; or in the History of the family.

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This MSc course addresses scientific, technological and legislative aspects of the diagnosis (analysis and assessment) and management (remediation and restoration) of important environmental issues concerned with contaminated land, water quality, air pollution and waste. Read more
This MSc course addresses scientific, technological and legislative aspects of the diagnosis (analysis and assessment) and management (remediation and restoration) of important environmental issues concerned with contaminated land, water quality, air pollution and waste.

It has been designed with industry advice to enable good science and engineering graduates begin and advance successful careers in the environmental sector, and pursue postgraduate scientific research. The MSc is delivered in first-class teaching and research facilities by a dedicated team of internationally renowned environmental scientists, and presents considerable interaction with environmental consultancies and engineers, industry, local and regulatory authorities, and research institutes.

During 2007-2011, the course was supported by 6 NERC studentships, the most awarded annually to an environmental MSc. Students on the course have won the most EMpower research projects funded by companies within the nuclear industry, and since 2008, a Prize for Best Performance Overall has been awarded annually by Arup, a global environmental engineering and consultancy company.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscenvironmentaldiagnosismanagement.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The quality of teaching and learning on the course is enhanced considerably by significant professional networking and interaction with leading experts from environmental consultants and engineers, industry, local and regulatory authorities, and universities and research institutes; who present seminars, host study visits, co-supervise research projects, and act as an advisory panel.

- Graduates of the course are skilled and knowledgeable scientists with excellent employment prospects within the environmental sector, particularly as environmental consultants and engineers, in local and regulatory authorities, industry, charitable trusts, and research institutes and universities.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

Course content and structure

You will study seven taught modules, three case studies and complete an Independent Research Project:

- Communication & Co-operation Skills
Provides practical training in written and verbal communication media; project, team and time management; role playing in environmental impact assessment; careers advice and a mock job interview.

- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
A practical laboratory and field-work based introduction to quality assured sampling strategies, preparation processes and analytical methods for heavy metals in soils, surface waters, and vegetation.

- Diagnostic & Management Tools
Provides practical computer-based training in statistical analysis of environmental data, geographical information systems, and environmental risk assessment.

- Environmental Organic Chemistry Pathways Toxicology
Comprises physical and chemical properties, transport, fate and distribution, and toxicology of organic compounds in the environment.

- Contaminated Land Case Study
A practical laboratory and field-work based human health risk assessment of pollutant linkages at a former gravel extraction and landfill site. It comprises desk-top study, site investigation and sampling, laboratory analysis, data interpretation, quantitative risk assessment, and remediation options.

- Water Quality: Diagnosis & Management
A practical laboratory and field-work based introduction to aquatic science, hydrogeology, treatment of water and wastewater, and chemical, biological and physical monitoring of water quality. Includes a study visit to a global manufacturer of pesticides and herbicides.

- River Thames Basin Case Study
A combination of fieldwork, laboratory work and desk-top study to diagnose water quality in chemical and ecological terms, to identify industrial and agricultural pollutant linkages, and to determine environmental, ecological and health impacts.

- Air Pollution: Monitoring, Impacts & Management
Covers: sources, sinks, dispersion, conversion, monitoring, impacts and management of air pollutants with study visits to a local authority and a government research institute.

- Royal Holloway Campus Air Quality Case Study
Involves a consultancy company-style investigation of ambient and indoor air quality within the confines of RHUL campus; and combines desk-top research with practical fieldwork and laboratory analysis.

- Waste Management & Utilisation
Considers municipal, industrial and radioactive waste management options, with study visits to a landfill site, a waste incinerator, composting facility, recycling centre and nuclear power station.

- Independent Research Project
Consists of a four-month, independent scientific investigation, usually in collaboration with environmental consultants and engineers, local and regulatory authorities, industry, research institutes, and universities. Projects may comprise a desk-top study or practical laboratory and field investigation, they may be funded, and often lead to employment or to PhD research. Final results are presented at the Research Project Symposium to an audience from within the environmental sector

On completion of the course graduates will have acquired the experience, knowledge, and critical understanding to enable them to:

- Conduct themselves as professional environmental research scientists, consultants, and managers, convey in a professional manner, scientific, technical and managerial information, and manage projects and resources efficiently

- Apply quality assured sampling strategies, preparation procedures and analytical systems to quantify health risks posed by inorganic and organic pollutant linkages in soils, waters and air

- Apply statistical analysis, geographical information systems, and environmental impact and risk assessment to the interpretation of environmental data

- Appreciate the importance and impacts of hydro-geological, and bio- and physico-chemical processes on the treatment of water and wastewater, and on the quality of groundwater and aquatic ecosystems

- Appreciate the emissions, dispersion, conversion, and monitoring of natural and man-made gaseous and particulate air pollutants, their impacts on climate change, human health and vegetation, and management on local, regional and global scales

- Appreciate the prevention, re-use, recycling, recovery, disposal and utilisation of municipal and industrial waste and the management of nuclear waste within the constraints of national and international legislation

- Manage an independent environmental science research project, often with professional collaboration, and of significant value to their career development.

Assessment

- Written examinations test understanding of the principles and concepts taught in the modules and case studies, and the ability to integrate and apply them to environmental diagnosis and management.

- Assessment of module work and practical computing, laboratory and fieldwork evaluates critical understanding of the environmental science taught, and mastery of producing quality assured data, and its analysis, interpretation, presentation and reporting.

- Assessment also reflects the ability to work independently and in teams, and to learn during study visits.

- Assessment of research projects is based on the ability to manage and report on an original piece of independent scientific work.

- All assessed work has significant confidential written and verbal feedback.

Employability & career opportunities

94% of the graduates of the MSc from 2008 to 2013 either successfully secured first-destination employment as international environmental consultants and engineers, in industry, local and regulatory authorities and charitable trusts, or are conducting postgraduate research within international research institutes and universities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You develop a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy, and the contexts within which international law operates.

You study the theoretical, social, political and scientific perspectives that underlie the substantive areas of law, as well as the practical situations in which international environmental law operates. Graduates of the LLM take with them the knowledge and expertise required to pursue a professional or academic career in this contemporary and developing discipline.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment
The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit Us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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